Emergency Management Plan and Appendices

Emergency Management PlanSeptember 2017

Members of the W&L Community:

Washington and Lee University ("W&L" or "the University") is committed to developing and administrating a comprehensive emergency management program to encompass the University community. The Emergency Management Plan ("the Plan") supports W&L's ongoing risk and threat assessment operations, emergency preparedness provisions, and business continuity and recovery plans to provide prompt and effective response for the protection of W&L students, faculty, staff, and campus visitors in an emergency situation. The Plan establishes procedures and an organized structure to guide the University in responding to significant foreseeable emergencies on the W&L campus or property owned or operated by W&L. While no plan can absolutely prevent any damage during an emergency, this Plan has been developed to coordinate the resources, facilities, and personnel of W&L, and other external agencies as appropriate, for an effective response to any foreseeable emergency. All personnel assigned specific emergency responsibilities under this Plan (including departmental plans) should have a working knowledge of assigned roles, responsibilities, and applicable procedures.

I encourage all W&L students, faculty, and staff to familiarize themselves with this Plan, particularly the guidance in Section I ("What You Should Do in an Emergency and How to Prepare") and to be vigilant and responsive to actual or threatened emergency situations.

Sincerely,
William C. Dudley

I. What You Should do in an Emergency and How to Prepare

Washington and Lee University ("W&L" or "the University") has developed this Plan to help prepare our campus community to respond to and recover from a range of emergency situations.

Creating a culture of preparedness is a team effort involving staff, faculty, and students. The first step in being prepared for an emergency is to learn how you would be notified of and updated about a significant emergency, and then to learn and remember key actions you may be directed to take by University officials.

Emergency Communications Systems and Methods

W&L uses several different systems and methods of communication to alert students, faculty, staff, and others of a significant emergency. It is important that you become familiar with these communication tools and ensure that your contact information is kept current so that the University can stay in touch with you. These include, as appropriate to the type and scope of emergency:

In case of a significant emergency, some or all of these systems will provide information about the nature of the emergency, what to do, and where to get additional details. Emergency updates and further information will be provided by postings to the listed websites, emails or texts to the campus community, and other methods as needed. Also, be sure to develop an emergency communications plan with your family, roommates and friends to keep them informed of your situation during an emergency.

Actions to Take

When a significant emergency occurs, there are typically two immediate strategies that are used to protect people: Evacuate and Shelter in Place.

This Plan provides more details on these strategies in Appendices B and C. In the event of an emergency, further details will be provided at the time by University officials.

People Requiring Additional/Special Assistance

People who have certain disabilities or impairments (specifically including, but not limited to, those limiting hearing, visual, and mobility functions) may require special or additional assistance during an emergency. These individuals are encouraged to inform University administrators designated to respond to requests for disability accommodations, and/or Resident Advisers/Assistants, roommates, classmates, co-workers, friends, faculty, and supervisors, of what special assistance they may require to receive effective emergency communications notices and to respond to emergency situations, so that interactive, advance planning can be done to see that such individuals receive emergency communications and to provide special or additional assistance in an emergency. University administrators designated to address disability accommodations requests by those individuals who self-identify should include consideration of effective emergency communications and emergency response assistance in the accommodations process as relevant to the disability.

In an emergency situation, all members of the University community should help those around them who may need additional assistance, whether by virtue of a disability, impairment, or otherwise. Members of the University community should report to University personnel or emergency responders the condition and location of any person unable to leave a building or area being evacuated. More specific guidance on evacuation and other emergency responses for persons needing special assistance can be found in Appendices B and C.

II. Plan Overview

Purpose

The purpose of this Plan is to establish general operational guidance, assign roles and responsibilities, and promote campus awareness for responding to emergencies that may affect the W&L community. Additionally, the Plan includes specific guidance for responding to particular types of emergency situations.

Scope

The guidance in this Plan applies to all members of the University community, visitors to the campus at the time of an emergency, and to the buildings and grounds that are owned and operated by W&L. It is intended to help protect life and property, minimize damage caused by emergency situations, minimize disruptions to University operations, and move promptly to resume operations following emergency situations.

Assumptions

An emergency or a disaster may occur at any time of the day or night, during a weekend, or on a holiday, with little or no warning. The events in an emergency cannot be predicted. Consequently, a plan of this type serves only as a general guide and checklist and will undoubtedly require modification, and more specific guidance and direction, as an emergency unfolds.

In certain emergency situations, W&L may need to coordinate its response to the situation with one or more outside agencies, including but not limited to local, state, and federal government agencies, and disaster relief organizations. The specific role for any outside agency(ies) will depend on the emergency situation; however, W&L will retain ultimate authority for decisions involving its facilities, campus, and community.

Phases of Emergency Management

Generally, an emergency will have three basic phases.

Some emergency situations may cause the campus to shut down some or all University operations. In such a case, the first step to recovery is to see that the campus is safe and secure. The second step will be to restore critical infrastructures and campus facilities/grounds to a level that will support critical functions. The third step will be to determine if and how to return to normal campus operations.

Business continuity begins shortly after an emergency has occurred (or, in some cases, while an emergency is occurring). After an assessment of damage or impact of the emergency has been completed, efforts will be taken to restore normal operations as quickly as possible. Business continuity is carried out at the University, departmental, building, or function level, as appropriate to the particular emergency. Department specific plans for W&L, which are in the process of being updated as of the date of adoption of this Plan, will separately address business continuity measures. In the case of a large, area-wide disaster, business continuity will be carried out on a community level, as such a disaster will likely involve damages to infrastructure, utilities, access to campus, etc.

