Course Offerings

Fall 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Selected Topics in Business Administration

BUS 195A - Junkunc, Marc T.

Topical coverage of areas in management, based on the interests of the instructor and students. Topics vary from year to year and are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2018, BUS-195A-01: Foundations of Management and Entrepreneurship (3). Open only to students who have not taken a 200-level business administration course and who are not BSADM, ACCB, or PACC majors. An introduction to the business world, intended to give non-business majors a sense of how a business operates by providing an overview of entrepreneurship, marketing, accounting, leadership, information systems, and finance, while emphasizing the integrated role these functions have in a business. Junkunc.

Fall 2018, BUS-195A-02: Foundations of Management and Entrepreneurship (3). Open only to students who have not taken a 200-level business administration course and who are not BSADM, ACCB, or PACC majors. An introduction to the business world, intended to give non-business majors a sense of how a business operates by providing an overview of entrepreneurship, marketing, accounting, leadership, information systems, and finance, while emphasizing the integrated role these functions have in a business. Junkunc.

Williams Investment Society

BUS 196 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob)

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. This cocurricular educational student organization manages a portion of Washington and Lee's endowment. Students meet in formal and informal sessions conducted by faculty advisers and attend presentations made by outside speakers hosted by the Williams School. The experiential learning that occurs in this setting is grounded in fields such as accounting, economics, and finance, as well as the practice of investments and banking.

Washington and Lee Student Consulting

BUS 197 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. This cocurricular student organization provides pro bono consulting services to businesses and not-for-profits. Experiential learning draws from business fields, such as marketing, finance, accounting, e-commerce, database management, business strategy, and human resources. In addition to working on various projects, students gain experience managing the organization.

Entrepreneurship Field Consulting Experience

BUS 198 - Shay, Jeffrey P. (Jeff) / Junkunc, Marc T.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. This co-curricular student organization provides pro bono consulting services to entrepreneurial businesses and entrepreneurial not-for-profits. Experiential learning draws from business fields, such as marketing, finance, accounting, e-commerce, database management, business strategy and human resources. Students gain real world experience through writing business plans, marketing plans, and strategic plans for real-world ventures.

Real Estate Society

BUS 199 - Hoover, Scott A.

This co-curricular student organization seeks to develop an enhanced understanding of real estate development and investment. The group hosts guest speakers, conducts and publishes market research, and acts as pro bono consultants to external constituents.

Marketing Management

BUS 211 - Bower, Amanda

An exploration of strategic marketing. The focus of the course is on the analysis of a firm's current marketing strengths and weaknesses and the development of a strategic plan to capitalize on key opportunities. Topics include environmental analysis, market segmentation, targeting and positioning, and management of the marketing mix. Throughout the course, significant attention is devoted to international issues, the interrelationships between marketing and other disciplines, and the role of ethically and socially responsible marketing.

Marketing Management

BUS 211 - Fox, Gavin L.

An exploration of strategic marketing. The focus of the course is on the analysis of a firm's current marketing strengths and weaknesses and the development of a strategic plan to capitalize on key opportunities. Topics include environmental analysis, market segmentation, targeting and positioning, and management of the marketing mix. Throughout the course, significant attention is devoted to international issues, the interrelationships between marketing and other disciplines, and the role of ethically and socially responsible marketing.

Management and Organizational Behavior

BUS 217 - Dean, Roger A.

A study of management in modern organizations. This course examines the factors which influence individual, group, and firm behavior in the context of the workplace. Topics covered include individual differences, motivation, leadership, business ethics, group behavior, decision making, and organizational design and change.

Management and Organizational Behavior

BUS 217 - Schatten, Jeffrey M.

A study of management in modern organizations. This course examines the factors which influence individual, group, and firm behavior in the context of the workplace. Topics covered include individual differences, motivation, leadership, business ethics, group behavior, decision making, and organizational design and change.

Managerial Finance

BUS 221 - Kester, George W.

A study of finance from a managerial perspective emphasizing the primary goal of the firm as stockholder wealth maximization. Emphasis is on decisions relating to the acquisition of assets and funds and internal management-financial analysis, planning and control, working capital management, capital budgeting, sources and forms of long-term financing, financial structure and the cost of capital, and valuation.

