Course Offerings

Fall 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Brain and Behavior with Laboratory

PSYC 110 - Schreiber, William B.

An introduction to behavioral neuroscience, including the physiological bases of sensation, learning and memory, motivation, cognition, and abnormal behavior. The laboratory component extends classroom materials to include experiential learning with comparative neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and research techniques in behavioral neuroscience.

Brain and Behavior

PSYC 111 - Schreiber, William B.

Fall 2017 PSYC 111-02 requires instructor consent - contact Professor Lorig. An introduction to behavioral neuroscience, including the physiological bases of sensation, learning and memory, motivation, cognition, and abnormal behavior.

Brain and Behavior

PSYC 111 - Lorig, Tyler S.

Fall 2017 PSYC 111-02 requires instructor consent - contact Professor Lorig. An introduction to behavioral neuroscience, including the physiological bases of sensation, learning and memory, motivation, cognition, and abnormal behavior.

Cognition

PSYC 112 - Scherschel, Heather M.

An introduction to human information processing, including an examination of perception, attention, memory, problem solving, and language.

Principles of Development

PSYC 113 - Fulcher, Megan

An introduction to the development of individual capacities from conception through the life span. Analysis of thought and behavior at different stages of growth with special emphasis on the period from infancy through adolescence.

Introduction to Social Psychology

PSYC 114 - Scherschel, Heather M.

The scientific study of how individuals' feelings, thoughts, and behavior are affected by others. Topics include prejudice, the self, interpersonal attraction, helping, aggression, attitudes, and persuasion.

Psychoactive Drugs and Behavior

PSYC 150 - Stewart, Robert E. (Bob)

An introduction to broad psychological perspectives of drug use, misuse, and abuse. The pharmacological and physiological actions of psychoactive drugs, as well as personality and social variables that influence their use, are considered. Emphasis is given to historically significant and currently popular drugs of abuse.

Introduction to Clinical Psychology

PSYC 210 - Murdock, Karla

This course is an empirically informed exploration of the characteristics, course, and treatment of psychological disorders as they are currently defined. A biopsychosocial framework is utilized to examine the continuum of psychological functioning, from psychopathology to flourishing.

Statistics and Research Design II

PSYC 250 - Johnson, Dan R.

Students learn about the design and analysis of psychological research, with particular emphasis on experimentation. Students learn statistical inference appropriate for hypothesis testing, and they use standard statistical packages to analyze data. Laboratory course.

Statistics and Research Design II

PSYC 250L - Whiting, Wythe L., IV

Students learn about the design and analysis of psychological research, with particular emphasis on experimentation. Students learn statistical inference appropriate for hypothesis testing, and they use standard statistical packages to analyze data. Laboratory course.

Sensation Measurement and Perception

PSYC 252 - Lorig, Tyler S.

Problems associated with sensory encoding, scaling, contextual and social determinants of perception are considered. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the senses in daily life.

Neural Mechanisms of Motivated Behaviors

PSYC 253 - Stewart, Robert E. (Bob)

The anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical bases for behaviors are considered. Some examples of behaviors to be discussed include thirst and drinking, ingestion, reproduction, and learning.

Attention

PSYC 254 - Whiting, Wythe L., IV

An examination of the theories and mechanisms associated with attentional processes. Topics include: selective attention, divided attention, inhibition, working memory, and the application of these processes in human/machine interfaces. The functioning of the above processes in abnormal patient populations is also examined.

Gender-Role Development

PSYC 262 - Fulcher, Megan

This course provides the student with an overview of gender-role development: How do children learn to be boys and girls? What role do biological factors play in different behaviors of boys and girls? Does society push boys and girls in different directions? We discuss children's evolving ideas about gender, and what can be done to change these ideas (or whether they need to be changed at all). Through the examination of these questions and issues, the course introduces students to the major theories of gender-role development, the research methods used to measure children's gender-role behaviors and attitudes, and the current research in the field.

