Course Offerings Winter Term 2020


Introduction to Environmental Studies

ENV 110 - Kahn, James R. (Jim), Bleicher, Sonny S.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Required
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Required
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Required
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Required

An interdisciplinary introduction to environmental studies with an emphasis on how societies organize themselves through their social, political and economic institutions to respond to environmental problems. The course begins with a discussion of the development of environmental thought, focusing on the relationship between humans and the environment. Participants then discuss alternative criteria for environmental decision making, including sustainability, equity, ecological integrity, economic efficiency, and environmental justice. The course concludes with an examination of contemporary environmental issues, including global warming, invasive species, energy and the environment, tropical deforestation, and the relationship between the environment and economic development in developing countries.

Environmental Service Learning

ENV 111 - Hodge, Kimberly S. (Kim)

  • Original Major Curriculum: Required
  • Original Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Required
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Practical application of student knowledge of environmental issues based on supervised volunteer work in the greater Rockbridge community. Students will participate in a service-learning environment. Topics will include environmental education, campus sustainability, conservation and sustainable agriculture in the surrounding region. The course culminates with a paper integrating students' knowledge with practical application throughout the term.

Environmental Systems, W&L Campus, and LEED

ENV 120 - Trimmer, S Morris (Morris)

  • Original Major Curriculum: N/A (recommended if taking ENV 220 in Spring Term which counts for Free Elective)
  • Original Minor Curriculum: N/A (recommended if taking ENV 220 in Spring Term)
  • NEW Major Curriculum: N/A (recommended if taking ENV 220 in Spring Term which counts for Water Resources)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A (recommended if taking ENV 220 in Spring Term which counts for Social Sciences)

How does our campus' built environment interleave with larger systems issues such as climate change, environmental degradation, and sustainability? This course examines these larger systems issues in our local context. Campus grounds and specific buildings are explored for environmental and social impacts with mitigation options considered. Students become conversant in the U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating systems, and investigate how W&L could minimize adverse impact on the environment and maximize credits within a LEED Campus master site framework. This course provides a large systems context for the LEED lab Spring Term course (ENV 220) but is not a prerequisite.

Environmental Science

ENV 201 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

  • Original Major Curriculum: Electives: Systems
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Natural Sciences: Group 2
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Required
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Required

A foundation in the natural sciences for environmental studies students, this course introduces foundational concepts in earth ecological sciences and their application in understanding human-environment relationships. Local, regional, and global environmental case studies are considered.

Environmental Humanities

ENV 203 - Fisher, Chelsea R.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Electives: Humanities
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Humanities
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Required
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Required

An introduction to the examination of human-environment relationships arising from the humanities, this course draws broadly upon the fields of philosophy, history, cultural anthropology, eco-criticism, art and art history, and the emerging interdisciplinary field of environmental humanities. Students receive a broad introduction to humanist perspectives on environmental challenges and solutions and preparation for examining specific fields in greater depth later in their studies.

Key Thinkers on the Environment

ENV 288 - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Electives: Humanities/Free Elective
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Humanitis
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Humanities
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Humanities

"Key thinkers on the environment" are central to this course, ranging from ancient greats such as Aristotle to modern writers such as David Suzuki and E.O. Wilson about the ecosystem crises of the Anthropocene. We highlight certain 19th-century icons of environmentalist awareness and nature preservation, such as Alexander von Humboldt in Europe and Humboldtians in America, including Frederic Edwin Church and Henry David Thoreau.

Special Topics in Environmental Studies

ENV 295A - Bleicher, Sonny S.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Electives: Interdisciplinary Approaches
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Social Sciences: Group 2
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Water Resources (Human Dimensions) Climate Change (Human Dimensions)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Social Sciences

This courses examines special topics in environmental studies, such as ecotourism, the environment and development, local environmental issues, values and the environment, global fisheries, global climate change, tropical deforestation and similar topics of importance, which could change from year to year. This is a research-intensive course where the student would be expected to write a significant paper, either individually or as part of a group, of sufficient quality to be made useful to the scholarly and policy communities. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.Winter 2020, ENV 295A-01: Special Topics in Environmental Studies: Water Policy and Politics (3). Current dynamics of conflict over water resources, and their influence on local and international policy, politics, and economics. We discuss the legality of water rights trade, conflicts of agriculture and conservation, water pollution, and the Super-PAC solution. Students investigate the ecology of susceptibility of freshwater systems to biological invasions. And we study the way the global community tackles the refugee problem stemming from diminishing fresh water in the developing world. Students follow three major international case studies to guide our investigation of water resources: (1) water rights on the Colorado, (2) industry and pollution in the Great Lakes, and (3) desertification and refugees in Sub-Saharan Africa. Bleicher.

Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies

ENV 397 - Fisher, Chelsea R. / Kahn, James R. (Jim)

  • Original Major Curriculum: Required
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Required
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Required
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Required

An interdisciplinary capstone course intended for students in the environmental studies program. Students analyze a particular environmental issue and attempt to integrate scientific inquiry, political and economic analysis and ethical implications. The particular issue changes each year.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 01 - Ayoub, Nadia A.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Required
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2020, BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Evolutionary Medicine (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, ecology, physiology, population dynamics, and biochemistry. This course examines underlying principles of evolution and genetics as applied to human health and medicine. Specific topics include how clonal evolution gives rise to antibiotic resistance, how population genetics can explain exceptionally high rates of heritable diseases like cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia in subsets of the human population, and the possibility that the recent rise of asthma may result from a mismatch between the environments experienced by humans for hundreds of generations versus the modern environment. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits). Ayoub.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 02 - Cabe, Paul R.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Required
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2020, BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: My Own Personal Genome (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. All students will be required to submit samples to the personal genetic testing company 23andMe, which is done as a group during the first week of class. Cost of testing is covered by a course fee of $110. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. The explosive growth of genetics and genomics offers unprecedented possibilities for investigating and understanding our own genomes. In medicine and health, are we entering an age of "personal genomics"? What can we learn about our own characteristics and health risks? Students explore the basics of molecular genetics, and use this foundation to better understand personal genomic data. Students examine their own data during the term. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits). Cabe

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 03 - Lanier, Leah S.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Required
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2020, BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Environmental Microbiology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113 . An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as genetics, molecular mechanisms, and environmental relationships.  In this section, we investigate the interactions among humans, microbes, and their shared environments. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits). Lanier.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 04 - Marsh, David M.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Required
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2020, BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Microbiome (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism.  The bacteria that inhabit our gut play an increasingly recognized role in diverse aspects of biology from neural development to immune function. We'll explore the ecosystem of the microbiome, its interaction with other physiological systems, and how its disruption can potentially lead to disease.  This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher-level biology courses. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits). Marsh.

Statistics for Biology and Medicine

BIOL 201 - Sackman, Andrew M.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Statistics
  • Original Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Statistics
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

This course examines the principles of statistics and experimental design for biological and medical research. The focus is on the practical and conceptual aspects of statistics, rather than mathematical derivations. Students completing this class will be able to read and understand research papers, to design realistic experiments, and to carry out their own statistical analyses using computer packages.

Seminar in Biology

BIOL 295A - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

  • Original Major Curriculum: Prereq for BIOL 332 (Yellowstone trip which counts as Systems or Free Elective)
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Prereq for BIOL 332 (Yellowstone trip which counts in Natural Sciences - Group 2)
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Prereq for BIOL 332 (Yellowstone trip which counts in Conservation Biology)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Prereq for BIOL 332 (Yellowstone trip which counts in Natural & Physical Sciences)

Seminar topics vary with instructor and term. Sample topics include: genetics, molecular genetics, virology, evolutionary biology, history of medicine, biology of aging, ecology, cancer, reproductive strategies, neuroendocrinology, microbiology and immunology. These are in-depth studies of restricted topics within the broad areas indicated by the titles, involving critical review of literature, discussion and oral and/or written presentation. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.  

Conservation Genetics

BIOL 322 - Cabe, Paul R.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Advanced Quantitative Skills / Free Elective
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 2
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Advanced Quantitative Skills Conservation Biology
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences

A study of the central issues of population genetics and their application to species preservation and conservation. Topics include genetic surveys of rare or threatened species; population structure and dispersal; inferring population histories from genetic data; phylogenetics of threatened species' groups; hybridization between species; the use of genetic data in captive breeding programs and the prosecution of endangered species legislation; and the use of biotechnologies, such as cloning.

Selected Topics in Ecology and Evolution

BIOL 398 - Hurd, Lawrence E. (Larry)

  • Original Major Curriculum: Free Elective
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 2
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Conservation Biology
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences

Topics include ecology, behavior, evolution, and natural history of selected taxonomic groups. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.Winter 2020, BIOL 398-01: Topics in Ecology and Evolution: Biodiversity and Conservation (3) . Prerequisites: BIOL 220 and at least junior standing, or instructor consent.   The recognition late during the 20th century that global biological diversity is threatened with precipitous decline of a magnitude similar to the past five mass extinctions, has stimulated a great deal of research, as well as the emergence of a new scientific discipline: conservation ecology.  The aim of this course is to introduce you to some of the major ideas and research efforts in ecology, especially as they relate to preservation of biodiversity. Hurd

Introduction to Economics

ECON 100 - Casey, James F. (Jim), Handy, Christopher M. (Chris), Kaiser, Carl P., Silwal, Shikha B., Shester, Katharine L.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Social Science Fundamentals
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Social Sciences: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Statistics for Economics

ECON 202 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

  • Original Major Curriculum: Statistics
  • Original Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Statistics
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Not open to students with credit for DCI 202 or INTR 202. Fundamentals of probability, statistics, estimation, and hypothesis testing and ending with an introduction to regression analysis. The topics are critical for success in upper-level economics electives and are important for careers that rely on empirical research in the social sciences. Students engage in a dialogue between theory and application and learn to think formally about data, uncertainty, and random processes, while learning hands-on methods to organize and analyze real data using modern statistical software.