Seminar in Organizational Behavior

BUS 301A - Schatten, Jeffrey M.

Offered from time to time when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2018, BUS 301A-01: Cross-Cultural Leadership (3) . Prerequisite: At least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during the first round of registration. Satisfies the international requirement for the business administration major. An exploration of the way in which leaders navigate cross-cultural challenges in an interdependent global market. Topics include: comparing cultures, leading across cultures, communication and negotiation, decision making, enacting change in multi-cultural teams, and leadership development. The seminar draws heavily on cases, memoirs, and hands on activities, so that in addition to leaving the class with a theoretical understanding of cross-cultural leadership, students also develop a set of specific narratives that can easily come to mind as you embark on your own international journeys and as you engage with the "melting pot" back home. Schatten.

Seminar in Management Information Systems

BUS 306A - Ballenger, Robert M. (Bob)

Topics vary by term and instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2018, BUS 306A-01: MIS Seminar: Data Management and Analytics for Business (3). Prerequisite: INTR 202 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during the first round of registration. No previous programming experience is required. Analysis of data is becoming a vital component of business decision-making. In this seminar, students examine the data challenges that businesses confront. How data management and analytics are used to help make sound management decisions. In the first module, students learn how to communicate and present data in business reports and presentations. The second module covers querying and extracting data from relational databases and preparing it for analysis using MySQL and Structured Query Language (SQL). The third module is data analytics, the process of discovery, interpretation, and communication of meaningful insights and patterns in data, using robust data-analysis software. We use R, the software language and environment for statistical computing and graphics, to conduct our data analysis, along with several of its introductory data analysis packages. Ballenger.

Seminar in Management Information Systems

BUS 306A - Ballenger, Robert M. (Bob)

Topics vary by term and instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2018, BUS 306A-02: MIS Seminar: Data Management and Analytics for Business (3). Prerequisite: INTR 202 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during the first round of registration. No previous programming experience is required. Analysis of data is becoming a vital component of business decision-making. In this seminar, students examine the data challenges that businesses confront. How data management and analytics are used to help make sound management decisions. In the first module, students learn how to communicate and present data in business reports and presentations. The second module covers querying and extracting data from relational databases and preparing it for analysis using MySQL and Structured Query Language (SQL). The third module is data analytics, the process of discovery, interpretation, and communication of meaningful insights and patterns in data, using robust data-analysis software. We use R, the software language and environment for statistical computing and graphics, to conduct our data analysis, along with several of its introductory data analysis packages. Ballenger.

Management Information Systems

BUS 310 - Larson, Keri M.

The objective is to build an understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operations, management decision making, and strategic advantage. Topics include basic systems concepts and major roles of information systems; computer, telecommunications, and database management concepts; and management issues in the implementation of information systems, including international, security, and ethical considerations.

Global Human-Resource Management

BUS 330 - Dean, Roger A.

Human-resource management (HRM) is concerned with how to best attract, select, develop, and retain employees in organizations. This course examines HRM in the global context. Topics include employee selection, training, performance management, compensation, health, safety, and security, and termination. We focus on designing HRM practices in the context of the global social, legal, and technological environments.

Foundations of Business Law

BUS 346 - Youngman, Julia F. (Julie)

An introduction to the law governing the relations between individuals and businesses in commerce, viewed through both an ethical and a legal lens. Students explore the issues that face both established businesses and innovation-driven startups exploring new markets, including the law governing intellectual property, products liability, contracts, business torts, sales of goods under the Uniform Commercial Code, employment and agency law, environmental law, and the formation and operation of partnerships and corporations.  Additional selected topics may be chosen in accordance with the interest of course participants.  Assignments apply legal theories to actual business disputes, court cases, and hypothetical situations.

Real Estate Development

BUS 353 - Hoover, Scott A.

Studying the development of commercial real estate, the course covers a range of topics from the idea stage until the property is eventually sold after completion. Although much of the course is qualitative in nature, students also learn how to create simple financial models to analyze properties. In addition, students study in some depth the real estate crisis that began in late 2007. Through exploration of case studies and interaction with practitioners (guest speakers), emphasis is placed on application rather than theory. Assignments include readings, case studies, and one examination. Guest speakers will typically speak in the evening and except in rare circumstances students will be required to attend those sessions.

