Archaeology Minor Requirements

2017 - 2018 Catalog

Archaeology minor

A minor in archaeology requires completion of six courses as follows. In meeting the requirements of this interdisciplinary minor, a student must complete at least nine credits not also used to meet the requirements of any other major or minor.

1. History/Theory: Either SOAN 206 or ARTH/CLAS 200

2. Methods: One course chosen from SOAN 210, 211, or, when appropriate and approved in advance, CLAS 295 or a field methods course

3. Distribution: Three courses selected from at least two of the following three areas. Additional courses may be used when the topic is relevant and approved in advance.

a. Natural and Physical Sciences: BIOL 101, 105, 140, 160, 185; CHEM 100, 156, 160; ENGN 178, 260; ENV 250; GEOL 100, 101, 105, 205, 247, 260, 275, 330; PHYS 260

b. Social Sciences: ECON 186, 255; HIST 230, 238; JOUR 266, 338; SOAN 186, 206, 207, 210, 211, 230, 238, 240, 266, 286

c. Humanities: ARTH 170, 200, 245, 246, 288, 343, 347; CLAS 200, 223, 287, 288, 326, 338; HIST 130, 131, 244, 245, 262; REL 223, 286, or when appropriate, CLAS 295

4. A capstone project that culminates in a major research project on a topic proposed by the student that focuses on archaeology. It will take the form of an independent study (3 credits) with a person in the core faculty or approved by the SOAN department chair or archaeology curriculum coordinator. It could also be a senior thesis or honors thesis with similar approval.

  1. History/Theory: Take either
    • SOAN 206 - Archaeology
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyGaylord

      An examination of anthropologically-oriented archaeology. Specific subjects to be considered will include the history of the subdiscipline, theoretical developments, field techniques, substantive contributions for the prehistoric and historic subareas and recent developments in theory and methodology.


    • ARTH 200 - Greek Art & Archaeology (CLAS 200 )
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyLaughy

      An introduction to ancient Greek art and archaeology. We encounter some of the greatest works of art in human history, as we survey the development of painting, sculpture, architecture, and town planning of the ancient Greeks. We encounter the history of the people behind the objects that they left behind, from the material remains of the Bronze Age palaces and Classical Athenian Acropolis to the world created in the wake of Alexander the Great's conquests. We also consider how we experience the ancient Greek world today through archaeological practice, cultural heritage, and the antiquities trade.


  2. Methods:
  3. One course chosen from SOAN 210 , 211 , or, when appropriate and approved in advance, CLAS 295 or a field methods course

  4. Distribution:
  5. Three courses selected from at least two of the following three areas. Additional courses may be used when the topic is relevant and approved in advance.

    • Natural and Physical Sciences:
      • BIOL 101 - Environmental Biology: Endangered Plants of the Appalachians
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultyWinder

        Using case studies in plant endangerment as a focal point for understanding ecological and evolutionary processes and the impact of human activities on biodiversity, students gain fundamental insight into their relationship with the living world and the importance of preserving biological diversity through a combination of targeted readings, intensive discussions, and basic research in the field, Field activities take place in regional hotspots of plant endemism and give students experience in applied conservation research. Field sites and subject species vary from year to year.


      • BIOL 105 - Introduction to Behavioral Ecology
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent required
        FacultyMarsh

        How do animals experience the world? What are animal social systems like? How do animals choose mates, find places to live, decide when to help others? This course for non-majors focuses on both the mechanisms of animal behavior (genes, hormones, sensory systems) and the adaptive value of behavior for survival and reproduction in nature. The laboratory includes field experiments and lab observations that test hypotheses using animals such as salamanders, cows, birds, and humans. Credit does not apply toward the biology major. Laboratory course.


      • BIOL 140 - Natural History of Rockbridge County
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        Prerequisite Non-biology majors only. Open to biology majors only by instructor consent
        FacultyCabe

        An introduction to the flora and fauna of Rockbridge County, with heavy emphasis on first-hand field experience. Readings include historical and current descriptions of biological communities and species typical of this area of Virginia, The close relationship between natural history and the fields of ecology and evolution is explored. Discussions and field trips emphasize the history of natural communities in the Shenandoah Valley and Southern Appalachians, the changes to these communities caused by human, and conservation strategies. Students should be prepared to be outside in all weather, hike in rough terrain, and enjoy field exploration (including early mornings and night excursions).


