Major Requirements

2017 - 2018 Catalog

Politics major leading to BA degree

A major in politics leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 37 credits as follows:

  1. POL 100, 105, 111; INTR 201, 202
  2. Either ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102;
  3. Five additional courses of 3 credits or more in politics, including completion of one of the following four sequences and including at least one 300-level seminar course which entails an independent research and writing component. All 300-level courses count towards the seminar requirement
    1. General Study: completion of five courses chosen from at least two of the three subfields below, including at least one 300-level seminar course.
    2. American Government: completion of four courses chosen from POL 203 (JOUR 203), 229, 230 (LEGL 230), 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 250, 251 (SOAN 251), 280, 283, 295, 342, 360, 370, 397, 466 and at least one course chosen from the remaining 200- and 300-level courses in international/global politics or political philosophy
    3. International/Global Politics: completion of four courses chosen from POL 214, 215, 227, 240, 245 (SOAN 245), 246 (SOAN 246), 247,249, 255, 272 (SOAN 272), 274, 276, 279, 285, 288, 292, 296, 327, 380, 381, 384, 385, 392, 395 and at least one course chosen from the remaining 200- and 300-level courses in American government or political philosophy
    4. Political Philosophy: completion of four courses chosen from POL 265, 266, 270 (HIST 270), 281, 297, 360, 370, 396 and at least one course chosen from the remaining 200- and 300-level courses in international/global politics or American government
  4. Six additional credits which must include courses from two of the following disciplines: economics, history, philosophy, psychology, religion, or sociology and anthropology.
  1. Required courses:
    • POL 100 - American National Government
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      A study of the constitutional origins and historical development of the national government with special attention to Congress, the presidency, the judiciary, and the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media in the policy process.


    • POL 105 - Introduction to Global Politics
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.


    • POL 111 - Introduction to Political Philosophy
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      An introduction to some of the perennial themes of politics, such as the relationship between human nature and political institutions, individual freedom and community, private conscience and civic virtue, the claims of reason and faith, the nature of law, obligation, and rights, among others. Our inquiry is guided by selections from influential works in the history of political thought, ancient, modern and contemporary, as well as plays, dialogues, comedies, tragedies, novels, and films. Consult with instructor for specific reading assignments and course requirements.


    • INTR 201 - Information Technology Literacy
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteFirst-year or sophomore standing
      FacultyBallenger, Boylan (administrator)

      Through the use of interactive online tutorials, students gain proficiency in and a working knowledge of five distinct areas of information technology literacy: Windows Operating System, spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel), word processing (Microsoft Word), presentation software (Microsoft PowerPoint), and basic networking (the Washington and Lee network, basic Web browsing, and Microsoft Outlook). Lessons, exercises, practice exams and exams mix online efforts and hands-on activities.


    • INTR 202 - Applied Statistics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteINTR 201

      An examination of the principal applications of statistics in accounting, business, economics, and politics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.

       


  2. Take either
    • ECON 100 - Introduction to Economics
      FDRSS1
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources to the production and consumption of goods and services. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic and macroeconomic questions.


    • or both
    • ECON 101 - Principles of Microeconomics
      FDRSS1
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteOpen only to members of the Class of 2020 and earlier
      FacultyStaff

      Survey of economic principles and problems with emphasis on analysis of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy. The first half of a two-term survey of economics. Should be followed by ECON 102.


    • and
    • ECON 102 - Principles of Macroeconomics
      FDRSS1
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 101. Open only to members of the Class of 2020 and earlier
      FacultyStaff

      Emphasis on performance of the aggregate economy. Analysis of unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.


  3. Five additional courses of 3 credits or more in politics, including completion of one of the following four sequences and including at least one 300-level seminar course which entails an independent research and writing component.
  4.  All 300-level courses count towards the seminar requirement

    • General Study:

      completion of five courses chosen from at least two of the three subfields below, including at least one 300-level seminar course.