III. Range and Scope of Covered Emergency Situations

An emergency addressed by this Plan includes any significant, unplanned event with the real potential to cause death or significant injury to students, faculty, staff, or visitors, or that can significantly disrupt University operations, causing physical or environmental damage or presenting other threats to University's facilities.

Examples (list not exhaustive):

Range of Severity and Scope of Emergencies

Emergencies can range from those impacting a single office or building to a large-scale catastrophe impacting the entire campus and surrounding communities. The larger the scale and scope of the emergency, the more campus and community resources required to manage it.

On the low end of the scale are department or building incidents that can be resolved with existing University resources or limited outside help. These typically are of limited duration and have little impact on the campus community beyond those people using the space/building at the time of the incident. A few illustrative examples are minor chemical or fuel spills, a minor fire confined to a single room not involving hazardous chemicals, or loss of heat or electricity to a building for a few hours not jeopardizing health or safety.

Other more serious emergencies are those which impact a significant portion of the campus and/or outside community, including events that may develop into major campus or community disasters. These often require coordination with local and state authorities. A few illustrative examples would be an extended power outage, a severe storm or other weather event, a major fire, an active shooter, or contamination of the water supply.

Some emergencies may be catastrophic, involving the entire campus and surrounding community. These are often multi-hazard events beyond the emergency-response capabilities of campus and local resources. They likely will call for coordination with multiple state or federal agencies. A few illustrative examples include a flood, earthquake, major hazardous chemical spill, or act of terrorism.

Emergencies may not unfold all at once. There can be situations that primarily involve people, rather than infrastructure, which begin with a single incident but have the potential to quickly evolve into a multi-faceted campus crisis. A few illustrative examples of this could include a communicable disease, a death on campus, an off-campus accident impacting multiple members of the campus community, a civil disturbance or riot, a hazing incident, or a hate crime.

IV. Emergency Management Authority

During an emergency, the President (or in his absence, by designation specifically for purposes of this Emergency Management Plan, the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, and thereafter, the Provost, and thereafter, the Vice President for Finance and Administration/Treasurer , and thereafter, the next most-senior available administrator) has ultimate emergency responsibility and authority for activating this Plan, as necessary, and designating a single appropriate Incident Commander to oversee the management of all emergency activities, including development, implementation, and review of strategic decisions, and post-event review. The President (or surrogate/designee) is assisted and advised by the Emergency Management Executive Team (EMET). The Incident Commander will assemble and direct an Emergency Operations Group (EOG) to manage that specific emergency situation, some or all of the members of which may be drawn from the EMET.

Emergency Management Executive Team (EMET)

The Emergency Management Executive Team provides executive leadership, advice and counsel to the President or his surrogate/designee on high level emergency management and recovery decisions for the University. Depending on the nature and scope of a particular emergency situation, some or all of the members of the EMET (or their designees) may be involved in tactical management of the response and recovery under the leadership of the designated Incident Commander, and may be designated as the Emergency Operations Group (EOG) for that emergency situation.

V. Activation of the Plan

Initial Notification

Any member of the W&L community who witnesses or receives information regarding an emergency or impending emergency situation should contact the Office of Public Safety at extension 8999, or (540) 458-8999 from off-campus, or dial 911. The University may receive initial notification of an emergency or impending emergency from a number of sources, including campus constituents, the National Weather Service, and/or local/state/federal emergency officials.

If the incident is a low level office or building incident that can be readily resolved, Public Safety or the appropriate department will take steps to remedy the situation and advise the appropriate member(s) of the EMET.

If the incident involves a more serious emergency, Public Safety will notify one or more of the appropriate senior staff members of the EMET, usually the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students. Senior staff will review the situation, consult with the President (or surrogate/designee) and other internal and external sources, as appropriate to the nature of the situation and the potential for threat to life and property, and designate a single Incident Commander, or implement other appropriate measures to address the situation. As emergency situations can be fluid and call for immediate action, senior staff members of the EMET may review a situation, decide on the appropriate course of action, and then notify the President (or surrogate/designee) of the planned course of action. However, in all cases, the President (or surrogate/designee) will be briefed and kept up to date.

Designation and Authority of Incident Commander; Convening Emergency Operations Group

If the Plan has been activated, a single Incident Commander will be designated as provided above and s/he will assemble an Emergency Operations Group (EOG). The Incident Commander will, in many cases, be the Director of Public Safety. In other cases, the Incident Commander may be another member of the EMET. Depending on the nature and circumstances of the emergency, the EOG may be made up of members of the EMET and/or may include other University administrators as appropriate. The Incident Commander will oversee the EOG and the management of all emergency activities, including development, implementation, and review of strategic decisions, and post-event review. The Incident Commander is the ultimate internal authority for all emergency response efforts involving the University in a particular emergency situation. S/he will lead a coordinated response effort, with members of the EOG charged with particular duties and leadership roles based on their areas of expertise.

Emergency Operations Center (EOC)

When needed in a particular emergency, the Board Room in Davis Hall (#206) will be the primary location for the initial meeting of the EOG. If the Davis Hall Board Room is inoperable or inaccessible, the University Facilities Office will be the secondary location for the EOG to gather. Should neither of these sites be feasible, another site will be designated after a campus status assessment.

In the event of a widespread emergency that involves the broader community, law enforcement, and/or other external agencies, the location for the EOG to meet may be changed to coordinate with the other entities or agencies involved in the emergency response, as appropriate.