      • BIOL 160 - CSI: W&L
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteNo prerequisites. Appropriate for non-science majors. Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term
        FacultyLaRiviere, Watson

        This laboratory course is an introduction to the field of forensic science with a focus on the physical, chemical, and biological basis of crime scene evidence. A particular emphasis is on the analysis of trace physical (e.g., glass, soil, fiber, ballistics) and biological (e.g., hair, blood, DNA) evidence and forensic toxicology (e.g., drugs, alcohol, poisons). The laboratory portion of this course provides "hands-on" opportunities to analyze collected crime scene samples and to utilize some of the commonly used forensic laboratory techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, and spectroscopy. The course also introduces some of the legal aspects associated with collection and analysis of crime-scene evidence. Laboratory course.


      • BIOL 185 - Data Science: Visualizing and Exploring Big Data
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent required
        FacultyWhitworth

        No prior programming experience required. We live in the era of Big Data. Major discoveries in science and medicine are being made by exploring large datasets in novel ways using computational tools. The challenge in the biomedical sciences is the same as in Silicon Valley: knowing what computational tools are right for a project and where to get started when exploring large data sets. In this course, students learn to use R, a popular open-source programming language and data analysis environment, to interactively explore data. Case studies are drawn from across the sciences and medicine. Topics include data visualization, machine learning, image analysis, geospatial analysis, and statistical inference on large data sets. We also emphasize best practices in coding, data handling, and adherence to the principles of reproducible research. Fulfills the computer science requirement for biology and neuroscience majors.


      • CHEM 100 - Modern Descriptive Chemistry
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultyPleva

        An elementary study of the structure and reactions of molecules. Laboratory work illustrates some fundamental procedures in chemistry. Designed for non-science students fulfilling general education requirements or desiring a science elective. Laboratory course with fee.


      • CHEM 156 - Science in Art
        FDRSC
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent
        FacultyUffelman

        This course develops students' fundamental understanding of certain physical, chemical, biological, and geological concepts and utilizes that vocabulary and knowledge to discuss 17th-century Dutch art. The emphasis is on key aspects of optics, light, and chemical bonding needed to understand how a painting "works" and how art conservators analyze paintings in terms of conservation and authenticity, using techniques such as X-ray radiography, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, infrared microscopy, infrared reflectography, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, UV-vis spectroscopy, UV photography, and laser ablation methods. When possible, the course develops modern notions of science with those of the 17th century in order to see how 17th-century science influenced 17th-century art.


      • CHEM 160 - CSI: W&L
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteNo prerequisites. Appropriate for non-science majors. Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term
        FacultyLaRiviere, Watson

        This laboratory course is an introduction to the field of forensic science with a focus on the physical, chemical, and biological basis of crime scene evidence. A particular emphasis is on the analysis of trace physical (e.g., glass, soil, fiber, ballistics) and biological (e.g., hair, blood, DNA) evidence and forensic toxicology (e.g., drugs, alcohol, poisons). The laboratory portion of this course provides "hands-on" opportunities to analyze collected crime scene samples and to utilize some of the commonly used forensic laboratory techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, and spectroscopy. The course also introduces some of the legal aspects associated with collection and analysis of crime-scene evidence. Laboratory course.


      • ENGN 178 - Introduction to Engineering
        FDRSC
        Credits4
        FacultyD'Alessandro, Erickson, Kuehner

        This course introduces students to basic skills useful to engineers, the engineering design process, and the engineering profession. Students learn various topics of engineering, including engineering disciplines, the role of an engineer in the engineering design process, and engineering ethics. Skills learned in this course include programming and the preparation of engineering drawings. Programming skills are developed using flowcharting and MATLAB. Autodesk Inventor is used to create three-dimensional solid models and engineering drawings. The course culminates in a collaborative design project, allowing students to use their new skills


      • ENGN 260 - Materials Science
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in PHYS 111
        FacultyD'Alessandro

        An introduction to solid state materials. A study of the relation between microstructure and the corresponding physical properties for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites.