Topical Seminar in Psychology

PSYC 298B - Murdock, Karla

Seminar topics vary with instructor and term. These topical seminars are designed to introduce students to an area of current interest in the field of psychology. Students receive an overview of the research and/or applied practices that have advanced an area of psychological science. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Applications of Psychological Science

PSYC 299 - Fulcher, Megan

This course is designed for junior psychology majors to learn about modern systems and subfields of psychological science. Pathways to professional applications of psychology are addressed along with experiences and tools necessary for professional development. The course has a topical structure in which primary source material is utilized to deepen students' exposure to the methodologies and findings of one subfield of psychology. The culmination of the course is a proposal for psychology majors' capstone experience.

Advanced Methods in Cognition and Emotion Research

PSYC 359 - Johnson, Dan R.

Directed research on a variety of topics in cognition and emotion. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Psychology Capstone

PSYC 413 - Whiting, Wythe L., IV

This course is designed for psychology majors to take near the end of their course of study. Students synthesize skills and information learned in the psychology curriculum and engage in deep study of an aspect of the field. Students choose one of four structures for their capstone work: topical specialization; senior thesis; community-based research; or applied science. Each structure involves participation in a capstone seminar and the production of a written report. Community-based research and applied-science structures involve interaction with local community agencies, and thus require planning at least one term in advance. May be repeated for credit.

Tutorials in Psychology

PSYC 431 - Fulcher, Megan

Advanced reading, study, or internships directed by a member of the staff to meet the needs of the individual student. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Tutorials in Psychology

PSYC 432 - Scherschel, Heather M.

Advanced reading, study, or internships directed by a member of the staff to meet the needs of the individual student. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Tutorials in Psychology

PSYC 432 - Murdock, Karla

Advanced reading, study, or internships directed by a member of the staff to meet the needs of the individual student. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Tutorials in Psychology

PSYC 432 - Woodzicka, Julie A.

Advanced reading, study, or internships directed by a member of the staff to meet the needs of the individual student. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Tutorials in Psychology

PSYC 433 - Whiting, Wythe L., IV

Advanced reading, study, or internships directed by a member of the staff to meet the needs of the individual student. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Honors Thesis

PSYC 493 - Fulcher, Megan

Laboratory research culminating in an honors thesis. Honors candidates also present a public summary of their work.

Spring 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Health Neuroscience

PSYC 216 - Schreiber, William B.

This seminar provides an introduction to the scientific study of physical and mental health using research methods in neuroscience. We examine the effects of exercise on the brain (from the cellular/molecular to systems-level perspective), how neuroplasticity contributes to both the etiology and treatment of neurological and psychological conditions. and extensively discuss the effects of stress on the brain. The course features comprehensive readings of popular psychology/neuroscience books, as well as empirical reports and reviews published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. A background in neuroscience is recommended. as well asĀ  additional experience with psychology and/or biology prior to enrollment.

Science and Policy

PSYC 280 - Lorig, Tyler S.

Students in this course adopt the role of consultants for a hypothetical legislator who must make a decision on a matter of public policy. A clear understanding of the scientific background and consequences of the policy must inform the legislator's decision. Each student works as a part of the consulting team and creates a document on a narrow aspect of the science related to the public policy. The policy being evaluated changes each term. Examples include: funding for mental health care, enactment or suspension of motorcycle helmet laws, establishing or abolishing court awards for mental suffering, and similar topics. Topic for Spring 2017: Mental Health and Gun Violence. Students examine and offer advice on issues related to gun violence and mental health. This is a controversial and complex issue currently receiving attention in Congress. After their own explorations and discussions of this issue and hearing from several experts on this topic, students prepare a white paper with their recommendations for public policy. Lorig.

