Neuroscience Major Requirements

2017 - 2018 Catalog

Neuroscience major leading to BS degree

A major in neuroscience leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires the completion of at least 50 credits in science and mathematics, including 47 or more credits from the following:

  1. Core (5 courses): BIOL 111/113, BIOL 211, 211S, or 220; CHEM 110; NEUR 120; and PSYC 111
  2. Quantitative Methods (3 courses):
    1. Computational: One course chosen from BIOL 185, 282; CSCI 102, 121
    2. Statistics and Research Design: PSYC 120; and either BIOL 201 or PSYC 250
  3. Specialization: Completion of at least five additional courses selected from the following and chosen from at least two disciplines
    1. BIOL 211 (or 211S), 220, 243, 250, 255, 275, 280, 282, 283, 360, 365, 397
    2. CSCI 102, 121
    3. ENGN 267 (BIOL 267)
    4. NEUR 395
    5. PSYC 216, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 259
  4. Capstone: Six credits chosen from the following:
    1. At least three credits chosen from NEUR 423, 442, 493, PSYC 353, 354, 355, 359
    2. No more than three credits chosen from NEUR 401, 403, 422, 453
  1. Core (5 courses):
    • BIOL 111 - Fundamentals of Biology
      FDRSL: BIOL 113 is a corequisite for students seeking laboratory science credits
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: BIOL 113. Prerequisite: CHEM 110 for first-years during initial winter registration (FY's who did not take CHEM 110 in the fall should contact Bill Hamilton for consent). Limited seating available for sophomores, juniors and seniors. Interested upper-division students should contact Bill Hamilton, in the Biology department, for consent as soon as the class schedule is available and before registration begins. Suitable for First-Years interested in pursuing a major in biology, neuroscience or environmental studies or the pre-health curriculum. During pick one you must choose a lecture (BIOL 111) and a lab section (BIOL 113). Securing a lab section (BIOL 113) only does not save a space in a lecture section (BIOL 111)

      An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

      Winter 2018, BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Evolutionary Medicine (3) Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, ecology, physiology, population dynamics, and biochemistry. This course examines underlying principles of evolution and genetics as applied to human health and medicine. Specific topics include how clonal evolution gives rise to antibiotic resistance and cancer progression, how population genetics can explain exceptionally high rates of heritable diseases like cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia, and the possibility that the recent rise of asthma and type II diabetes may result from a mismatch between the environments experienced by humans for hundreds of generations versus the modern environment. Ayoub.

      Winter 2018, Biology 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: My Own Personal Genome (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. All students will be required to submit samples to the personal genetic testing company 23andMe, which is done as a group during the first week of class. Cost of testing is covered by a course fee of $105. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. The explosive growth of genetics and genomics offers unprecedented possibilities for investigating and understanding our own genomes. In medicine and health, are we entering an age of "personal genomics"? What can we learn about our own characteristics and health risks? Students explore the basics of molecular genetics, and use this foundation to better understand personal genomic data. Students examine their own data during the term. Laboratory fee. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Cabe.

      Winter 2018, BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Diversity of Life (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Biologists use the word diversity, or biodiversity, to describe the variety of life forms in nature. This section is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? (3) what is its future? We cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hurd.

      Winter 2018, BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Rhythms (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, ecology, physiology, population dynamics, and biochemistry. From cell division to bird migration, clocklike rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section, we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. Toporikova.

      Fall 2017, BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Addiction & Drugs of Abuse (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as ecology, physiology, population dynamics, and biochemistry. This course utilizes addiction as a model for understanding the basic principles of cell biology, anatomy, physiology, neuroscience, pharmacology, and genetics. Students gain an appreciation for the biological basis of addiction, as well as the complexity of the body-drug interactions. Students also learn to search and read primary literature, understand the fundamentals of experimental design, and discuss topics related to addiction and drugs. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Blythe.

      Fall 2017, BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Yellowstone Ecology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as ecology, physiology, population dynamics, and biochemistry. From cells to satellite data and bacteria and bears, this course investigates multiple biological levels of organization using the world's first national park as a case study. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hamilton.

