MRST Major Requirements

2018 - 2019 Catalog

Medieval and Renaissance Studies major leading to BA degree

A major in Medieval and Renaissance Studies leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 33 credits as follows:

1. MRST 110, 110A, or one of the following courses: ARTH 101, 102; CLAS 201, 205, 210, 224; ENGL 240, 242, 250, 252; FILM 255; GERM 318; HIST 100, 101, 170; LIT 203, 218, 219; MRST 252; MUS 201; REL 101, 102, 105, 106, 108, 131, 132; SPAN 210; THTR 210; or, when appropriate, ARTH 180; CLAS 180; ENGL 299; FILM 195, 196; FREN 281, 283, 285; HIST 180, 195; LIT 180, 295; REL 180; SPAN 211, 220; THTR 121, 180; WRIT 100

2. 27 additional credits chosen from courses in the following four areas. Majors must complete four courses in one area, two courses in each of two other areas, and one course in the fourth area.

History and History of Science: CLAS 224; HIST 100, 101, 170, 201, 202, 203, 204, 217, 219, 305, 306, 307; PHYS 150; SPAN 333, or, when appropriate, HIST 180, 195, 229, 395, 403; MRST 395, 403; PHYS 403; ROML 295

Literature: CLAS 180, 201, 203, 205, 215; ENGL 240, 242, 250, 252, 311, 312, 313, 316, 319, 320, 326, 330, FREN 281; GERM 318; LIT 203, 218, 219; MRST 252; SPAN 210, 211, 220, 312, 320, 322, 323, 333; or, when appropriate, ENGL 299, 392, 394, 403; FREN 341, 403; ITAL 403; LIT 180, 295; MRST 395, 403; ROML 295; SPAN 397, 403

History of Ideas: ARTH 385; CLAS 200, 204, 210, 221; FREN 341; HIST 200, 306, 307; PHIL 110, 221, 222; REL 101, 102, 105, 106, 108, 131, 132, 215, 216, 219, 225, 250, 260, 283, 284, 350; or, when appropriate, FREN 283, 285; PHIL 180, 195; 395, 403; MRST 395, 403; POL 396, 403; REL 180, 403; ROML 295

Fine Arts: FILM 255; ARTH 101, 102, 253, 254, 255, 256, 350, 354, 355, 384, MUS 201; THTR 210, 341, or, when appropriate, FILM 195, 196; ARTH 180, 394, 403; MUS 423; MRST 395, 403; ROML 295; THTR 121, 180

3. MRST 403, 473 or 493 (3-3). A directed study or thesis in another discipline may be used to meet this requirement if approved in advance by the MRST Advisory Committee through its chair.

  1. Choose one course
    • MRST 110 - Medieval and Renaissance Culture (or MRST 110A)
      FDROffered as 110A when HL; or as 110 when HU; depending on topic
      Credits3

      An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of the Medieval and Renaissance periods through the study of a particular topic. Recent studies: The Crusades, Monasticism, Chivalry, Elizabethan England, the Birth of Italian Literature, Pilgrimage, and European Encounters with Islam. Offered as 110A when HL; or as 110 when HU; depending on topic.

      Winter 2019, MRST 110A-01: Giants of Italian Renaissance Literature in Translation (3). This course proposes an overview of some of the major literary and philosophical figures of the Italian Renaissance who have profoundly influenced Western thought, art and culture. The course starts with the thorough reading of Dante's Inferno, continues with selections of sonnets from Petrarca's Canzoniere, then moves on to a wide selection of stories from Boccaccio's Decameron, explores the contributions of women artists to Renaissance drama and poetry, and concludes with the reading of Machiavelli's The Prince and the play La Mandragola. The readings and discussions focus on the evolution of humanist thought, of the development of literary genres such as the sonnet, on the literary virtuosity and philosophical concepts as embodied throughout the three main centuries of the Italian Renaissance and represented by this particular selection of authors and works. The course is taught in an interdisciplinary manner as it reveals the interconnections between theology, philosophy, literature and rhetoric as developed throughout the golden period of the Italian Renaissance. (HL) Radulescu.