    • American Government:
      • Completion of four courses from:
      • POL 203 - State and Local Government
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        FacultyFinch

        An introduction to the structures and functions of United States subnational governments, with particular emphasis on the policy-making process and on the relationships between policy makers and the public. Computer-assisted analysis of survey-research data is included.


      • POL 229 - Political Parties, Interest Groups, and the Media
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100
        FacultyConnelly

        A study of the three central extra-constitutional mediating institutions in the American political system: political parties, interest groups, and the media. The course explores theoretical and practical, historical and contemporary developments in party politics, interest group politics, and media politics. Special attention to the debate between the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists.


      • POL 230 - Separation of Powers in the U.S. Constitution (LEGL 230)
        FDRSS2
        Credits4
        FacultyMurchison

        This course probes the origins, development, advantages, and disadvantages of the tripartite structure of the federal government, beginning with an examination of the background and text of Articles I, II, and III of the U.S. Constitution. We analyze structural explanations provided in the Federalist Papers, along with Classical and Enlightenment sources addressing the nature of political power, the problem of faction, the role of checks and balances, and the purpose of separated functions. In-depth analyses of leading U.S. Supreme Court decisions trace evolving conceptions of legislative. executive. and judicial powers along with attention to the relevance of war and economic crisis to the authority and function of each branch. In discussions of landmark decisions, students compare the legal thought of a number of Justices--John Marshall, William Howard Taft, Robert Jackson, William Brennan, Sandra Day O'Connor, Anthony Kennedy, and Antonin Scalia. We trace the creation of the so-called "fourth branch" of government--the administrative state-- and examine whether this "branch" can be reconciled with ideas of representative democracy and constitutional text. Students prepare and deliver two oral arguments based on assigned cases and write an appellate brief on a separation-of-powers topic.


      • POL 232 - Public Policy
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100
        FacultyHarris

        Introduction to public policy formation and implementation, decision making in government, the concepts and techniques of policy analysis, and ethical analysis of policy. Policy issues such as education, the environment, and public health are used as illustrations.


      • POL 233 - Environmental Policy and Law
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteECON 101 or POL 100
        FacultyHarris

        A study of major environmental laws and the history of their enactment and implementation. Discusses different theoretical approaches from law, ethics, politics, and economics. Reviews significant case law and the legal context. Emphasis is on domestic policy with some attention to international law and treaties.


      • POL 234 - Congress and the Legislative Process
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100
        FacultyConnelly

        A review of the constitutional origins and historical development of Congress as a representative and deliberative institution. Course focus includes the relation between the President and Congress, bicameralism, congressional elections, congressional reform, legislative rules and procedures, and the policy process. The course follows the current Congress using C-SPAN and Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report.


      • POL 235 - The Presidency
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100
        FacultyConnelly, Strong

        A review of the origins and development of the office of the presidency from Washington to the present, with an emphasis on post-war administrations. Topics include constitutional issues arising from presidential powers, policy making within the executive branch, and modern presidential leadership styles.


      • POL 236 - The American Supreme Court and Constitutional Law
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100
        FacultyStaff

        A survey of the development of American constitutional law and a study of the role of the Supreme Court as both a political institution and principal expositor of the Constitution.


      • POL 250 - Black American Politics
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 111 or AFCA 130
        FacultyMorel

        A study of important black figures in American political thought. The course focuses on the intellectual history of black Americans but also considers contemporary social science and public policies dealing with race in America.


      • POL 251 - Social Movements (SOAN 251)
        FDRSS4
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100, 105 or 111 or instructor consent
        FacultyLeBlanc, Eastwood

        A survey of American social movements, including an evaluation of competing theoretical approaches to the study of social movements and an examination of the strategies, successes, failures, and political and social consequences of the civil rights, labor, student, and women's movements. Close attention is given to factors contributing to the rise and decline of these


      • POL 283 - Minority Voting Rights and Fair Redistricting
        FDRSS2
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteNo prerequisite. Meets the American politics field requirement in the politics major
        FacultyStaff

        This course introduces students to the redistricting process and election law by engaging them in a lab setting in which they use geographic information systems (GIS) software to develop alternative election district plans for the Commonwealth of Virginia. In addition to learning basic GIS skills, students also study voting rights case law, electoral systems and electoral reform.