      Fall 2017, BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Diversity of Life (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Biologists use the word diversity, or biodiversity, to describe the variety of life forms in nature. This section is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? (3) what is its future? We cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hurd.

      Fall 2017, BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

       


    • and
    • BIOL 113 - Biology Laboratory
      FDRSL: see note in BIOL 111
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteCorequisite: BIOL 111. Prerequisites: Limited seating available for sophomores, juniors and seniors. Interested upper-division students should contact Charles Winder, in the Biology department, for consent as soon as the class schedule is available and before registration begins
      CorequisiteBIOL 111
      FacultyLanier, Winder

      A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.


    • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry
      FDRSL
      Credits4
      FacultyDesjardins, LaRiviere, Tuchler, Uffelman, Abry

      This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course with fee.


    • NEUR 120 - Introduction to Neuroscience
      FDRSC
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteEither PSYC 110 or PSYC 111; or instructor consent
      FacultyStaff

      An introduction to neuroscience emphasizing the molecular organization, chemistry, and physiology of the neuron; how neurons are organized into functional circuits; and how these functional circuits process information and control both normal and abnormal behavior.


    • PSYC 111 - Brain and Behavior
      FDRSC
      Credits3

      An introduction to behavioral neuroscience, including the physiological bases of sensation, learning and memory, motivation, cognition, and abnormal behavior.

       


    • One course from:
    • BIOL 211 - Cell Biology
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteBio 111 and 113
      FacultyWatson

      This course will focus on understanding the components of a cell, the internal organization of a cell, how they move, how they function, how they respond to cues from their external environment, and the limits of our current knowledge. Lecture topics will include the internal organization of a cell, structure and function of DNA, RNA and proteins, membrane and cytoskeleton structure function, protein sorting, membrane transport, cell cycle and cell-cycle control, cell signaling and communication, and cell death. The lab component reinforces the lecture by emphasizing the experimental approaches to the study of cell biology. Laboratory course.


    • BIOL 211S - Cell Biology at St. Andrews
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAn average grade of at least 3.0 in BIOL 111 and 113, a 3.000 cumulative GPA, and permission of the Department of Biology
      FacultyStaff

      Lecture and lab work are intermingled in this course that introduces the structure and function of the cell and sub-cellular organelles. as well as prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The diversity and development of different cell types within multicellular organisms is also discussed. Taught at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland with final grade assigned by W&L biology faculty.


    • BIOL 220 - Genetics
      FDRSL: BIOL 221 is a corequisite for students seeking laboratory science credits
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and 113, and sophomore or junior standing
      FacultyAyoub, Cabe

      A study of the three main branches of modern genetics: 1) Mendelian genetics, the study of the transmission of traits from one generation to the next; 2) molecular genetics, a study of the chemical structure of genes and how they operate at the molecular level; and 3) population genetics, the study of the variation of genes between and within populations. This course is a prerequisite to most 300-level courses in biology.


  2. Quantitative Methods (3 courses):
    • Computational: One course chosen from
      • BIOL 185 - Data Science: Visualizing and Exploring Big Data
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent required
        FacultyWhitworth

        No prior programming experience required. We live in the era of Big Data. Major discoveries in science and medicine are being made by exploring large datasets in novel ways using computational tools. The challenge in the biomedical sciences is the same as in Silicon Valley: knowing what computational tools are right for a project and where to get started when exploring large data sets. In this course, students learn to use R, a popular open-source programming language and data analysis environment, to interactively explore data. Case studies are drawn from across the sciences and medicine. Topics include data visualization, machine learning, image analysis, geospatial analysis, and statistical inference on large data sets. We also emphasize best practices in coding, data handling, and adherence to the principles of reproducible research. Fulfills the computer science requirement for biology and neuroscience majors.