Emergency Response Priorities

General priorities for emergency response at W&L are as follows:

Protection of Life
Stabilization of the Situation
Protect the Environment
Protect University Property
Restoration of Critical Services, Education, and Research Programs

First-Aid Centers

The Student Health Center will be the primary first-aid center. However, in a widespread campus emergency, the decision of whether and where to set up another campus location for first response, triage, and stabilization will be made by the Incident Commander and the EOG in consultation with area emergency services providers. Serious injuries will be transported to Carilion Stonewall Jackson Memorial Hospital.

Temporary Shelter

Should the emergency call for extensive temporary shelter, the Elrod Commons and/or Evans Dining Hall will be the facilities most likely designated to serve that purpose. The backup temporary shelter will likely be Doremus Gymnasium. If none of these sites is viable, the University will take steps to identify other available community resources for temporary shelter, including, but not limited to, coordinating with the City of Lexington, Rockbridge County, and/or other resources, as appropriate.

Emergency Communications

Upon confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate or impending threat to the health or safety of students or employees occurring on the campus, or in any other situation deemed appropriate by the President (or surrogate/designee), the President (or surrogate/designee) or the Incident Commander will, without delay, and taking into account the safety of the community, work to determine the content of an emergency notification and will instruct the Director of Communications to provide notice of the emergency using the Emergency Communications Systems, unless issuing the notification would compromise efforts to respond to the emergency. The University will take steps to see that Emergency Communications Systems provide information to individuals with disabilities, including vision or hearing disabilities, as effectively as they are provided to others.

The President (or surrogate/designee) or the Incident Commander will continue to work with the Director of Communications to provide content of relevant directions and updates to the campus community throughout the emergency situation, using the best and most effective means possible under the circumstances.

In certain emergency situations, when time does not permit consultation, the Director of Communications, upon notification from the Director of Public Safety or the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, may independently determine to issue a campus alert using one or more of the following components of the emergency communications systems and methods.

Emergency Communications Tools for On-Campus Constituents
(some or all of which may be used, as appropriate to the type and scope of emergency):
Emergency Communications Tools for Families and the General Public

The Incident Commander and the EOG will communicate and coordinate with community partners (other institutions of higher education, K-12 school systems, transportation providers, health care providers, local law enforcement, and City of Lexington government officials) as well as local/regional/state/federal emergency response officials and networks as necessary and appropriate in a particular emergency situation. The University will work to develop information sharing agreements as needed with such community partners to facilitate a prompt response in an emergency.

The Director of Communications or designee will be the principal media contact and University spokesperson with external audiences.

Assessment of Campus Property and Facilities Damage

The Director of Facilities and his/her staff will assess campus property and facilities damage as soon as possible and communicate their findings to the Incident Commander. In an emergency involving multiple facilities, they and the Incident Commander should first evaluate medical facilities and student residences. University Facilities will work to mitigate any damage to facilities and grounds to restore them to a functional level. The Director of Facilities, working with the Engineer, has the temporary emergency authority to evacuate or close a site they deem an immediate threat to life or safety, with the assistance of Public Safety, as appropriate, and subject to review by the Incident Commander. The Director of Facilities will also coordinate a survey of gas, electric, steam, water and sewer utilities, and, together with Public Safety, will also assist law enforcement and/or other external agencies with creating a safety perimeter at the site of the emergency, in consultation with the Incident Commander as appropriate. The Chemical Hygiene Officer, Radiation Safety Officer, and/or Director of Environmental Health and Safety may assist in providing information and/or on site response in emergencies involving hazardous substances, including assessing damage or vulnerability to supplies of such substances from emergencies impacting storage sites. If an emergency situation calls for water or utility rationing, the Incident Commander, in consultation with the Director of Facilities, Public Safety, and/or external agencies, will direct that the campus community be notified of the specifics of such rationing and will oversee compliance, as needed.

Search of Open Buildings for Individuals Sheltered, Entrapped, or Injured

If and when the Incident Commander believes it prudent and safe to do so, depending on the nature of a particular campus emergency, Public Safety, with the assistance of other designated individuals, as needed, shall conduct a search of all accessible University buildings to determine if any individuals are sheltered, entrapped, or injured inside.

Order for Evacuation of Campus

If it is necessary to evacuate the campus because of extensive failure of any critical system (sewer, water, electricity, etc.) or other danger present on campus, the Incident Commander, in consultation with the EOG and the President (or surrogate/designee), may order an evacuation. In that case, the University will communicate all evacuation details through the Emergency Communications Systems. See Appendix B for detailed information on campus evacuations.

Coordination with Local Officials

The Director of Communications will distribute this Plan to local officials (see Record of Distribution on page two of this Plan document). During a campus emergency with impact beyond the campus and requiring coordination/assistance from outside agencies, the Incident Commander, assisted by the Director of Communications and other members of the EOG as necessary, will coordinate with government officials and external agencies as appropriate to the emergency situation. W&L will conduct an integrated response to such emergencies using a joint or unified command structure. Decisions directly impacting W&L will be made by the Incident Commander, in consultation with the EOG and the President (or surrogate/designee). Contact information for all essential Lexington and Rockbridge emergency personnel, and key state and federal agencies likely to be involved with large-scale emergencies, is in Appendix F.

Key Roles

The Incident Commander and the EOG may request the following University offices to assume various roles during an emergency, sometimes outside the normal scope of their duties. If a department does not have specific emergency roles for its personnel, those personnel will become part of a pool of reserve personnel to assist as assigned by the Incident Commander and the EOG coordinating the specific emergency.

