WRIT 100: Courses Current Offerings

Fall 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-01: Writing Seminar for First Years: War Is Hell: Literary Depictions of the Second World War (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. General William T. Sherman famously told a crowd in Columbus, Ohio, in the year 1880 that, "There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell." In this seminar we read, discuss, and write about three famous novels by authors who agreed with Sherman but chose very different strategies to convey that message: The Naked and the Dead by Norman Mailer (1948), Joseph Heller's dark comedy, Catch-22 (1961), and Thomas Keneally's carefully researched Schindler's List (1982). We compare these novels with oral histories collected from veterans and women who served on the home front to investigate what motivated support for the war effort, the different forms of suffering caused by the Second World War, its long-term psychological impact, and its role in causing social change in postwar America. We also compare the book version of Schindler's List with the film directed by Steven Spielberg. (FW) Patch .

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - STAFF / Ruiz, Maria F. (Florinda)

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-02: Writing Seminar for First Years: Homeward Bound (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. "Home" is an enduring topic in literature, in part, because of its broad appeal and applicability. It can refer to both a physical structure as well as the emotional bonds that hold us together. Building on both of these meanings, homes become symbols for broader social configurations—the unit whose safeguarding represents the security of the nation. Moreover, imaginings of home, literary or otherwise, offer us a window through which to consider how normative and alternative families form. In this course, we explore varying, often contradicting, expressions of the domestic. We explore how "home" intersects with markers of identity, such as race, class, and gender. Possible topics and genres include: kinship, sexuality, alienation, homelessness, memory/nostalgia, the gothic, and horror/home invasion. In addition to non-fictional accounts and sources, possible texts include: The Garies and Their Friends (Webb), House of Mirth (Wharton), Home (Morrison), Fun Home (Bechdel), Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (Albee), and A Raisin in the Sun (Hansberry). (FW) Millan.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Miranda, Deborah A.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-03: Writing Seminar for First Years: The Absolutely True Story of Literary Memoir (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Patricia Hampl says, "True memoir is an attempt to find not only a self but a world." Over the course of the semester, we explore the diverse ways that memoir represents the interactions between self and world. What goes into this complicated act of interpreting "the truth," particularly considering how "selves" exist in/are shaped by issues of gender, race, age, ethnicity, nationality, class, and culture? We analyze novels, short prose, graphic novels and poetry by writers using memoir/life-writing as a tool to construct and inhabit an identity. (FW) Miranda.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Gertz, Genelle C.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-04: Writing Seminar for First Years: Faith, Doubt and Identity (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this seminar, we explore the topic of belief and how it shapes a person's selfhood. How does being a part of a religious community, or a variety of religious communities, shape one's identity? How does identity change with the adoption of either belief, skepticism, or another culture? We ask these questions primarily through the genres of novels and short stories, examining lives of faith and doubt in several religious contexts. Students also create a personal digital story in their final assignment that builds on ideas of the seminar. Authors studied include Paul Kalanithi, Marilynne Robinson, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Ian McEwan, and Orhan Pamuk. (FW) Gertz.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Wilson, Ricardo A.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-05: Writing Seminar for First Years: Race, Memory, Nation (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This seminar explores our collective national consciousness in relation to ideas of race. We examine archival texts, as well as 20th- and 21st-century fiction, poetry, and film. Authors and artists considered throughout the term include James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Claudia Rankine, Steven Spielberg, and Quentin Tarantino. Multiple writing assignments deal with Washington and Lee's legacy regarding slavery, integration, and civil rights. As we interact with a wide variety of mediums, emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing (and rewriting), as well as on research skills. In addition to traditional scholarly writing, an option exists for students to produce a creative project responding to the ideas of the seminar. (FW) Wilson.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Cumming, Douglas O.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-06: Writing Seminar for First Years: Civil Rights and the Press (3) . Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This seminar explores the news media's role in the Civil Rights Movement of the South in the 1950s and '60s. Using the Pulitzer Prize winning history The Race Beat as guide, the course initiates students into college-level expectations for writing, reading, and classroom discussion. Combining the professor's interests in American press history and experience in newspapers and magazines for 25 years, we cover both academic and journalistic styles of writing. (FW) Cumming.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Bufkin, Sydney M.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-07: Writing Seminar for First Years: Writing in Public (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Fifty years ago, getting your writing into print could be tough. Now, anyone with a keyboard and an internet connection can publish their thoughts. But how do you get people to read what you've written? And what makes good public writing? How do you make your opinions about pop culture or politics or animal cruelty interesting and persuasive? How do you join the public conversation, instead of screaming into the internet void? This class investigates public writing on topics as varied as Kim Kardashian, Black Lives Matter, September 11, and Internet trolls. We examine ways authors use evidence and analysis to build persuasive arguments and learn strategies for identifying and engaging with public audiences. We also produce public writing in response to the essays we read and learn the skills for setting up, maintaining and promoting blogs and websites. (FW) Bufkin.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Wheeler, Lesley M.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-08: Writing Seminar for First Years: Other Worlds (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This course focuses on fiction and poetry about borders and boundary states. Many readings come from the edges of literary genre: serious fiction with dystopian elements, poetry based on fairy tales, and more. The core skill you hone is critical writing, but you also try other modes and media, including creative writing and digital storytelling. (FW) Wheeler.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-09: Writing Seminar for First Years: Aspects of Elizabeth (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Queen Elizabeth I (1533-1603) is among history's most fascinating figures. She ruled a small island, beset by threats both external and internal, during a period of tremendous political, religious and cultural change. Her 45-year reign saw the conspiracies and eventual execution of Mary, Queen of Scots, the consolidation of the Church of England, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and the flowering of English culture in such figures as Shakespeare, Donne, and Marlowe. We learn about both the public and private Elizabeth by focusing on four distinct topics: her own poetry, letters and speeches; the portraits of her as princess and queen; her controversial personal and political relationship with Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex; and films about Elizabeth. The primary texts of the course are each other's essays; we learn about our topic by reading what other students have written, while focusing most of our class time on improving our writing skills. (FW) Dobin.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Fuentes, Freddy O.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-10: Writing Seminar for First Years: Don't "I" Me: Privilege, Otherness, and Writing Good (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing . Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this seminar, we examine "One of these things is not like the others" (a.k.a impostor) syndrome and its effect on the human quest to feel good enough. Our reading and writing explores the complexities of and correspondence between inferiority and otherness based on factors such as color, gender, privilege and language. We dig into works from, among others, James Baldwin, Peggy McIntosh, Claudia Rankine, Tucker Carlson and Isabel Allende. (FW) Fuentes.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Oliver, Bill

