Film Courses

Winter 2020

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Color Photography

ARTS 224 - Bowden, Christa K.

An exploration of the visual and technical principles of color photography, as applied in the digital realm. Students learn the concepts of color photography through studio projects, as well as image presentations, readings, and discussions of methods and artists, historical and contemporary. Students photograph in digital format and learn the craft of fine color printing in the digital darkroom. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.

Science in Art

CHEM 156 - Uffelman, Erich S.

This course develops students' fundamental understanding of certain physical, chemical, biological, and geological concepts and utilizes that vocabulary and knowledge to discuss 17th-century Dutch art. The emphasis is on key aspects of optics, light, and chemical bonding needed to understand how a painting "works" and how art conservators analyze paintings in terms of conservation and authenticity, using techniques such as X-ray radiography, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, infrared microscopy, infrared reflectography, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, UV-vis spectroscopy, UV photography, and laser ablation methods. When possible, the course develops modern notions of science with those of the 17th century in order to see how 17th-century science influenced 17th-century art.

Introduction to Film

ENGL 233 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus on texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. At its origins, film displayed boundary-crossing international ambitions, and this course attends to that important fact, but the course's individual variations emphasize one national film tradition (e.g., American, French, Indian, British, Italian, Chinese, etc.) and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history, theory, and basic terminology of film.

Introduction to Film

FILM 233 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus on texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. At its origins, film displayed boundary-crossing international ambitions, and this course attends to that important fact, but the course's individual variations emphasize one national film tradition (e.g., American, French, Indian, British, Italian, Chinese, etc.) and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history, theory, and basic terminology of film.

Research and Writing Film Capstone

FILM 413 - Evans, Shawn Paul

A collaborative group research, writing, and/or production project for junior or senior minors, conducted in supervising faculty members' areas of expertise, with directed independent study culminating in a substantial final project. Possible topics include global and national film, focused treatments of auteur-directors or genres, film and psychology, film and technological change, film and painting, original film production.

The Documentary

JOUR 338 - Finch, Kevin D.

A critical study of the documentary in film and television, with analysis of prominent directors and genres.

Stage Acting 1

THTR 141 - Levy, Jemma A.

An introduction to acting for the stage. In this hands-on class, students learn and develop physical and vocal techniques for text-based and improvisational performance, focusing on relationships, objectives, and actions. Work includes in-class scene presentations from modern scripts.

Scene Painting and Scenic Art

THTR 337 - Collins, Owen

This course is an exploration and application of the methods and materials used in painting and finishing scenery for the theater. The course covers both historical and current scene painting techniques, as well as the tools and paints that have been developed to support those techniques. Outside projects are required. Lab fee required.

Fall 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

19th-Century European Art

ARTH 262 - Lazevnick, Ashley

This course begins in the late 18th century and covers major European art movements and criticism up to c.1900. Topics include the art of the French Revolution as an instrument of propaganda; the rise of Romanticism; the advent and impact of early photography; and the aesthetic and ideological origins of Modern Art.

Art Since 1945

ARTH 267 - Lazevnick, Ashley

This course introduces students to art and art theory from 1945 to the present. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance student knowledge of the major works, artists, and movements of art in Europe and the United States since 1945; (2) to integrate these works of art within the broader social and intellectual history of the period; and  (3) to help students develop their skills in visual analysis and historical interpretation. Among the issues we examine are the politics of abstract art; the ongoing dialogue between art and mass culture; the differences between modernism and postmodernism; and contemporary critiques of art history's prevailing narratives. This is a lecture course with a heavy emphasis on in-class discussion.

Drawing I

ARTS 111 - Stevens-Lubin, Laure A.

Development of skills and visual awareness through the study of the basic elements of drawing. Variety of media, including pencil, charcoal, ink and crayon. Lab fee required.

Photography I

ARTS 120 - Archer, Clover H.

An introduction to the methods and materials of black and white film photography, with an emphasis on composition, exposure, and darkroom technique. The course includes a combination of image presentations, technical demonstrations, studio instruction, and group critiques. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.

Photography I

ARTS 120 - Bowden, Christa K.

An introduction to the methods and materials of black and white film photography, with an emphasis on composition, exposure, and darkroom technique. The course includes a combination of image presentations, technical demonstrations, studio instruction, and group critiques. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.

Design I

ARTS 131 - de Lissovoy, Sandy B.

An introduction to the elements and concepts of two-dimensional design within the context of current digital technology, with an emphasis on contemporary computer software programs.

Painting II

ARTS 218 - Olson-Janjic, Kathleen

Continuation of ARTS 217. Lab fee required.

Introduction to Film

ENGL 233 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus on texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. At its origins, film displayed boundary-crossing international ambitions, and this course attends to that important fact, but the course's individual variations emphasize one national film tradition (e.g., American, French, Indian, British, Italian, Chinese, etc.) and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history, theory, and basic terminology of film.

Script Analysis for Stage and Screen

FILM 121 - Evans, Shawn Paul

The study of selected plays and screenplays from the standpoint of the theatre and screen artists. Emphasis on thorough examination of the scripts preparatory to production. This course is focused on developing script analysis skills directly applicable to work in production. Students work collaboratively in various creative capacities to transform texts into productions.

Introduction to Film

FILM 233 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus on texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. At its origins, film displayed boundary-crossing international ambitions, and this course attends to that important fact, but the course's individual variations emphasize one national film tradition (e.g., American, French, Indian, British, Italian, Chinese, etc.) and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history, theory, and basic terminology of film.