University OfficeRole
Academic Deans and Chairs Identify and address instructional and research issues, including feasibility of continuing class schedule. Coordinate necessary faculty resources.
Athletics Coordinate use of the Doremus Gym as a possible staging area, backup first-aid center, open bay temporary shelter, and/or temporary morgue.
Student Health Center

Provide medical support and mental health counseling. Assist in providing services to those with minor injuries and provide trauma support. Coordinate with first-aid services, community emergency services providers, and local medical providers. May be asked to assist/provide onsite medical triage.
Print & Mail Center

Provide courier services as directed. Provide printed material as directed (letters to parents, posters, temporary procedures, signage, etc.)
University Facilities Mitigate facility and grounds damages and work to restore functionality. Set up temporary quarters for displaced units. Evaluate structures and estimate repairs. Have temporary emergency authority to evacuate or close a site deemed to present a threat to life or well-being. Provide site and building information to the Incident Commander. Coordinate a survey of gas, electric, steam, water, and sewer utilities, as appropriate. Assist Public Safety and law enforcement with creating a safety perimeter at the site of the emergency.
Director of Public Safety

Provide site security, crowd control, evacuation, mobile communications, and investigation of incidents, as appropriate. Serve as liaison with on-site law enforcement, fire, and medical command personnel. Oversee periodic inventory and necessary testing of emergency supplies and equipment.
Chemical Hygiene Officer, Radiation Safety Officer, and/or Director of Environmental Health and Safety Assist in providing information and/or on site response in emergencies involving hazardous substances. Assess damage or vulnerability to supplies of such substances from emergencies impacting storage sites.
University Veterinarian and/or Chair of Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) Provide for pre-emergency care/transport of laboratory animals when practical. Provide post-emergency response to assess and address health and safety threats to laboratory animals and/or take appropriate measures to dispose of deceased animals.
Center for International Education Serve as resource for Student Affairs Division and Provost in emergencies involving international students or scholars. Serve as primary contact with State Department and embassies, immigration authorities, and overseas resources. Assist as needed in liaison with overseas family members and/or local providers in emergencies calling for special religious or cultural customs (such as death of an international student or scholar).
Student Affairs Division Coordination of non-academic needs of students, including shelter, food, health care, and transportation services. Serve as liaison with families. Coordinate Resident Assistants/Resident Advisors and other staff or student resources as building runners for communication with students in on- and off-campus housing, when other means of communication are unavailable.
Information Technology Assure availability of key/critical systems (onsite restoration if required or offsite/disaster recovery options). Facilitate and support emergency technology offerings (devices and connectivity as possible, including laptops, tablets, telephones [plus phone bank and 800 number if feasible and beneficial], cellular broadband, etc.) at Emergency Operations Center.
Transportation
(Business Office)
Provide or arrange for transportation services, as required.
Communications and Public Affairs Media coordination, campus communications, community liaison, and spokesperson.
Secretary of the University Staff the President's office, communicate with trustees, and gather EMET and other personnel on call of the President.
University Dining Services Provide dining services for students, displaced personnel, and emergency workers. Oversee procurement and stockpiling of emergency food and water supplies.
Human Resources Coordination of emergency needs of employees on campus, including shelter, food, health care, and transportation services, as appropriate. Serve as liaison with families.


Emergency Equipment and Supplies

The University will stock emergency supplies and equipment in a location centrally available to the campus and inform key campus emergency personnel of the location.

Termination of State of Emergency

The President (or surrogate/designee), in consultation with the Incident Commander and the EOG, has the sole authority to declare an end to any state of emergency. The Director of Communications will send follow-up information to the campus community via Emergency Communications Systems as necessary.

Departmental Emergency Management Plans

At the time of publication of this Plan document, the offices listed above that have particular roles under this Plan are currently preparing or updating departmental emergency management plans to provide for carrying out those roles and responsibilities, and such departmental plans will be appended to this Plan document when finalized. In addition, certain other departments, in order to protect invaluable and irreplaceable University assets, have emergency management plans in place to provide for their particular and unique university records and/or assets, and are responsible for reviewing those plans annually and updating them as appropriate:

Training and Tests

The EMET or a subgroup of that team, as directed by the President, will annually review this Plan. Members of the EMET and departments having particular roles and responsibilities under this Plan will receive training on their roles and responsibilities. The Plan will be tested at least annually using tabletop and/or other tests/exercises, including local government and emergency response officials, and other resources, as appropriate. The University, through the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students, will document tests and exercises of the Plan, including date, time, and specifics of each test/exercise, and whether it was announced or unannounced. In conjunction with such annual tests of the Plan, and otherwise as required by applicable law, the University will publicize the Plan and emergency guidance and resources.

VI. Adoption, History of Prior Plan Documents, and Record of Distribution

Adoption

The Washington and Lee University Emergency Management Plan ("the Plan" or "this Plan") is adopted effective September 29, 2017. It replaces the prior Emergency Management Plan, which was adopted September 30, 2016.

Approved by: William C. Dudley, President

A formal review of this Plan will occur annually by the Emergency Management Executive Team, or a subgroup of that Team, as designated by the President. In addition, the Plan will be revisited, and updated as necessary, based on issues or concerns identified by drills, exercises, actual emergency situations, and/or changes necessitated by regulatory developments, agency guidance, organizational structure, technological changes, etc. As changes are made to the Plan, they will be approved by the President of the University and recorded by date and description below to provide a record of the Plan's modification.