      • ENV 250 - Ecology of Place
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent
        FacultyCooper, Hurd

        Think globally, study locally. This course explores globally significant environmental issues such as biodiversity conservation, sustainable delivery of ecosystem goods and services, and environmental justice, as they are manifested on a local/regional scale. We examine interactions among ethical, ecological, and economic concerns that shape these issues. Students are fully engaged in the development of policy recommendations that could guide relevant decision makers. The course incorporates readings, field trips, films, and discussions with invited experts.


      • GEOL 100 - General Geology with Field Emphasis
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultyStaff

        Preference given to first-years and sophomores. GEOL 100A: First-Year seminar, open to FY students only. The study of our physical environment and the processes shaping it. The materials and structure of the Earth's crust, the origin of the landforms, the concept of geologic time, and the nature of the Earth's interior are considered, with special emphasis on field study in the region near Lexington. No credit for students who have completed GEOL 101. Laboratory course. Lab fee required.


      • GEOL 101 - General Geology
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultyStaff

        Preference given to first-years and sophomores. The study of our physical environment and the processes shaping it. The materials and structure of the Earth's crust, the origin of the landforms, the concept of geologic time, and the nature of the Earth's interior are considered. No credit for students who have completed GEOL 100. Laboratory course. Lab fee required.


      • GEOL 105 - Earth Lab
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteAdditional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term

        Preference given to first-years and sophomores. The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside field work with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. The primary goal of this course is an in-depth introduction to a particular region or field of geological study for introductory level science students. Information about the course is made available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements. Lab fee required.

        Spring 2018, GEOL 105-01: FS: Earth Lab: Sand (4). First-Year seminar. A Jockey John Robinson Seminar. Prerequisite: First-Year standing. Sand is everywhere. It is between our toes at the beach, sweeping beneath us in rivers, and blown against us in stinging desert storms. And yet, this ubiquitous, ordinary substance tells incredible stories of plate tectonic upheavals, vast seas covering now-dry continents, and journeys through rivers, into inland deserts, and along ocean shores. This field-based seminar explores the origin and nature of sand, its journeys, and how geologists use observations in modern environments along with detailed microscopic and field descriptions of rocks to define the conditions of landscapes long past. Participation requires camping on eastern barrier islands, travel to the Colorado Plateau of Utah, and a healthy imagination. Most expenses are covered by the Jockey John Robinson Fund. (SL) Harbor.

        Spring 2018, GEOL 105-02: Earth Lab: Is the Earth Worth Saving (4). Can we 'save the earth'? What does that really mean? This course explores both the humbling existence of humans in deep time (4.6 billion years), and the potentially profound impacts of humans on the earth environment. Students consider whether it is the earth or only ourselves that we wish to 'save'. We study how rocks reveal a deep and rich history of changing climate and environment with time, and then compare this record with what we know about human-influenced climate and environmental change in the last few hundred years. We reflect on what, if anything, we should do with this information. We evaluate the effectiveness of efforts to 'protect' the environment, specifically with regards to marine-protected areas. Extensive field exploration of the geology of Rockbridge County and a week-long trip to Belize, to visit protected and unprotected coral reefs. (SL) Greer.

         


      • GEOL 205 - History and Evolution of the Earth
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101 or GEOL 105
        FacultyStaff

        An introductory examination of the origin and physical evolution of the Earth as inferred from the rock record. Areas of particular emphasis include: (1) the origin of the solar system and differentiation of the planets; (2) the evolution of the terrestrial atmosphere and hydrosphere; (3) explanations for the development of life; (4) organic evolution and interpretations of "mass extinctions;" (5) the changing configuration of continental blocks and ocean basins by continental drift, seafloor spreading, and plate tectonics; and (6) the growth of continental blocks and their mountain systems.


