Course Offerings

Fall 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Principles of Microeconomics

ECON 101 - Silwal, Shikha B.

Survey of economic principles and problems with emphasis on analysis of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy. The first half of a two-term survey of economics. Should be followed by ECON 102.

Principles of Microeconomics

ECON 101 - Scharadin, Benjamin P.

Survey of economic principles and problems with emphasis on analysis of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy. The first half of a two-term survey of economics. Should be followed by ECON 102.

Principles of Macroeconomics

ECON 102 - Collins, Taylor A.

Emphasis on performance of the aggregate economy. Analysis of unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Principles of Macroeconomics

ECON 102 - Smitka, Michael J. (Mike)

Emphasis on performance of the aggregate economy. Analysis of unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Principles of Macroeconomics

ECON 102 - Kaiser, Carl P.

Emphasis on performance of the aggregate economy. Analysis of unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Econometrics

ECON 203 - Anderson, Michael A.

Explorations of regression models that relate a response variable to one or more predictor variables. The course begins with a review of the simple bivariate model used in INTR 202, and moves on to multivariate models. Underlying model assumptions and consequences are discussed. Advanced topics include non-linear regression and forecasting. Examples in each class are drawn from a number of disciplines. The course emphasizes the use of data and student-directed research.

Microeconomic Theory

ECON 210 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

Contemporary theory relating to consumer behavior, the firm's optimizing behavior, the nature of competition in various types of markets and market equilibrium over time. Recommended for economics majors not later than their junior year.

Macroeconomic Theory

ECON 211 - Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

This course develops the classical macroeconomic framework and uses this to explore the causes and consequences of economic growth, inflation, output, and employment. This same exercise is conducted using alternative theoretical frameworks, including those associated with Keynes, Monetarists, and New Classical thinkers. Emphasis is placed on investigating the impact and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy under each of the theoretical paradigms or schools of thought developed.

Macroeconomic Theory

ECON 211 - Collins, Taylor A.

This course develops the classical macroeconomic framework and uses this to explore the causes and consequences of economic growth, inflation, output, and employment. This same exercise is conducted using alternative theoretical frameworks, including those associated with Keynes, Monetarists, and New Classical thinkers. Emphasis is placed on investigating the impact and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy under each of the theoretical paradigms or schools of thought developed.

Money and Banking

ECON 215 - Hooks, Linda M.

A study of the fundamental principles of money, credit, and banking in the United States. Emphasis is on modern conditions and problems, with particular attention to the validity of monetary and banking theory in the present domestic and international situation.

Labor Economics

ECON 230 - Kaiser, Carl P.

This course addresses how labor markets and institutions allocate labor and determine earnings and the distribution of income in the United States. Economic models are used to explain labor market outcomes generated by our economy. Where such outcomes are deemed less than socially optimal, these models are used to evaluate prospective and current labor market policies intended to address these shortcomings. Some attention is given to comparing American labor market outcomes with those in other developed countries.

The Economics of Social Issues

ECON 235 - Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

This seminar is based on readings that set out hypotheses developed by economists and other social scientists regarding the causes and consequences of a wide range of social problems. Evidence examining the validity of these hypotheses is scrutinized and evaluated. The course is writing intensive and interdisciplinary since readings are drawn from a wide variety of fields. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to, poverty, education, health, crime, race, ethnicity, immigration, and fiscal matters.

Women in the Economy

ECON 251 - Shester, Katharine L.

Students explore how economic theory and analysis can be applied to examine the multiple roles that women play in our society. In particular, we examine linkages and changes in women's human capital, marriage, fertility, family structure, and occupation and labor supply decisions in the post-World War II era. We also investigate the magnitude and causes of the gender wage gap. We assess how much of the gender wage gap can be explained by education and occupational choice, and how much appears to be due to discrimination. We also learn about {and try to explain} the differences in labor-market outcomes for women with and without children. Finally, we access the causes and consequences of teenage pregnancy and single motherhood.

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

ECON 255 - Goodenberger, James S.

The course serves as an introduction to environmental and natural resource economics. Economic principles are used to evaluate public and private decision making involving the management and use of environmental and natural resources. Aspects pertaining to fisheries, forests, species diversity, agriculture, and various policies to reduce air, water and toxic pollution will be discussed. Lectures, reading assignments, discussions and exams will emphasize the use of microeconomic analysis for managing and dealing with environmental and natural resource problems and issues.

