Russian Area Studies Major Requirements

2017 - 2018 Catalog

Russian Area Studies major leading to BA degree

A major in Russian Area Studies leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires the completion of at least 33 credits as follows:

  1. RUSS 301, 302
  2. Three credits from RAS 473 or 493
  3. One of the following two groups:
    LIT 215 and HIST 220
    LIT 263 and HIST 221
  4. One of the following courses:
    POL 245, 246
    SOAN 245, 246, 260
  1. One of the following courses not used to satisfy the requirements above:
    HIST 220, 221,222, 228
    LIT 215, 263
    POL 245, 246
    SOAN 245, 246, 260
  2. 12 credits chosen from the following Russian area studies courses not used to satisfy any requirements above:
    ARTH 394, when the topic is appropriate
    HIST 220, 221, 222, 228, 322, and when appropriate 401, 402, 403
    LIT 215, 263
    POL 245, 246, and when appropriate, 380, 401, 402, 403, 406
    RUSS 313, 315, 316, 395, 401, 402, 403
    RAS 401, 402, 403, 493
    SOAN 245, 246, 260

Additional courses required as prerequisites for completion of the above are RUSS 111, 112, 261 and 262. Also, most politics courses that grant credit toward the Russian Area Studies major require POL 105 as a prerequisite.

  1. Required courses:
  2. Three credits from:
    • RAS 473 - Senior Thesis
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteSenior standing, Russian Area Studies major, and permission of the program head
      FacultyStaff

      Students explore specialized issues in Russian Area Studies through writing a thesis on a topic chosen in consultation with two members of the Russian Area Studies faculty committee.


    • RAS 493 - Honors Thesis
      Credits3-3
      PrerequisiteSenior standing and honors candidacy
      FacultyStaff

      Honors Thesis.


  3. One of the following two groups:
  4. One of the following courses:
    • POL 245 - European Politics and Society
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.


    • POL 246 - Post-Communism and New Democracies
      FDRSS4 as sociology only
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of transition from Communism in the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Cases of successful and unsuccessful transitions to civil society, pluralist democracy, and market economy are examined. The comparative framework includes analysis of transition from non-Communist authoritarianism and democratic consolidation in selected countries of Latin America, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and South Africa.


    • SOAN 245 - European Politics and Society
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.


    • SOAN 246 - Post-Communism and New Democracies
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of transition from Communism in the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Cases of successful and unsuccessful transitions to civil society, pluralist democracy, and market economy are examined. The comparative framework includes analysis of transition from non-Communist authoritarianism and democratic consolidation in selected countries of Latin America, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and South Africa.


  5. One of the following courses not used to satisfy the requirements above:
    • HIST 220 - Imperial Russia, 1682 to 1917
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBidlack

      From the rise to power of Peter the Great, Russia's first emperor, through the fall of the Romanov dynasty.


    • HIST 221 - Soviet Russia, 1917 to 1991
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNote: Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Interested first-years may request instructor consent
      FacultyBidlack

      The revolutions of 1917, the emergence of the Soviet system, the Stalinist period, Stalin's successors, and the eventual collapse of the USSR.


    • HIST 222 - Decline and Fall of the Soviet Union and the Resurgence of Russia
      FDRHU
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteNote: Completion of HIST 102 is recommended but not required
      FacultyBidlack

      This course analyzes the reasons for the decline of the Soviet Union commencing in the latter part of the Brezhnev era and its collapse under the weight of the failed reforms of Gorbachev. It further traces the fragmentation of the USSR into fifteen republics and the simultaneous devolution of authority within the Russian Republic under Yeltsin. The course concludes with the remarkable reassertion of state power under Putin up to the present. Students write an essay assessing the Yeltsin transition and engage in a class debate at the end of the term on the prospects for Russia's future.


    • HIST 228 - Women in Russian History
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBidlack

      Students read many accounts by and about Russian women to gain an understanding of how Russian women have been affected by wars, revolutions, and other major events and, simultaneously, how they have been agents of change from the beginnings Russian history up to the present.


    • LIT 215 - 20th-Century Russian Literature in Translation
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW FDR requirement
      FacultyBrodsky

      Selected Russian literary masterpieces (short stories, plays and novels). Authors include Olesha, Babel, Nabokov, and Solzhenitsyn.


    • LIT 263 - 19th-Century Russian Literature in Translation
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
      FacultyBrodsky

      A study of major works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov.


    • POL 245 - European Politics and Society
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.


    • POL 246 - Post-Communism and New Democracies
      FDRSS4 as sociology only
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of transition from Communism in the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Cases of successful and unsuccessful transitions to civil society, pluralist democracy, and market economy are examined. The comparative framework includes analysis of transition from non-Communist authoritarianism and democratic consolidation in selected countries of Latin America, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and South Africa.


