Physics and Engineering Degree Requirements

2017 - 2018 Catalog

The Physics department has the following degrees:

Engineering major leading to BS degree

A major in engineering leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 63 credits:

  1. PHYS 111, 112, 113, 114; MATH 101, 102, 221, 332; ENGN 178, 203, 204, 207 (PHYS 207), 225 (PHYS 225), 378, 379
  2. One lecture/lab sequence chosen from ENGN 301+351 or ENGN 311+361
  3. Three additional courses chosen from ENGN 208, 240, 260, 267, 295, 301+351, 311+361, 312, 330, 395
  4. One four-credit laboratory course not used above chosen from
    • CHEM 110 or CSCI 121, or
    • 200 level or above from a list of approved courses in BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, ENGN, GEOL, PHYS
  1. Required courses
    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I
      FDRSL
      Credits3
      Prerequisiteor corequisite: MATH 101 or equivalent. Corequisite: PHYS 113
      FacultyStaff

      An introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics. Topics include Newton's laws, wave motion, and the laws of thermodynamics. This course must be taken simultaneously with Physics 113.


    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II
      FDRSL
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 111. Corequisite: PHYS 114
      FacultyStaff

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include electricity and magnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum theory. This course must be taken simultaneously with PHYS 114.


    • PHYS 113 - General Physics Laboratory I
      FDRSL
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: PHYS 111. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 111
      FacultyStaff

      Laboratory exercises in classical mechanics. Laboratory course with fee.


    • PHYS 114 - General Physics Laboratory II
      FDRSL
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: PHYS 112. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 112
      FacultyStaff

      Laboratory exercises in electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Laboratory course with fee.


    • MATH 101 - Calculus I
      FDRFM
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNote: Students needing this course to fulfill an FDR requirement should add to a waiting list when open; additional sections may be added

      An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem.

      Fall 2017, MATH 101B-01: Calculus I for Beginners: A First Course (3). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. This section meets 4 hours a week and is restricted to and specially tailored for those who are beginning their study of calculus. Students who have already seen calculus, yet wish to retake it, must register for MATH 101, 101E, or 101F instead of 101B. An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. (FM) Staff.
       
      Fall 2017, MATH 101E-01: Calculus I with Biology Applications (3). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Corequisite: BIOL 111 or CHEM 110. This section meets 4 hours a week and has a strong emphasis on biological applications, and is intended to benefit students interested in biological majors and health-related careers. It is designed and specially tailored for First-Years who took high school biology and who are taking a lab-science course concurrently. It is intended both for those students who are beginning their study of calculus and for those who have seen some calculus but want to start over at the beginning of the calculus sequence. Mathematical concepts include the study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. This section meets four days per week. (FM) Toporikova.
       
      Fall 2017, MATH 101F-01: Calculus and Environmental Data (3). This section meets 3 hours a week. The course covers the same calculus material as Math 101, namely the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. Applications in this section are focused on data collected by the Environmental Protection Agency and include discussions of finding an appropriate model for a data set and using calculus tools to analyze models. (FM) Staff.

       


    • MATH 102 - Calculus II
      FDRFM
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteThe equivalent of MATH 101 with C grade or better. Note: Students wanting to take this course should add to the waiting list when open; additional sections may be added
      FacultyStaff

      A continuation of MATH 101, including techniques and applications of integration, transcendental functions, and infinite series.


    • MATH 221 - Multivariable Calculus
      FDRSC
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteThe equivalent of MATH 102 with C grade or better. Note: Students needing this course to fulfill an FDR requirement should add to a waiting list when open; additional sections may be added

      Motion in three dimensions, parametric curves, differential calculus of multivariable functions, multiple integrals, line integrals, and Green's Theorem.


    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 with C grade or better

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.


    • ENGN 178 - Introduction to Engineering
      FDRSC
      Credits4
      FacultyD'Alessandro, Erickson, Kuehner

      This course introduces students to basic skills useful to engineers, the engineering design process, and the engineering profession. Students learn various topics of engineering, including engineering disciplines, the role of an engineer in the engineering design process, and engineering ethics. Skills learned in this course include programming and the preparation of engineering drawings. Programming skills are developed using flowcharting and MATLAB. Autodesk Inventor is used to create three-dimensional solid models and engineering drawings. The course culminates in a collaborative design project, allowing students to use their new skills


    • ENGN 203 - Mechanics I: Statics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in MATH-101 and PHYS-111 (PHYS 111 as corequisite with instructor consent)
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      The science of mechanics is used to study bodies in equilibrium under the action of external forces. Emphasis is on problem solving: trusses, frames and machines, centroids, area moments of inertia, beams, cables, and friction.


    • ENGN 204 - Mechanics II: Dynamics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade C or better in ENGN 203
      FacultyKuehner

      A study of kinetics of particles and rigid bodies including force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, momentum. A student may not receive degree credit for both ENGN 204 and PHYS 230.