Spring-Term Topics in Psychology

PSYC 296 - Kreiss, Deborah S. (Deb)

Topics and prerequisites vary with instructor and term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, PSYC 296-01: Spring Term Topics in Psychology: Psychopharmacology (4). Prerequisite: One course chosen from PSYC 110, PSYC 111, PSYC 150, and NEUR 120. This course explores the major neurotransmitter systems in the brain and the mechanisms by which the chemical systems can be manipulated through use of pharmacological agents (i.e., drugs). We address the effects of drugs at the molecular, cellular, and circuit levels, and examine the influence of drugs upon the behavior of those with and without psychological disorders, including the influences of socio-cultural norms, the media, and the legal system upon use of drugs in our society. Students collaborate in conducting a novel research experiment concerning the behavior of rats in an animal model of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. The course features readings from empirical reports and reviews published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, as well as material from lay sources such as popular books and films. (SS3) Kreiss.

Spring-Term Topics in Psychology

PSYC 296 - Scherschel, Heather M.

Topics and prerequisites vary with instructor and term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, PSYC 296-02: Spring Term Topics in Psychology: Psychology of Self-Control (4). This seminar focuses on understanding different theoretical approaches to self-control, critically analyzing the research applying these self-control models to different behavioral domains, and evaluating the effectiveness of self-control interventions based on their theoretical assumptions. Students evaluate and apply the theories through empirical reports and reviews published in peer-reviewed scientific journals and popular-press articles. Students also apply what they are learning in class to themselves through a self-directed behavior change program and to the world around them through application assignments. (SS3). Scherschel .

Winter 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Brain and Behavior

PSYC 111 - Lorig, Tyler S.

An introduction to behavioral neuroscience, including the physiological bases of sensation, learning and memory, motivation, cognition, and abnormal behavior.

Cognition

PSYC 112 - Scherschel, Heather M.

An introduction to human information processing, including an examination of perception, attention, memory, problem solving, and language.

Cognition

PSYC 112 - Whiting, Wythe L., IV

An introduction to human information processing, including an examination of perception, attention, memory, problem solving, and language.

Principles of Development

PSYC 113 - Fulcher, Megan

An introduction to the development of individual capacities from conception through the life span. Analysis of thought and behavior at different stages of growth with special emphasis on the period from infancy through adolescence.

Introduction to Social Psychology

PSYC 114 - Woodzicka, Julie A.

The scientific study of how individuals' feelings, thoughts, and behavior are affected by others. Topics include prejudice, the self, interpersonal attraction, helping, aggression, attitudes, and persuasion.

Introduction to Social Psychology

PSYC 114 - Scherschel, Heather M.

The scientific study of how individuals' feelings, thoughts, and behavior are affected by others. Topics include prejudice, the self, interpersonal attraction, helping, aggression, attitudes, and persuasion.

Statistics and Research Design I

PSYC 120 - Schreiber, William B.

Students learn the basics of collecting, interpreting, and presenting data in the behavioral sciences. Data from a variety of sources, such as questionnaires, psychological tests, and behavioral observations, are considered. Students learn to use and to evaluate critically statistical and graphical summaries of data. They also study techniques of searching the literature and of producing written reports in technical format. Individual projects include oral presentations, creating technical graphics, and publishing on the World Wide Web.

Psychoactive Drugs and Behavior

PSYC 150 - Kreiss, Deborah S. (Deb)

An introduction to broad psychological perspectives of drug use, misuse, and abuse. The pharmacological and physiological actions of psychoactive drugs, as well as personality and social variables that influence their use, are considered. Emphasis is given to historically significant and currently popular drugs of abuse.

Cognitive Neuroscience

PSYC 255 - Lorig, Tyler S.

An examination of the role of the central nervous system in the production of human behavior. Special emphasis is placed on the contribution of the cerebral cortex to cognitive activity and to the effects of brain injury on psychological processes. Laboratories focus on neuropsychological testing and basic concepts in the brain's distribution of complex function. Laboratory course.