History of Prior Plan Documents and Amendments

Record of Distribution

Copies of this Plan document have been distributed by the University's Director of Communications to the Commandant of the Virginia Military Institute, the Chiefs of the Fire and Police Departments of the City of Lexington, the Emergency Manager for the City of Lexington, the Sheriff of Rockbridge County, the Coordinator for Emergency Management for Rockbridge County, and the Chief Executive Officer of the Carilion Stonewall Jackson Hospital. The Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students or designee has provided a copy of this Plan document to each member of the Emergency Management Executive Team and has placed a copy in each location designated herein as an Emergency Operations Center. Notice of the adoption of this Plan has been provided to the Washington and Lee University campus community by mass email, and postings in Campus Notices and the Human Resources Newsletter. This Plan has also been made available to the campus community and the general public by posting on the University's main website (www.wlu.edu) and emergency website (http://emergency.wlu.edu).

VII. Acknowledgements

The following institutional plan documents and guidance information served as valuable resources in the development of this Plan document:

Management of Specific Emergency SituationsAppendix A

This Appendix describes the courses of action that are unique to specific emergency situations. The purpose of this Appendix is to provide guidance for any individual who is faced with a specific emergency situation, including whom to notify, how to respond, and other situation-specific information.

Each specific emergency situation contains three different components: Initial Response, General Instructions, and Special Considerations. The information contained under the heading "Initial Response" is designed to serve as a guide for individuals who discover or identify a specific emergency situation. The information set forth under the heading "General Instructions" is designed to provide guidance to all students, faculty, staff, and others in responding to a specific emergency situation. The information under the "Special Considerations" heading includes other information that may be helpful in handling or responding to a specific emergency situation.

The list of specific emergency situations contained in this Appendix is not exhaustive. If you are faced with an emergency situation that is not specifically identified in this Appendix, you should contact the Office of Public Safety at extension 8999, or 540.458.8999 from off-campus, or dial 911. In any situation, if you call either 911 or Public Safety, the other will be notified automatically. Given the communication between Public Safety and the 911 emergency responders, if you are responding to an emergency and are unsure as to which number to call, rest assured that either call you make will prompt an emergency response.

Some of the specific emergency situations contained in this Appendix could involve a bias, hate, or discrimination component. In such instances, the emergency situation itself will be handled under this Plan. After the emergency situation has been addressed, any bias, hate, or discrimination component will be addressed separately under W&L's University Policy on Prohibited Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation Other Than Sex, Sexual Discrimination and Misconduct Policy, and/or other applicable University policies and procedures.

1. Bomb Threat

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

Bomb Threat Checklist

Remain calm. Gather as much information as possible regarding the bomb and the caller. If possible, have someone else contact Public Safety during the call at extension 8999, or 540.458.8999 from off campus. If no one else has contacted Public Safety, notify Public Safety immediately after the caller has ended the call.

Time:
Call Received:
Call Ended:
Caller's Exact First Words (ask caller to repeat if necessary):

Questions to ask
  1. When is the bomb going to explode?
  2. Where is the bomb located?
    1. What building?
    2. What floor?
    3. What room or area?
  3. What kind of bomb is it?
  4. What does it look like?
  5. What will cause it to explode?
  6. Why has the bomb been planted?
  7. Did you place the bomb?
  8. Where are you calling from?
Caller's Voice

Any Accent?
Familiar Voice?
Whose?
Any background noises?

Other information:
Your Name:
Telephone Number Called:

2. Civil Disturbance

A civil disturbance, for purposes of this Plan, is a disruptive event caused by a group of people, including, but not limited to, riots, protests, sit-ins, demonstrations, and illegal parades. A civil disturbance might include actual or potential violence or other crimes, either immediately or as the disturbance escalates.

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

3. Death of a Student, Faculty or Staff Member

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

4. Earthquake/Aftershock

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

5. Explosion

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

6. Fire

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

7. Flooding

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

8. Food-Borne Illness or Incidents

Initial Response

General Instructions

9. Hazardous Materials Incident

A hazardous materials incident may be a spill or release of chemicals, radioactive materials, or biological materials that endangers people or the environment. Simple spills that can be managed by the user and do not endanger people or the environment can be cleaned up by an individual who has been trained pursuant to the Chemical Spill Response Plan, the Chemical Hygiene Plan, and/or the Radiation Safety Manual, as applicable, and do not constitute an emergency situation for purposes of this Plan.

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

10. Infrastructure Failure

From time to time, infrastructure problems could render work sites, classrooms and residence halls unsafe or uninhabitable. These problems include, but are not limited to, failures of electricity, computers, steam, water or telephones.

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

11. Pandemics and Infectious Diseases

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

12. Snow or Ice Storm

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

13. Suspicious Packages/Mail

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

14. Tornado/Derecho/High Winds

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

15. Violent Incidents

For purposes of this Plan, violent incidents include, but are not limited to, the following:

Initial Response

General Instructions

Special Considerations

EvacuationAppendix B

This Appendix describes the procedures recommended for evacuation of individual buildings or areas, or the entire campus, as a result of a campus emergency. All members of the University community should become familiar with these recommended evacuation procedures. This includes learning where exits are located in classroom, work, and residential buildings, knowing the location of the assembly area designated for your location, and knowing the off-campus transportation pick up site.