    • ENGN 207 - Electrical Circuits (PHYS 207)
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in PHYS 112. Corequisite: ENGN 207L
      FacultyErickson

      A detailed study of electrical circuits and the methods used in their analysis. Basic circuit components, as well as devices such as operational amplifiers, are investigated. The laboratory acquaints the student both with fundamental electronic diagnostic equipment and with the design and behavior of useful circuits. Laboratory course.


    • ENGN 225 - Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering (PHYS 225)
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112, MATH 221
      FacultyErickson

      Study of a collection of mathematical techniques particularly useful in upper-level courses in physics and engineering: vector differential operators such as gradient, divergence, and curl; functions of complex variables; Fourier analysis; orthogonal functions; matrix algebra and the matrix eigenvalue problem; ordinary and partial differential equations.


    • ENGN 378 - Capstone Design
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in all of the following: ENGN 178,204,207, 225; in either ENGN 301 with 351 or ENGN 311 with 361; and in one engineering elective for the major
      FacultyD'Alessandro, Erickson, Kuehner

      First term of the year-long capstone design project in which student teams solve open-ended engineering problems by integrating and synthesizing engineering design and analysis learned in previous courses. Project topics vary year-to-year and are driven by student interest. The fall term is dedicated to the design and planning phases. This includes project topic selection; comprehensive study of necessary background material; and identification of design objectives, conceptual models, and materials and equipment needed. This course culminates with submission of a full design proposal. Laboratory course with fee.


    • ENGN 379 - Capstone Design
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in ENGN 378
      FacultyD'Alessandro, Erickson, Kuehner

      Second term of the year-long capstone design project in which student teams solve open-ended engineering problems by integrating and synthesizing engineering design and analysis learned in previous courses. Project topics vary year-to-year and are driven by student interest. The winter term is dedicated to implementation -- building, testing, analyzing, and revising the design, culminating with a public presentation and proof-of-concept demonstration. Laboratory course with fee.


  2. One lecture/lab sequence chosen from:
    • ENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics +
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in ENGN 203. Corequisite: ENGN 351
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      Internal equilibrium of members; introduction to mechanics of continuous media; concepts of stress, material properties, principal moments of inertia; deformation caused by axial loads, shear, torsion, bending and combined loading.


    • ENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: ENGN 301
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      Experimental observation and correlation with theoretical predictions of elastic behavior of structures under static loading; statically determinate loading of beams; tension of metals; compression of mortar; torsion; and computer models for stress analysis. Laboratory course.


    • or
    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics +
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in ENGN 204 or PHYS 230 and grade of C or better in ENGN (PHYS) 225. Corequisite: ENGN 361
      FacultyKuehner

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and differential analysis.


    • ENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 311
      FacultyKuehner

      Experimental investigation of fluid mechanics under static and dynamic conditions. Correlation of experimental results with theoretical models of fluid behavior. Experiments examine concepts such as hydrostatic force, fluid kinematics, kinetics, and energy. Laboratory course.


  3. Three additional courses chosen from:
    • ENGN 208 - Electronics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteC or better in ENGN (PHYS) 207
      FacultyErickson

      An introduction to practical analog and digital electronics emphasizing design, construction, and measurement of circuits in the laboratory. Topics may include diode wave-shaping circuits, transistor audio amplifiers, power supplies, oscillators, data converters (A/D and D/A), Boolean logic gates, programmable logic devices, flip-flops, counters, data storage and retrieval, and a survey of emerging technologies.


    • ENGN 240 - Thermodynamics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 and C or better in PHYS 112
      FacultyKuehner

      A study of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of matter, and applications to engineering processes.


    • ENGN 260 - Materials Science
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in PHYS 111
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      An introduction to solid state materials. A study of the relation between microstructure and the corresponding physical properties for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites.


    • ENGN 267 - Bioengineering and Bioinspired Design
      FDRSC
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 or instructor consent
      FacultyErickson

      Interdisciplinary study of the physical principles of animal navigation and sensory mechanisms. This course integrates biology, physics, engineering, and quantitative methods to study how an animal's physiology is optimized to perform a critical function, as well as how these biological systems inspire new technologies. Topics include: long-distance navigation; locomotion; optical, thermal, and auditory sensing; bioelectricity; biomaterials; and swarm synchronicity. Some examples of questions addressed are: How does a loggerhead turtle navigate during a 9,000 mile open-ocean swim to return to the beach where it was born? How does a blowfly hover and outmaneuver an F-16? How is the mantis shrimp eye guiding the next revolution in DVD technology? This course is intended for students interested in working on problems at the boundary of biology and physics/engineering, and is appropriate for those who have more experience in one field than the other. Lectures, reading and discussion of research literature, and hands-on investigation/field-work, where appropriate.


    • ENGN 295 - Intermediate Special Topics in Engineering
      Credits3 credits for fall or winter; 4 credits for spring
      PrerequisiteVary with topic

      Intermediate work in bioengineering, solid mechanics, fluid mechanics or materials science. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits if the topics are different.


    • ENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics +
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in ENGN 203. Corequisite: ENGN 351
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      Internal equilibrium of members; introduction to mechanics of continuous media; concepts of stress, material properties, principal moments of inertia; deformation caused by axial loads, shear, torsion, bending and combined loading.


    • ENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: ENGN 301
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      Experimental observation and correlation with theoretical predictions of elastic behavior of structures under static loading; statically determinate loading of beams; tension of metals; compression of mortar; torsion; and computer models for stress analysis. Laboratory course.


    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics +
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in ENGN 204 or PHYS 230 and grade of C or better in ENGN (PHYS) 225. Corequisite: ENGN 361
      FacultyKuehner

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and differential analysis.


    • ENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 311
      FacultyKuehner

      Experimental investigation of fluid mechanics under static and dynamic conditions. Correlation of experimental results with theoretical models of fluid behavior. Experiments examine concepts such as hydrostatic force, fluid kinematics, kinetics, and energy. Laboratory course.


    • ENGN 312 - Heat Transfer
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332 and grade of C or better in ENGN 311
      FacultyKuehner

      Principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation. Topics include transient and steady state analysis, boiling, condensation, and heat exchanger analysis. Application of these principles to selected problems in engineering.


    • ENGN 330 - Mechanical Vibrations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332 and grade of C or better in ENGN 204 or PHYS 230
      FacultyErickson

      Analysis of lumped parameter and continuous systems (free and forced, damped and undamped, single- and multi-degree-of-freedom); transient response to shock pulses; simple linear systems; exact and approximate solution techniques; and solution to continuous systems using partial differential equations.


    • ENGN 395 - Special Topics in Engineering
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJunior standing
      FacultyStaff

      Advanced work in solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, or materials science. Topics selected based on student interest. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits if the topics are different.


  4. One four-credit laboratory course not used above chosen from:
    • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry
      FDRSL
      Credits4
      FacultyDesjardins, LaRiviere, Tuchler, Uffelman, Abry

      This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course with fee.


    • CSCI 121 - Scientific Computing
      FDRFM
      Credits4
      FacultyLevy

      An introduction to computer programming for scientific applications and a survey of the main methodological areas of scientific computation. The course provides the tools needed for students to use computers effectively in scientific work, whether in physics, chemistry, mathematics, economics, biology, psychology, or any field involving quantitative work. Programming in Matlab, a scientific-computing software package, with a focus on topics relevant to students' major fields of study. Lectures and formal labs.


    • or200 level or above from a list of approved courses in BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, ENGN, GEOL, PHYS

Integrated Engineering major leading to BS degree

A major in integrated engineering leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 65 credits including the following. This major may not be combined with the major in engineering nor with a major in the respective department associated with the science track that a student selects for the IE major.

  1. PHYS 111, 112, 113, 114; MATH 101, 102, 221, 332; ENGN 178, 203, 204, 207 (PHYS 207), 225 (PHYS 225), 378, 379
  2. One lecture/lab sequence chosen from ENGN 301+351 or 311+361
  3. One course chosen from: ENGN 208, 240, 260, 267, 295, 301+351, 311+361, 312, 330, 395
  4. Four courses in a single science subject in one of the following tracks:
    • BIOL 111+113 and three BIOL courses 200 level or above
    • CHEM 110, 241, 242, and 261
    • CSCI 111, 112, and two CSCI courses 200 level or above
    • GEOL 100 or 101, and three GEOL courses 200 level or above
  1. Required courses
    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I
      FDRSL
      Credits3
      Prerequisiteor corequisite: MATH 101 or equivalent. Corequisite: PHYS 113
      FacultyStaff

      An introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics. Topics include Newton's laws, wave motion, and the laws of thermodynamics. This course must be taken simultaneously with Physics 113.


    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II
      FDRSL
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 111. Corequisite: PHYS 114
      FacultyStaff

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include electricity and magnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum theory. This course must be taken simultaneously with PHYS 114.


    • PHYS 113 - General Physics Laboratory I
      FDRSL
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: PHYS 111. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 111
      FacultyStaff

      Laboratory exercises in classical mechanics. Laboratory course with fee.


    • PHYS 114 - General Physics Laboratory II
      FDRSL
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: PHYS 112. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 112
      FacultyStaff

      Laboratory exercises in electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Laboratory course with fee.


    • MATH 101 - Calculus I
      FDRFM
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNote: Students needing this course to fulfill an FDR requirement should add to a waiting list when open; additional sections may be added

      An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem.

      Fall 2017, MATH 101B-01: Calculus I for Beginners: A First Course (3). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. This section meets 4 hours a week and is restricted to and specially tailored for those who are beginning their study of calculus. Students who have already seen calculus, yet wish to retake it, must register for MATH 101, 101E, or 101F instead of 101B. An introduction to the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. (FM) Staff.
       
      Fall 2017, MATH 101E-01: Calculus I with Biology Applications (3). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Corequisite: BIOL 111 or CHEM 110. This section meets 4 hours a week and has a strong emphasis on biological applications, and is intended to benefit students interested in biological majors and health-related careers. It is designed and specially tailored for First-Years who took high school biology and who are taking a lab-science course concurrently. It is intended both for those students who are beginning their study of calculus and for those who have seen some calculus but want to start over at the beginning of the calculus sequence. Mathematical concepts include the study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. This section meets four days per week. (FM) Toporikova.
       