      • GEOL 247 - Geomorphology
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101 or GEOL 105
        FacultyHarbor

        Investigation of landforms from maps, aerial photographs, digital data, and the analysis of the surficial processes by which they are formed. Laboratory activities include identification and interpretation of topography, field measurements of landscape form and process, and a required weekend field trip. Laboratory course.


      • GEOL 260 - GIS and Remote Sensing
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101 or GEOL 105. For GEOL or ENV majors only, or by instructor consent
        FacultyHarbor

        A laboratory course introducing the use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) and remote sensing in geological/environmental analyses and decision making. Students use state-of-the-art software with a wide variety of spatial geologic, environmental, economic and topographic data derived from satellites; remote databases and published maps to evaluate geologic conditions; local landscape processes; environmental conditions; and hypothetical land-use cases.


      • GEOL 275 - Introductory Geophysics
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, 101 or 105; PHYS 111 or 112
        FacultyConnors

        A review of the geophysical methods used to study the interior of the Earth, the magnetic field, isostasy, and earthquake seismology. Attention is given to the methods used in geophysics to collect and analyze data. A gravimeter, a magnetometer, seismic refraction and electrical resistivity equipment are used to collect field data. The data, corrections, and interpretations are incorporated into a technical report for each of the four surveys. Laboratory course.


      • GEOL 330 - Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101 or GEOL 105
        FacultyGreer

        Properties, origins, and dynamics of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Correlation, organization, and historical interpretation of the sedimentary rock record. Field and laboratory analyses of sedimentary rocks. Laboratory course.


      • PHYS 260 - Materials Science
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in PHYS 111
        FacultyD'Alessandro

        An introduction to solid state materials. Study of the relation between microstructure and corresponding physical properties for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites.


    • Social Sciences:
      • ECON 286 - Lakota Land Culture, Economics and History
        FDRSS4
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteECON 100 or 101 or instructor consent
        FacultyGuse, Markowitz

        This class focuses on the cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of the Lakotas' (Titonwan tawapi) ties to their lands as expressed in their pre- and post-reservation lifeways. It includes a 10 day field trip to western South Dakota to visit and meet with people in the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations and the Black Hills.


      • ECON 255 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteECON 100 or 101. Economics and environmental studies majors/minors will have priority during the initial registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years
        FacultyCasey, Kahn

        The course serves as an introduction to environmental and natural resource economics. Economic principles are used to evaluate public and private decision making involving the management and use of environmental and natural resources. Aspects pertaining to fisheries, forests, species diversity, agriculture, and various policies to reduce air, water and toxic pollution will be discussed. Lectures, reading assignments, discussions and exams will emphasize the use of microeconomic analysis for managing and dealing with environmental and natural resource problems and issues.


      • HIST 230 - Discovering W&L's Origins Using Historical Archaeology
        FDRSS4
        Credits3
        FacultyGaylord

        Not open to students who have taken SOAN 181 with the same description. This course introduces students to the practice of historical archaeology using W&L's Liberty Hall campus and ongoing excavations there as a case study. With archaeological excavation and documentary research as our primary sources of data. we use the methods of these two disciplines to analyze our data using tools from the digital humanities to present our findings. Critically, we explore the range of questions and answers that these data and methods of analysis make possible. Hands-on experience with data collection and analysis is the focus of this course, with students working together in groups deciding how to interpret their findings to a public audience about the university's early history. The final project varies by term but might include a short video documentary. a museum display, or a web page.


      • HIST 238 - Anthropology of American History
        FDRSS4
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent
        FacultyBell

        This course explores issues within historic American communities that ethnographers often investigate among living groups, including cultural values, religious ideologies, class structures, kinship networks, gender roles, and interethnic relations. Although the communities of interest in this course ceased to exist generations ago, many of their characteristic dynamics are accessible through such means as archaeology, architectural history, and the study of documents. Case studies include early English settlement in Plymouth, Mass.; the 18th-century plantation world of Virginia and South Carolina; the post-Revolutionary Maine frontier and 19th-century California.