      • BIOL 282 - Problem Solving in Biological Systems: A Modeling Approach
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteMATH 101
        FacultyToporikova

        Biological systems are incredibly complex and include multiple interactions, which makes them hard to understand and to predict the outcomes. In this course, students learn how to solve complex problems inspired by biological systems
        using a modeling approach. Students learn to identify most essential elements of biological systems, construct the
        verbal and graphical models, translate them to a computational software, and make predictions that are relevant for
        health policy, conservation efforts, or experimental outcomes. The topics include spread of infectious diseases,
        population dynamics, physiology, and neuroscience. Laboratory course.


      • CSCI 102 - Introduction to Computational Modeling
        FDRFM
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent required
        FacultyLevy

        This course provides a hands-on understanding of the computational methods that support science and technology now and that will be essential for success in the science, engineering, and business worlds of the near future. The central theme of the course is building computational models of the processes that surround us every day, from the effects of drugs on the body to the formation of galaxies in the universe to the interactions of nations in the global economy. Classroom lectures and textbook readings are supplemented with lab exercises implementing the models using state-of-the-art software tools.


      • CSCI 121 - Scientific Computing
        FDRFM
        Credits4
        FacultyLevy

        An introduction to computer programming for scientific applications and a survey of the main methodological areas of scientific computation. The course provides the tools needed for students to use computers effectively in scientific work, whether in physics, chemistry, mathematics, economics, biology, psychology, or any field involving quantitative work. Programming in Matlab, a scientific-computing software package, with a focus on topics relevant to students' major fields of study. Lectures and formal labs.


    • Statistics and Research Design:
      • PSYC 120 - Statistics and Research Design I
        FDRSS3
        Credits3
        FacultyStaff

        Students learn the basics of collecting, interpreting, and presenting data in the behavioral sciences. Data from a variety of sources, such as questionnaires, psychological tests, and behavioral observations, are considered. Students learn to use and to evaluate critically statistical and graphical summaries of data. They also study techniques of searching the literature and of producing written reports in technical format. Individual projects include oral presentations, creating technical graphics, and publishing on the World Wide Web.


      • and either
      • BIOL 201 - Statistics for Biology and Medicine
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and 113
        FacultyMarsh

        This course examines the principles of statistics and experimental design for biological and medical research. The focus is on the practical and conceptual aspects of statistics, rather than mathematical derivations. Students completing this class will be able to read and understand research papers, to design realistic experiments, and to carry out their own statistical analyses using computer packages.


      • or
      • PSYC 250 - Statistics and Research Design II
        Credits4
        PrerequisitePSYC 120
        CorequisitePSYC 250L
        FacultyJohnson, Murdock, Whiting, Woodzicka

        Students learn about the design and analysis of psychological research, with particular emphasis on experimentation. Students learn statistical inference appropriate for hypothesis testing, and they use standard statistical packages to analyze data. Laboratory course.


  3. Specialization:
  4. Completion of at least five additional courses selected from the following and chosen from at least two disciplines.

      • BIOL 211 - Cell Biology      (or 211S )
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteBio 111 and 113
        FacultyWatson

        This course will focus on understanding the components of a cell, the internal organization of a cell, how they move, how they function, how they respond to cues from their external environment, and the limits of our current knowledge. Lecture topics will include the internal organization of a cell, structure and function of DNA, RNA and proteins, membrane and cytoskeleton structure function, protein sorting, membrane transport, cell cycle and cell-cycle control, cell signaling and communication, and cell death. The lab component reinforces the lecture by emphasizing the experimental approaches to the study of cell biology. Laboratory course.


      • BIOL 220 - Genetics
        FDRSL: BIOL 221 is a corequisite for students seeking laboratory science credits
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and 113, and sophomore or junior standing
        FacultyAyoub, Cabe

        A study of the three main branches of modern genetics: 1) Mendelian genetics, the study of the transmission of traits from one generation to the next; 2) molecular genetics, a study of the chemical structure of genes and how they operate at the molecular level; and 3) population genetics, the study of the variation of genes between and within populations. This course is a prerequisite to most 300-level courses in biology.


      • BIOL 243 - Animal Behavior
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and 113
        FacultyMarsh

        An introduction to the scientific study of animal behavior, including exploration of the evolutionary basis of behavior and examination of how animals choose mates, defend territories, find food, and avoid predators. Field and laboratory exercises focus on testing hypotheses through experiments with a variety of animals, including fish, amphibians, birds, and humans. Laboratory course.