Development Economics

ECON 280 - Smitka, Michael J. (Mike)

A survey of the major issues of development economics. Economic structure of low-income countries and primary causes for their limited economic growth. Economic goals and policy alternatives. Role of developed countries in the development of poor countries. Selected case studies.

Comparative Institutional Economics

ECON 281 - Grajzl, Peter

Institutions such as laws, the political system, and cultural norms embed all social activity. They structure economic, political, and social interaction and as such play a central role in facilitating (or hindering) economic development. This course's objective is to explore from a broad perspective how institutions affect economic performance, what the determinants of institutions are, and how institutions evolve. We study examples from the existing capitalist economies, the developing and transition countries, as well as the more distant history. Because the study of institutions is necessarily an interdisciplinary endeavor, the course combines the approach of economics with the insights from law, political science, history, and sociology.

Mathematical Economics

ECON 320 - Grajzl, Peter

An introduction to fundamental mathematical methods of economic analysis with a variety of applications from both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Topics covered include theory and applications of linear algebra, multivariable calculus, static optimization, and comparative statics. The course is highly recommended for anyone planning to undertake graduate studies in economics or a closely related field. Should not be taken if completed ECON 220: Mathematical Economics.

Economics of the Environment in Developing Countries

ECON 356 - Kahn, James R. (Jim)

This course focuses on the unique characteristics of the relationship between the environment and the economy in developing nations. Differences in economic structure, political structure, culture, social organization and ecosystem dynamics are emphasized as alternative policies for environmental and resource management are analyzed.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 395A - Silwal, Shikha B.

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and will be announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Fall 2017, ECON 395A-01: Topic: Economic Culture and Development (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. Economic development is deeply rooted in cultural factors, such as identity, belief, trust, and religion. These cultural factors in turn are rooted in history and economic development. The course explores historic origins of cultural factors and how those cultural factors have direct implication for economic development.   Development, as such, is understood within the backdrop of slow-changing, structural, and systematic elements. We also make use of data availability, methodological improvements, and empirical literature to advance our understanding of the economics of being poor. Silwal.

Fall 2017, ECON 395B-01: Topic: U.S. Economic History (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. This course examines selected topics in the economic development of the U.S. economy.  The goals are to review major themes in U.S. economic history, to study professional research papers to learn how economists develop and interpret historical evidence, and to give students hands-on experience analyzing historical data.  Major themes include: migration flows to and within the U.S.; slavery and African-American economic progress since emancipation; transportation and industrialization; the Great Depression; and long-run changes in education, income, and urbanization. Shester.

Fall 2017, ECON 395C-01: International Trade (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. This course examines a set of topics in International Economics, with an emphasis on policy.  We examine the current debates on who wins and who loses from trade and immigration, as well as the role of trade agreements like NAFTA in the U.S. economy.  We focus on a narrower range of topics in order to investigate issues in greater depth including examining primary research. Anderson .

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 395B - Shester, Katharine L.

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and will be announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Fall 2017, ECON 395A-01: Topic: Economic Culture and Development (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. Economic development is deeply rooted in cultural factors, such as identity, belief, trust, and religion. These cultural factors in turn are rooted in history and economic development. The course explores historic origins of cultural factors and how those cultural factors have direct implication for economic development.   Development, as such, is understood within the backdrop of slow-changing, structural, and systematic elements. We also make use of data availability, methodological improvements, and empirical literature to advance our understanding of the economics of being poor. Silwal.

Fall 2017, ECON 395B-01: Topic: U.S. Economic History (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. This course examines selected topics in the economic development of the U.S. economy.  The goals are to review major themes in U.S. economic history, to study professional research papers to learn how economists develop and interpret historical evidence, and to give students hands-on experience analyzing historical data.  Major themes include: migration flows to and within the U.S.; slavery and African-American economic progress since emancipation; transportation and industrialization; the Great Depression; and long-run changes in education, income, and urbanization. Shester.

Fall 2017, ECON 395C-01: International Trade (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. This course examines a set of topics in International Economics, with an emphasis on policy.  We examine the current debates on who wins and who loses from trade and immigration, as well as the role of trade agreements like NAFTA in the U.S. economy.  We focus on a narrower range of topics in order to investigate issues in greater depth including examining primary research. Anderson .

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 395C - Anderson, Michael A.

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and will be announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Fall 2017, ECON 395A-01: Topic: Economic Culture and Development (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. Economic development is deeply rooted in cultural factors, such as identity, belief, trust, and religion. These cultural factors in turn are rooted in history and economic development. The course explores historic origins of cultural factors and how those cultural factors have direct implication for economic development.   Development, as such, is understood within the backdrop of slow-changing, structural, and systematic elements. We also make use of data availability, methodological improvements, and empirical literature to advance our understanding of the economics of being poor. Silwal.