      • JOUR 266 - Cross-Cultural Documentary Filmmaking
        Credits3
        FacultyFinch

        The United States is a melting pot of nationalities and cultures. As people move to the U.S. from other countries they go through cross-cultural adaptation, and identity becomes an issue for everyone. Students in this course work in three-person teams to produce five-minute documentaries on cross-cultural adaptation by an ethnic community in our region or by selected international students at Washington and Lee. Students are expected to immerse themselves in learning about the home countries and current communities of their subjects. The course includes instruction in the techniques of documentary film-making, allowing students to develop their writing, storytelling, shooting and editing skills.


      • JOUR 338 - The Documentary
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteJunior standing. Appropriate for nonmajors
        FacultyFinch

        A critical study of the documentary in film and television, with analysis of prominent directors and genres.


      • SOAN 286 - Lakota Land Culture, Economics and History
        FDRSS4
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteECON 100 or 101 or instructor consent
        FacultyGuse, Markowitz

        This class focuses on the cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of the Lakotas' (Titonwan tawapi) ties to their lands as expressed in their pre- and post-reservation lifeways. It includes a 10 day field trip to western South Dakota to visit and meet with people in the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations and the Black Hills.


      • SOAN 206 - Archaeology
        FDRSS4
        Credits3
        FacultyGaylord

        An examination of anthropologically-oriented archaeology. Specific subjects to be considered will include the history of the subdiscipline, theoretical developments, field techniques, substantive contributions for the prehistoric and historic subareas and recent developments in theory and methodology.


      • SOAN 207 - Biological Anthropology
        FDRSS4
        Credits3
        FacultyBell

        This course considers the emergence and evolution of Homo sapiens from fossil, archaeological, and genetic evidence. The class focuses on evolutionary mechanisms; selective pressures for key human biological and behavioral patterns, such as bipedalism, intelligence, altruism, learned behavior, and expressive culture; relations among prehuman species; the human diaspora; and modern human diversity, particularly "racial" variation. The course also examines theories from sociobiology and evolutionary psychology about motivations for modern human behaviors.


      • SOAN 210 - Field Methods in Archaeology
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultyGaylord

        Additional special fees may apply. If necessary, some financial aid may be available through departmental funds. This course introduces students to archaeological field methods through hands-on experience, readings, and fieldtrips. Students study the cultural and natural processes that lead to the patterns we see in the archaeological record. Using the scientific method and current theoretical motivations in anthropological archaeology, students learn how to develop a research design and to implement it with actual field excavation. We visit several field excavation sites in order to experience, first hand, the range of archaeological field methods and research interests currently undertaken by leading archaeologists. Students use the archaeological data to test hypotheses about the sites under consideration and produce a report of their research, which may take the form of a standard archaeological report, an academic poster, or a conference-style presented paper.


      • SOAN 211 - Laboratory Methods in Archaeology
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultyGaylord

        Additional special fees may apply. If necessary, some financial aid may be available through departmental funds. This course introduces students to archaeological lab methods through hands-on experience, readings, and fieldtrips. Students process and catalogue archaeological finds ensuring they maintain the archaeological provenience of these materials. Using the scientific method and current theoretical motivations in anthropological archaeology, students learn how to develop and test hypotheses about the site under consideration by analyzing the artifacts they themselves have processed. We visit several archaeology labs in order to experience, first hand, the range of projects and methods currently undertaken by leading archaeologists. Students then use the archaeological data to test their hypotheses and produce a report of their research, which may take the form of a standard archaeological report, an academic poster, or a conference-style presented paper.


      • SOAN 230 - Discovering W&L's Origins Using Historical Archaeology
        FDRSS4
        Credits3
        FacultyGaylord

        Not open to students who have taken SOAN 181 with the same description. This course introduces students to the practice of historical archaeology using W&L's Liberty Hall campus and ongoing excavations there as a case study. With archaeological excavation and documentary research as our primary sources of data. we use the methods of these two disciplines to analyze our data using tools from the digital humanities to present our findings. Critically, we explore the range of questions and answers that these data and methods of analysis make possible. Hands-on experience with data collection and analysis is the focus of this course, with students working together in groups deciding how to interpret their findings to a public audience about the university's early history. The final project varies by term but might include a short video documentary. a museum display, or a web page.