Developmental Psychopathology

PSYC 265 - Murdock, Karla

This course utilizes a biopsychosocial perspective to explore atypical developmental processes. The course examines risk and protective factors that contribute to the development of social, emotional, behavioral difficulties and competencies in childhood and adolescence. Conceptualization, assessment, and treatment of children's and adolescents' psychological disorders is also discussed.

Advanced Methods in Systems Neuroscience Research

PSYC 353 - Schreiber, William B.

Directed research on a variety of topics in systems neuroscience. May be repeated for credit if the topics are different.

Advanced Methods in Systems Neuroscience Research

PSYC 353 - Kreiss, Deborah S. (Deb)

Directed research on a variety of topics in systems neuroscience. May be repeated for credit if the topics are different.

Advanced Methods in Attention Research

PSYC 354 - Whiting, Wythe L., IV

Directed research on a variety of topics in attention and memory. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Advanced Methods in Cognitive Neuroscience Research

PSYC 355 - Lorig, Tyler S.

Directed research on a variety of topics in human neuropsychology. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Advanced Methods in Developmental Psychology Research

PSYC 362 - Fulcher, Megan

Directed research on a variety of topics in developmental psychology. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Advanced Methods in Social Psychology Research

PSYC 369 - Woodzicka, Julie A.

Directed research on a variety of topics in social psychology. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Special Topics in Psychology

PSYC 395A - Scherschel, Heather M.

These seminars are designed to help the advanced student integrate his or her knowledge of specific fields into a comprehensive view of psychology, both as a science and as a profession. Specific topics vary and are determined, in part, by student demand. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter, 2017, PSYC 395A-01: Advanced Methods in Health Psychology Research (3). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Directed research on topics in Health Psychology. Scherschel.

Psychology Capstone

PSYC 413 - Whiting, Wythe L., IV

This course is designed for psychology majors to take near the end of their course of study. Students synthesize skills and information learned in the psychology curriculum and engage in deep study of an aspect of the field. Students choose one of four structures for their capstone work: topical specialization; senior thesis; community-based research; or applied science. Each structure involves participation in a capstone seminar and the production of a written report. Community-based research and applied-science structures involve interaction with local community agencies, and thus require planning at least one term in advance. May be repeated for credit.

Psychology Capstone

PSYC 413 - Murdock, Karla

This course is designed for psychology majors to take near the end of their course of study. Students synthesize skills and information learned in the psychology curriculum and engage in deep study of an aspect of the field. Students choose one of four structures for their capstone work: topical specialization; senior thesis; community-based research; or applied science. Each structure involves participation in a capstone seminar and the production of a written report. Community-based research and applied-science structures involve interaction with local community agencies, and thus require planning at least one term in advance. May be repeated for credit.

Tutorials in Psychology

PSYC 431 - Fulcher, Megan

Advanced reading, study, or internships directed by a member of the staff to meet the needs of the individual student. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Tutorials in Psychology

PSYC 432 - Murdock, Karla

Advanced reading, study, or internships directed by a member of the staff to meet the needs of the individual student. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Tutorials in Psychology

PSYC 432 - Scherschel, Heather M.

Advanced reading, study, or internships directed by a member of the staff to meet the needs of the individual student. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Tutorials in Psychology

PSYC 433 - Kreiss, Deborah S. (Deb)

Advanced reading, study, or internships directed by a member of the staff to meet the needs of the individual student. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Honors Thesis Proposal

PSYC 443 - Fulcher, Megan

Conferences, directed reading, and exploratory research culminating in the preparation of a proposal for honors thesis research, which will minimally include a clear statement of the problem being studied, a comprehensive literature review, and a feasible, detailed plan for the research. Must be taken no later than spring term of the junior year.

Senior Thesis

PSYC 473 - Woodzicka, Julie A.

Taken in the winter term of the senior year by all psychology majors seeking a Bachelor of Science degree. Students conduct a research project and prepare a thesis based on that research.