An evacuation may be necessary when conditions are such that it is no longer safe for individuals to remain inside of a single building or area, within a section of campus, or anywhere on campus, whether due to extensive failure of critical systems or other danger(s). You may be notified of the need to evacuate by the sounding of a fire alarm in the building, a directive from Public Safety or University Facilities personnel, or by an evacuation order communicated through the Emergency Communications Systems. However, if you are in a campus building and, despite not having received any order to evacuate, you believe it is not safe for individuals to remain inside the building (due to a fire or hazardous materials leak, for example), pull the nearest fire alarm to alert all those in the building to evacuate, and follow the evacuation procedures below.

Building or Area Evacuation

If a fire alarm sounds or you receive an order to evacuate from Public Safety or University Facilities personnel or through the Emergency Communications Systems, follow these procedures:

Accounting for Individuals following Building/Area Evacuation

Campus Evacuation

In case of a campus-wide disaster, such as a major earthquake, large hazardous materials release, or widespread fire, certain sections of campus, or the entire campus, may need to be evacuated, whether because of extensive failure of critical systems or other dangers on campus. In such cases, the Incident Commander, in consultation with the EOG and the President (or surrogate/designee), Public Safety, and others, depending on the situation), may order an evacuation and, with the coordination of any appropriate external agencies, will determine the scope and method of implementing such an evacuation, as warranted by the situation.

Public Safety and the Emergency Communications Systems will alert the campus community on specific evacuation details. However, if an order is given to evacuate the campus or a section of campus, follow these general procedures:

Accounting for Individuals During or Following Campus Evacuation

Evacuation of Individuals with Disabilities

If you have a disability and are unable to evacuate a building or area on your own, stay calm and take steps to protect yourself, as appropriate. Call 911 or Public Safety at extension 8999, or 540.458.8999 from off-campus, and tell the responder where you are or where you will be and if you have a service animal or other assistive devices or equipment. If you must move:

NOTE: It is suggested that individuals with disabilities prepare for emergencies by learning the locations of exit corridors and enclosed stairwells and by informing co-workers, professors, and/or classmates of the best methods of assistance during an emergency. For assistance with preplanning for an emergency, contact the Title IX Coordinator and Director of Disability Resources or your supervisor or department head (for employees). A few non-exclusive examples of preplanning measures include:Learning alternate exit routes from commonly used areas

Assisting Individuals with Disabilities in Evacuation

During an emergency, if you notice an individual with a disability who may need assistance, ask him/her if s/he needs help, how you can properly provide assistance, and if s/he needs to take any necessary items, including, but not limited to, service animals or other assistive devices or equipment.

The following guidance is intended to provide general instructions for aiding individuals with disabilities during an evacuation based on the specific type of disability:

Designated Assembly Areas and Off-campus Transportation Pickup Site

In the event of any emergency where evacuation of sections of campus or the entire campus is necessary, the following locations have been designated as assembly areas where students, faculty, staff and visitors are to report once they have evacuated the listed buildings. Remain at the designated location until you are accounted for and/or receive further instructions.

Work/Living AreasDesignated Assembly Location
7 Courthouse Square Front corner of courtyard near Main Street
2 South Main Street (Business Office, Treasurer) Front corner of courtyard near Main Street
109 South Jefferson Street (Dance Program) Sidewalk in front of building
11 University Place (Lee Chapel Museum Administration) Sidewalk on uphill (northwest) side of building
Alpha Delta Pi Sorority House Grass area in front of sorority houses
Archaeology Laboratory Parking lot across West Denny Circle
Arts, Recreation, and Culture House Davidson Park parking lot - rear of Sustainability House
Baker Hall Sidewalk in Washington Street Park
Beta Theta Pi Fraternity House Red Square parking lot
Chavis House Sidewalk in front of Early-Fielding
Chi Omega Sorority House Grass area in front of sorority houses
Chi Psi Fraternity House Sidewalk in front of house
Culinary House Lee Chapel Visitor Lot
Davis Hall Sidewalk in Washington Street Park
Delta Society House Grass area in front of sorority houses
Development Building Leyburn Library loading dock driveway
Doremus Gym Cannan Green
Duchossois Tennis Center Parking lot on West Denny Circle
Early-Fielding Sidewalk across Washington Street
Elrod Commons Cannan Green near Doremus Gymnasium
Evans Hall Sidewalk in front (Washington Street)
Financial Aid Office Sidewalk on uphill (northwest) side of building
Gaines Residence Hall Washington Street Park 
Gilliam Admissions House Walkway at Letcher Avenue
Global Service House Sidewalk in front of house
Graham-Lees Residence Hall Cannan Green near Elrod Commons
Heating-Cooling Plant Woods Creek parking lot
Hillel House Sidewalk in front of R.E. Lee Memorial Church
Holekamp Hall Courtyard near Elrod Commons
Hopkins House Hopkins Green
Hotchkiss Alumni House Walkway at Letcher Avenue
Howe Annex Walkway near rear of Robinson/Tucker
Howe Hall Walkway near rear of Robinson/Tucker
Huntley Hall Courtyard near Elrod Commons
Kappa Alpha Order Fraternity House Davidson Park parking lot — rear of Kappa Sigma
Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority House Grass area in front of sorority houses
Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority House Grass area in front of sorority houses
Kappa Sigma Fraternity House Davidson Park parking lot — near Sustainability House
Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity House Parking lot
Lee Chapel and Museum Walkway on Colonnade side toward Washington Hall
Lee House Sidewalk across Washington Street in front of Evans
Lee-Jackson House Courtyard beside Huntley Hall
Lenfest Hall Box Office parking lot
Leyburn Library Walkway near rear of Washington Hall
Mattingly House Sidewalk near Early-Fielding
Morris House Courtyard beside Huntley Hall
Newcomb Hall Walkway in front of Leyburn Library
Outing Club House Davidson Park parking lot
Parmly Hall Walkway near rear of Robinson/Tucker
Payne Hall Walkway in front of Leyburn Library
Phi Delta Theta Fraternity House Red Square parking lot
Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity House Parking lot
Pi Beta Phi Sorority House Grass area in front of sorority houses
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity House Red Square parking lot
Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity House Parking lot behind house
Public Safety Office Woods Creek parking lot
Reeves Center Walkway near rear of Tucker
Reid Hall Courtyard near Elrod Commons
Robinson Hall Walkway in front of Leyburn Library
Ruscio Center for Global Learning Walkway in front of Science Building
Science Addition Walkway near rear of Robinson/Tucker
Sigma Chi Fraternity House Davidson Park parking lot — rear of Sustainability House
Sigma Nu Fraternity House Lee Chapel Visitor Lot
Spanish House Sidewalk near Early-Fielding
Student Activities Pavilion Parking lot on West Denny Circle
Student Health Center Gaines Hall parking lot
Sustainability House Davidson Park parking lot — near Sigma Chi
Sydney Lewis Hall Lewis Hall visitor parking lot area
Tucker Hall Walkway in front of Leyburn Library
University Facilities Maintenance and Operations Building Parking lot on West Denny Circle
University Facilities Office Parking lot on West Denny Circle
Village (Upper-Division Housing including two community buildings) Parking lot between Village and Athletic Practice Fields (Liberty Hall Lot)
Warner Athletic Center Cannan Green near Elrod Commons
Washington Hall Walkway in front of Leyburn Library
Watson Pavilion Walkway near rear of Tucker
Wilson Field Stadium Wilson Field
Wilson Hall Box Office parking lot
Woods Creek Apartments (East, Central and West) Sidewalk on East Denny Circle