      Fall 2017, MATH 101F-01: Calculus and Environmental Data (3). This section meets 3 hours a week. The course covers the same calculus material as Math 101, namely the calculus of functions of one variable, including a study of limits, derivatives, extrema, integrals, and the fundamental theorem. Applications in this section are focused on data collected by the Environmental Protection Agency and include discussions of finding an appropriate model for a data set and using calculus tools to analyze models. (FM) Staff.

       


    • MATH 102 - Calculus II
      FDRFM
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteThe equivalent of MATH 101 with C grade or better. Note: Students wanting to take this course should add to the waiting list when open; additional sections may be added
      FacultyStaff

      A continuation of MATH 101, including techniques and applications of integration, transcendental functions, and infinite series.


    • MATH 221 - Multivariable Calculus
      FDRSC
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteThe equivalent of MATH 102 with C grade or better. Note: Students needing this course to fulfill an FDR requirement should add to a waiting list when open; additional sections may be added

      Motion in three dimensions, parametric curves, differential calculus of multivariable functions, multiple integrals, line integrals, and Green's Theorem.


    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 with C grade or better

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.


    • ENGN 178 - Introduction to Engineering
      FDRSC
      Credits4
      FacultyD'Alessandro, Erickson, Kuehner

      This course introduces students to basic skills useful to engineers, the engineering design process, and the engineering profession. Students learn various topics of engineering, including engineering disciplines, the role of an engineer in the engineering design process, and engineering ethics. Skills learned in this course include programming and the preparation of engineering drawings. Programming skills are developed using flowcharting and MATLAB. Autodesk Inventor is used to create three-dimensional solid models and engineering drawings. The course culminates in a collaborative design project, allowing students to use their new skills


    • ENGN 203 - Mechanics I: Statics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in MATH-101 and PHYS-111 (PHYS 111 as corequisite with instructor consent)
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      The science of mechanics is used to study bodies in equilibrium under the action of external forces. Emphasis is on problem solving: trusses, frames and machines, centroids, area moments of inertia, beams, cables, and friction.


    • ENGN 204 - Mechanics II: Dynamics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade C or better in ENGN 203
      FacultyKuehner

      A study of kinetics of particles and rigid bodies including force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, momentum. A student may not receive degree credit for both ENGN 204 and PHYS 230.


    • ENGN 207 - Electrical Circuits (PHYS 207)
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in PHYS 112. Corequisite: ENGN 207L
      FacultyErickson

      A detailed study of electrical circuits and the methods used in their analysis. Basic circuit components, as well as devices such as operational amplifiers, are investigated. The laboratory acquaints the student both with fundamental electronic diagnostic equipment and with the design and behavior of useful circuits. Laboratory course.


    • ENGN 225 - Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering (PHYS 225)
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112, MATH 221
      FacultyErickson

      Study of a collection of mathematical techniques particularly useful in upper-level courses in physics and engineering: vector differential operators such as gradient, divergence, and curl; functions of complex variables; Fourier analysis; orthogonal functions; matrix algebra and the matrix eigenvalue problem; ordinary and partial differential equations.


    • ENGN 378 - Capstone Design
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in all of the following: ENGN 178,204,207, 225; in either ENGN 301 with 351 or ENGN 311 with 361; and in one engineering elective for the major
      FacultyD'Alessandro, Erickson, Kuehner

      First term of the year-long capstone design project in which student teams solve open-ended engineering problems by integrating and synthesizing engineering design and analysis learned in previous courses. Project topics vary year-to-year and are driven by student interest. The fall term is dedicated to the design and planning phases. This includes project topic selection; comprehensive study of necessary background material; and identification of design objectives, conceptual models, and materials and equipment needed. This course culminates with submission of a full design proposal. Laboratory course with fee.


    • ENGN 379 - Capstone Design
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in ENGN 378
      FacultyD'Alessandro, Erickson, Kuehner

      Second term of the year-long capstone design project in which student teams solve open-ended engineering problems by integrating and synthesizing engineering design and analysis learned in previous courses. Project topics vary year-to-year and are driven by student interest. The winter term is dedicated to implementation -- building, testing, analyzing, and revising the design, culminating with a public presentation and proof-of-concept demonstration. Laboratory course with fee.


  2. One lecture/lab sequence chosen from:
  3. .

    • ENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in ENGN 203. Corequisite: ENGN 351
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      Internal equilibrium of members; introduction to mechanics of continuous media; concepts of stress, material properties, principal moments of inertia; deformation caused by axial loads, shear, torsion, bending and combined loading.


    • ENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: ENGN 301
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      Experimental observation and correlation with theoretical predictions of elastic behavior of structures under static loading; statically determinate loading of beams; tension of metals; compression of mortar; torsion; and computer models for stress analysis. Laboratory course.


    • or
    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in ENGN 204 or PHYS 230 and grade of C or better in ENGN (PHYS) 225. Corequisite: ENGN 361
      FacultyKuehner

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and differential analysis.


    • ENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 311
      FacultyKuehner

      Experimental investigation of fluid mechanics under static and dynamic conditions. Correlation of experimental results with theoretical models of fluid behavior. Experiments examine concepts such as hydrostatic force, fluid kinematics, kinetics, and energy. Laboratory course.


  4. One course from:
    • ENGN 208 - Electronics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteC or better in ENGN (PHYS) 207
      FacultyErickson

      An introduction to practical analog and digital electronics emphasizing design, construction, and measurement of circuits in the laboratory. Topics may include diode wave-shaping circuits, transistor audio amplifiers, power supplies, oscillators, data converters (A/D and D/A), Boolean logic gates, programmable logic devices, flip-flops, counters, data storage and retrieval, and a survey of emerging technologies.


    • ENGN 240 - Thermodynamics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 and C or better in PHYS 112
      FacultyKuehner

      A study of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of matter, and applications to engineering processes.


    • ENGN 260 - Materials Science
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in PHYS 111
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      An introduction to solid state materials. A study of the relation between microstructure and the corresponding physical properties for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites.


    • ENGN 267 - Bioengineering and Bioinspired Design
      FDRSC
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 or instructor consent
      FacultyErickson

      Interdisciplinary study of the physical principles of animal navigation and sensory mechanisms. This course integrates biology, physics, engineering, and quantitative methods to study how an animal's physiology is optimized to perform a critical function, as well as how these biological systems inspire new technologies. Topics include: long-distance navigation; locomotion; optical, thermal, and auditory sensing; bioelectricity; biomaterials; and swarm synchronicity. Some examples of questions addressed are: How does a loggerhead turtle navigate during a 9,000 mile open-ocean swim to return to the beach where it was born? How does a blowfly hover and outmaneuver an F-16? How is the mantis shrimp eye guiding the next revolution in DVD technology? This course is intended for students interested in working on problems at the boundary of biology and physics/engineering, and is appropriate for those who have more experience in one field than the other. Lectures, reading and discussion of research literature, and hands-on investigation/field-work, where appropriate.


    • ENGN 295 - Intermediate Special Topics in Engineering
      Credits3 credits for fall or winter; 4 credits for spring
      PrerequisiteVary with topic

      Intermediate work in bioengineering, solid mechanics, fluid mechanics or materials science. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits if the topics are different.


    • ENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in ENGN 203. Corequisite: ENGN 351
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      Internal equilibrium of members; introduction to mechanics of continuous media; concepts of stress, material properties, principal moments of inertia; deformation caused by axial loads, shear, torsion, bending and combined loading.


    • with
    • ENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: ENGN 301
      FacultyD'Alessandro

      Experimental observation and correlation with theoretical predictions of elastic behavior of structures under static loading; statically determinate loading of beams; tension of metals; compression of mortar; torsion; and computer models for stress analysis. Laboratory course.


    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in ENGN 204 or PHYS 230 and grade of C or better in ENGN (PHYS) 225. Corequisite: ENGN 361
      FacultyKuehner

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and differential analysis.


    • with
    • ENGN 361 - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
      Credits1
      CorequisiteENGN 311
      FacultyKuehner

      Experimental investigation of fluid mechanics under static and dynamic conditions. Correlation of experimental results with theoretical models of fluid behavior. Experiments examine concepts such as hydrostatic force, fluid kinematics, kinetics, and energy. Laboratory course.


    • ENGN 312 - Heat Transfer
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332 and grade of C or better in ENGN 311
      FacultyKuehner

      Principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation. Topics include transient and steady state analysis, boiling, condensation, and heat exchanger analysis. Application of these principles to selected problems in engineering.


    • ENGN 330 - Mechanical Vibrations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332 and grade of C or better in ENGN 204 or PHYS 230
      FacultyErickson

      Analysis of lumped parameter and continuous systems (free and forced, damped and undamped, single- and multi-degree-of-freedom); transient response to shock pulses; simple linear systems; exact and approximate solution techniques; and solution to continuous systems using partial differential equations.


    • ENGN 395 - Special Topics in Engineering
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJunior standing
      FacultyStaff

      Advanced work in solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, or materials science. Topics selected based on student interest. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits if the topics are different.


  5. Four courses in a single science subject in one of the following tracks:
    • Biology
      • BIOL 111 - Fundamentals of Biology
        FDRSL: BIOL 113 is a corequisite for students seeking laboratory science credits
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCorequisite: BIOL 113. Limited seating available for sophomores, juniors and seniors. Interested upper-division students should contact Bill Hamilton, in the Biology department, for consent as soon as the class schedule is available and before registration begins. Suitable for First-Years interested in pursuing a major in biology, neuroscience or environmental studies or the pre-health curriculum

        An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

        Fall 2017, BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Addiction & Drugs of Abuse (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as ecology, physiology, population dynamics, and biochemistry. This course utilizes addiction as a model for understanding the basic principles of cell biology, anatomy, physiology, neuroscience, pharmacology, and genetics. Students gain an appreciation for the biological basis of addiction, as well as the complexity of the body-drug interactions. Students also learn to search and read primary literature, understand the fundamentals of experimental design, and discuss topics related to addiction and drugs. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Blythe.

