Psychology Major

2017 - 2018 Catalog

The Psychology department has the following degrees:

Psychology major leading to BA degree

A major in psychology leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of 42 credits in psychology as follows:

  1. Foundations:
    a. PSYC 110 or 111
    b. PSYC 112, 113, and 114
  2. Methods and Applications: PSYC 120, 210, 250, 299
  3. Capstone: PSYC 413
  4. Two topical seminars selected from PSYC 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 259, 261, 262, 265, 269, and 298
  5. One advanced methods course selected from PSYC 353, 354, 355, 359, 362, 365, 369 and 398
  6. At least six additional credits chosen from PSYC course numbered below 400
  7. Completion of the Major Field Test (MFT) in psychology
  1. Foundations
    • Take either:
      • PSYC 110 - Brain and Behavior with Laboratory
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultySchreiber

        An introduction to behavioral neuroscience, including the physiological bases of sensation, learning and memory, motivation, cognition, and abnormal behavior. The laboratory component extends classroom materials to include experiential learning with comparative neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and research techniques in behavioral neuroscience.


      • or
      • PSYC 111 - Brain and Behavior
        FDRSC
        Credits3

        Fall 2017 PSYC 111-02 requires instructor consent - contact Professor Lorig. An introduction to behavioral neuroscience, including the physiological bases of sensation, learning and memory, motivation, cognition, and abnormal behavior.

         


    • Take:
      • PSYC 112 - Cognition
        FDRSC
        Credits3
        FacultyJohnson, Whiting

        An introduction to human information processing, including an examination of perception, attention, memory, problem solving, and language.


      • PSYC 113 - Principles of Development
        FDRSS3
        Credits3
        FacultyFulcher

        An introduction to the development of individual capacities from conception through the life span. Analysis of thought and behavior at different stages of growth with special emphasis on the period from infancy through adolescence.


      • PSYC 114 - Introduction to Social Psychology
        FDRSS3
        Credits3
        FacultyWoodzicka

        The scientific study of how individuals' feelings, thoughts, and behavior are affected by others. Topics include prejudice, the self, interpersonal attraction, helping, aggression, attitudes, and persuasion.


  2. Methods and Applications:
    • PSYC 120 - Statistics and Research Design I
      FDRSS3
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      Students learn the basics of collecting, interpreting, and presenting data in the behavioral sciences. Data from a variety of sources, such as questionnaires, psychological tests, and behavioral observations, are considered. Students learn to use and to evaluate critically statistical and graphical summaries of data. They also study techniques of searching the literature and of producing written reports in technical format. Individual projects include oral presentations, creating technical graphics, and publishing on the World Wide Web.


    • PSYC 210 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 110, 111, 150, or NEUR 120
      FacultyMurdock

      This course is an empirically informed exploration of the characteristics, course, and treatment of psychological disorders as they are currently defined. A biopsychosocial framework is utilized to examine the continuum of psychological functioning, from psychopathology to flourishing.


    • PSYC 250 - Statistics and Research Design II
      Credits4
      PrerequisitePSYC 120
      CorequisitePSYC 250L
      FacultyJohnson, Murdock, Whiting, Woodzicka

      Students learn about the design and analysis of psychological research, with particular emphasis on experimentation. Students learn statistical inference appropriate for hypothesis testing, and they use standard statistical packages to analyze data. Laboratory course.


    • PSYC 299 - Applications of Psychological Science
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJunior standing and PSYC 120
      FacultyStaff

      This course is designed for junior psychology majors to learn about modern systems and subfields of psychological science. Pathways to professional applications of psychology are addressed along with experiences and tools necessary for professional development. The course has a topical structure in which primary source material is utilized to deepen students' exposure to the methodologies and findings of one subfield of psychology. The culmination of the course is a proposal for psychology majors' capstone experience.


  3. Capstone:
    • PSYC 413 - Psychology Capstone
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 250
      FacultyStaff

      This course is designed for psychology majors to take near the end of their course of study. Students synthesize skills and information learned in the psychology curriculum and engage in deep study of an aspect of the field. Students choose one of four structures for their capstone work: topical specialization; senior thesis; community-based research; or applied science. Each structure involves participation in a capstone seminar and the production of a written report. Community-based research and applied-science structures involve interaction with local community agencies, and thus require planning at least one term in advance. May be repeated for credit.