      • SOAN 238 - Anthropology of American History
        FDRSS4
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent
        FacultyBell

        This course explores issues within historic American communities that ethnographers often investigate among living groups, including cultural values, religious ideologies, class structures, kinship networks, gender roles, and interethnic relations. Although the communities of interest in this course ceased to exist generations ago, many of their characteristic dynamics are accessible through such means as archaeology, architectural history, and the study of documents. Case studies include early English settlement in Plymouth, Massachusetts; the 18th-century plantation world of Virginia and South Carolina; the post-Revolutionary Maine frontier; and 19th-century California.


      • SOAN 240 - Food, Culture, and Society
        FDRSS4
        Credits3
        FacultyGoluboff

        This course explores connections among food, culture, and society. Food has been an essential way that individuals and societies define themselves, especially now in our ever globalizing world, as cultural anthropology continues to be a central discipline guiding this field of study. Students review some of the classic symbolic and structural analyses of gastro-politics. We explore relationships between fast-food/globalized taste vs. the Slow Food Movement/localized taste, and delve into socioeconomic and political practices behind the production and consumption of coffee, milk products, and alcoholic beverages. Students investigate relationships among cooking/eating and race, gender, and sexuality, and discuss community food justice. Opportunities to experience the Rockbridge area food scene are integrated into the syllabus.


      • SOAN 266 - Neighborhoods, Culture, and Poverty
        FDRSS3
        Credits3
        FacultyEastwood

        This course examines social-scientific research on the determinants of poverty, crime, and ill health by focusing on neighborhoods as the sites where many of the mechanisms impacting these outcomes operate. In addition to engaging with key readings and participating in seminar discussions, students conduct their own exploratory analyses of neighborhood level processes using a variety of spatial data analysis tools in R.


      • SOAN 286 - Land in American Indian Culture, Religion, and History
        Credits4
        FacultyMarkowitz

        This class focuses on the religious, cultural, and historical dimensions of a selected American Indian nation and ties to its lands as they found expression in the beliefs and practices of its pre- and post-reservation communities. The specific themes that the seminar will address are: 1) Lands, Culture, and Cosmology; 2) Lands, Subsistence, and Ceremony; and 3) Land in the Nation's History; and 4) Sacred Landscape and Contestation.  The course may cover the Lakota Sioux, Cherokee, or other Indian nation.


    • Humanities:
      • ARTH 170 - Arts of Mesoamerica and the Andes
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyLepage

        Survey of the art and architecture of Mesoamerica and the Andes before the arrival of the Europeans, with a focus on indigenous civilizations including the Olmec, Maya, Aztec, and Inca. Art is contextualized in terms of religious, social, political, and economic developments in each region under discussion. The class includes a trip to the Virginia Museum of fine Arts in Richmond.


      • ARTH 200 - Greek Art & Archaeology
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyLaughy

        An introduction to ancient Greek art and archaeology. We encounter some of the greatest works of art in human history, as we survey the development of painting, sculpture, architecture, and town planning of the ancient Greeks. We encounter the history of the people behind the objects that they left behind, from the material remains of the Bronze Age palaces and Classical Athenian Acropolis to the world created in the wake of Alexander the Great's conquests. We also consider how we experience the ancient Greek world today through archaeological practice, cultural heritage, and the antiquities trade.


      • ARTH 245 - Ancient Cultures, New Markets: Modern and Contemporary Asian Art
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyKerin

        This course examines the art movements of the last one hundred years from India, China, Tibet, and Japan primarily through the lenses of the larger sociopolitical movements that informed much of Asia's cultural discourses: Colonialism, Post-Colonialism, Socialism, Communism, and Feminism. We also address debates concerning "non-Western" 20th-century art as peripheral to the main canons of Modern and Contemporary art. By the end of the course, students have created a complex picture of Asian art/artists, and have engaged broader concepts of transnationalism, as well as examined the roles of galleries, museums, and auction houses in establishing market value and biases in acquisition practices.