        Fall 2017, BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Yellowstone Ecology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as ecology, physiology, population dynamics, and biochemistry. From cells to satellite data and bacteria and bears, this course investigates multiple biological levels of organization using the world's first national park as a case study. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hamilton.

        Fall 2017, BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Diversity of Life (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Biologists use the word diversity, or biodiversity, to describe the variety of life forms in nature. This section is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? (3) what is its future? We cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hurd.

        Fall 2017, BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

         


      • with
      • BIOL 113 - Biology Laboratory
        FDRSL: see note in BIOL 111
        Credits1
        PrerequisiteCorequisite: BIOL 111. Prerequisites: Limited seating available for sophomores, juniors and seniors. Interested upper-division students should contact Charles Winder, in the Biology department, for consent as soon as the class schedule is available and before registration begins
        CorequisiteBIOL 111
        FacultyLanier, Winder

        A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.


      • andthree BIOL courses 200 level or above
    • Chemistry
      • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultyDesjardins, LaRiviere, Tuchler, Uffelman, Abry

        This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course with fee.


      • CHEM 241 - Organic Chemistry I
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteGrade of C (2.0) or better in CHEM 110
        FacultyAlty, Higgs

        A survey of the compounds of carbon including their structure, chemical and physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms, identification, and synthesis. Laboratory focuses on the development of skills in preparing, purifying, and identifying organic compounds using spectroscopic methods. Laboratory course with fee.


      • CHEM 242 - Organic Chemistry II
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteCHEM 241 or 241S
        FacultyAlty, Higgs

        A continuation of CHEM 241.  Laboratory course with fee.


      • CHEM 261 - Physical Chemistry: Quantum & Computational Chemistry
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCHEM 110 and MATH 102 and junior standing
        FacultyTuchler

        An introduction to quantum mechanics as it applies to atomic and molecular systems. The emphasis is placed on spectroscopic methods and the modern picture of chemical bonding and molecular structure. The accompanying lab focuses on computational methods to illustrate course topics. Laboratory course.


    • Computer Science
      • CSCI 111 - Fundamentals of Programming I
        FDRFM
        Credits4
        FacultyStaff

        A disciplined approach to programming with Python. Emphasis is on problem-solving methods, algorithm development, and object-oriented concepts. Lectures and formal laboratories.


      • CSCI 112 - Fundamentals of Programming II
        FDRSC
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteCSCI 111
        FacultyStaff

        A continuation of CSCI 111. Emphasis is on the use and implementation of data structures, introductory algorithm analysis, and object-oriented design and programming with Python. Laboratory course.


      • andtwo CSCI courses 200 level or above
    • Geology
      • GEOL 100 - General Geology with Field Emphasis
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultyStaff

        Preference given to first-years and sophomores. GEOL 100A: First-Year seminar, open to FY students only. The study of our physical environment and the processes shaping it. The materials and structure of the Earth's crust, the origin of the landforms, the concept of geologic time, and the nature of the Earth's interior are considered, with special emphasis on field study in the region near Lexington. No credit for students who have completed GEOL 101. Laboratory course. Lab fee required.


      • or
      • GEOL 101 - General Geology
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultyStaff

        Preference given to first-years and sophomores. The study of our physical environment and the processes shaping it. The materials and structure of the Earth's crust, the origin of the landforms, the concept of geologic time, and the nature of the Earth's interior are considered. No credit for students who have completed GEOL 100. Laboratory course. Lab fee required.


      • andthree GEOL courses 200 level or above

Physics major leading to BS degree

A major in physics leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 50 credits including the following.

  1. PHYS 111, 112, 113, 114, 207 (ENGN 207), 210, 215, 220, 225 (ENGN 225), 230, 340, 345; and MATH 332, 333
  2. One additional PHYS course at the 200- or 300-level
  3. Seven additional credits chosen from the following, with no more than three credits at the 400-level:
    BIOL 280, 282, 283, 385
    CHEM 110, CHEM numbered 200 and above;
    CSCI 121, 211, 250;
    ENGN numbered 200 and above
    GEOL 211, 275, 311;
    MATH 303, 309, 310, 345, 353
    PHYS numbered 200 and above

Additional courses required as prerequisites for completion of the above include MATH 101, 102, and 221.

  1. Required courses:
    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I
      FDRSL
      Credits3
      Prerequisiteor corequisite: MATH 101 or equivalent. Corequisite: PHYS 113
      FacultyStaff

      An introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics. Topics include Newton's laws, wave motion, and the laws of thermodynamics. This course must be taken simultaneously with Physics 113.


    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II
      FDRSL
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 111. Corequisite: PHYS 114
      FacultyStaff

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include electricity and magnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum theory. This course must be taken simultaneously with PHYS 114.


    • PHYS 113 - General Physics Laboratory I
      FDRSL
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: PHYS 111. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 111
      FacultyStaff

      Laboratory exercises in classical mechanics. Laboratory course with fee.


    • PHYS 114 - General Physics Laboratory II
      FDRSL
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: PHYS 112. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 112
      FacultyStaff

      Laboratory exercises in electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Laboratory course with fee.