  4. Two topical seminars selected from:
    • PSYC 252 - Sensation Measurement and Perception
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or 111, and PSYC 250 (as corequisite with instructor consent)
      FacultyLorig

      Problems associated with sensory encoding, scaling, contextual and social determinants of perception are considered. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the senses in daily life.


    • PSYC 253 - Neural Mechanisms of Motivated Behaviors
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or 111, and PSYC 120
      FacultyStewart

      The anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical bases for behaviors are considered. Some examples of behaviors to be discussed include thirst and drinking, ingestion, reproduction, and learning.


    • PSYC 254 - Attention
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 112, and PSYC 120; and at least junior standing
      FacultyWhiting

      An examination of the theories and mechanisms associated with attentional processes. Topics include: selective attention, divided attention, inhibition, working memory, and the application of these processes in human/machine interfaces. The functioning of the above processes in abnormal patient populations is also examined.


    • PSYC 255 - Cognitive Neuroscience
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or PSYC 111; and PSYC 250 (as prerequisite or corequisite)
      CorequisitePSYC 255L
      FacultyLorig

      An examination of the role of the central nervous system in the production of human behavior. Special emphasis is placed on the contribution of the cerebral cortex to cognitive activity and to the effects of brain injury on psychological processes. Laboratories focus on neuropsychological testing and basic concepts in the brain's distribution of complex function. Laboratory course.


    • PSYC 256 - Neuropharmacology
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or PSYC 111, and PSYC 120
      FacultyStewart

      This course combines lecture and seminar elements to explore the physiological bases for drug action in the nervous system with emphasis on molecular mechanisms. The course begins with an overview of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and then proceeds to examinations of major neurotransmitter classes, functional neural circuits, and a survey of recreational drugs, drug abuse, and drug dependence. The course concludes with a consideration of pharmacotherapies for selected disorders of cognition and affect. The role of neuropharmacology in the growth of our understanding of normal neurochemical function is stressed throughout.


    • PSYC 259 - Cognition and Emotion
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 250
      FacultyJohnson

      This course challenges the notion that cognition and emotion are fundamentally opposing psychological systems and explores how they function together to influence attention, memory, thinking, and behavior in our social world. Coverage includes contemporary theory, research, experimental design, and application on topics regarding both healthy individuals and those with psychological disorders.


    • PSYC 261 - Socioemotional Development
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 113; pre-or corequisite: PSYC 250
      FacultyFulcher

      Exploration of children's understanding of emotions and how socialization and cognitive development contribute to the creation of different emotional styles and experiences. Examination of the theoretical and developmental aspects of emotions. Topics include understanding emotional states and the role of socialization practices on emotional expression.


    • PSYC 262 - Gender-Role Development
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 113, PSYC 250 or WGS 120
      FacultyFulcher

      This course provides the student with an overview of gender-role development: How do children learn to be boys and girls? What role do biological factors play in different behaviors of boys and girls? Does society push boys and girls in different directions? We discuss children's evolving ideas about gender, and what can be done to change these ideas (or whether they need to be changed at all). Through the examination of these questions and issues, the course introduces students to the major theories of gender-role development, the research methods used to measure children's gender-role behaviors and attitudes, and the current research in the field.


    • PSYC 265 - Developmental Psychopathology
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 113, 210 and 250
      FacultyMurdock

      This course utilizes a biopsychosocial perspective to explore atypical developmental processes. The course examines risk and protective factors that contribute to the development of social, emotional, behavioral difficulties and competencies in childhood and adolescence. Conceptualization, assessment, and treatment of children's and adolescents' psychological disorders is also discussed.


    • PSYC 269 - Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 114 and PSYC 250 (as co-req or pre-req) or instructor consent
      FacultyWoodzicka

      This course examines cognitive and affective processes involved in stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Causes and social implications of prejudice involving various stigmatized groups (e.g., African-Americans, women, homosexuals, people of low socioeconomic status, overweight individuals) are examined. Participants focus on attitudes and behaviors of both perpetrators and targets of prejudice that likely contribute to and result from social inequality.


    • PSYC 298 - Topical Seminar in Psychology
      Credits3 credits in fall and winter, 4 in spring
      Prerequisiteor corequisite: PSYC 250. Other prerequisites vary, determined at time of offering
      FacultyStaff

      Seminar topics vary with instructor and term. These topical seminars are designed to introduce students to an area of current interest in the field of psychology. Students receive an overview of the research and/or applied practices that have advanced an area of psychological science. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


  5. One advanced methods course selected from:
  6. At least six additional credits chosen from PSYC courses numbered below 400.
  7. Completion of the Major Field Test (MFT) in psychology.

