Spanish Courses

Winter 2020

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Spanish II

SPAN 112 - Buenadicha Gomez, Javier J.

Emphasis on listening comprehension and speaking, with gradual introduction of reading and writing.

Intermediate Spanish II

SPAN 162 - Hernandez, Julia C.

Intensive, concentrated course in review grammar and reading, with practice in listening and speaking.

Intermediate Spanish II

SPAN 162 - Reino, Jayne E.

Intensive, concentrated course in review grammar and reading, with practice in listening and speaking.

Intermediate Spanish II

SPAN 162 - Barnett, Jeffrey C. (Jeff)

Intensive, concentrated course in review grammar and reading, with practice in listening and speaking.

Intermediate Spanish II

SPAN 162 - Kuettner, Paul R. (Dick)

Intensive, concentrated course in review grammar and reading, with practice in listening and speaking.

Advanced Intermediate Spanish

SPAN 164 - Botta, Monica B.

Emphasis on reading and composition skills, with extensive practice in speaking and listening through class discussion. Some grammar review.

Conversational Skills

SPAN 204 - Reyes, Antonio

Development of speaking skills for communication in Spanish. Acquisition and use of practical vocabulary and development of pronunciation skills.

Introducción a la literatura española

SPAN 220 - Hernandez, Julia C.

Spanish literary masterpieces from the Poema del Cid through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.

Introducción a la literatura hispanoamericana

SPAN 240 - Michelson, Seth R.

Spanish-American literary masterpieces from colonial times through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.

Introducción al análisis literario

SPAN 275 - Mayock, Ellen C.

Preparation for analysis of Hispanic literature. Composition develops style and method for analyzing prose, poetry, and drama in Spanish. Conversation continues vocabulary building and concentrates on discussion of literary themes.

Special Topics in Conversation

SPAN 295A - Mayock, Ellen C.

Further development of listening and speaking skills necessary for advanced discussion. Acquisition of both practical and topic-specific vocabulary. Appropriate writing and reading assignments, related to the topic, accompany the primary emphasis on conversational skills. Recent topics include: Hispanic Cinema and La Prensa. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2020, SPAN 295A-01: Special Topics in Conversation: Vivir Nen Communidad (3) . Prerequisite: SPAN 162, 164, or equivalent. ESOL community-based learning component. Counts towards the requirements for the RL major and the LACS minor (with Prof. Botta's permission in advance). Experiential Learning. Further development of listening and speaking skills necessary for advanced discussion. Acquisition of both practical and topic-specific vocabulary. Appropriate writing and reading assignments, related to the topic, accompany the primary emphasis on conversational skills. Class time is devoted primarily to students meeting small groups or as a large group for extensive conversation in order to enhance aural and oral skills and to develop a deeper understanding of migration in the Spanish-speaking/Latinx world, including in Rockbridge County. Assignments require application of all language skills. In 2020, the course has a special emphasis on community-based learning, with each student working 1-2 hours each week using Spanish in different community sectors of Rockbridge County. In addition, class discussions will treat the themes of the students' community-based experiences and of issues and current events of Latinas/os/xs in the U.S. Mayock .

Topics in Hispanic Culture and Expression

SPAN 296A - Barnett, Jeffrey C. (Jeff)

This course offers students the opportunity to further their understanding of Hispanic cultures and their expression by focusing on a relevant cultural, linguistic or literary topic, on an historical period, or on a region of Spain, Latin America or the U.S. Readings, discussions, and assignments are primarily in Spanish. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2020, SPAN 296A-01: Topic in Hispanic Culture and Expression: Los Hispanos en EEUU (3). Prerequisite: SPAN 162, 164, or equivalent. This civilization and culture course examines the presence of major Latino cultural groups in the United States. Special attention is given to Mexican-American, Cuban, and Puerto Rican diaspora, with secondary attention to populations from the Northern Triangle countries of Central America. In particular, the course focuses on the manifestations of cultural and artistic expression by exploring questions of identity, as influenced by heritage, assimilation, hybridity, and immigration and exile. For each group, the study takes into account the past (civilization and cultural legacies) as well as the present (socio-political circumstances). In this way, we hope to answer fundamental cultural questions such as: What are the prevalent demographic and cultural characteristics of many Latino groups in the US? How might they differ? What are the historical roots that distinguish them? What impact will these and future groups have on US society at large? And, how do visual and literary artists reflect their own personal histories within a given culture? Class discussion and writing assignments are mostly in Spanish; reading assignments in English and Spanish. In addition to select chapters from a civilization reader, we read brief excerpts from several major diasporic writers such as Gloria Anzaldúa, Esmeralda Santiago, Uva de Aragón, and Achy Obejas. Sandra Cisneros' La casa en Mango Street is be read in its entirety. Barnett.

Poetry and Power

SPAN 347 - Michelson, Seth R.