      • ARTH 246 - Questions of Ownership: Looting, Curating, and Destroying Cultural Heritage Objects
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyKerin

        Cultural heritage objects are powerful artifacts to own, display, and even destroy. But why? This courses explores the ways art and cultural heritage objects have been stolen, laundered, purchased, curated, and destroyed in order to express political, religious, and cultural messages. Case studies and current events are equally studied to shed light on practices of looting and iconoclasm. Some of the questions we consider: What is the relationship between art and war? Under what conditions should museums repatriate art from its collections? What nationalist agendas are at work when cultural heritage objects are claimed by modem nation states or terrorist groups?


      • ARTH 288 - Chinese Export Porcelain and the China Trade, 1500 to 1900
        Credits3
        FacultyFuchs

        This course covers the development and history of Chinese export porcelain made for the European and American markets and its role as a commodity in the China Trade. Students examine Chinese export porcelain from several different perspectives, including art history, material culture, and economic history.


      • ARTH 343 - Art and Material Culture of Tibet
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyKerin

        Through a chronological presentation of sites and objects, we study Tibet's great artistic movements from the 7th-20th centuries. Our analyses of the art and material culture of Tibet, and its larger cultural zone, has an art historical and historiographic focus. This two-pronged approach encourages students to analyze not only the styles and movements of Tibetan art, but the methods by which this art world has been studied by and simultaneously presented to Western audiences.


      • ARTH 347 - Forget Me Not: Visual Culture of Historic and Religious Memorials
        FDRHA
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteNo prerequisites. Appropriate for students of all class years
        FacultyKerin

        This class analyzes the visual material of memorial sites that shape social identity. Whether simple or elaborate in their construction, these creations allow people the space to connect with and/or honor a person or event from the historic or even mythological past. This global and thematic examination of memorials considers three primary foci: the built environment of a memorial; the performative role of visitors; and the function of memory at these sites.


      • CLAS 200 - Greek Art & Archaeology
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyLaughy

        An introduction to ancient Greek art and archaeology. We encounter some of the greatest works of art in human history, as we survey the development of painting, sculpture, architecture, and town planning of the ancient Greeks. We encounter the history of the people behind the objects that they left behind, from the material remains of the Bronze Age palaces and Classical Athenian Acropolis to the world created in the wake of Alexander the Great's conquests. We also consider how we experience the ancient Greek world today through archaeological practice, cultural heritage, and the antiquities trade.


      • CLAS 223 - Ancient Greek Religion
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyLaughy

        In this course, we examine the strange and wonderful world of ancient Greek religion, beginning with stories of the gods that all Greeks knew: Homer and Hesiod. We then study religion on the ground, examining how religion functioned at a number of sanctuaries and shrines in Greece. Topics covered in this course include ancient conceptions of the cosmos; the nature of Greek deities and heroes; the distinction between myth and religion; the art and architecture of sanctuaries; ritual performances and festivals; ritual sacrifice; sacred games; oracles; the underworld; sacred mysteries; women and religion; and the socio-political role of Greek ritual practice.


      • CLAS 287 - Supervised Study Abroad: Athens
        FDRHU
        Credits4
        PrerequisitePermission of the department
        FacultyGildner, Laughy

        Classics and history of Greece. A survey of the development of art, archaeology, history, and literature in ancient and modern Greece, with an emphasis on the relationship between past and present conceptions of Greek identity.


      • CLAS 288 - Supervised Study Abroad: Rome and Ancient Italy
        FDRHA
        CreditsNot yet approved for new spring term
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent. Offered when interest is expressed and faculty resources permit
        FacultyBenefiel

        This course traces the growth of Rome and Roman civilization from its modest beginnings to its glory during the Republic and Empire. Lectures and readings prepare students for daily visits to sites, excavations, monuments and museums in Rome and its environs, and to locations in the Bay of Naples area.


      • CLAS 326 - The Trojan War
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyLaughy

        The Trojan War ranks among the greatest tales ever told. But is the story real? In this course, we begin with the literary evidence, including the epics of Homer, as well as contemporary accounts from the Bronze Age Greeks, Hittites, and Egyptians. We then follow the archaeological evidence, from the palaces of mainland Greece to the presumed site of Troy itself. Our search leads not just to the truth that lies behind the destruction of Troy, but reveals a long-lost international community of world superpowers whose cities were nearly all destroyed at the same time that Troy fell, an international cataclysm on a scale never before seen in ancient history.


