Major Requirements

2019 - 2020 Catalog

Economics major leading to BA degree

A major in economics leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 42 credits as follows:

  1. ECON 100, 202, 203, 210, 211
  2. One economics course numbered from 330 to 399
  3. One additional economics course numbered from 300 to 399, or 493
  4. Four additional courses in economics numbered above 211
  5. Achievement in calculus at a level equivalent to MATH 101
  6. Two additional courses in politics or computer science, or in mathematics for which MATH 101 is a prerequisite
  7. Grade-point average: at least 2.000 in the economics credits offered for the major, and at least 2.000 in the total of all credits, from whatever department, offered for the major.

Students pursuing Honors in Economics should speak with the department head about the required coursework.

Due to content overlap, students may take only one of the following courses for degree credit: DCI 202, ECON 202, INTR 202.
• Students considering the Business Administration major are encouraged to enroll in INTR 202.
• Students considering the Economics major are encouraged to enroll in ECON 202.

  1. Required courses:
    • ECON 100 - Introduction to Economics
      FDRSS1
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. No retakes allowed. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic questions of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy, and macroeconomic questions of performance of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.


    • ECON 202 - Statistics for Economics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100 and MATH 101
      FacultyStaff

      Not open to students with credit for DCI 202 or INTR 202. Fundamentals of probability, statistics, estimation, and hypothesis testing and ending with an introduction to regression analysis. The topics are critical for success in upper-level economics electives and are important for careers that rely on empirical research in the social sciences. Students engage in a dialogue between theory and application and learn to think formally about data, uncertainty, and random processes, while learning hands-on methods to organize and analyze real data using modern statistical software.


    • ECON 203 - Econometrics
      Credits3
      Prerequisite

      Prerequisite: ECON 202 or INTR 202 or consent of instructor or department head.

      FacultyAnderson, Blunch

      Explorations of regression models that relate a response variable to one or more predictor variables. The course begins with a review of the simple bivariate model used in INTR 202, and moves on to multivariate models. Underlying model assumptions and consequences are discussed. Advanced topics include non-linear regression and forecasting. Examples in each class are drawn from a number of disciplines. The course emphasizes the use of data and student-directed research.


    • ECON 210 - Microeconomic Theory
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or 101, and MATH 101
      FacultyGrajzl, Guse

      Contemporary theory relating to consumer behavior, the firm's optimizing behavior, the nature of competition in various types of markets and market equilibrium over time. Recommended for economics majors not later than their junior year.


    • ECON 211 - Macroeconomic Theory
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102, or instructor consent
      FacultyDavies, Goldsmith

      This course develops the classical macroeconomic framework and uses this to explore the causes and consequences of economic growth, inflation, output, and employment. This same exercise is conducted using alternative theoretical frameworks, including those associated with Keynes, Monetarists, and New Classical thinkers. Emphasis is placed on investigating the impact and effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy under each of the theoretical paradigms or schools of thought developed.


  2. One economics course numbered from 330 to 399
  3. One additional economics course numbered from 300 to 399, or 493
  4. Four additional courses in economics numbered above 211.
  5. (Note: A maximum of nine credits from supervised study abroad and/or special topics courses may apply toward major requirements.)

  6. Achievement in calculus at a level equivalent to MATH 101
  7. Two additional courses in politics or computer science, or in mathematics for which MATH 101 is a prerequisite
  8. Grade-point average:
  9. at least 2.000 in the economics credits offered for the major, and at least 2.000 in the total of all credits, from whatever department, offered for the major.