This is a course about reading. We read Spanish-American poetry on power and violence as a way of engaging and investigating the multifaceted and layered historiographies of the region. To intensify our reading, we also "read" a diversity of complementary cultural production, including paintings, murals, and music. Through these self-conscious acts of reading--that is, acts of identifying, evaluating, and critiquing form as much as content--we enhance our ability to analyze and debate ways of defining power in the Americas from within, without, and in liminal zones. Recurring motifs include sexism, racism, classism, and fascism.

Spanish Grammar Rules: The Making of a Language

SPAN 380 - Reyes, Antonio

This course analyzes areas of the Spanish language that are problematic for non-native speakers of Spanish. At the same time, students explore the processes involved in the standardization of a language, in particular the Spanish language, as a social and political construct.

Peninsular Seminar

SPAN 397A - Hernandez, Julia C.

A seminar focusing on a single period, genre, motif, or writer. The specific topic will be determined jointly according to student interest and departmental approval. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2020, SPAN 397A-01: Peninsular Seminar: Early Modern Spanish Theater: Reading, Writing, and Performing Comedia on Both Sides of the Atlantic. (3). Prerequisites: SPAN 220 and SPAN 275. Much like today's prestige television, the early modern Spanish theatrical genre known as comedia nueva fused popular and elite entertainment, drawing spectators from every level of society into packed playhouses from Madrid to Mexico City. Comedias were not only blockbusters, however, but also bestsellers, with the burgeoning commercial print market circulating play texts far beyond 16th- and 17th-century stage. In this seminar, we explore the comedia as both a literary phenomenon and as a performance practice; as a transatlantic genre penned not only by elite Peninsular men but also by women, creole, mestizo, and indigenous writers; as a medium to transmit imperial ideology from the metropolis to the periphery; and, simultaneously, as a space for playwrights on the margins of society and empire to explore their identities within these systems of power. Course readings place the works of Peninsular figures, including Lope de Vega and Ana Caro, in dialogue with those of their transatlantic counterparts, from the loas of Mexican poet Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz to the Quechua-language comedias of Peruvian playwright Gabriel Centeno de Osma. (HL) Hernández.

Directed Individual Study

SPAN 403 - Mayock, Ellen C.

Nature and content of course to be determined by students' needs and by instructors acquainted with their earlier preparation and performance. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Spanish I

SPAN 111 - Buenadicha Gomez, Javier J.

Emphasis on listening comprehension and speaking, with gradual introduction of reading and writing.

Intermediate Spanish I

SPAN 161 - Reino, Jayne E.

Intensive, concentrated course in review grammar and reading, with practice in listening and speaking.

Intermediate Spanish I

SPAN 161 - Reyes, Antonio

Intensive, concentrated course in review grammar and reading, with practice in listening and speaking.

Intermediate Spanish I

SPAN 161 - Pinto-Bailey, Ana C. (Cristina)

Intensive, concentrated course in review grammar and reading, with practice in listening and speaking.

Advanced Intermediate Spanish

SPAN 164 - Hernandez, Julia C.

Emphasis on reading and composition skills, with extensive practice in speaking and listening through class discussion. Some grammar review.

Advanced Intermediate Spanish

SPAN 164 - Botta, Monica B.

Emphasis on reading and composition skills, with extensive practice in speaking and listening through class discussion. Some grammar review.

Advanced Intermediate Spanish

SPAN 164 - Barnett, Jeffrey C. (Jeff)

Emphasis on reading and composition skills, with extensive practice in speaking and listening through class discussion. Some grammar review.

Conversational Skills

SPAN 204 - Michelson, Seth R.

Development of speaking skills for communication in Spanish. Acquisition and use of practical vocabulary and development of pronunciation skills.

Intro to Hispanic Linguistics

SPAN 209 - Reyes, Antonio

This course provides a broad view of major subfields of linguistic study with a particular focus on data drawn from the Spanish language. Class discussions begin with broader questions, such as "What is language?" and "How do language and human behavior intersect?"; throughout the term students revisit those questions in light of topics presented in class. By the end of the course, students demonstrate an understanding of the many facets of the Spanish language and also the linguistic principles as can be applied to any language. The course covers major concepts in Spanish phonology and phonetics, Spanish morphology and syntax, and lastly, Spanish dialectology.

Spanish Civilization and Culture

SPAN 211 - Bailey, Matthew J.

A survey of significant developments in Spanish civilization. The course addresses Spanish heritage and the present-day cultural patterns formed by its legacies. Readings, discussions and papers, primarily in Spanish, for further development of communication skills.

Introducción a la literatura española

SPAN 220 - Bailey, Matthew J.

Spanish literary masterpieces from the Poema del Cid through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.

Introducción a la literatura hispanoamericana

SPAN 240 - Michelson, Seth R.

Spanish-American literary masterpieces from colonial times through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.

Introducción al análisis literario

SPAN 275 - Hernandez, Julia C.

Preparation for analysis of Hispanic literature. Composition develops style and method for analyzing prose, poetry, and drama in Spanish. Conversation continues vocabulary building and concentrates on discussion of literary themes.