Shelter in PlaceAppendix C

This Appendix describes the procedures recommended when you are instructed to shelter in place. For purposes of this Plan, the term shelter in place is intended to include the safety strategy often referred to as "lockdown." All members of the W&L community should become familiar with these recommended procedures. For additional guidance related to a specific type of emergency situation, see the applicable section(s) of Appendix A.

It may be necessary to shelter in place when conditions are such that it is safest to go inside or remain inside a building or room. This strategy is used when conditions do not allow for a safe evacuation or when being inside a building or room provides additional protection from an emergency situation. You may be notified of the need to shelter in place by a directive from Public Safety personnel or an order to shelter in place communicated through the Emergency Communications Systems. However, if you are in a campus building and, despite not having received any order to shelter in place, you believe it is not safe to leave the building, or if you are outside and believe that it is safest to be indoors (due to a weather emergency or hazardous materials incident, for example), follow the shelter in place procedures below.

Shelter in Place

If you are instructed to shelter in place:

Accounting for Individuals When Instructed to Shelter In Place

Shelter in Place for Individuals with Disabilities

If you have a disability and are unable to get to a building or area to shelter in place on your own, stay calm and take steps to protect yourself, as appropriate. If it is safe to do so, call 911 or Public Safety at extension 8999, or 540.458.8999 from off-campus, and tell the responder where you are or where you will be and if you have a service animal or other assistive devices or equipment. If you must move:

NOTE: It is suggested that individuals with disabilities prepare for emergencies before they happen and inform co-workers, professors, and/or classmates of the best methods of assistance during an emergency. For assistance with preplanning for an emergency, contact the Title IX Coordinator and Director of Disability Resources or your supervisor or department head (for employees). A few examples of preplanning measures include:

Assisting Individuals with Disabilities When Instructed to Shelter in Place

During an emergency, if you notice an individual with a disability who may need assistance, ask him/her if s/he needs help, how you can properly provide assistance, and if s/he needs to take any necessary items, including, but not limited to, service animals or other assistive devices or equipment.

The following guidance is intended to provide general instructions for aiding individuals with disabilities when instructed to shelter in place, based on the specific type of disability:

Public Health, Medical, and Mental Health ProvisionsAppendix D

This Appendix describes the courses of action that the University will implement to address emergency medical, public health, and mental health counseling issues, including treatment needs, medical supplies, and reporting.

Public Health, Medical, and Mental Health Treatment

In the event of an emergency, the Student Health Center medical personnel who are on campus will be available to assist in the evaluation and care of students and others who require medical attention. Additionally, the University Counseling staff will be available to provide counseling support services for students and others affected by an emergency situation. Untrained University personnel should only provide basic first aid and/or cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if necessary and appropriate.

If an emergency situation requires additional health care providers, the University will use all reasonable efforts to secure additional providers or arrange for those affected to be transported to other locations where proper evaluation and care may be obtained. When external providers or agencies are involved in providing emergency care, the Student Health Center and University Counseling personnel will coordinate their efforts with these external providers and agencies based on the facts and circumstances of each emergency situation. The University has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the Central Shenandoah Health District, in effect from June 2017 through June 2022, to provide for coordination and collaboration in dispensing mass vaccination and treatment to the University's students, employees and employee family members in a public health emergency.

Emergency Medical Supplies

The University maintains emergency medical supplies, including first aid kits and automatic external defibrillators (AEDs). Large first aid kits are located in the University Facilities Office, the Marketplace area of Elrod Commons, and Evans Dining Hall. Small first aid kits are located in the other dining venues on campus. Each Public Safety patrol vehicle and the Public Safety Office also have first aid kits, which are maintained and refilled by Public Safety. Additionally, the Student Health Center has a first aid kit packed and ready to respond to an emergency situation.