Modern Professional Presentations: Design and Delivery

BUS 365 - Lind, Stephen J.

This course offers students the theories, skills, strategies, and tactics to become an effective oral communicator in a modern professional setting. The course focuses on the critical development and engaged delivery of information and ideas in various professional communication situations including live presentations and interviews. Proper design and deployment of slide-deck presentations and print materials is a vital part of developing competencies in these oral-communication situations. The course also emphasizes the importance of competencies in digital oratory through development and delivery of effective video communication. A hallmark of this course is significant individualized feedback from the professor and classroom peers.

Strategic Management

BUS 398 - Shay, Jeffrey P. (Jeff)

A capstone course designed to expose students to a strategic perspective on global issues that impact the firm. Integrative in that it draws on concepts from functional disciplines (e.g., finance, marketing, accounting) in the diagnosis, analysis, and resolution of complex business situations. Practical problem-solving skills are emphasized. Case analysis and/or computer simulation are used extensively in oral presentations and written cases.

Entrepreneurship

BUS 399 - Junkunc, Marc T.

A capstone course designed to expose students to a strategic perspective on business challenges in the context of entrepreneurial firms. Integrating concepts and analytical tools from functional disciplines (e.g., finance, marketing, accounting) in the diagnosis, analysis, and resolution of complex business situations, this seminar helps students develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to excel in either new ventures or in today's increasingly entrepreneurial corporate environments. Among other activities, students learn from case studies, class discussions, and working together to develop and present a business plan.

Directed Individual Study

BUS 401 - Ballenger, Robert M. (Bob)

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest. Credits may not be used toward the major requirements in business administration.

Spring 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

The Business of Contemporary Art

BUS 125 - King, Elliott H. / Schwartz, Adam L.

This course combines finance, tax policy, marketing, economics, and art history to provide a 'nuts-and-bolts' view of how the contemporary art world operates. Appropriate for business students with an interest in contemporary art as well as museum studies and art history majors who wish to gain an understanding of business concepts in the art world, the course serves as preparation for students who may anticipate acquiring art for personal or business investment/use, serving on a museum board, pursuing employment in the art world, or advising high wealth clients on business matters related to art. Each topic begins with an overview of general principles before reviewing applications to the art world. For example, discussion of charitable giving covers the general tax rules of charitable deductions before discussing the specific rules related to art and museums. Additional course fee; see details link at http://go.wlu.edu/CourseOfferings .

FS: First-Year Seminar

BUS 180 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

Topics vary by subject and term.

Spring 2018, BUS 180: First-Year Seminar: International Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability (4). Prerequisite: FY standing and instructor consent. ACCT 201 recommended. Do corporations have an obligation to manage their social impact in addition to maximizing sales, profits and stock price? What happens when these objectives are in conflict with each other? This course seeks to explore the relative roles of businesses, not-for-profits, government and individual citizens in managing social and environmental impact. Significant time is spent exploring case studies and interacting with senior management of various companies. Recent examples include Carlsberg, Dr. Pepper-Snapple Group, Dunkin' Brands, Norden, Novo Nordisk, Pandora, Proctor & Gamble, Starbucks, and Unilever. The class culminates with two weeks in Copenhagen visiting numerous Danish companies and developing a group research project on a topic chosen by the students. The time abroad also includes cultural excursions to places such as Frederiksborg Castle and Tivoli, dinners with Danish families, a harbor/canal tour, and a closing dinner featuring New Nordic cuisine. Oliver and Straughan.

Seminar in Organizational Behavior

BUS 301 - Schatten, Jeffrey M.

Offered from time to time when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, BUS 301-01: Leading Teams (4). Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. This course is taught at the Middle River Regional Jail in Staunton, VA. Eight W&L students and eight soon-to-be-released inmates take the course together. Students learn from the professor and from one another as they explore the interpersonal processes and psychological factors that affect the way in which individuals interact and engage with one another. Students learn to understand conflict and how to effectively manage conflict in group settings. This course is mostly comprised of team activities and cases, which is intended to give students the tools, insight, and experience to better understand and manage teams. Schatten.