    • SOAN 245 - European Politics and Society
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.


    • SOAN 246 - Post-Communism and New Democracies
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of transition from Communism in the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Cases of successful and unsuccessful transitions to civil society, pluralist democracy, and market economy are examined. The comparative framework includes analysis of transition from non-Communist authoritarianism and democratic consolidation in selected countries of Latin America, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and South Africa.


  6. 12 credits chosen from the following Russian area studies courses not used to satisfy any requirements above:
    • ARTH 394, when the topic is appropriate
    • HIST 220 - Imperial Russia, 1682 to 1917
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBidlack

      From the rise to power of Peter the Great, Russia's first emperor, through the fall of the Romanov dynasty.


    • HIST 221 - Soviet Russia, 1917 to 1991
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNote: Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Interested first-years may request instructor consent
      FacultyBidlack

      The revolutions of 1917, the emergence of the Soviet system, the Stalinist period, Stalin's successors, and the eventual collapse of the USSR.


    • HIST 222 - Decline and Fall of the Soviet Union and the Resurgence of Russia
      FDRHU
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteNote: Completion of HIST 102 is recommended but not required
      FacultyBidlack

      This course analyzes the reasons for the decline of the Soviet Union commencing in the latter part of the Brezhnev era and its collapse under the weight of the failed reforms of Gorbachev. It further traces the fragmentation of the USSR into fifteen republics and the simultaneous devolution of authority within the Russian Republic under Yeltsin. The course concludes with the remarkable reassertion of state power under Putin up to the present. Students write an essay assessing the Yeltsin transition and engage in a class debate at the end of the term on the prospects for Russia's future.


    • HIST 228 - Women in Russian History
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBidlack

      Students read many accounts by and about Russian women to gain an understanding of how Russian women have been affected by wars, revolutions, and other major events and, simultaneously, how they have been agents of change from the beginnings Russian history up to the present.


    • HIST 322 - Seminar in Russian History
      Credits3-4
      PrerequisiteJunior or senior standing. Note: Completion of HIST 102 or 221 is recommended but not required prior to taking HIST 322

      Selected topics in Russian history, including but not limited to heroes and villains, Soviet biography, Stalin and Stalinism, the USSR in the Second World War and origins of the Cold War, the KGB, and the decline and fall of the Soviet Union and the re-emergence of Russia. May be repeated for degree and major credit if the topics are different.

      Fall 2017, HIST 322-01: Seminar In Russian History: USSR in World War II and The Origins Of The Cold War, 1939-1953 (3).  Counts toward a history major, the Russian area studies major, and the Russian culture and language minor. An examination of the role of the Soviet Union in the Second World War and in the origins of the Cold War through analysis of original Soviet documents (in English translation), scholarly studies, and documentary film. Students discuss all assigned readings in class and write a research paper on a topic of their choice with the instructor's approval. (HU) Bidlack.


    • LIT 215 - 20th-Century Russian Literature in Translation
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW FDR requirement
      FacultyBrodsky

      Selected Russian literary masterpieces (short stories, plays and novels). Authors include Olesha, Babel, Nabokov, and Solzhenitsyn.


    • LIT 263 - 19th-Century Russian Literature in Translation
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
      FacultyBrodsky

      A study of major works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov.


    • POL 245 - European Politics and Society
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.


    • POL 246 - Post-Communism and New Democracies
      FDRSS4 as sociology only
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of transition from Communism in the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Cases of successful and unsuccessful transitions to civil society, pluralist democracy, and market economy are examined. The comparative framework includes analysis of transition from non-Communist authoritarianism and democratic consolidation in selected countries of Latin America, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and South Africa.


    • RUSS 313 - Advanced Conversation
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteRUSS 262 with a grade of B+ or better, or RUSS 302, or instructor consent
      FacultyStaff

      A course designed for the advanced language student with emphasis on conversation.


    • RUSS 315 - 19th-Century Russian Literature
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteRUSS 262 or equivalent
      FacultyBrodsky

      The novels, plays, poetry, and literary movements of the 19th century. Authors examined include Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, and Chekhov. Conducted in Russian.


    • RUSS 316 - 20th-Century Russian Literature
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteRUSS 262 or equivalent
      FacultyBrodsky

      The novels, plays, poetry, and literary movements of the 20th century. Solzhenitsyn, Babel, Platonov, Mandelshtam, and Tsvetaeva are examples of authors examined. Conducted in Russian.


    • RUSS 395 - Topics in Russian Literature
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteRUSS 262 or equivalent

      A seminar on a particular author, period, or genre. Recent topics have included Russian War Stories, Russian Childhood, The Art and Craft of Propaganda, and The Caucases. The subject changes annually. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Conducted in Russian.