The University has installed approximately 20 AEDs in various locations around campus, which are designated on the campus map (http://campusmap.wlu.edu). The Director of Environmental Health and Safety is responsible for maintaining the AEDs in working order.

Reporting Information to Health Department

Public Safety, the Student Health Center, or other University personnel will report information about outbreaks, epidemics, or other unusual medical situations to the health department or other external agencies, as appropriate or required by law.

Emergencies in Off-Campus Programs (Domestic or International)Appendix E

This Appendix provides general guidance for addressing emergency situations that occur away from campus. Specifically, this Appendix is designed to address emergency situations that may arise during off-campus trips and/or programs involving W&L students, faculty and/or staff (whether academic, athletic, cultural, or otherwise). Such emergency situations may include, but are not limited to, the following:

This Appendix is addressed to faculty and staff coordinators of W&L domestic and international off-campus programs (from single day field trips or athletic events to extended international trips), who will have primary responsibility for addressing such off-campus emergencies and who will be the critical point of contact for W&L officials on campus. To the extent relevant, faculty/staff coordinators should also refer to the threat specific instructions and guidance provided in Appendix A of this Plan in particular emergency situations.

Advance Planning and Participant Orientation

Traveling and studying away from campus carries certain inherent risks and W&L faculty and staff cannot ensure the safety of students and other participants in off-campus trips. Nevertheless, recognizing these inherent risks, faculty and staff coordinating trips away from campus should take reasonable steps to prepare themselves to deal with any situation that may arise. As part of this preparation, the coordinating faculty and staff should do the following in advance of travel:

NOTE: Faculty leading Spring Term Abroad trips should follow the specific guidelines for such programs.

General Instructions to Follow in Any Emergency

Each emergency situation will require a unique response specific to the event at hand, which will depend upon an immediate assessment of the situation and the appropriate actions that should be taken under the circumstances. However, there are several key steps that help in assessing any situation, establishing an appropriate course of action, and accounting for all participants.

NOTE: If a crime occurs in housing or classroom space leased by the University, report details on the incident to W&L's Office of Public Safety as soon as practicable following the incident or upon return to campus, so that the incident can be accounted for in Campus Security Act compliance statistical reporting.

Additional Procedures in the Event of Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence, or Sex-Based Stalking

NOTE: Faculty and staff accompanying students on trips away from campus are designated as responsible employees, and as such, have a duty to report sexual assaults, relationship violence, and sex-based stalking. Reports can be made to the Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students or the Title IX Coordinator.

Additional Procedures in the Event of a Death on an International Trip

Faculty Program Director Accident or Medical Emergency

If the faculty or staff coordinating the trip/program becomes ill, has an accident, or otherwise becomes unable or unavailable to carry out his/her duties, another faculty or staff member on the trip, or one of the students or other participants, should immediately contact the University Emergency Number (540) 458-8999.

Special Measures if Terrorist or Anti-American Threats or Acts Occur on International Trips

Contacting the University to Confirm Your Group is Unaffected by an Emergency in Your City/Country

If a major incident has occurred within the country/city you are visiting (act of terrorism, natural disaster, etc.), but has not affected your group, please contact the University Emergency Number (540) 458-8999 to confirm that all participants are safe so that the University will be able to give family members or others who contact the University current information on the safety of the participants.

Campus Response to Emergencies during Off-Campus Trips

Criteria/Factors to Consider for Suspending/Cancelling a Program

The University will consider various factors, which may include some or all of the following, in deciding whether to suspend or cancel an international (or domestic) program:

Evacuation

In some cases (such as a terrorist attack or natural disaster in the immediate vicinity of the program site), it may be necessary to consider evacuating participants from the program site or host country. As a situation unfolds, in order to develop an action plan, the program director and trip provider or host institution representative, together with the University's Office of International Education, appropriate officials from Emergency Management Executive Team, and other appropriate University officials will assess the nature and extent of the situation, and evaluate the risks to safety and security of participants, including:

Off-Site Emergency PersonnelAppendix F

Phone numbers current as of September 2017.

Contact PersonPhone Number
City of Lexington
Mayor (Frank Friedman) 540-462-3700
City Manager (Noah Simon) 540-462-3700
Emergency Management Coordinator/Fire Marshall (Trent Roberts) 540-463-3210
Police Chief (Sam Roman, Jr.) 540-462-3705
Fire and Rescue Chief (Ty Dickerson) 540-463-3210
Rockbridge County
Chairman, Board of Supervisors (David Hinty, Jr.) 540-784-0709
Director of Fire and EMS (Nathan Ramsey) 540-463-1467/2532
Sheriff (Chris Blalock) 540-463-7329
Carilion Stonewall Jackson Hospital
Director of Emergency Services (Karen Lafon) 540-458-3300
Central Shenandoah Health District
Administrative Offices 540-332-7830
After Hours Emergency 866-531-3068
American Red Cross
National Office 800-733-2767
Roanoke Office 540-985-3535
Virginia Department of Emergency Management
Virginia Emergency Operations Center 804-674-2400
Virginia Highway Patrol (Virginia State Police)
24-Hour Emergency Response 804-674-2000/
800-542-5959
Natural Bridge Area Office (M-F 8:30-5:00) 540-291-2548
Federal Emergency Management Agency
Region III 215-931-5500

1This information has been compiled from guidance issued by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Department of Homeland Security and the United States Postal Service.