    • PHYS 207 - Electrical Circuits (ENGN 207)
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteGrade of C or better in PHYS 112. Corequisite: PHYS 207L
      FacultyErickson

      A detailed study of electrical circuits and the methods used in their analysis. Basic circuit components, as well as devices such as operational amplifiers, are investigated. The laboratory acquaints the student both with fundamental electronic diagnostic equipment and with the design and behavior of useful circuits. Laboratory course.


    • PHYS 210 - Modern Physics
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112
      FacultySukow, D. Mazilu

      An introduction to the physics of the atom, including the wave description of matter and quantum mechanics, and the experiments that led to the theory. Selected topics from atomic, molecular, nuclear, statistical, and solid state physics are discussed; the choice of topics may vary from year to year.


    • PHYS 215 - Optics
      Credits4
      PrerequisitePHYS (ENGN) 225
      FacultySukow

      A study of the properties of electromagnetic waves with special emphasis on visible light. Wave descriptions are developed for scattering, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, and polarization. Topics in geometrical optics are also studied, including lenses and aberration theory. Laboratory course.


    • PHYS 220 - Electricity and Magnetism
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112 and 114; Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS (ENGN) 225
      FacultyD. Mazilu

      An introduction to the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields. The basic equations of electromagnetism (Maxwell's equations) are developed through a study of electrostatics, steady-state magnetism, and electromagnetic induction.


    • PHYS 225 - Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering (ENGN 225)
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 112, MATH 221
      FacultyErickson

      Study of a collection of mathematical techniques particularly useful in upper-level courses in physics and engineering: vector differential operators such as gradient, divergence, and curl; functions of complex variables; Fourier analysis; orthogonal functions; matrix algebra and the matrix eigenvalue problem; ordinary and partial differential equations.


    • PHYS 230 - Newtonian Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 111 and 113, MATH 221
      FacultyD. Mazilu

      A thorough study of Newton's laws of motion, rigid body motion, and accelerated reference frames. A student may not receive degree credit for both ENGN 204 and PHYS 230.


    • PHYS 340 - Quantum Mechanics
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 210 and PHYS (ENGN) 225, and MATH 332 as prerequisite or corequisite
      FacultySukow

      A study of the postulates and formalism of quantum theory emphasizing the Schroedinger approach. The probabilistic theory is applied to one-dimensional bound and scattering states and the three-dimensional central force problem. Investigation of spin and angular momentum, Clebsch-Gordan coefficients, indistinguishable particles, and perturbation theory. Mathematical formalism includes operators, commutators, Hilbert space, and Dirac notation.


    • PHYS 345 - Statistical Physics
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePHYS 210 and PHYS (ENGN) 225, or instructor consent
      FacultyI. Mazilu

      A study of the statistical methods used in various branches of physics. The Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein distribution functions are derived and applied to problems in thermodynamics and the physics of solids.


    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 with C grade or better

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.


    • MATH 333 - Partial Differential Equations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 332

      An introduction to the study of boundary value problems and partial differential equations. Topics include modeling heat and wave phenomena, Fourier series, separation of variables, and Bessel functions. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.


  2. One additional PHYS course at the 200- or 300-level.
  3. Seven additional credits chosen from the following, with no more than three credits at the 400-level:
    • BIOL 280 - Neural Imaging
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteBIOL 111, 113, 220 or instructor consent
      FacultyWatson

      This course examines how the architecture of specific types of neurons affect the neuron's ability to receive, process, and transmit synaptic information. In particular, the course examines how some of the important molecular growth and differentiation cues (e.g., growth factors) can transmit signals important for axon growth and survival of developing and mature neurons. Topics may include neurogenesis, axonal pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and regeneration. Students will conduct original research in the laboratory and acquire skills with various imaging techniques and analytical tools.


    • BIOL 282 - Dynamics of Biological Systems
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteMATH 101, BIOL 111/113, or instructor consent
      FacultyToporikova

      This course discusses how biological systems, ranging from single cells to entire human populations, change over time. Students learn to describe a biological system quantitatively, create a model of the system's dynamics, and make testable predictions. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, cell metabolism, scaling laws for biological systems, population dynamics, and epidemiological modeling. Students learn how to develop and analyze their own models in the lab component of this course where all necessary mathematical and programming background are developed as needed.  Laboratory course.


    • BIOL 283 - Pregnancy: A KISS in Time?
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and 113. No programming experience required; all necessary skills and training are provided as a set of tutorials
      FacultyToporikova

      Kisspeptin (KISS) is a neuropeptide that controls reproductive maturation and function. Its adequate secretion is essential for correct reproductive function and successful pregnancy. Recent experimental studies have shown that KISS may act as a central integrator for other reproductive hormones and neuropeptides. For example, KISS stimulates release of the hormone prolactin (PRL), which helps to maintain pregnancy and prepare the body for lactation. In this class ,students determine the role that KISS plays in successful pregnancy using computational modeling. Students experience the world of computational modeling in neuroendocrinology by working in teams to investigate and extend an existing model for hormonal interaction between KISS and PRL in pregnancy in rats. The model will be used to generate experimentally tested predictions.