      • POL 295 - Special Topics in American Politics
        FDRSS2
        Credits3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring
        PrerequisiteFirst-year or sophomore standing or instructor consent

        A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • POL 342 - Seminar: Law and the Judicial Process
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100 or POL 111, or instructor consent
        FacultyHarris

        A survey of legal theories and the problems of reconciling such theories with the realities of administering a legal system. The course draws upon readings from literature, philosophy, legal scholarship, and political science. Topics include the nature of law and justice, constitutionalism, the role and power of courts and judges, and the function of a legal system.


      • POL 360 - Seminar: Lincoln's Statesmanship
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100
        FacultyMorel

        This seminar examines the political thought and practice of Abraham Lincoln. Emphasis is on his speeches and writings, supplemented by scholarly commentary on his life and career.


      • POL 370 - Seminar in American Political Thought
        FDRSS2
        Credits3 credits in fall or winter; 4 credits in spring
        PrerequisitePOL 100 or POL 111

        An examination of classic themes and current issues in American political thought. Depending on the instructor, emphases may include the Federalists, Anti-Federalists, Alexis de Tocqueville, Abraham Lincoln, and voices from the Progressive and civil rights eras. Course readings stress primary sources including speeches, essays, and books by politicians and theorists. The course explores the effort to reconcile liberty and equality, individualism and community, liberalism and republicanism, politics and religion, among other themes. The course highlights the contemporary relevance of the enduring tensions between political principles and practice.


      • POL 397 - Seminar in American Government
        FDRSS2
        Credits3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring
        PrerequisitePOL 100 or instructor consent

        Examination of selected topics in American political institutions, ideas, and processes. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • POL 466 - Washington Term Program
        Credits6
        PrerequisiteGrade-point average of 3.000 overall and in politics courses; POL 100, 105, or 111
        FacultyConnelly

        The Washington Term Program aims to enlarge students' understanding of national politics and governance. Combining the practical experience of a Washington internship with academic study, it affords deeper insight into the processes and problems of government at the national level. A member of the politics faculty is the resident director, supervising students enrolled in this program while they are in Washington, D.C.


      • and at least one course chosen from the remaining 200- and 300-level courses in international/global politics or political philosophy
    • International/Global Politics:
      • completion of four courses chosen from:
      • POL 214 - The Conduct of American Foreign Policy
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100 or 105
        FacultyStrong

        Constitutional basis, role of the President and the Congress, the State Department and the Foreign Service, role of public opinion, political parties, and pressure groups. Relation to other political areas and to the United Nations and other international agencies.


      • POL 215 - International Development
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        FacultyDickovick

        A study of international development and human capability, with a focus on Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The course analyzes theories to explain development successes and failures, with a focus on the structures, institutions, and actors that shape human societies and social change. Key questions include measuring economic growth and poverty, discussing the roles of states and markets in development, and examining the role of industrialized countries in reducing global poverty. The course explores links between politics and other social sciences and humanities.


      • POL 227 - East Asian Politics
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        FacultyLeBlanc

        An investigation of East Asian political systems and the global, historical, and cultural contexts in which their political institutions have developed. Students consider the connections between political structure and the rapid social and economic changes in East Asia since World War II, as well as the effectiveness of varied political processes in addressing contemporary problems. Emphasis is given to China, Korea, and Japan.


      • POL 240 - Elections and Law in Comparative Perspective
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100 or 105 or instructor consent
        FacultyMcCaughrin

        A comparative analysis of the constitutions, elections, and political processes around the world. The course addresses issues of election law, theories of good government, issues of political and institutional reform, and the debates about democratization.