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-11: Writing Seminar for First Years: Misfits, Rebels, and Outcasts (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing . Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. The title of this section leaves out a lot. If extended, it might include strangers, visionaries, fanatics, criminals, prophets, artists, lovers, freaks, and monsters. We read stories and plays, as well as view films, about individuals challenging the status quo, either directly or indirectly, deliberately or inadvertently. We consider, among other things, what happens to the individual in the process, and what happens to the status quo. (FW) Oliver.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Smout, Kary

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-12: Writing Seminar for First Years: A Whole New World (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this age of global travel, economics, and politics, people can go almost anywhere and find similar technology and consumer goods, experiencing a new place as a comfortable and in some ways familiar variation on home. At other times visitors and newcomers really have discovered a whole new world. In this section, students study novels, movies, and other accounts of cultural encounters between people who have been in the same place but experienced very different worlds. Works may include James Welch's Fools Crow about white men first meeting the Blackfeet Indians in Montana, Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart about the English first coming to Nigeria, and Cormac McCarthy's The Road about the breakdown of shared culture in a post-apocalyptic world. We also think about how such encounters are depicted in popular culture, from Disney movies to advertisements to music videos. We compare these fictional encounters with international experiences, issues, and conflicts today. (FW) Smout.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Gavaler, Christopher P. (Chris)

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-13: Writing Seminar for First Years: Superheroes (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this section, students analyze the evolution of the character type from Superman's first appearance in 1938 Action Comics to contemporary superheroes in 21st-century short stories, poetry, films, and graphic novels. (FW) Gavaler.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Lind, Stephen J.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Fall 2018, WRIT 100-14: Writing Seminar for First Years: Business Writing Essentials (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. From emails to pitch books, writing remains a foundation of modern business communication. This section offers students the essential theories, skills, strategies, and tactics to become effective written communicators in modern business settings. Students taking this course develop written work purposefully designed to engage readers within a business context with well-researched information and well-founded arguments. Students analyze, discuss, and produce various forms of professional documentation as they develop their abilities to ethically and effectively write. Projects involve chirographic, print, digital, verbal, and non-verbal forms of business writing. (FW) Lind.

Spring 2018

We do not offer any courses this term.