      • BIOL 250 - Vertebrate Endocrinology
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and 113
        FacultyBlythe

        This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of the endocrine system, including exploration of chemoregulatory mechanisms in vertebrates and examination of biochemical, cellular, and physiological aspects of hormone action. In-class exercises focus on developing written and verbal scientific communication skills, as well as in-depth analysis of primary literature.


      • BIOL 255 - Reproductive Physiology
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and 113
        FacultyStaff

        An examination of sex as a biological phenomenon with consideration of the genetic (chromosomal), embryological, endocrine, and neurological bases of sexual development, differentiation, and identity.


      • BIOL 275 - Food for Thought
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and 113
        FacultyBlythe

        This course utilizes problem-based learning to investigate nutrition and metabolism, as well as to the neural and hormonal regulation of feeding behavior. Through the use of primary literature and service-learning experiences, students develop an understanding of the experimental tools used in basic and applied nutritional sciences research.  Because nutrition directly relates to many health care and quality-of-life issues at the forefront of modern society, this course also examines popular literature on food-related topics. 


      • BIOL 280 - Neural Imaging
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteBIOL 111, 113, 220 or instructor consent
        FacultyWatson

        This course examines how the architecture of specific types of neurons affect the neuron's ability to receive, process, and transmit synaptic information. In particular, the course examines how some of the important molecular growth and differentiation cues (e.g., growth factors) can transmit signals important for axon growth and survival of developing and mature neurons. Topics may include neurogenesis, axonal pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and regeneration. Students will conduct original research in the laboratory and acquire skills with various imaging techniques and analytical tools.


      • BIOL 282 - Problem Solving in Biological Systems: A Modeling Approach
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteMATH 101
        FacultyToporikova

        Biological systems are incredibly complex and include multiple interactions, which makes them hard to understand and to predict the outcomes. In this course, students learn how to solve complex problems inspired by biological systems
        using a modeling approach. Students learn to identify most essential elements of biological systems, construct the
        verbal and graphical models, translate them to a computational software, and make predictions that are relevant for
        health policy, conservation efforts, or experimental outcomes. The topics include spread of infectious diseases,
        population dynamics, physiology, and neuroscience. Laboratory course.


      • BIOL 283 - Pregnancy: A KISS in Time?
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteBIOL 111 and 113. No programming experience required; all necessary skills and training are provided as a set of tutorials
        FacultyToporikova

        Kisspeptin (KISS) is a neuropeptide that controls reproductive maturation and function. Its adequate secretion is essential for correct reproductive function and successful pregnancy. Recent experimental studies have shown that KISS may act as a central integrator for other reproductive hormones and neuropeptides. For example, KISS stimulates release of the hormone prolactin (PRL), which helps to maintain pregnancy and prepare the body for lactation. In this class ,students determine the role that KISS plays in successful pregnancy using computational modeling. Students experience the world of computational modeling in neuroendocrinology by working in teams to investigate and extend an existing model for hormonal interaction between KISS and PRL in pregnancy in rats. The model will be used to generate experimentally tested predictions.


      • BIOL 360 - Experimental Neurophysiology
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteBIOL 111, 113 and 220
        FacultyBlythe

        An in-depth exploration of the theory and techniques of cellular neurophysiology. Labs utilize extracellular and intracellular recording techniques to explore motor neuron and sensory receptor firing properties and to examine the ionic basis for resting and action potentials and synaptic transmission. Laboratory course.


      • BIOL 365 - Developmental Biology
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteBIOL 220 and at least junior standing
        FacultyWatson

        An examination of the goals, practices, and accomplishments of contemporary developmental biology. Topics include gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, organogenesis, genetic control of cell differentiation, transgenic procedures, cloning, embryo manipulation, and stem cells. Lectures, discussions of the developmental literature, and electronic media are utilized. Laboratory sessions focus on experimental manipulations of early invertebrate and vertebrate embryos and emphasize student-designed research projects. Laboratory course.