Fall 2017, ECON 395B-01: Topic: U.S. Economic History (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. This course examines selected topics in the economic development of the U.S. economy.  The goals are to review major themes in U.S. economic history, to study professional research papers to learn how economists develop and interpret historical evidence, and to give students hands-on experience analyzing historical data.  Major themes include: migration flows to and within the U.S.; slavery and African-American economic progress since emancipation; transportation and industrialization; the Great Depression; and long-run changes in education, income, and urbanization. Shester.

Fall 2017, ECON 395C-01: International Trade (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. This course examines a set of topics in International Economics, with an emphasis on policy.  We examine the current debates on who wins and who loses from trade and immigration, as well as the role of trade agreements like NAFTA in the U.S. economy.  We focus on a narrower range of topics in order to investigate issues in greater depth including examining primary research. Anderson .

Directed Individual Study

ECON 401 - Casey, James F. (Jim)

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of economics not presented in other courses, or to emphasize a particular field of interest. May be repeated for degree credit with permission for different topics.

Spring 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Current Public Policy Debates

ECON 222 - Diette, Timothy M. (Tim) / Shester, Katharine L.

The course is an applied public finance and policy course that focuses on current policy debates. While the topics are updated with each offering, students in this course examine options for replacing the Affordable Care Act, analyze whether the country should adopt a universal voucher program for K-12, discuss containing the cost of college, and explore options for securing the long-term financial stability of Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security. We use economic theory to frame the each of the policy questions. Students conduct additional research on each of the topics, debate topics, and author policy opinion papers.

The Auto Industry: Economics, Society, Culture

ECON 244 - Smitka, Michael J. (Mike)

This course investigates the automobile industry from an interdisciplinary perspective, including a visit to factories and R&D facilities in Detroit. Why did GM file bankruptcy? Why do we have 600-plus new passenger vehicles available in the US -- isn't such diversity wasteful? How and why has the automobile shifted the rhythm of daily life, including the growth of suburbs and decline of cities? What of safety and the environment -- electric vehicles? The course also considers cars themselves, the subject of two Tom Wolfe stories in The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Bab y.

Caste at the Intersection of Economy, Religion, and Law

ECON 246 - Silwal, Shikha B. / Lubin, Timothy (Tim)

Social stratification touches every aspect of life, and South Asia's traditional caste structure is a special case: this highly complex, strictly-adhered-to system has been religiously legitimized and criticized over a 3,000-year history, and is nowadays seen as being at odds with the modern world. Yet it remains a crucial factor in social identity, economic roles, legal status, and religious practice. This course offers a 360-degree survey of caste both historically and in practice today in Nepal. The course addresses four themes, respectively providing for each a combination of historical background, social scientific analysis of the modern situation, and direct field experience for the students.

Supervised Study Abroad: The Environment and Economic Development in Amazonas

ECON 259 - Kahn, James R. (Jim)

Spring Term Abroad course. Amazonas is a huge Brazilian state of 1.5 million sq. kilometers which retains 94 percent of its original forest cover. This course examines the importance of the forest for economic development in both the formal and informal sectors of the economy, and how policies can be develop to promote both environmental protection and an increase in the quality life in both the urban and rural areas of Amazonas. The learning objectives of this course integrate those of the economics and environmental studies majors. Students are asked to use economic tools in an interdisciplinary context to understand the relationships among economic behavior, ecosystems and policy choices. Writing assignments focus on these relationships and look towards the development of executive summary writing skills.

Winter 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Principles of Microeconomics

ECON 101 - Goodenberger, James S.

Survey of economic principles and problems with emphasis on analysis of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy. The first half of a two-term survey of economics. Should be followed by ECON 102.

Principles of Microeconomics

ECON 101 - Sen, Srimayi B. (Tinni)

Survey of economic principles and problems with emphasis on analysis of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy. The first half of a two-term survey of economics. Should be followed by ECON 102.

Principles of Microeconomics

ECON 101 - Diette, Timothy M. (Tim)

Survey of economic principles and problems with emphasis on analysis of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy. The first half of a two-term survey of economics. Should be followed by ECON 102.

Principles of Macroeconomics

ECON 102 - Handy, Christopher M. (Chris)

Emphasis on performance of the aggregate economy. Analysis of unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Principles of Macroeconomics

ECON 102 - Kaiser, Carl P.