Econometrics

ECON 203 - Anderson, Michael A.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Advanced Quantitative Skills
  • Original Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Advanced Quantitative Skills Environmental Economics
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Explorations of regression models that relate a response variable to one or more predictor variables. The course begins with a review of the simple bivariate model used in INTR 202, and moves on to multivariate models. Underlying model assumptions and consequences are discussed. Advanced topics include non-linear regression and forecasting. Examples in each class are drawn from a number of disciplines. The course emphasizes the use of data and student-directed research.

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

ECON 255 - Casey, James F. (Jim)

  • Original Major Curriculum: Electives: Social Science / Free Elective
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Social Sciences: Group 2
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Climate Change Conservation Biology Environmental Economics Water Resources
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Social Sciences

The course serves as an introduction to environmental and natural resource economics. Economic principles are used to evaluate public and private decision making involving the management and use of environmental and natural resources. Aspects pertaining to fisheries, forests, species diversity, agriculture, and various policies to reduce air, water and toxic pollution will be discussed. Lectures, reading assignments, discussions and exams will emphasize the use of microeconomic analysis for managing and dealing with environmental and natural resource problems and issues.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 295A - Kahn, James R. (Jim)

  • Original Major Curriculum: Electives: Interdisciplinary Approaches / Free Elective
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Social Sciences: Group 2
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Environmental Economics Conservation Biology (Group B)
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Social Sciences

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.Winter 2020, ECON 295A-01: Fishery Economics (3). Prerequisite: ECON 100 or 101. An examination of how to use economics as a foundation for managing fisheries. Topics include bioeconomic models of fisheries, use of economic incentives such as individual transferable quotas, recreational fishing, subsistence fishing in developing countries, and conflicts among users. Writing assignments consist of policy briefs. Kahn.

Key Thinkers on the Environment

HIST 288 - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Electives: Humanities/Free Elective
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Humanities
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Humanities
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Humanities

"Key thinkers on the environment" are central to this course, ranging from ancient greats such as Aristotle to modern writers such as David Suzuki and E.O. Wilson about the ecosystem crises of the Anthropocene. We highlight certain 19th-century icons of environmentalist awareness and nature preservation, such as Alexander von Humboldt in Europe and Humboldtians in America, including Frederic Edwin Church and Henry David Thoreau.

General Geology

GEOL 101 - Jay Seymour, Cassidy N., Lyon, Eva C.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Geology Fundamentals
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Preference given to first-years and sophomores. The study of our physical environment and the processes shaping it. The materials and structure of the Earth's crust, the origin of the landforms, the concept of geologic time, and the nature of the Earth's interior are considered. No credit for students who have completed GEOL 100. Laboratory course. Lab fee required.

Oceanography

GEOL 155 - Lyon, Eva C.

  • Original Major Curriculum: N/A
  • Original Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Climate Change
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Introduction to physical oceanography and marine geology; tides, waves, currents, and the interaction of oceans and atmosphere; submarine landscapes; and sedimentary, volcanic, and tectonic activity in the ocean basins.

Hydrology

GEOL 240 - Hinkle, Margaret A.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Electives: Systems/Free Elective
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences: Group 2
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Water Resources
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Natural and Physical Sciences

Systems and processes of water movement on and below the Earth's surface. Encompasses the theoretical and applied aspects of soil moisture, runoff, flooding, groundwater movement, and water-well use. Numerical evaluation of flow properties from field and lab data describing water movement in soils, aquifers, and streams. Laboratory course.

Applied Statistics

INTR 202 - Garvis, Dennis M. (Denny), Lee, Inyeop, Reiter, Sandra L. (Sandy) / STAFF

  • Original Major Curriculum: Statistics
  • Original Minor Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Statistics
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

Not open to students with credit for DCI 202 or ECON 202. An examination of the principal applications of statistics in accounting, business, economics, and politics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.  

American National Government

POL 100 - Lee, Inyeop

  • Original Major Curriculum: Social Science Fundamentals
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Social Science: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: N/A
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

A study of the constitutional origins and historical development of the national government with special attention to Congress, the presidency, the judiciary, and the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media in the policy process.

Introduction to Global Politics

POL 105 - Strong, Robert A. (Bob), Ponce de Leon Seijas, Zoila

  • Original Major Curriculum: Social Science Fundamentals
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Social Science: Group 1
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Climate Change
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: N/A

A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.

Environmental Policy and Law

POL 233 - Harris, Rebecca C.

  • Original Major Curriculum: Electives: Social Sciences / Free Elective
  • Original Minor Curriculum: Social Science: Group 2
  • NEW Major Curriculum: Climate Change Conservation Biology Water Resources
  • NEW Minor Curriculum: Social Sciences

A study of major environmental laws and the history of their enactment and implementation. Discusses different theoretical approaches from law, ethics, politics, and economics. Reviews significant case law and the legal context. Emphasis is on domestic policy with some attention to international law and treaties.