Psychology major leading to BS degree

A major in psychology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of 52 credits in psychology and cognate fields distributed as follows:

  1. Foundations:
    a. PSYC 110 or 111
    b. PSYC 112, 113, and 114
  2. Methods and Applications: PSYC 120, 210, 250, and 299
  3. Capstone: PSYC 413
  4. Two topical seminars selected from PSYC 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 259, 261, 262, 265, 269, and 298
  5. Two advanced methods courses selected from PSYC 353, 354, 355, 359, 362, 365, 369, and 398
  6. At least 12 additional credits chosen from among the following: courses in BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, MATH, NEUR, PHYS and the following PSYC courses: PSYC 118, 150, 216, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, and 259. No more than 6 credits to be taken in PSYC.
  7. Completion of the Major Field Test (MFT) in psychology
  1. Foundations
    • Take either:
      • PSYC 110 - Brain and Behavior with Laboratory
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultySchreiber

        An introduction to behavioral neuroscience, including the physiological bases of sensation, learning and memory, motivation, cognition, and abnormal behavior. The laboratory component extends classroom materials to include experiential learning with comparative neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and research techniques in behavioral neuroscience.


      • or
      • PSYC 111 - Brain and Behavior
        FDRSC
        Credits3

        Fall 2017 PSYC 111-02 requires instructor consent - contact Professor Lorig. An introduction to behavioral neuroscience, including the physiological bases of sensation, learning and memory, motivation, cognition, and abnormal behavior.

         


    • Take:
      • PSYC 112 - Cognition
        FDRSC
        Credits3
        FacultyJohnson, Whiting

        An introduction to human information processing, including an examination of perception, attention, memory, problem solving, and language.


      • PSYC 113 - Principles of Development
        FDRSS3
        Credits3
        FacultyFulcher

        An introduction to the development of individual capacities from conception through the life span. Analysis of thought and behavior at different stages of growth with special emphasis on the period from infancy through adolescence.


      • PSYC 114 - Introduction to Social Psychology
        FDRSS3
        Credits3
        FacultyWoodzicka

        The scientific study of how individuals' feelings, thoughts, and behavior are affected by others. Topics include prejudice, the self, interpersonal attraction, helping, aggression, attitudes, and persuasion.


  2. Methods and Applications:
    • PSYC 120 - Statistics and Research Design I
      FDRSS3
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      Students learn the basics of collecting, interpreting, and presenting data in the behavioral sciences. Data from a variety of sources, such as questionnaires, psychological tests, and behavioral observations, are considered. Students learn to use and to evaluate critically statistical and graphical summaries of data. They also study techniques of searching the literature and of producing written reports in technical format. Individual projects include oral presentations, creating technical graphics, and publishing on the World Wide Web.


    • PSYC 210 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 110, 111, 150, or NEUR 120
      FacultyMurdock

      This course is an empirically informed exploration of the characteristics, course, and treatment of psychological disorders as they are currently defined. A biopsychosocial framework is utilized to examine the continuum of psychological functioning, from psychopathology to flourishing.


    • PSYC 250 - Statistics and Research Design II
      Credits4
      PrerequisitePSYC 120
      CorequisitePSYC 250L
      FacultyJohnson, Murdock, Whiting, Woodzicka

      Students learn about the design and analysis of psychological research, with particular emphasis on experimentation. Students learn statistical inference appropriate for hypothesis testing, and they use standard statistical packages to analyze data. Laboratory course.


    • PSYC 299 - Applications of Psychological Science
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJunior standing and PSYC 120
      FacultyStaff

      This course is designed for junior psychology majors to learn about modern systems and subfields of psychological science. Pathways to professional applications of psychology are addressed along with experiences and tools necessary for professional development. The course has a topical structure in which primary source material is utilized to deepen students' exposure to the methodologies and findings of one subfield of psychology. The culmination of the course is a proposal for psychology majors' capstone experience.


  3. Capstone:
    • PSYC 413 - Psychology Capstone
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 250
      FacultyStaff

      This course is designed for psychology majors to take near the end of their course of study. Students synthesize skills and information learned in the psychology curriculum and engage in deep study of an aspect of the field. Students choose one of four structures for their capstone work: topical specialization; senior thesis; community-based research; or applied science. Each structure involves participation in a capstone seminar and the production of a written report. Community-based research and applied-science structures involve interaction with local community agencies, and thus require planning at least one term in advance. May be repeated for credit.