Seminar in Management

BUS 304 - Herbert, Richard H. (Rick)

Topics vary by term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, BUS 304-01: Money, Power, and Lies (3). Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. Preference to BSADM or JOURF(JMCB) majors during the first round of registration. How do we design and lead organizations that foster ethical behavior? This course integrates the disciplines of business ethics and organizational behavior to address this question. Students examine the impact of organizational forces on the ability of individuals to act ethically in large, complex organizations, with special emphasis on the financial industry. Beginning with the era of the ENRON and Arthur Anderson scandals and continuing through the 2008 financial crisis, the issue of unethical behavior in large organizations has grown more disturbing. The major case study we address is the 2008 financial meltdown and its aftermath. Outside speakers interact with the class and add perspective. Past speakers have included financial executives and business journalists from Lehman Brothers, Goldman Sachs, and The Washington Post. Herbert.

Seminar in Management

BUS 304 - Christiansen, Anne M.

Topics vary by term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, BUS 304-02: Human Rights and Business: Changing Expectations in the Age of Transparency (4). Additional fee. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. Preference to BSADM majors or POV minors during the first round of registration. This course explores how business can work with human rights in a corporate context to manage stakeholder demands and expectations as well as to explore new opportunities. We investigate a number of different perspectives on business and human rights and engage in discussions of how businesses can manage human rights, which is by no means a simple task. The course includes a study tour to meet with relevant stakeholders in the field in Washington, D.C. Christiansen.

Special Topics in Real Estate Development

BUS 307 - Hoover, Scott A.

This course exposes students to issues related to commercial real estate development. Class lectures/discussions are supplemented with real-world case studies and site visits in an effort to provide students with practical knowledge in addition to theory and evidence. The focus of the course may change from term to term, so students should examine the syllabus for a given term carefully to better understand the course material. Potential topics include sustainability, international development, rebuilding cities through rehabilitation, or others.

Spring 2018, BUS 307-01: Sustainability in Real Estate Development (4). Prerequisites ACCT 201 and BUS 221. In this seminar, students are introduced to issues related to economic, environmental, and social sustainability in the context of commercial real estate development. Other course topics include cost-benefit relationships, identifying and managing key development risks, and effective communication of analyses. Students learn about the implementation of sustainable practices through case studies. The seminar includes travel to Washington, D.C., to tour properties and learn from key alumni in the field. Hoover.

Negotiation and Dispute Resolution in a Business Environment

BUS 349 - Youngman, Julia F. (Julie)

This course is designed to give students the abilities to negotiate successfully in a commercial environment and to create business solutions when a problem or dispute arises. Lectures, written materials, group projects, video, and role-play are utilized to explore the various theories of negotiation and types of dispute resolution, and to equip students with practical skills for forming and preserving business relationships and resolving business disputes as they occur.

Corporate Mergers, Leveraged Buyouts, and Divestitures

BUS 358 - Kester, George W.

This course focuses upon company valuation, mergers, leveraged buyouts, and divestitures. The interactive course makes extensive use of the case method in developing an understanding of business valuation methodologies and corporate financing decisions. Advanced-level finance concepts, models, and techniques are applied by students in the development of situational problem formulation, analysis, evaluation, and decision-making skills necessary to solve the unstructured problems faced in the practice of financial and business management. Classroom participation and group presentations are emphasized.

Creative Strategic Planning

BUS 371 - Bower, Amanda

Strategic planning (also called account or brand planning) is a philosophy of consumer research that fully incorporates the consumer in strategic developments. The course includes the types of qualitative techniques traditionally associated with social sciences (e.g., anthropology, sociology and psychology) in order to arrive at a brand (or other) strategy. The students must think creatively, independently, and interdependently as they apply the variety of research techniques, develop the strategic recommendations and present and defend both the research and recommendations. In addition to research techniques, students receive an orientation in relevant software (video editing, photo manipulation) and learn effective and persuasive presentation skills. The course is project-based, and the course culminates in the opportunity to present their work to the client (usually an advertising/marketing professional) for whom they've been working the course of the term.

Adventures in Advertainment

BUS 376 - Fox, Gavin L.

Open to both majors and non-majors. This course focuses on how to create strong marketing narratives and execute them through film-production techniques. The content draws heavily from creative writing, studio art, psychology, and branding to help students understand underlying themes of strong narrative development. In addition, much of the course is dedicated to learning how to use open-source film production software in order to bring these narratives to life in a team-based project.