      • BIOL 397 - Neuroendocrinology
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteBIOL 220, and at least junior standing
        FacultyI'Anson

        The study of the interaction between the nervous system and the endocrine system, with special reference to regulation and communication in the mammal. Topics may include neuroendocrine regulation of development, the role of the adrenal axis in stress, metabolic regulation of reproduction, or biological rhythms. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • CSCI 102 - Introduction to Computational Modeling
        FDRFM
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent required
        FacultyLevy

        This course provides a hands-on understanding of the computational methods that support science and technology now and that will be essential for success in the science, engineering, and business worlds of the near future. The central theme of the course is building computational models of the processes that surround us every day, from the effects of drugs on the body to the formation of galaxies in the universe to the interactions of nations in the global economy. Classroom lectures and textbook readings are supplemented with lab exercises implementing the models using state-of-the-art software tools.


      • CSCI 121 - Scientific Computing
        FDRFM
        Credits4
        FacultyLevy

        An introduction to computer programming for scientific applications and a survey of the main methodological areas of scientific computation. The course provides the tools needed for students to use computers effectively in scientific work, whether in physics, chemistry, mathematics, economics, biology, psychology, or any field involving quantitative work. Programming in Matlab, a scientific-computing software package, with a focus on topics relevant to students' major fields of study. Lectures and formal labs.


      • ENGN 267 - Bioengineering and Bioinspired Design ( BIOL 267 )
        FDRSC
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePHYS 112 and instructor consent
        FacultyErickson

        Interdisciplinary study of the physical principles of animal navigation and sensory mechanisms. This course integrates biology, physics, engineering, and quantitative methods to study how an animal's physiology is optimized to perform a critical function, as well as how these biological systems inspire new technologies. Topics include: long-distance navigation; locomotion; optical, thermal, and auditory sensing; bioelectricity; biomaterials; and swarm synchronicity. Some examples of questions addressed are: How does a loggerhead turtle navigate during a 9,000 mile open-ocean swim to return to the beach where it was born? How does a blowfly hover and outmaneuver an F-16? How is the mantis shrimp eye guiding the next revolution in DVD technology? This course is intended for students interested in working on problems at the boundary of biology and physics/engineering, and is appropriate for those who have more experience in one field than the other. Lectures, reading and discussion of research literature, and hands-on investigation/field-work, where appropriate.


      • NEUR 395 - Special Topics in Neuroscience
        Credits1, 2, or 3

        A seminar designed to provide the advanced student with a broader knowledge of the field of neuroscience. Specific topics will vary and will be determined, in part, by student interest. May be repeated for credit if the topics are different.


      • PSYC 216 - Health Neuroscience
        FDRSC
        Credits4
        Prerequisiteone course chosen from PSYC 110, 111, 150, BIOL 111, CHEM 110, or NEUR 120
        FacultySchreiber

        This seminar provides an introduction to the scientific study of physical and mental health using research methods in neuroscience. We examine the effects of exercise on the brain (from the cellular/molecular to systems-level perspective), how neuroplasticity contributes to both the etiology and treatment of neurological and psychological conditions. and extensively discuss the effects of stress on the brain. The course features comprehensive readings of popular psychology/neuroscience books, as well as empirical reports and reviews published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. A background in neuroscience is recommended. as well as  additional experience with psychology and/or biology prior to enrollment.


      • PSYC 252 - Sensation Measurement and Perception
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or 111, and PSYC 250 (as corequisite with instructor consent)
        FacultyLorig

        Problems associated with sensory encoding, scaling, contextual and social determinants of perception are considered. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the senses in daily life.


      • PSYC 253 - Neural Mechanisms of Motivated Behaviors
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or 111, and PSYC 120
        FacultyStewart

        The anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical bases for behaviors are considered. Some examples of behaviors to be discussed include thirst and drinking, ingestion, reproduction, and learning.


      • PSYC 254 - Attention
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 112, and PSYC 120; and at least junior standing
        FacultyWhiting

        An examination of the theories and mechanisms associated with attentional processes. Topics include: selective attention, divided attention, inhibition, working memory, and the application of these processes in human/machine interfaces. The functioning of the above processes in abnormal patient populations is also examined.