    • BIOL 385 - Molecular Mechanics of Life
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteBIOL 220
      FacultyWhitworth

      How do we study complex networks of interactions between molecules in cells? How do we discover what roles different molecular machines play in the development and behavior of cells and animals? How can we identify the ways in which medical illness is caused by the misregulation of biological complexes because of a pathogenic infection or genetic disease? Our approach to answering these questions reflects the same interdisciplinary strategy being used at the forefront of current biomedical research. We consider the ways in which traditional approaches in biochemistry, genetics and cell biology can be merged with new systems-level approaches such as genomics and proteomics, to allow us to probe the underlying molecular mechanics of life. In the classroom, we examine different molecular networks, while readings include selections from the primary literature. The laboratory is based on an investigation of a novel research question, designed and addressed by student participants. Laboratory course


    • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry
      FDRSL
      Credits4
      FacultyDesjardins, LaRiviere, Tuchler, Uffelman, Abry

      This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course with fee.


    • CHEM numbered 200 and above
    • CSCI 121 - Scientific Computing
      FDRFM
      Credits4
      FacultyLevy

      An introduction to computer programming for scientific applications and a survey of the main methodological areas of scientific computation. The course provides the tools needed for students to use computers effectively in scientific work, whether in physics, chemistry, mathematics, economics, biology, psychology, or any field involving quantitative work. Programming in Matlab, a scientific-computing software package, with a focus on topics relevant to students' major fields of study. Lectures and formal labs.


    • CSCI 211 - Algorithm Design and Analysis
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCSCI 112 and MATH 121 or MATH 301
      FacultyStaff

      Methods for designing efficient algorithms, including divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and greedy algorithms. Analysis of algorithms for correctness and estimating running time and space requirements. Topics include advanced data structures, graph theory, network flow, and computational intractability.


    • CSCI 250 - Introduction to Robotics
      FDRSC
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteCSCI 112
      FacultyLevy

      This course combines readings from the contemporary robotics literature with hands-on lab experience building robots (equipment provided) and programming them to do various tasks. The lab experience culminates with a peer-judged competition of robot projects proposed and built during the second half of the term.


    • ENGN numbered 200 and above
    • GEOL 211 - Earth Materials I: Rocks and Minerals
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101 or GEOL 105
      FacultyStaff

      A laboratory course introducing Earth materials, including minerals and rocks, with an emphasis on a hands-on approach to identifying and interpreting minerals and their associations in igneous and metamorphic rocks. Students learn the techniques and principles of hand sample identification, optical mineralogy and petrography, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.


    • GEOL 275 - Introductory Geophysics
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteGEOL 100, 101 or 105; PHYS 111 or 112
      FacultyConnors

      A review of the geophysical methods used to study the interior of the Earth, the magnetic field, isostasy, and earthquake seismology. Attention is given to the methods used in geophysics to collect and analyze data. A gravimeter, a magnetometer, seismic refraction and electrical resistivity equipment are used to collect field data. The data, corrections, and interpretations are incorporated into a technical report for each of the four surveys. Laboratory course.


    • GEOL 311 - Earth Materials II: Geochemistry
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteGEOL 100, GEOL 101 or GEOL 105
      FacultyStaff

      A laboratory course emphasizing the principles and tools of the chemical composition of Earth materials to interpret petrogenesis. The course focuses on processes occurring below and at the Earth's surface. Topics include: crystal chemistry, magmatic and metamorphic processes, trace element and isotope geochemistry, oxidation and reduction, and water-rock interactions. The laboratory includes both a local field and laboratory component and focuses on using analytical techniques to evaluate chemical composition including electron microscopy, ion chromatography, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.


    • MATH 303 - Complex Analysis
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 or consent of the instructor

      Algebra of complex numbers, polar form, powers, and roots. Derivatives and geometry of elementary functions. Line integrals, the Cauchy Integral Theorem, the Cauchy Integral formula, Taylor and Laurent Series, residues, and poles. Applications.


    • MATH 309 - Mathematical Statistics I
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteThe equivalent of MATH 221 with C grade or better

      Probability, probability density and distribution functions, mathematical expectation, discrete and continuous random variables, and moment generating functions.


    • MATH 310 - Mathematical Statistics II
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 309

      Sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, testing hypotheses, regression and correlation, and analysis of variance.


    • MATH 345 - Calculus on Manifolds
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 and 222
      FacultyDenne

      This course builds on material from both multivariable calculus and linear algebra. Topics covered include: manifolds, derivatives as linear transformations, tangent spaces, inverse and implicit function theorems, integration on manifolds, differential forms, and the generalized Stokes's Theorem.


    • MATH 353 - Numerical Analysis
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteMATH 221 and 222
      FacultySiehler

      Analysis, implementation, and applications of algorithms for solving equations, fitting curves, and numerical differentiation and integration. Theorems and proofs are complemented by hands-on programming exercises fostering a concrete understanding of accuracy, efficiency and stability, as well as an awareness of potential pitfalls in machine arithmetic. No previous programming experience is required.


    • PHYS numbered 200 and above