    • RUSS 401 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent
      FacultyStaff

      Advanced study in Russian. The nature of the course will be determined by the students' needs and by evaluation of their previous work. May be repeated for degree credit with permission and if the topics are different.


    • RUSS 402 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits2
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent
      FacultyStaff

      Advanced study in Russian. The nature of the course will be determined by the students' needs and by evaluation of their previous work. May be repeated for degree credit with permission and if the topics are different.


    • RUSS 403 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent
      FacultyStaff

      Advanced study in Russian. The nature of the course will be determined by the students' needs and by evaluation of their previous work. May be repeated for degree credit with permission and if the topics are different.


    • RAS 401 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits1
      PrerequisitePermission of the Russian Area Studies Committee
      FacultyStaff

      Directed Individual Study.


    • RAS 402 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits2
      PrerequisitePermission of the Russian Area Studies Committee
      FacultyStaff

      Directed Individual Study.


    • RAS 403 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePermission of the Russian Area Studies Committee
      FacultyStaff

      Directed Individual Study.


    • RAS 493 - Honors Thesis
      Credits3-3
      PrerequisiteSenior standing and honors candidacy
      FacultyStaff

      Honors Thesis.


    • SOAN 245 - European Politics and Society
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.


    • SOAN 246 - Post-Communism and New Democracies
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyJasiewicz

      A comparative analysis of transition from Communism in the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Cases of successful and unsuccessful transitions to civil society, pluralist democracy, and market economy are examined. The comparative framework includes analysis of transition from non-Communist authoritarianism and democratic consolidation in selected countries of Latin America, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and South Africa.


    • and when appropriate
    • HIST 403 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCumulative grade-point average of 3.250 in all history courses, completion of three 200- or 300-level history courses, and instructor consent

      A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit each term of the junior and senior year.


    • HIST 402 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits2
      PrerequisiteCumulative grade-point average of 3.250 in all history courses and instructor consent
      FacultyStaff

      A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered by other courses. May be repeated for degree credit with permission.


    • HIST 401 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCumulative grade-point average of 3.250 in all history courses and instructor consent
      FacultyStaff

      A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered by other courses. May be repeated for degree credit with permission.


    • POL 380 - Global Politics Seminar
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNormally POL 105 or instructor consent, though prerequisite may vary with topic. Open to majors and non-majors of all classes. Meets the global politics field requirement in the politics major

      Examination of selected topics dealing with international and comparative politics. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      Winter 2018, POL 380-01: Nationalism and Global Crises (3). Prerequisite POL 105 or instructor consent. This course examines the recent resurgence of nationalism, populism, militancy, and nativism around the world. It examines the extent to which these resurgent viewpoints present challenges to modern liberalism. Students in the course will identify country-based case studies and will bring these into a collective conversation that informs theories about social and political change. Students will be expected to take the lead in classroom conversations, and the format of the course will replicate aspects of academic publication, to include drafting of case studies, revision and resubmission, double-blind peer review, and efforts to construct an edited volume of essays. (SS2) Dickovick.

      Fall 2017, POL 380-01: The Global Politics of Churchill (3). Prerequisite: POL 105 or instructor consent. Open to majors and non-majors. Meets the 300-level seminar requirement for the politics major. Winston Spencer-Churchill was one of the most significant figures of early 20th-century global politics. The breadth of his experience—journalist, parliamentarian, soldier, government minister with responsibility for the Royal Navy and later the British economy, and ultimately prime minister—helped to shape the contemporary world. He was also an author and historian who famously proclaimed that history would be kind to him because he would write it. This course uses his extensive writings to examine the global politics of his time, pairing them with selections drawn from international relations theory and comparative politics. Topics include the twilight of European colonialism (1890-1955), the British political system and the Irish question, the gold standard and free trade, the origins and conduct of both World Wars, and the postwar international order. (SS2) O'Dell.


    • POL 401 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteGrade-point average of 3.000 in politics and permission of the instructor
      FacultyStaff

      This course permits a student to follow a program of directed reading, library research, or data collection and analysis in some area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • POL 403 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade-point average of 3.000 in politics and instructor consent

      This course permits a student to follow a program of directed reading, library research, or data collection and analysis in some area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      Winter 2018, POL 403-01: Directed Individual Study: Party Machines and Institutional Effectiveness (3). TA cancas of the literature of American political development on the subject of Progressive-era machine politics, pairing it with directed original research comparing the activities of the Byrd Machine in central and southwestern Virginia with its near contemporaries in the Deep South. Students address fundamental questions about the institutional effectiveness of state and local government through a critical examination of how state machines concentrated and dispersed authority to obtain and retain political power through constituent service. O'Dell.