Spanish Language Theory and Practice

SPAN 392A - Barnett, Jeffrey C. (Jeff)

A topics course that approaches language study through theories of language use and meaning, as well as their practical application through extensive writing exercises. Topics may include translation theory, analysis of theoretical approaches to language study, and advanced grammar. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2019, SPAN 392A-01: Spanish Language Theory and Practice in Literary Translation (3). Prerequisite: SPAN 275 . An advanced seminar devoted to the application, methods, and theories of literary translation. Initial attention is given to the translation of English narrative into Spanish. For this portion, we compare our own translations of oft-translated authors—such as those of Hemingway or Poe—to existing and divergent versions. The majority of the course however is devoted to producing artistic renderings of Spanish and Spanish-American literary texts into English. Students produce individual and collaborative translations of poetry by Pablo Neruda, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, and García Lorca, among others, as well as narrative passages from Ana María Matute, Julio Cortázar, Gabriel García Márquez, and Jorge Luis Borges. As an example of cross-genre production, we also render 17th-century epic poetry into English prose. The central activity of the course involves the collaborative production of an original translation of a previously non-translated Spanish text into English. Barnett.

Peninsular Seminar

SPAN 397A - Mayock, Ellen C.

A seminar focusing on a single period, genre, motif, or writer. The specific topic will be determined jointly according to student interest and departmental approval. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2019, SPAN 397A-01: Peninsular Seminar: Representaciones de la Guerra Civil Española (3). This course examines the fundamental importance of the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) in literary and visual texts of the Franco and contemporary periods of Spain. Through these readings, students come to understand the evolution of often conflicting histories, ideologies, obsessions, and artistic notions surrounding the war itself and its consequences. After a review of the events leading up to the Spanish Civil War and of the prelude to the Second World War, we observe how the themes and issues of the war manifest in fiction, poetry, film, and other visual texts, paying particular attention to the Franco regime, the pact of silence, and the desire to uncover the past in myriad ways. Literature includes works by Federico García Lorca, Jaime Gil de Biedma, Carmen Laforet, Alberto Méndez, and Mercè Rodoreda. Visual texts include posters, newspapers, letters, government documents, documentaries, fictional films, and NO-DO reels from the Franco era. Mayock.

Spanish-American Seminar

SPAN 398A - Botta, Monica B.

A seminar focusing on a single period, genre, motif, or writer. Recent topics have included "Spanish American Women Writers: From America into the 21st Century," "20th Century Latin America Theater," and "Past, Memory, and Identity in Contemporary Argentina's Cultural Products." May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2019, SPAN 398A-01 (3): Spanish-American Seminar: La representación del yo en escritos y documentales latinoamericanos. (3). Prerequisites: SPAN 240 and SPAN 275. The course examines the practices of self-representation through the study of literary and non-literary works, oral narratives, and documentaries. In addition to conceptual discussions of how individuals use fictionalized forms of self-portraiture in diverse Latin-American contexts, special attention is paid to issues of memory, subjectivity, self-empowerment, authority, and audience and addressee, among others. Primary texts focus mainly on the 20th and 21th centuries. (HL) Botta.

Spring 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Seville and the Foundations of Spanish Civilization

SPAN 213 - Bailey, Matthew J.

This course takes place in Seville, Spain, and uses this privileged location to study the cultures of Foundational Spain. Primary focus is on the medieval and Renaissance periods, from the troubled co-existence of Muslims, Jews, and Christians to the Christian reconquest and subsequent Empire. Significant cultural currents are examined through texts (literary, historical, and religious), direct contact with art and architecture through site visits, and with hands-on exposure to early and contemporary cuisine. Students live in homestays, attend daily classes, participate in site visits, and engage with the local culture independently and through planned activities.

Topics in Hispanic Culture and Expression

SPAN 296 - Spragins, Elizabeth L. (Liz)

This course offers students the opportunity to further their understanding of Hispanic cultures and their expression by focusing on a relevant cultural, linguistic or literary topic, on an historical period, or on a region of Spain, Latin America or the U.S. Readings, discussions, and assignments are primarily in Spanish. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, SPAN 296-01: Topics in Hispanic Culture and Expression: Comparative Critical Race Theory and the Early-Modern Creation of Race (3). Prerequisite: One 200-level Spanish course. Have you ever wondered why you should bother to read 16th- and 17th-century literature? What does Bartolome´ de las Casas have to do with Thomas Jefferson? How can Francisco de Vitoria help us to better understand the United States or, even more locally, the Virginia of 2019? This course comprises a survey of theorizations of race and ethnicity in Hispanophone literary and cultural studies, performance studies, visual studies, and philosophy. The course engages with the body of critical literature that examines the construction of race in a variety of different social, political, legal, and economic settings in the West, from the15th century Western Mediterranean to early-modern Spanish-American colonies to the United States of the 20th and 21st centuries. Accordingly, students gain the tools with which to examine their own beliefs and attitudes surrounding race, and with which to engage with the many, diverse people whom they encounter in the complex world of 21st century America. We seek to historicize the context of race and to understand the ways in which people have constructed and made use of race for particular purposes. Spragins.