Film Courses

Winter 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

American Art to 1945

ARTH 266 - King, Elliott H.

A survey of painting and sculpture in the United States from its earliest settlement to about 1945. Lectures and discussions emphasize the English eastern seaboard development in the 17th and 18th centuries, though other geographical areas are included in the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include art of the early colonies, the Hudson River School, Realism and Regionalism, and the reception of abstract art in the United States.

Surrealism

ARTH 363 - King, Elliott H.

Surrealism was one of the most multi-faceted and influential intellectual movements of the 20th century with a legacy and practice that continues today. This seminar examines the key writings and ideas that underlie surrealism with a focus on its artistic practice. We will consider works by artists including Salvador Dalí, René Magritte, and Max Ernst; watch surrealist films; discuss the significance of dreams; and play surrealist "games of chance."

Drawing I

ARTS 111 - Beavers, Leigh A.

Development of skills and visual awareness through the study of the basic elements of drawing. Variety of media, including pencil, charcoal, ink and crayon. Lab fee required.

Photography I

ARTS 120 - Archer Lyle, Clover

An introduction to the methods and materials of black and white film photography, with an emphasis on composition, exposure, and darkroom technique. The course includes a combination of image presentations, technical demonstrations, studio instruction, and group critiques. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.

Film

ENGL 233 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

An introductory study of film in English. The course may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of film.

Global Cinema

FILM 233 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus upon texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. The course generally emphasizes one national film tradition and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of film.

Research and Writing

FILM 413 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

A collaborative group research, writing, and/or production project for junior or senior minors, conducted in supervising faculty members' areas of expertise, with directed independent study culminating in a substantial final project. Possible topics include global and national film, focused treatments of auteur-directors or genres, film and psychology, film and technological change, film and painting, original film production.

The Documentary

JOUR 338 - Finch, Kevin D.

A critical study of the documentary in film and television, with analysis of prominent directors and genres.

Aesthetics

PHIL 264 - McGonigal, Andrew J.

This course offers a wide-ranging, reflective overview of contemporary debates in the philosophy of art. We discuss the following kinds of questions: How are artistic experience and value interrelated? In what does beauty consist? What is the nature of aesthetic experience? Should we value works of art for what we can learn from them? How do pictures represent? What constitutes artistic expression? In what ways is the imagination involved in engaging with artworks? Can emotional responses to fiction be genuine and rational? Is artistic intention relevant to the interpretation of artworks? Are there general principles of aesthetic evaluation? What are the relations between the moral and aesthetic values of art?

Introduction to Text and Performance

THTR 121 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

This course explores the intersection between dramatic script and performance.  Students are guided through a method of critical strategies for assessing and interpreting dramatic literature, as well as a series of formal writing exercises designed to develop their critical and creative abilities. The course  culminates in the creation and presentation of student-written and performed scenes.

Stage Acting I

THTR 141 - Levy, Jemma A.

An introduction to acting for the stage. In this hands-on class, students learn and develop physical and vocal techniques for text-based and improvisational performance, focusing on relationships, objectives, and actions. Work includes in-class scene presentations from modern scripts.

Digital Production

THTR 253 - Evans, Shawn Paul

Digital technologies and multimedia interaction are increasingly utilized to produce, enhance, and innovate theatrical production. Students examine and experiment with various digital technologies as they relate to theater and dance performance. Students create digital audio, video, design rendering, and animation projects for theatrical performances.

Stage Directing 1

THTR 361 - Levy, Jemma A.

An introduction to directing for the stage.  In this hands-on class, students learn and develop basic techniques for integrating work with scripts, performers, and designers into a cohesive stage performance.  Students direct scenes from realistic modern or contemporary plays, focusing on collaboration, clarity, imagination, and analysis to create stage pictures and character relationships that tell a specific story on stage.  The class culminates in invited classroom performances.

Fall 2016

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Art Since 1945

ARTH 267 - King, Elliott H.