Winter 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Brodie, Laura F.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-01: Writing Seminar for First Years: Wicked Women (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This section begins with Chaucer's Wife of Bath and ends with recent essays on Hillary Clinton. In between, we examine witches, femme fatales, and prostitutes, considering representations of difficult women in literature, journalism, and film. The course is not for women only—for instance, our discussion of witchcraft and wizardry runs from Miller's The Crucible through excerpts from Harry Potter . (FW) Brodie.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Adams, Edward A.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-02: Writing Seminar for First Years: AdaptationX2 (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Film adaptations of stories, novels, plays, and even historical events or persons (see, for example, the long career of Oliver Stone and his Snowden, World Trade Center, and JFK ) have proven a mainstay of a multibillion-dollar industry along with a perennial concern of newspaper reviews, cultural debates, and dinner-table conversations. We explore this phenomenon through a series of case studies and raise the stakes by looking at instances in which there have been multiple adaptations (here limited to two) of the source. Such material allows for productive classroom discussions meant to prepare students for their individual papers, but advances this central purpose by foregrounding complex, varying, sometimes contradictory perspectives that at once require and foster careful thinking, analysis, and writing. The course showcases four examples (each comprising a written work and two subsequent film adaptations) drawn from numerous possibilities—a myth or fairy take such as "Cinderella", A Christmas Carol , Jane Eyre , a Sherlock Holmes detective story, The Picture of Dorian Gray, True Grit, Murder on the Orient Express, The Maltese Falcon, Talented Mr. Ripley, Casino Royale, and The Shining . (FW) Adams.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-03: Writing Seminar for First Years: War is Hell: Literary Depictions of the Second World War (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. General William T. Sherman famously told a crowd in Columbus, Ohio, in the year 1880 that, "There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell." In this seminar, we read, discuss, and write about three famous novels by authors who agreed with Sherman but chose very different strategies to convey that message: The Naked and the Dead , by Norman Mailer (1948), Joseph Heller's dark comedy, Catch 22 (1961), and Thomas Keneally's carefully researched Schindler's List (1982). We compare these novels with reminiscences by women workers on the "home front" to investigate the different forms of suffering caused by the Second World War, its long-term psychological impact, and its role in causing social change in postwar America. We also compare the book version of Schindler's List with the film directed by Steven Spielberg. (FW) Patch.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Bufkin, Sydney M.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-04: Writing Seminar for First Years: Writing in Public (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Fifty years ago, getting your writing into print could be tough. Now, anyone with a keyboard and an internet connection can publish their thoughts. But how do you get people to read what you have written? And what makes good public writing? How do you make your opinions about pop culture or animal cruelty interesting and persuasive? How do you join the public conversation, instead of screaming into the internet void? This class investigates public writing on topics as varied as Kim Kardashian, Black Lives Matter, September 11, and internet trolls. We examine ways authors use evidence and analysis to build persuasive arguments and team strategies for identifying and engaging with public audiences. We also produce public writing in response to the essays we read and learn the skills for setting up, maintaining, and promoting blogs and websites. (FW) Bufkin.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Rajbanshi, Reema

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-05: Writing Seminar for First Years: Slaveries, Past and Present (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This writing-intensive course reads about place and period, spanning ancient Greece, 19th-century Brazil, and 20th-21st-century India. What defines and distinguishes forms of enslavement ranging from war conquests to chattel slavery to debt bondage? How have abolitionists, past and present, defined and argued for freedom, equality, and other Enlightenment ideals? A readerly goal of this section is to excavate the presence of slavery in seemingly straightforward and "post"-abolition texts. Canonical works include André Schwarz-Bart's novel A Woman Named Solitude, R. F. Conrad's documentary history Children of God's Fire , and the film adaptation of Patricia McCormick's novel Sold . Such cross-genre readings emphasize the potential of form in articulating un/freedom and guides students in generating a final hybrid work. (FW) Rajbanshi.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Ferguson, Andrew J.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-06: Writing Seminar for First Years: Conspiracies and the Paranoid Style (3) . Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this section, we explore the strange shadow realities of the conspiracy theory, from classics like the Kennedy assassination and alien autopsies to new favorites like lizard people and the flat earth. We watch a handful of movies and read some fiction, some creative non-fiction, and some things that defy categorization, with the goal of understanding how conspiracy theorists construct arguments and how to recognize when we might be buying into paranoid narratives or fake news. (FW) Ferguson.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Oliver, Bill

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-07: Writing Seminar for First Years: Mysteries, Puzzles, & Conundrums (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. We concern ourselves with mysteries, not in the generic sense of stories about crime and detection, but mysteries of character, morality, religion, and art. Central to each of the works we study is some puzzle, secret, riddle, enigma, or complexity. Sometimes the work itself is the mystery, a kind of hieroglyph. Each work, in its own way, raises questions about the methods and limitations of human discovery. We approach the student's writing as a means of investigation and discovery as well, with an emphasis on developing the skills necessary to build convincing "cases" (i.e., arguments) when evidence is incomplete, ambiguous, or contradictory. (FW) Oliver.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Warren, James P. (Jim)