Technology and Entrepreneurship

BUS 383 - Hess, Andrew M. (Drew)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of process through which technological inventions are transformed into innovations.  Key works from scholars in the field will guide class discussions on understanding why managing innovation is complex, cross-functional, and a historically-dependent endeavor.  By the end of the class, students will have an appreciation for the entrepreneurial mindset, key actors in the start-up process, and the means through which technology is commercialized.  In addition to these discussions, students will travel to Silicon Valley to not only meet individuals who are a part of the recent start-up/technology scene, but also visit key locations that capture the history and context of innovation in the San Francisco/Bay Area.

Corporate Social Responsibility Practicum

BUS 391 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

The course provides students an opportunity to explore corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability challenges from within an organization. The course is taught in Denmark, regarded as one of the most progressive economies in terms of CSR implementation. Initial reading, discussion, and research in the winter term prepare students to be matched with a Danish organization grappling with a CSR issue. Students work in small groups (four students) in a consultative capacity with a sponsoring Danish organization's decision makers. Students also participate in larger group discussions of issues confronted during the practicum and reflect on their experiences in both a personal journal and group blog. Sponsoring organizations include both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations, and the nature of the issues varies from sponsor to sponsor. May be taken twice for degree credit if the topics are significantly different.

Directed Individual Study

BUS 401 - Youngman, Julia F. (Julie)

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest. Credits may not be used toward the major requirements in business administration.

Spring 2018, BUS 401-01: Directed Individual Study: Environmental Impacts (1). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Research on legal issues and business considerations related to state law requirements to create, enhance, and preserve wetlands as mitigation for the environmental impacts of the development of privately owned property. Youngman .

Winter 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Selected Topics in Business Administration

BUS 195A - Junkunc, Marc T.

Topical coverage of areas in management, based on the interests of the instructor and students. Topics vary from year to year and are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, BUS-195A-01: Foundations of Management and Entrepreneurship (3) . Open only to students who have not taken a 200-level business administration course and who are not majors in business administration, accounting and business administration, or public accounting. This course is an introduction to the business world, intended to give non-business majors a sense of how a business operates by providing an overview of entrepreneurship, marketing, accounting, leadership, information systems, and finance, while emphasizing the integrated role these functions have in a business. Junkunc.

Winter 2018, BUS-195A-02: Foundations of Management and Entrepreneurship (3). Open only to students who have not taken a 200-level business administration course and who are not majors in business administration, accounting and business administration, or public accounting. This course is an introduction to the business world and intended to give non-business majors a sense of how a business operates by providing an overview of entrepreneurship, marketing, accounting, leadership, information systems, and finance, while emphasizing the integrated role these functions have in a business. Junkunc.

Williams Investment Society

BUS 196 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob)

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. This cocurricular educational student organization manages a portion of Washington and Lee's endowment. Students meet in formal and informal sessions conducted by faculty advisers and attend presentations made by outside speakers hosted by the Williams School. The experiential learning that occurs in this setting is grounded in fields such as accounting, economics, and finance, as well as the practice of investments and banking.

Washington and Lee Student Consulting

BUS 197 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. This cocurricular student organization provides pro bono consulting services to businesses and not-for-profits. Experiential learning draws from business fields, such as marketing, finance, accounting, e-commerce, database management, business strategy, and human resources. In addition to working on various projects, students gain experience managing the organization.

Entrepreneurship Field Consulting Experience

BUS 198 - Shay, Jeffrey P. (Jeff)

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. This co-curricular student organization provides pro bono consulting services to entrepreneurial businesses and entrepreneurial not-for-profits. Experiential learning draws from business fields, such as marketing, finance, accounting, e-commerce, database management, business strategy and human resources. Students gain real world experience through writing business plans, marketing plans, and strategic plans for real-world ventures.

Real Estate Society

BUS 199 - Hoover, Scott A.

This co-curricular student organization seeks to develop an enhanced understanding of real estate development and investment. The group hosts guest speakers, conducts and publishes market research, and acts as pro bono consultants to external constituents.