This course introduces students to art and art theory from 1945 to the present. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance student knowledge of the major works, artists, and movements of art in Europe and the United States since 1945; (2) to integrate these works of art within the broader social and intellectual history of the period; and  (3) to help students develop their skills in visual analysis and historical interpretation. Among the issues we examine are the politics of abstract art; the ongoing dialogue between art and mass culture; the differences between modernism and postmodernism; and contemporary critiques of art history's prevailing narratives. This is a lecture course with a heavy emphasis on in-class discussion.

Arts of Modern Latin America

ARTH 273 - Lepage, Andrea C.

This lecture course surveys the art and architecture of Latin America from circa 1900 to the present. Students explore the relationship between the arts in Europe and Latin America, trace the development of modern art in Latin America, and consider topics such as the rise of modernismo in Latin America, art in service of nationalism, indigenismo, and the growing Chicana/o movement in the United States. Among the artists covered are Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Tarsila do Amaral, Joaquin Torres-Garcia, Wilfredo Lam, Lygia Clark, and Francisco Botero.

Drawing I

ARTS 111 - Olson-Janjic, Kathleen

Development of skills and visual awareness through the study of the basic elements of drawing. Variety of media, including pencil, charcoal, ink and crayon. Lab fee required.

Drawing I

ARTS 111 - Beavers, Leigh A.

Development of skills and visual awareness through the study of the basic elements of drawing. Variety of media, including pencil, charcoal, ink and crayon. Lab fee required.

Photography I

ARTS 120 - Griffiths, Megan S. (Meg)

An introduction to the methods and materials of black and white film photography, with an emphasis on composition, exposure, and darkroom technique. The course includes a combination of image presentations, technical demonstrations, studio instruction, and group critiques. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.

Design I

ARTS 131 - Stene, Larry M.

An introduction to the elements and concepts of two-dimensional design within the context of current digital technology, with an emphasis on contemporary computer software programs.

Painting II

ARTS 218 - Olson-Janjic, Kathleen

Continuation of ARTS 217. Lab fee required.

Color Photography

ARTS 224 - Griffiths, Megan S. (Meg)

An exploration of the visual and technical principles of color photography, as applied in the digital realm. Students learn the concepts of color photography through studio projects, as well as image presentations, readings, and discussions of methods and artists, historical and contemporary. Students photograph in digital format and learn the craft of fine color printing in the digital darkroom. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.

Global Cinema

FILM 233 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus upon texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. The course generally emphasizes one national film tradition and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of film.

Stage Acting I

THTR 141 - Levy, Jemma A.

An introduction to acting for the stage. In this hands-on class, students learn and develop physical and vocal techniques for text-based and improvisational performance, focusing on relationships, objectives, and actions. Work includes in-class scene presentations from modern scripts.

Lighting Design

THTR 336 - Evans, Shawn Paul

A study of the practice of stage lighting, focusing on styles of production, historical methods and artistic theory. Culminates in a light design for a public theatrical production. Lab fee required.

Spring 2016

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Science in Art: Technical Examination of 17th-Century Dutch Paintings

ARTH 356 - Uffelman, Erich S.

Spring Term Abroad course. A survey of 17th-century Dutch history, art history, politics, religion, economics, etc., which links the scientific analysis of art to the art and culture of the time. The course begins on campus and then history, etc., will occur for a few days in Lexington and then proceed to Center for European Studies, Universiteit Maastricht, The Netherlands. Students visit numerous museums, hear guest lectures from faculty at Universiteit Maastricht, and observe at conservation laboratories at some of the major Dutch art museums. Students are graded by their performance on two research projects involving presentations and journals. Though students are not required to learn a foreign language to participate in the program, they are expected to learn key phrases in Dutch as a matter of courtesy to citizens of the host country.

Antique Photographic Processes

ARTS 221 - Bowden, Christa K.

Additional fee. An exploration of 19th-century photographic processes within the context of the history of photography. Individual processes are learned through studio demonstration and intensive hands-on lab sessions. Processes covered in this course include salt printing, cyanotype, Van Dyke, kallitype, and platinum and palladium printing and toning, as well as wet plate collodion processes such as tintypes and ambrotypes. Students learn how to make enlarged digital negatives for contact printing from photographs that originate in either film or digital formats. In addition to technique, students learn the historical background of each process, as well as contemporary trends and artists working with these methods.