Emphasis on performance of the aggregate economy. Analysis of unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Principles of Macroeconomics

ECON 102 - Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

Emphasis on performance of the aggregate economy. Analysis of unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Econometrics

ECON 203 - Blunch, Niels-Hugo (Hugo)

Explorations of regression models that relate a response variable to one or more predictor variables. The course begins with a review of the simple bivariate model used in INTR 202, and moves on to multivariate models. Underlying model assumptions and consequences are discussed. Advanced topics include non-linear regression and forecasting. Examples in each class are drawn from a number of disciplines. The course emphasizes the use of data and student-directed research.

Microeconomic Theory

ECON 210 - Grajzl, Peter

Contemporary theory relating to consumer behavior, the firm's optimizing behavior, the nature of competition in various types of markets and market equilibrium over time. Recommended for economics majors not later than their junior year.

Macroeconomic Theory

ECON 211 - Davies, Martin H.

This course develops the classical macroeconomic framework and uses this to explore the causes and consequences of economic growth, inflation, output, and employment. This same exercise is conducted using alternative theoretical frameworks, including those associated with Keynes, Monetarists, and New Classical thinkers. Emphasis is placed on investigating the impact and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy under each of the theoretical paradigms or schools of thought developed.

Money and Banking

ECON 215 - Hooks, Linda M.

A study of the fundamental principles of money, credit, and banking in the United States. Emphasis is on modern conditions and problems, with particular attention to the validity of monetary and banking theory in the present domestic and international situation.

Urban Economics

ECON 229 - Shester, Katharine L.

A study of the economics of cities. Students discuss why cities exist, what determines city growth, and how firms make city location decisions. We then shift our focus to within-city location decisions, and we discuss land-use patterns, housing, and neighborhoods. Our discussion of housing and neighborhoods focus on a number of issues related to urban poverty, including the effects of segregation and housing policies on the poor.

The Economics of Social Issues

ECON 235 - Goldsmith, Arthur H. (Art)

This seminar is based on readings that set out hypotheses developed by economists and other social scientists regarding the causes and consequences of a wide range of social problems. Evidence examining the validity of these hypotheses is scrutinized and evaluated. The course is writing intensive and interdisciplinary since readings are drawn from a wide variety of fields. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to, poverty, education, health, crime, race, ethnicity, immigration, and fiscal matters.

Economics of Business Strategy

ECON 243 - Smitka, Michael J. (Mike)

A survey of the structure and performance of industry, from entry and exit of new technologies and products, to economies of scale and scope in mature industries, to how firms are organized and what they "make" versus "buy." As metrics, we focus on what such behavior implies consumers and for corporate strategy. Students develop an industry case study as a term project.

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

ECON 255 - Casey, James F. (Jim)

The course serves as an introduction to environmental and natural resource economics. Economic principles are used to evaluate public and private decision making involving the management and use of environmental and natural resources. Aspects pertaining to fisheries, forests, species diversity, agriculture, and various policies to reduce air, water and toxic pollution will be discussed. Lectures, reading assignments, discussions and exams will emphasize the use of microeconomic analysis for managing and dealing with environmental and natural resource problems and issues.

China's Modern Economy

ECON 274 - Smitka, Michael J. (Mike)

Economic analysis of the Chinese economy in the 20th century. Comparisons of pre- and post-revolutionary periods. Performance and policies of Taiwan and mainland China. Issues include the population problem, industrialization, provision of public health and education, alleviation of poverty and inequality. Microeconomic emphasis.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 295A - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Winter 2017, ECON 295A-01: Land in O'odham Cultural, Economic, and Historical Perspectives (3) . Prerequisite: ECON 101. Applicable to economics and poverty and human capability studies. Field Component Cost: $1,350 (departmental aid and loans possible), deposit due Dec. 2, final payment due Dec. 9. This course explores the cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of the O'odham (Papago and Pima) Indians' ties to their lands as expressed in their pre-reservation and contemporary lifeways. Student and faculty travel to the O'odham Nation in Arizona during Washington Break. The seminar first examines pre-reservation O'odham-land relationships as expressed in the tribes' beliefs concerning the structure and operation of the cosmos. Students then place O'odham economics in historical perspective paying particular note to the major 19th- and 20th-century forces that eroded the O'odham's original land base and control over their economic practices. Lastly, we consider attempts of O'odham peoples to solve present-day economic problems in ways that are compatible with their cultural heritage. Guse.