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-08: Writing Seminar for First Years: Animals, People, and Cyborgs (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This section examines the relationships of human beings to nature and technology. What kinds of relationships do we have with animals, both wild and domestic? Where do we draw the boundary between humans and machines? Does humanity occupy a (privileged) middle ground between other kinds of being? Our readings come from a mix of science, environmental literature, and science fiction. (FW) Warren.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Smout, Kary

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-09: Writing Seminar for First Years: A Whole New World (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this age of global travel, economics, and politics, people can go almost anywhere and find similar technology and consumer goods, experiencing a new place as a comfortable and in some ways familiar variation on home. At other times visitors and newcomers really have discovered a whole new world. In this section, students study novels, movies, and other accounts of cultural encounters between people who have been in the same place but experienced very different worlds. Works may include James Welch's Fools Crow about white men first meeting the Blackfeet Indians in Montana, Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart about the English first coming to Nigeria, and Cormac McCarthy's The Road about the breakdown of shared culture in a post-apocalyptic world. We also think about how such encounters are depicted in popular culture, from Disney movies to advertisements to music videos. We compare these fictional encounters with international experiences, issues, and conflicts today. (FW) Smout.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Fuentes, Freddy O.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-10: Writing Seminar for First Years: Magic, Realism and Alternative Facts: Literature, Politics and the Creation of Reality (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In our class we study works by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Alejo Carpentier, Isabel Allende and others, who responded to government-sponsored atrocities in Latin America through the literary form of Magical Realism. When confronted by political machines insistent on minimizing, denying and ultimately erasing brutal events, these authors paradoxically embraced the fantastical in order to accurately portray reality. With this as our starting point, we continue to consider other authors and different forms of media, including the contemporary and popular, to examine the role of fact in both showing, and shaping, reality. (FW) Fuentes.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Green, Leah N.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-11: Writing Seminar for First-Years: The Nature of Nature: Environmental Thought and Literature (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This section is an exploration of the human relationship to nature. How do writers, poets, and environmental thinkers understand their relationships to "the natural world"? How can we understand our own? In this section, we read widely within environmental literature. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Annie Dillard, and Wendell Berry, among others, provide scaffolding for our discussion of "nature", "truth", "individuality", "community", "life", "death", "knowledge", and "mystery", and the relationships these ideas have to one another. We explore the implications of these ideas for an individual life as well as for a globalized world in which ecological concern is a matter of daily news and attention. (FW) Green.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Ruiz, Maria F. (Florinda)

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-12: Writing Seminar for First Years: Immigrant Voices (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This section stresses active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style as we examine how the voices of recent immigrants to the United States speak to us about social struggle, tradition, isolation, discovery, prejudice, identity, transition and freedom. We explore the lives and experiences, cultural differences and challenges of various immigrant communities and different generations within immigrant families. Throughout focused reading and class discussions about contemporary novels, short stories, media, and related articles by and about recent immigrants to the United States, students learn to compose clear, organized, and well-supported articulations of their understanding of the texts and issues at hand. (FW) Ruiz.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Brodie, Laura F.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-13: Writing Seminar for First Years: Wicked Women (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This section begins with Chaucer's Wife of Bath and ends with recent essays on Hillary Clinton. In between, we examine witches, femme fatales, and prostitutes, considering representations of difficult women in literature, journalism, and film. The course is not for women only—for instance, our discussion of witchcraft and wizardry runs from Miller's The Crucible through excerpts from Harry Potter . (FW) Brodie.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Green, Leah N.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-14: Writing Seminar for First-Years: The Nature of Nature: Environmental Thought and Literature (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This section is an exploration of the human relationship to nature. How do writers, poets, and environmental thinkers understand their relationships to "the natural world"? How can we understand our own? In this section, we read widely within environmental literature. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Annie Dillard, and Wendell Berry, among others, provide scaffolding for our discussion of "nature", "truth", "individuality", "community", "life", "death", "knowledge", and "mystery", and the relationships these ideas have to one another. We explore the implications of these ideas for an individual life as well as for a globalized world in which ecological concern is a matter of daily news and attention. (FW) Green.

Writing Seminar for First-Years

WRIT 100 - Harrington, Jane F.

Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

Winter 2018, WRIT 100-15: Writing Seminar for First Years: Controversies in Children's Literature (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing . Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this section, students engage with works written for children (some classic and some modern, some fiction and some nonfiction) and apply a critical lens to issues involving violent content, gender representation, racial stereotyping, religious objections, and historical accuracy. Coursework will stress active reading, critical analysis, argumentation, presentation of evidence, and clarity of style. (FW) Harrington.