Script Analysis for Stage and Screen

THTR 121 - Evans, Shawn Paul

The study of selected plays and screenplays from the standpoint of the theatre and screen artists. Emphasis on thorough examination of the scripts preparatory to production. This course is focused on developing script analysis skills directly applicable to work in production. Students work collaboratively in various creative capacities to transform texts into productions.

Stage Acting 1

THTR 141 - Levy, Jemma A.

An introduction to acting for the stage. In this hands-on class, students learn and develop physical and vocal techniques for text-based and improvisational performance, focusing on relationships, objectives, and actions. Work includes in-class scene presentations from modern scripts.

Playwriting

THTR 220 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

An introductory workshop in creative writing for the theater that will focus on traditional forms of scene and script writing. Opportunities for collaborative writing and devised theater may be included. Weekly writing and reading assignments are required. Limited enrollment.

Introduction to Performance Design

THTR 251 - Collins, Owen

An introduction to the history, fundamentals and aesthetics of design for theater and dance with an emphasis on the collaborative nature of the design disciplines. Design projects are required. Lab fee required

Lighting Design

THTR 336 - Evans, Shawn Paul

A study of the practice of stage lighting, focusing on styles of production, historical methods and artistic theory. Culminates in a light design for a public theatrical production. Lab fee required.

Spring 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Antique Photographic Processes

ARTS 221 - Bowden, Christa K.

An exploration of 19th-century photographic processes within the context of the history of photography. Individual processes are learned through studio demonstration and intensive hands-on lab sessions. Processes covered in this course include salt printing, cyanotype, Van Dyke, kallitype, and platinum and palladium printing and toning, as well as wet plate collodion processes such as tintypes and ambrotypes. Students learn how to make enlarged digital negatives for contact printing from photographs that originate in either film or digital formats. In addition to technique, students learn the historical background of each process, as well as contemporary trends and artists working with these methods.

Seven-Minute Shakespeare

FILM 255 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

After intensive collective reading and discussion of four Shakespeare plays in the first week, students organize into four-person groups with the goal of producing a seven-minute video version of one of the plays by the end of the term, using only the actual text of the play. The project requires full engagement and commitment, and includes tasks such as editing and selecting from the text to produce the film script, creating storyboards, casting and recruiting actors, rehearsing, filming, editing, adding sound tracks and effects. We critique and learn from each other's efforts.

Scenes from Chinese History

HIST 105 - Bello, David A.

Film is one of the 20th century's most influential forms of mass communication and, consequently, has been one medium for the creation and maintenance of nation-states. In this sense, no film can be considered as mere entertainment entirely divorced from the social, political, economic and, ultimately, historical context in which it was produced. This is particularly true of modern nation-states "invented" during the 20th century like the People's Republic of China (PRC). This course is intended to explore how contemporary PRC cinema has interpreted Chinese history, as represented by some of that history's pre-PRC milestones of conflict in the Qin and Qing dynasties as well as the Republican period. Students evaluate the films critically as historical products of their own times as well as current historical narratives of the past by examining each event through a pair of films produced at different times in PRC history. Students also examine post-1949 changes in China and its interpretation of its pre-1949 history, and so, by seeing how a country interprets its history at a given time.

Seminar in Politics, Literature and the Arts

POL 290 - Connelly, William F., Jr. (Bill)

In this course, we study how literature, film, and other media are used to examine political themes and how they are used to achieve political ends. We address how politics shapes the arts and how the arts shape politics. The topic is announced at registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Only one such seminar may be counted towards the politics major.

Spring 2019, POL 290-01: Politics and Culture: Seminar in Politics, Literature, and the Arts (3). Prerequisite: POL 100. In this American politics course, we study how literature, film, and other media are used to examine political themes and how they are used to achieve political ends. We explore the interplay between politics and culture from William Shakespeare's King Lear to Mark Twain's Tom Sawyer to Lin Manuel Miranda's Hamilton, with a particular focus on the role of political humor in reflecting and molding political mores and opinions. Movies include Casablanca and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. We address how politics shapes the arts and how the arts shape politics. Political science texts supplement the artistic sources assigned. (SS2) Connelly.

Topics in Politics and Film

POL 292 - LeBlanc, Robin M.

This course examines how film and television present political issues and themes. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, POL 292-02: Politics and Film: The Politics of Race and Gender in Mad Men (4). Prerequisite: Instructor consent . This class uses episodes of the Emmy Award-winning television series Mad Men -- famous for its depiction of shifting understandings of gender and race relations in the United States in the 1960s -- as a basis for exploring the culture of race and gender shared/challenged by the show's 21st century audience. Supplementary reading and films will offer a framework for critique. Students create their own short screenplays to further explore how entertainment can work as social criticism. (SS2) LeBlanc.

Peoples of Central Europe Through Literature and Film

SOAN 225 - Jasiewicz, Krzysztof

This course provides basic information about the citizens of Central European nations of Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary. Beliefs, attitudes, and value systems of the people of Central Europe are examined against the backdrop of major historical events of the 20th century.  Core textbook readings are supplemented by feature films, video materials, novels, short stories, plays, and poetry.  Class discussions focus on interpreting these works of art in the context of comparative historical-sociological analysis of the Polish, Czech, and Hungarian cultures and societies.