      • POL 245 - European Politics and Society (SOAN 245)
        FDRSS4
        Credits3
        FacultyJasiewicz

        A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.


      • POL 246 - Post-Communism and New Democracies (SOAN 246)
        FDRSS4 as sociology only
        Credits3
        FacultyJasiewicz

        A comparative analysis of transition from Communism in the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Cases of successful and unsuccessful transitions to civil society, pluralist democracy, and market economy are examined. The comparative framework includes analysis of transition from non-Communist authoritarianism and democratic consolidation in selected countries of Latin America, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and South Africa.


      • POL 247 - Latin American Politics
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        FacultyDickovick

        This course focuses on Latin American politics during the 20th and 21st centuries. Major topics include: democracy and authoritarianism; representation and power; populism, corporatism, socialism, and communism; and questions of poverty, inequality, and economic growth. The course places particular emphasis on the Cuban and Mexican Revolutions, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Guatemala, and Peru. In addition, the course examines political and economic relations between the United States and Latin America.


      • POL 249 - African Politics
        FDRSS2
        Credits4
        FacultyDickovick

        This course focuses on the politics, society, and economy of Africa during the 20th and 21st centuries. Major topics include: politics and economics of development, poverty, and human capability; authoritarian rule and transitions to democracy; causes and consequences of social change; and relations between Africa and the rest of the world. The course enables students to select country case studies for individual and group research, with a view toward testing hypotheses and formulating theories about comparative politics in Africa.


      • POL 255 - Gender and Politics
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100, 105 or 111 or instructor consent
        FacultyLeBlanc

        This course investigates the gendered terms under which women and men participate in political life. Attention is given to the causes of men's and women's different patterns of participation in politics, to processes that are likely to decrease the inequalities between men's and women's political power, and the processes by which society's gender expectations shape electoral and institutional politics. The different effects of gender on the practice of politics in different nations are compared, with a special emphasis placed on advanced industrial democracies.


      • POL 268 - Migration, Identity, and Conflict (SOAN 268)
        FDRSS4
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteSOAN 102, POV 101, or POL 105
        FacultyEastwood

        This course focuses on the complex relationship between migration, political institutions, group identities, and inter-group conflict. The course is a hybrid of a seminar and research lab in which students (a) read some of the key social-scientific literature on these subjects, and (b) conduct team-based research making use of existing survey data about the integration of migrant populations into various polities.


      • POL 272 - Social Revolutions (SOAN 272)
        FDRSS4
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteSOAN 101, 102, or instructor consent
        FacultyEastwood

        This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of a variety of social revolutions. The overarching goal of the course is to discern whether or not a single "theory of revolutions" can be constructed. Are there common patterns to be observed in (and common causes behind) events as separated by time, place, and ideology as the 17th-century "Glorious Revolution" in England, the French Revolution, Latin American revolutions (including the Wars of Independence and the Mexican Revolution), the Russian Revolution, and more recent events such as the revolution that brought the current regime in Iran to power? To this end, students read and discuss a variety of such theories that have been put forward by sociologists, historians, and political scientists and then consider case studies of the aforementioned social revolutions in order to scrutinize these theories.


      • POL 274 - Terrorism
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        FacultyCantey

        The principal goal of this course is to help students understand the complexities of contemporary terrorism. We discuss definitional issues, the historical roots of modern terrorism, and various micro- and macro-explanations for this form of violence. We also investigate the life cycles of terrorist groups: How do they emerge? What kinds of organizational challenges do they face? How do they end? Other topics include leaderless movements (e.g., "lone wolves") and state sponsorship. Throughout the course, students observe that terrorism is not a phenomenon unique to one class of people. The course ends with three weeks focused on a certain kind of terrorism which some have called violent Islamic extremism.