       


  4. Two topical seminars selected from:
    • PSYC 252 - Sensation Measurement and Perception
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or 111, and PSYC 250 (as corequisite with instructor consent)
      FacultyLorig

      Problems associated with sensory encoding, scaling, contextual and social determinants of perception are considered. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the senses in daily life.


    • PSYC 253 - Neural Mechanisms of Motivated Behaviors
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or 111, and PSYC 120
      FacultyStewart

      The anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical bases for behaviors are considered. Some examples of behaviors to be discussed include thirst and drinking, ingestion, reproduction, and learning.


    • PSYC 254 - Attention
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 112, and PSYC 120; and at least junior standing
      FacultyWhiting

      An examination of the theories and mechanisms associated with attentional processes. Topics include: selective attention, divided attention, inhibition, working memory, and the application of these processes in human/machine interfaces. The functioning of the above processes in abnormal patient populations is also examined.


    • PSYC 255 - Cognitive Neuroscience
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or PSYC 111; and PSYC 250 (as prerequisite or corequisite)
      CorequisitePSYC 255L
      FacultyLorig

      An examination of the role of the central nervous system in the production of human behavior. Special emphasis is placed on the contribution of the cerebral cortex to cognitive activity and to the effects of brain injury on psychological processes. Laboratories focus on neuropsychological testing and basic concepts in the brain's distribution of complex function. Laboratory course.


    • PSYC 256 - Neuropharmacology
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or PSYC 111, and PSYC 120
      FacultyStewart

      This course combines lecture and seminar elements to explore the physiological bases for drug action in the nervous system with emphasis on molecular mechanisms. The course begins with an overview of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and then proceeds to examinations of major neurotransmitter classes, functional neural circuits, and a survey of recreational drugs, drug abuse, and drug dependence. The course concludes with a consideration of pharmacotherapies for selected disorders of cognition and affect. The role of neuropharmacology in the growth of our understanding of normal neurochemical function is stressed throughout.


    • PSYC 259 - Cognition and Emotion
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 250
      FacultyJohnson

      This course challenges the notion that cognition and emotion are fundamentally opposing psychological systems and explores how they function together to influence attention, memory, thinking, and behavior in our social world. Coverage includes contemporary theory, research, experimental design, and application on topics regarding both healthy individuals and those with psychological disorders.


    • PSYC 261 - Socioemotional Development
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 113; pre-or corequisite: PSYC 250
      FacultyFulcher

      Exploration of children's understanding of emotions and how socialization and cognitive development contribute to the creation of different emotional styles and experiences. Examination of the theoretical and developmental aspects of emotions. Topics include understanding emotional states and the role of socialization practices on emotional expression.


    • PSYC 262 - Gender-Role Development
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 113, PSYC 250 or WGS 120
      FacultyFulcher

      This course provides the student with an overview of gender-role development: How do children learn to be boys and girls? What role do biological factors play in different behaviors of boys and girls? Does society push boys and girls in different directions? We discuss children's evolving ideas about gender, and what can be done to change these ideas (or whether they need to be changed at all). Through the examination of these questions and issues, the course introduces students to the major theories of gender-role development, the research methods used to measure children's gender-role behaviors and attitudes, and the current research in the field.


    • PSYC 265 - Developmental Psychopathology
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 113, 210 and 250
      FacultyMurdock

      This course utilizes a biopsychosocial perspective to explore atypical developmental processes. The course examines risk and protective factors that contribute to the development of social, emotional, behavioral difficulties and competencies in childhood and adolescence. Conceptualization, assessment, and treatment of children's and adolescents' psychological disorders is also discussed.


    • PSYC 269 - Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 114 and PSYC 250 (as co-req or pre-req) or instructor consent
      FacultyWoodzicka

      This course examines cognitive and affective processes involved in stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Causes and social implications of prejudice involving various stigmatized groups (e.g., African-Americans, women, homosexuals, people of low socioeconomic status, overweight individuals) are examined. Participants focus on attitudes and behaviors of both perpetrators and targets of prejudice that likely contribute to and result from social inequality.