Marketing Management

BUS 211 - Bower, Amanda

An exploration of strategic marketing. The focus of the course is on the analysis of a firm's current marketing strengths and weaknesses and the development of a strategic plan to capitalize on key opportunities. Topics include environmental analysis, market segmentation, targeting and positioning, and management of the marketing mix. Throughout the course, significant attention is devoted to international issues, the interrelationships between marketing and other disciplines, and the role of ethically and socially responsible marketing.

Management and Organizational Behavior

BUS 217 - Dean, Roger A.

A study of management in modern organizations. This course examines the factors which influence individual, group, and firm behavior in the context of the workplace. Topics covered include individual differences, motivation, leadership, business ethics, group behavior, decision making, and organizational design and change.

Management and Organizational Behavior

BUS 217 - Schatten, Jeffrey M.

A study of management in modern organizations. This course examines the factors which influence individual, group, and firm behavior in the context of the workplace. Topics covered include individual differences, motivation, leadership, business ethics, group behavior, decision making, and organizational design and change.

Managerial Finance

BUS 221 - Hoover, Scott A.

A study of finance from a managerial perspective emphasizing the primary goal of the firm as stockholder wealth maximization. Emphasis is on decisions relating to the acquisition of assets and funds and internal management-financial analysis, planning and control, working capital management, capital budgeting, sources and forms of long-term financing, financial structure and the cost of capital, and valuation.

Managerial Finance

BUS 221 - Kester, George W.

A study of finance from a managerial perspective emphasizing the primary goal of the firm as stockholder wealth maximization. Emphasis is on decisions relating to the acquisition of assets and funds and internal management-financial analysis, planning and control, working capital management, capital budgeting, sources and forms of long-term financing, financial structure and the cost of capital, and valuation.

Seminar in Organizational Behavior

BUS 301A - Schatten, Jeffrey M.

Offered from time to time when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Database Management for Business

BUS 315 - Larson, Keri M.

An introduction to the theories, concepts, features, and capabilities of database management systems in a business environment. This course provides a greater understanding of how to design, develop and access database-driven business applications and emphasizes the use of database-management systems in real-world business settings and how this technology can be applied effectively to solve business problems. In this project-oriented course, students acquire the skills to document, design, create, test, and access a fully functional Oracle business database application. No prior programming or application development experience is assumed.

Economic Globalization and Multinational Corporations

BUS 337 - Reiter, Sandra L. (Sandy)

This course focuses on the historical and present effects and issues of economic globalization, and the role of multinational corporations in a global economy. Topics covered may include: production, supply chain, technology, trade, finance, natural environment, labor, development, poverty and inequality, privatization of utilities, immigration, and state sovereignty. Emphasis is on understanding the costs and benefits of economic globalization and the role business plays in contributing to these outcomes.

Foundations of Business Law

BUS 346 - Youngman, Julia F. (Julie)

An introduction to the law governing the relations between individuals and businesses in commerce, viewed through both an ethical and a legal lens. Students explore the issues that face both established businesses and innovation-driven startups exploring new markets, including the law governing intellectual property, products liability, contracts, business torts, sales of goods under the Uniform Commercial Code, employment and agency law, environmental law, and the formation and operation of partnerships and corporations.  Additional selected topics may be chosen in accordance with the interest of course participants.  Assignments apply legal theories to actual business disputes, court cases, and hypothetical situations.

Real Estate Development

BUS 353 - Hoover, Scott A.

Studying the development of commercial real estate, the course covers a range of topics from the idea stage until the property is eventually sold after completion. Although much of the course is qualitative in nature, students also learn how to create simple financial models to analyze properties. In addition, students study in some depth the real estate crisis that began in late 2007. Through exploration of case studies and interaction with practitioners (guest speakers), emphasis is placed on application rather than theory. Assignments include readings, case studies, and one examination. Guest speakers will typically speak in the evening and except in rare circumstances students will be required to attend those sessions.

Cases in Corporate Finance

BUS 355 - Kester, George W.

Through use of the case method of learning, this course focuses on applied corporate finance strategy, including financial forecasting, financing sales growth, short-term versus long-term financing, commercial bank borrowing, leasing, and capital structure policy. Classroom participation is emphasized.

Investments

BUS 359 - Schwartz, Adam L.