East Asian Cinema

EALL 215 - Zhu, Yanhong

This course provides an introduction to and overview of contemporary East Asian cinema, including the Chinese-language cinemas of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, and those of Japan and Korea. It focuses on the flourishing cinema of East Asia since the 1980s and provides a solid foundation in the successes and dominant tendencies of contemporary East Asian cinema and culture. Among the aims of the course are examining ways in which the contemporary East Asian cinemas and cultures are in dialogue with one another and looking at specific conditions and cultural forces at work in each unique case. The course also explores how the cinemas of East Asia reflect the changing cultural, economic, historical, political and social conditions of each country and how these cinemas and cultures are part of a larger redefinition of the idea of a national culture. Screenings and readings consist of exemplary works from each East Asian culture, organized around specific motifs, such as history, memory, identity, communication, love, and death.

Topics in British Literature

ENGL 292 - Adams, Edward A.

Studies in British literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2016, ENGL 292-01: Topics in British Literature: J.R.R. Tolkien's Epic Fantasies from German Philology to Hollywood CGI (4). Tolkien's epic novels and historical fantasies along with Peter Jackson's spectacular films have made these texts and, more importantly, the narrative they tell among the most significant cultural events of the 20th and now the 21st centuries. This course focuses upon the original novels and films and frames that dual achievement by looking back to Tolkien's roots in 19th-century romance fiction and historical philology and ahead to the role played by Jackson's adaptations in the development of contemporary CGI films and technology. It highlights Tolkien's achievement in its own terms, in how his fictions transformed major 19th-century historical, scholarly, and romance traditions, and in how it enabled key 21st century cultural, artistic, and technological achievements. (HL) Adams.

Seven-Minute Shakespeare

FILM 255 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

After intensive collective reading and discussion of four Shakespeare plays in the first week, students organize into four-person groups with the goal of producing a seven-minute video version of one of the plays by the end of the term, using only the actual text of the play. The project requires full engagement and commitment, and includes tasks such as editing and selecting from the text to produce the film script, creating storyboards, casting and recruiting actors, rehearsing, filming, editing, adding sound tracks and effects. We critique and learn from each other's efforts.

Music in the Films of Stanley Kubrick

FILM 285 - Gaylard, Timothy R. (Tim)

How does music add power and meaning to a film? What are the connections between the flow of music and the flow of a dramatic narrative? How does music enhance visual images? The course will focus on the pre-existent classical compositions chosen by Stanley Kubrick for his movies 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980). The ability to read music is not a requirement for this course.

Digital Media and Society

JOUR 270 - Artwick, Claudette G.

Facebook, YouTube, and iPhones are popular, if not essential elements in college students' busy lives. Being born into the digital age, students have grown up with profound and rapidly-changing media and communication technologies, yet likely take them for granted. This course takes an in-depth look at digital media, exploring the relationship between technology and social change. The concept of technological determinism guides our examination of social networking, online news/information, digital entertainment, and health online.

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Edwards, Anthony (Antoine)

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2016, LIT 295-02: The Arab World through Film (4). Prerequisite: Completion of the FDR FW requirement. The geopolitical importance of the Arab world and the legacy of Orientalism reduce "the Arab" and the region to stereotypes and misrepresentations. In order to challenge these depictions, we start by asking how Arab cinema represents contemporary Arab society'. This course introduces the student to the vibrant societies and dynamic cultures of the Arab world through the medium of film. This course analyzes, upholds, and challenges issues of social and cultural significance in the region. (HL) Edwards.

Music in the Films of Stanley Kubrick

MUS 285 - Gaylard, Timothy R. (Tim)

How does music add power and meaning to a film? What are the connections between the flow of music and the flow of a dramatic narrative? How does music enhance visual images? The course will focus on the pre-existent classical compositions chosen by Stanley Kubrick for his movies 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980). The ability to read music is not a requirement for this course.