Winter, 2017, ECON 295B-01: Economy of Brazil in the 21st Century (3). Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102 and instructor consent required. This course examines economic development in Brazil, with the purpose of identifying the factors that have prevented Brazil from developing the type of economy and standard of living level associated with a North American or European country. Recommendations are made for future policy directions, and implications for other emerging economy countries are examined. The class has three distinct phases. In the first phase, we have four hours of lectures per week. Following this, there is a weekend workshop with distinguished speakers. After the workshop, the research phase of the class begins, with students responsible for contributing to a white paper on the topic of the course. During the research phase, weekly class meetings are scheduled to discuss progress. Kahn, Blunch, Davies.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 295B - Kahn, James R. (Jim) / Blunch, Niels-Hugo (Hugo) / Davies, Martin H.

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 295C - Casey, James F. (Jim)

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Winter 2017, ECON 295C-01: Conservation and Sustainable Tourism Development in Cuba (3). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Applicable to economics, environmental studies, Latin American and Caribbean studies, and poverty and human capability studies. Field Component Cost: $2750 (departmental aid and loans possible), deposit due Dec. 2, final payment due Dec. 9. This course offers a unique opportunity for international and interdisciplinary learning. Students spend the first three weeks learning about the culture, history, and politics of Cuba, helped by several guest speakers, including the famous Cuban novelist, Uva de Aragon. The next three weeks introduce students to theories of marine conservation and sustainable tourism, with examples from Cuba. The course travels to Cuba during Washington Break where students learn from marine scientists at the Center for Marine Research at the University of Havana. We visit several coastal research sites and learn about potential collaborative opportunities with University of Havana students and faculty. The final six weeks are devoted to continued exploration of conservation and sustainable tourism in Cuba, and students develop their own research proposals for future collaboration based upon their particular interests and contacts made in Cuba.

Game Theory

ECON 302 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

This course abandons the assumptions of perfect competition. Buyers and sellers may be few; information may be privately held; property rights may poorly enforced; externalities abound and uncertainty is the rule. Game theory is a general framework for analyzing the messy world of strategic interactions. Standard solution concepts such as Nash Equilibrium, subgame perfection, and Bayesian equilibrium are introduced in the context of a broad array of microeconomic topics. These include auctions, bargaining, oligopoly, labor market signaling, public finance and insurance. Class time combines lectures, problem-solving workshops, and classroom experiments.

Advanced Labor Economics

ECON 330 - Handy, Christopher M. (Chris)

This course is an empirically advanced introduction to fundamental topics in the economic study of labor markets. We focus on labor supply, labor market equilibrium, investments in education, the distribution of labor income, and the effects of discrimination. Each part of the course provides a theoretical treatment of the respective topic followed by coverage of one or more academic research papers on that topic. Compared to most undergraduate labor economics courses, this course adopts a narrower topical focus in order to study, in depth, some primary research from the discipline. Students further develop their own quantitative research skills by writing two empirical papers.

Topical Research Seminar in Economics

ECON 398A - Hooks, Linda M.

Students work through the original literature in a given field within the discipline of economics. Emphasis is on critical understanding of that literature. Required written work and class discussion focus on summarizing and reviewing articles, gaining insight into the current economic knowledge documented in that literature, and identifying research questions implied by that literature. Based upon this review, students write a detailed proposal of an independent research project after which they carry out the project and write a paper documenting their research. Those students who choose to continue in ECON 399 have the opportunity to develop their proposals into complete research papers.

Topical Research Seminar in Economics

ECON 398B - Smitka, Michael J. (Mike)

Students work through the original literature in a given field within the discipline of economics. Emphasis is on critical understanding of that literature. Required written work and class discussion focus on summarizing and reviewing articles, gaining insight into the current economic knowledge documented in that literature, and identifying research questions implied by that literature. Based upon this review, students write a detailed proposal of an independent research project after which they carry out the project and write a paper documenting their research. Those students who choose to continue in ECON 399 have the opportunity to develop their proposals into complete research papers.

Advanced Research Seminar in Economics

ECON 399 - Davies, Martin H.

This capstone course builds upon the foundations developed in ECON 398. The central element is a major independent research project. This project is carried out with continual mentoring by a faculty member. Students document their research in a formal paper and offer an oral presentation summarizing their research results.

Honors Thesis

ECON 493 - Davies, Martin H.

This course is required of Honors candidates in addition to the 21 credits in economics (courses numbered 200 and above) required of all economics majors.