      • POL 276 - Intelligence in Practice
        FDRSS2
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteAdditional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term
        FacultyCantey

        This course examines the responsibilities of, and challenges faced by, today's intelligence community (IC). Drawing on current literature and case studies, topics include intelligence collection and analysis, ethical and moral issues, oversight and accountability, covert action, and the increasing role of "cyber" in espionage. Through an intelligence lens, we explore the rise of al Qaeda and the global jihadist movement, the run-up to 9/11, intelligence failures (and successes) associated with the Iraq war and the Arab Spring, and the role of the IC in future scenario planning. One week is spent in and around Washington, DC, where we tour the National Spy Museum, meet with intelligence officials, and visit other intelligence-related sites.


      • POL 285 - Contemporary Britain
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteAcceptance into the London Summer Internship Program. Corequisite: INTR 453
        FacultyBlick

        The course introduces students to some key features of contemporary life in the United Kingdom (UK). It focuses on political institutions and processes and extends to take in wider British society. Consideration is given both to the history of recent decades in the UK and to currently prevailing circumstances. Class meetings are combined with a series of visits to relevant sites of interest intended to enhance and expand upon the learning experience.


      • POL 288 - Supervised Study Abroad
        FDRSS2
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent and other prerequisites as specified in advance

        This spring-term course covers a topic of current interest for which foreign travel provides a unique opportunity for significantly greater understanding. Topics and locations change from year to year and is announced each year, well in advance of registration. This course may be repeated if the topics are different. Offered when interest and expressed and department resources permit.


      • POL 292 - Topics in Politics and Film
        FDRSS2
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteVary by offering. Open to non-majors and majors of all class years

        This course examines how film and television present political issues and themes. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • POL 296 - Special Topics in Global Politics
        FDRSS2
        Credits3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring
        Prerequisitevary by topic. Meets the global politics field requirement in the politics major

        A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

        Spring 2018, POL 296-01: Special Topics in Global Politics: Comparative Constitution-Building (4). This course introduces students to how a constitution is formed. Constitution-building processes have played a critical part in the history of many countries, including the USA, Spain, and Germany. Often they marked an important break with the past, leaving behind authoritarian rule or colonial government. Constitution-building may take place in the wake of traumatic events such as military defeat or revolutionary upheaval. It can have powerful consequences--both good and ill--for the future of the country in which it takes place. Through historical analysis, case studies, and international comparison, students investigate different processes of creating a constitution. (SS2) Blick. Spring 2018 only.


      • POL 380 - Global Politics Seminar
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteNormally POL 105 or instructor consent, though prerequisite may vary with topic. Open to majors and non-majors of all classes. Meets the global politics field requirement in the politics major

        Examination of selected topics dealing with international and comparative politics. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

        Fall 2017, POL 380-01: The Global Politics of Churchill (3). Prerequisite: POL 105 or instructor consent. Open to majors and non-majors. Meets the 300-level seminar requirement for the politics major. Winston Spencer-Churchill was one of the most significant figures of early 20th-century global politics. The breadth of his experience—journalist, parliamentarian, soldier, government minister with responsibility for the Royal Navy and later the British economy, and ultimately prime minister—helped to shape the contemporary world. He was also an author and historian who famously proclaimed that history would be kind to him because he would write it. This course uses his extensive writings to examine the global politics of his time, pairing them with selections drawn from international relations theory and comparative politics. Topics include the twilight of European colonialism (1890-1955), the British political system and the Irish question, the gold standard and free trade, the origins and conduct of both World Wars, and the postwar international order. (SS2) O'Dell.


      • POL 381 - Seminar in International Political Economy
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteECON 102 or POL 105, or instructor consent. Meets the global politics field requirement in the politics major
        FacultyDickovick

        This course provides an intermediate-level introduction to the major actors, questions, and theories in the field of international political economy (IPE). Course participants discuss political and economic interactions in the areas of international trade, fiscal and monetary policy, and exchange rates; discuss globalization in historical and contemporary perspectives; and examine the international politics of the major intergovernmental organizations, multinational corporations, states, and other institutional actors in the global economy.