A study of investments and investment management from a practical and theoretical point of view, including the institutional and economic environment relevant to common stocks, preferred stocks, bonds, puts, calls, and commodity future contracts. These assets are studied in terms of the markets in which they are traded, governing regulations, taxes, valuation, risk, characteristic line, and construction of a portfolio. Capital market theory and the Markowitz portfolio model are explored. Text, readings, and projects.

Integrated Marketing Communications

BUS 370 - Bower, Amanda

Nature and contributions of the elements of marketing communications (e.g., advertising, sales promotions, the Web) in creating brand equity and stimulating demand. A project-oriented course with an emphasis on the strategic application of concepts resulting in an integrated communication plan for products and/or services. Course has a complementary lab component to teach technical skills and reinforce concepts via practicum.

Strategic Management

BUS 398 - Hess, Andrew M. (Drew)

A capstone course designed to expose students to a strategic perspective on global issues that impact the firm. Integrative in that it draws on concepts from functional disciplines (e.g., finance, marketing, accounting) in the diagnosis, analysis, and resolution of complex business situations. Practical problem-solving skills are emphasized. Case analysis and/or computer simulation are used extensively in oral presentations and written cases.

Entrepreneurship

BUS 399 - Shay, Jeffrey P. (Jeff)

A capstone course designed to expose students to a strategic perspective on business challenges in the context of entrepreneurial firms. Integrating concepts and analytical tools from functional disciplines (e.g., finance, marketing, accounting) in the diagnosis, analysis, and resolution of complex business situations, this seminar helps students develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to excel in either new ventures or in today's increasingly entrepreneurial corporate environments. Among other activities, students learn from case studies, class discussions, and working together to develop and present a business plan.

Directed Individual Study

BUS 401 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest. Credits may not be used toward the major requirements in business administration.

Winter 2018, BUS 401-01: CSR Field Research (1). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Graded Pass/Fail only. Preparatory course for the spring term abroad offering of BUS 391: Corporate Social Responsibility Practicum in Copenhagen. Oliver, E, Straughan .

Directed Individual Study

BUS 401 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest. Credits may not be used toward the major requirements in business administration.

Winter 2018, BUS 401-02: Case Studies in CSR (1). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Graded Pass/Fail only. Preparatory course for the spring term abroad offering of BUS 180: Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability in Copenhagen. Oliver, E, Straughan.

Directed Individual Study

BUS 401 - Youngman, Julia F. (Julie)

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest. Credits may not be used toward the major requirements in business administration.

Winter 2018, BUS 401-03: Directed Individual Study: Environmental Law and Business Practices (1). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Research on legal issues and recent court decisions affecting the environment and sustainable business practices. Youngman .

Directed Individual Study

BUS 401 - Garvis, Dennis M. (Denny)

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest. Credits may not be used toward the major requirements in business administration.

Winter 2018, BUS 401-04: Directed Study: Introduction to Cape Town Internship Program (1). Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. Graded Pass/Fail only. Students selected for the summer Cape Town Internship Program discuss preliminary readings and research on South African history and Culture. Garvis.

Directed Individual Study

BUS 403 - Bower, Amanda

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest.

Winter 2019, BUS 403-01: Directed Individual Study: Ad Class Advisers (3). Bower.

Directed Individual Study

BUS 403 - Hoover, Scott A.

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest.

Winter 2019, BUS 403-02: Directed Individual Study (3). Hoover.

Directed Individual Study

BUS 403 - Ballenger, Robert M. (Bob)

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest.

Winter 2019, BUS 403-03: Directed Individual Study (3). Ballenger.

Directed Individual Study

BUS 403 - Shay, Jeffrey P. (Jeff)

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest.

Winter 2019, BUS 403-04: Directed Individual Study (3). Shay.

Directed Individual Study

BUS 403 - Garvis, Dennis M. (Denny)

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest.

Winter 2019, BUS 403-05: Directed Individual Study: Non-profit Organizations and Social Enterprises; Governance and Taxation (3). This course uses the Institutional-Based View of organizations as a lens to view the governance activities and practices of social enterprise start-ups. In this context, governance in these entities are compared and contrasted to the governance of profit-driven organizations. Based on corporate governance research, seminar type instruction is provided to introduce students to key governance topics. Using various readings and resources, focus is on required and recommended practices for non-profit board governance in order to identify, discuss, and prioritize governance issues for two specific social enterprise start-ups. Garvis.