    • PSYC 298 - Topical Seminar in Psychology
      Credits3 credits in fall and winter, 4 in spring
      Prerequisiteor corequisite: PSYC 250. Other prerequisites vary, determined at time of offering
      FacultyStaff

      Seminar topics vary with instructor and term. These topical seminars are designed to introduce students to an area of current interest in the field of psychology. Students receive an overview of the research and/or applied practices that have advanced an area of psychological science. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


  5. Two advanced methods courses selected from:
  6. At least 12 additional credits chosen from among the following:
  7. Courses in BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, MATH, NEUR, PHYS and the following PSYC courses. No more than 6 credits to be taken in PSYC.

    • PSYC 118 - Psychology Mythbusters
      FDRSC
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteFirst-year standing
      FacultyJohnson

      In this course, students learn how to test psychological myths and to determine a status: confirmed, plausible, or busted. We explore a variety of myths, including the existence of the unconscious mind, relationship myths, brain myths, psychology and law myths, social myths, personality myths, and mental-illness myths. Students critically evaluate psychology myths by 1) gathering and writing about empirical evidence; 2) designing, running, and analyzing an experiment on a particular psychology myth; and 3) making class presentations.


    • PSYC 150 - Psychoactive Drugs and Behavior
      FDRSC
      Credits3
      FacultyStewart

      An introduction to broad psychological perspectives of drug use, misuse, and abuse. The pharmacological and physiological actions of psychoactive drugs, as well as personality and social variables that influence their use, are considered. Emphasis is given to historically significant and currently popular drugs of abuse.


    • PSYC 216 - Health Neuroscience
      FDRSC
      Credits4
      Prerequisiteone course chosen from PSYC 110, 111, 150, BIOL 111, CHEM 110, or NEUR 120
      FacultySchreiber

      This seminar provides an introduction to the scientific study of physical and mental health using research methods in neuroscience. We examine the effects of exercise on the brain (from the cellular/molecular to systems-level perspective), how neuroplasticity contributes to both the etiology and treatment of neurological and psychological conditions. and extensively discuss the effects of stress on the brain. The course features comprehensive readings of popular psychology/neuroscience books, as well as empirical reports and reviews published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. A background in neuroscience is recommended. as well as  additional experience with psychology and/or biology prior to enrollment.


    • PSYC 252 - Sensation Measurement and Perception
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or 111, and PSYC 250 (as corequisite with instructor consent)
      FacultyLorig

      Problems associated with sensory encoding, scaling, contextual and social determinants of perception are considered. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the senses in daily life.


    • PSYC 253 - Neural Mechanisms of Motivated Behaviors
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or 111, and PSYC 120
      FacultyStewart

      The anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical bases for behaviors are considered. Some examples of behaviors to be discussed include thirst and drinking, ingestion, reproduction, and learning.


    • PSYC 254 - Attention
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 112, and PSYC 120; and at least junior standing
      FacultyWhiting

      An examination of the theories and mechanisms associated with attentional processes. Topics include: selective attention, divided attention, inhibition, working memory, and the application of these processes in human/machine interfaces. The functioning of the above processes in abnormal patient populations is also examined.


    • PSYC 255 - Cognitive Neuroscience
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or PSYC 111; and PSYC 250 (as prerequisite or corequisite)
      CorequisitePSYC 255L
      FacultyLorig

      An examination of the role of the central nervous system in the production of human behavior. Special emphasis is placed on the contribution of the cerebral cortex to cognitive activity and to the effects of brain injury on psychological processes. Laboratories focus on neuropsychological testing and basic concepts in the brain's distribution of complex function. Laboratory course.


    • PSYC 256 - Neuropharmacology
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or PSYC 111, and PSYC 120
      FacultyStewart

      This course combines lecture and seminar elements to explore the physiological bases for drug action in the nervous system with emphasis on molecular mechanisms. The course begins with an overview of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and then proceeds to examinations of major neurotransmitter classes, functional neural circuits, and a survey of recreational drugs, drug abuse, and drug dependence. The course concludes with a consideration of pharmacotherapies for selected disorders of cognition and affect. The role of neuropharmacology in the growth of our understanding of normal neurochemical function is stressed throughout.


    • PSYC 259 - Cognition and Emotion
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePSYC 250
      FacultyJohnson

      This course challenges the notion that cognition and emotion are fundamentally opposing psychological systems and explores how they function together to influence attention, memory, thinking, and behavior in our social world. Coverage includes contemporary theory, research, experimental design, and application on topics regarding both healthy individuals and those with psychological disorders.


  8. Completion of the Major Field Test (MFT) in psychology