      • POL 384 - Seminar on Middle Eastern Politics
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 105 or instructor consent
        FacultyCantey

        This course examines contemporary politics in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Topics include the role of colonial legacies in state formation, the region's democratic deficit, nationalism, sectarianism, and the influence of religion in politics. We explore inter- and intrastate conflict, including the use of terrorism, economic development and underdevelopment, and the recent Arab uprisings (commonly referred to as the Arab Spring). Throughout, we consider why the Middle East attracts as much attention from policymakers and scholars as it does, how analysts have studied the region across time and space, and why understanding different cultural perspectives is critical to understanding the region.


      • POL 392 - Seminar in Asian Politics
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteVary with topic

        A topical seminar focusing on Chinese politics, other Asian countries, or selected subjects in Asian politics. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • and at least one course chosen from the remaining 200- and 300-level courses in American government or political philosophy
    • Political Philosophy:
      • POL 265 - Classical Political Philosophy
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 111
        FacultyHale

        An examination of some of the central questions and concerns of classical political philosophy. The course is not restricted to a historical period but extends to classical themes within contemporary culture. A mixture of plays, novels, epics, dialogues, treatises, and films are used. Authors, texts, and themes vary from year to year. Consult with the instructor for specific course details.


      • POL 266 - Modern Political Philosophy
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 111
        FacultyStaff

        An examination of some of the central questions and concerns of modern political philosophy. The course is not restricted to a historical period but extends to modern themes within contemporary culture. A mixture of plays, novels, epics, dialogues, treatises, and films are used. Authors, texts, and themes vary from year to year. 


      • POL 270 - Modern Islamic Political Thought (HIST 270)
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyBlecher

        This course investigates Islamic political thought and action from the 18th century to the present. The course begins with an examination of the commentaries, treatises, and debates among Muslim political thinkers in light of their historical context and the writings on Islamic politics from the classical and middle ages. Then, students compare historical case studies of modern Islamic political movements in practice in Pakistan, Syria, Egypt, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, France and the U.S. Throughout the course, we contemplate a variety of themes: the relationship of Islamic law to the state, the meaning of "lslamism" and fundamentalism, the relationship of democracy and constitutionalism to the Islamic tradition, the influence of women's changing participation in the public sphere, the impact of colonialism, technology and new media. and the limits placed on political speech. the place of non-Muslims and Muslim minorities in the West. and the changing role of religious education and traditional authority.


      • POL 297 - Special Topics in Political Philosophy
        FDRSS2
        Credits3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring
        PrerequisiteFirst-year or sophomore standing or instructor consent

        A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • POL 360 - Seminar: Lincoln's Statesmanship
        FDRSS2
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePOL 100
        FacultyMorel

        This seminar examines the political thought and practice of Abraham Lincoln. Emphasis is on his speeches and writings, supplemented by scholarly commentary on his life and career.


      • POL 370 - Seminar in American Political Thought
        FDRSS2
        Credits3 credits in fall or winter; 4 credits in spring
        PrerequisitePOL 100 or POL 111

        An examination of classic themes and current issues in American political thought. Depending on the instructor, emphases may include the Federalists, Anti-Federalists, Alexis de Tocqueville, Abraham Lincoln, and voices from the Progressive and civil rights eras. Course readings stress primary sources including speeches, essays, and books by politicians and theorists. The course explores the effort to reconcile liberty and equality, individualism and community, liberalism and republicanism, politics and religion, among other themes. The course highlights the contemporary relevance of the enduring tensions between political principles and practice.


      • POL 396 - Seminar in Political Philosophy
        FDRSS2
        Credits3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring
        PrerequisitePOL 111 or instructor consent

        An examination of selected questions and problems in political philosophy and/or political theory. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

         


      • and at least one course chosen from the remaining 200- and 300-level courses in international/global politics or American government
  5. Six additional credits which must include courses from two of the following disciplines:
  6. economics
    history
    philosophy
    psychology
    religion
    or sociology and anthropology