      • PSYC 255 - Cognitive Neuroscience
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or PSYC 111; and PSYC 250 (as prerequisite or corequisite)
        CorequisitePSYC 255L
        FacultyLorig

        An examination of the role of the central nervous system in the production of human behavior. Special emphasis is placed on the contribution of the cerebral cortex to cognitive activity and to the effects of brain injury on psychological processes. Laboratories focus on neuropsychological testing and basic concepts in the brain's distribution of complex function. Laboratory course.


      • PSYC 256 - Neuropharmacology
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteNEUR 120 or PSYC 110 or PSYC 111, and PSYC 120
        FacultyStewart

        This course combines lecture and seminar elements to explore the physiological bases for drug action in the nervous system with emphasis on molecular mechanisms. The course begins with an overview of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and then proceeds to examinations of major neurotransmitter classes, functional neural circuits, and a survey of recreational drugs, drug abuse, and drug dependence. The course concludes with a consideration of pharmacotherapies for selected disorders of cognition and affect. The role of neuropharmacology in the growth of our understanding of normal neurochemical function is stressed throughout.


      • PSYC 259 - Cognition and Emotion
        Credits3
        PrerequisitePSYC 250
        FacultyJohnson

        This course challenges the notion that cognition and emotion are fundamentally opposing psychological systems and explores how they function together to influence attention, memory, thinking, and behavior in our social world. Coverage includes contemporary theory, research, experimental design, and application on topics regarding both healthy individuals and those with psychological disorders.


  5. Capstone:
  6. Six credits chosen from the following.

    • At least three credits chosen from
      • NEUR 423 - Directed Individual Research
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteConsent of the neuroscience faculty
        FacultyStaff

        Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a neuroscience faculty member by prior mutual agreement.Consult with individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits may apply towards the major.


      • NEUR 442 - Honors Thesis Proposal
        Credits2
        PrerequisiteHonors candidacy
        FacultyStaff

        Writing a proposal for honors thesis research, including a clear statement of the problem being studied, a literature review, and a feasible, detailed plan for the research. Taken no later than the winter term of the junior year.


      • NEUR 493 - Honors Thesis
        Credits3-3
        PrerequisiteSenior standing and honors candidacy
        FacultyStaff

        Individual conference.


      • PSYC 353 - Advanced Methods in Systems Neuroscience Research
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent
        FacultyStewart

        Directed research on a variety of topics in systems neuroscience. May be repeated for credit if the topics are different.


      • PSYC 354 - Advanced Methods in Attention Research
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent
        FacultyWhiting

        Directed research on a variety of topics in attention and memory. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • PSYC 355 - Advanced Methods in Cognitive Neuroscience Research
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent
        FacultyLorig

        Directed research on a variety of topics in human neuropsychology. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • PSYC 359 - Advanced Methods in Cognition and Emotion Research
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent
        FacultyJohnson

        Directed research on a variety of topics in cognition and emotion. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • No more than three credits chosen from
      • NEUR 401 - Directed Individual Study
        Credits1
        PrerequisiteConsent of the neuroscience faculty
        FacultyStaff

        This seminar involves independent reading and/or research. Students are expected to prepare a detailed research proposal based on their independent work. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • NEUR 403 - Directed Individual Study
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteConsent of the neuroscience faculty
        FacultyStaff

        This seminar involves independent reading and/or research. Students are expected to prepare a detailed research proposal based on their independent work. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • NEUR 422 - Directed Individual Research
        Credits2
        PrerequisiteConsent of the neuroscience faculty
        FacultyStaff

        Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a neuroscience faculty member by prior mutual agreement.Consult with individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits may apply towards the major.


      • NEUR 453 - Neuroscience Internship
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteInstructor's or major director's consent
        FacultyStaff

        This course provides students an opportunity to engage in scholarly and professional development though external placements in research laboratory, clinical, or business settings where neuroscientific content is a focus of daily work activity.