      • CLAS 338 - Pompeii
        FDRSS4
        Credits3 in fall-winter; 4 in spring
        FacultyBenefiel

        The site of ancient Pompeii presents a thriving Roman town of the first century AD, virtually frozen in time by the devastating eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. In this course, we examine Pompeii's archaeological remains-public buildings, domestic architecture, painting, artifacts, inscriptions, and graffiti-in order to reconstruct the life of the town. We also consider religion, games and entertainment, politics, and the structure of Roman society.


      • HIST 130 - Latin America: Mayas to Independence
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyGildner

        An introduction to the "Indian" and Iberian people active from Florida to California through Central and South America between 1450 and 1750.


      • HIST 131 - Modern Latin America: Túpak Katari to Tupac Shakur
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyGildner

        A survey of Latin America from the 1781 anticolonial rebellion led by indigenous insurgent Túpak Katari to a globalized present in which Latin American youth listen to Tupac Shakur yet know little of his namesake. Lectures are organized thematically (culture, society, economics, and politics) and chronologically, surveying the historical formation of people and nations in Latin America. Individual countries (especially Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, and Peru) provide examples of how local and transnational forces have shaped the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries of North and South America and the Caribbean, and the cultural distinctions and ethnic diversity that characterize a region too often misperceived as homogeneous.


      • HIST 244 - The Art of Command during the American Civil War
        FDRHU
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent required. Most appropriate for students who have completed HIST 245 or HIST 269. Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term
        FacultyMyers

        This seminar examines the role of military decision-making, the factors that shape it and determine its successes and failures, by focusing on four Civil War battles: Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Wilderness. Extensive reading and writing. Battlefield tours.


      • HIST 245 - The American Civil War
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyMyers

        The sectional crisis. The election of 1860 and the secession of the southern states. Military strategy and tactics. Weapons, battles, leaders. Life of the common soldier. The politics of war. The economics of growth and destruction. Emancipation. Life behind the lines. Victory and defeat.


      • HIST 262 - The Old South to 1860
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyMyers

        A study of the making of the Old South. Slavery. Antebellum political, economic, social, and cultural developments. The origins and growth of sectionalism.


      • REL 223 - Ancient Greek Religion
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyLaughy

        In this course, we examine the strange and wonderful world of ancient Greek religion, beginning with stories of the gods that all Greeks knew: Homer and Hesiod. We then study religion on the ground, examining how religion functioned at a number of sanctuaries and shrines in Greece. Topics covered in this course include ancient conceptions of the cosmos; the nature of Greek deities and heroes; the distinction between myth and religion; the art and architecture of sanctuaries; ritual performances and festivals; ritual sacrifice; sacred games; oracles; the underworld; sacred mysteries; women and religion; and the socio-political role of Greek ritual practice.


      • or, when appropriate
      • CLAS 295 - Topics in Classical Civilization
        Credits3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring

        Selected subject areas in classical civilization. The topic selected varies from year to year. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

        Spring 2018, CLAS 295-01: Nature and the Environment in Antiquity (3). How did people in the ancient world conceive of nature from a philosophical, religious, and scientific standpoint? What attitudes did they hold towards animals and other forms of life? How did they shape the world around them through practices such as agriculture, mining, water management, and deforestation? Did they share our modern concerns about the use and conservation of natural spaces? Students in this course investigate these questions using literature, art, and artifacts from the ancient Mediterranean world (primarily Greece and Rome) as well as works by contemporary scholars. Readings are in English, with the opportunity to read portions of some texts in Greek or Latin, if desired, by students with prior knowledge of these languages. (HU) Hagen.


  6. Capstone Experience:
  7. A capstone project that culminates in a major research project on a topic proposed by the student that focuses on archaeology. It will take the form of an independent study (3 credits) with a person in the core faculty or approved by the SOAN department chair or archaeology curriculum coordinator. It could also be a senior thesis or honors thesis with similar approval.