      Fall 2018, MRST 110-01: The Age of Elizabeth: Politics, Personalities, Faith and Culture (3). We study the 45-year reign of Elizabeth I through a variety of lenses in order to develop a complex understanding of this fascinating and formative period of English history. We look at the politics (the war with Spain, marriage negotiations, internal factions); the personalities (Elizabeth herself, Mary Stuart, key courtiers, suitors, and councilors); the religious controversies (the Elizabethan Settlement, the transition from Catholicism, the rise of Puritanism); and the rich cultural heritage (popular theater, sonnet sequences, portraiture). (HU) Dobin.


    • ARTH 101 - Survey of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyBent

      Chronological survey of Western art from the Paleolithic Age through the Middle Ages in Italy and Northern Europe. Examination of cultural and stylistic influences in the art and architecture of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Consideration of distinct interests of Early Christian, Byzantine, and Medieval Europe. Focus on major monuments and influential images produced up to circa 1400.


    • ARTH 102 - Survey of Western Art: Renaissance to the Present
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyKing, Lepage

      Chronological survey of Western art from the Renaissance through the present. Topics include the Renaissance, from its cultural and stylistic origins through the Mannerist movement; the Baroque and Rococo; the Neoclassical reaction; Romanticism and Naturalism; the Barbizon School and Realism; Impressionism and its aftermath; Fauvism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimalism, and the Postmodern reaction to Modernism.


    • CLAS 201 - Classical Mythology
      FDRHL
      Credits3 in fall, winter; 4 in spring
      FacultyCrotty

      An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.


    • CLAS 205 - Reading Rome: A Survey of Latin Literature
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      FacultyDance

      The course offers a survey of influential works composed in Latin between the 3rd century BCE and the 2nd century CE. Alongside poems, histories, and philosophical writings that were originally conceived of as literary projects, we also examine plays, military chronicles, speeches, and letters, all of which come down to the present as "literature" but may not have been created as such. The boundaries of "literature" is an ongoing topic of inquiry throughout the term. Students explore the literary traditions represented in the readings and consider their impact on other traditions, with the bulk of class sessions spent discussing the significance of the literary works and improving our knowledge of the contexts--historical and literary--in which they were composed.


    • CLAS 210 - Sex, Gender and Power in Ancient Literature
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      What does it mean to be a woman or a man and what power dynamic exists between the two genders? Definitions of gender and gender roles are not a modern phenomenon but have their origins in antiquity. Both literary and visual sources reveal to us the constant puzzling over issues of gender that preoccupied the ancient Greeks and Romans. In this course, we examine sources from various genres and media for example, philosophy, epic, drama, poetry, history, painting, and sculpture in an attempt to understand the various ways the Greeks and Romans conceived of gender. Readings include primary sources from antiquity (e.g., Homer, Aeschylus, Euripides, Plato, Terence, Cicero, Livy), as well as secondary sources from modern scholarship on gender in antiquity.


    • CLAS 224 - The World of Late Antiquity
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      This course introduces students to the historical period between the close of the ancient world and the rise of the Middle Ages ca. 250 to 650 AD). Students read primary sources and explore the historical evidence in order to investigate the reigning historical model of "Decline and Fall" inherited from Edward Gibbon and others, and study the development of Christianity and Judaism during this period. Finally, the course investigates the formation of Europe and the rise of Islam.


    • ENGL 240 - Arthurian Legend
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
      FacultyKao

      Why does King Arthur continue to fascinate and haunt our cultural imagination? This course surveys the origins and histories of Arthurian literature, beginning with Celtic myths, Welsh tales, and Latin chronicles. We then examine medieval French and English traditions that include Chrétien de Troyes's Perceval, the lais of Marie de France, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the Alliterative Morte Arthure, and Malory's Le Morte Darthur. In addition to historical and literary contexts, we explore theoretical issues surrounding the texts, especially the relationship between history and fantasy, courtly love and adultery, erotic love and madness, romance and chivalry, gender and agency, and Europe and its Others. Finally, we investigate Arthurian medievalisms in Victorian England and in American (post)modernity through Tennyson, Twain, Barthelme, and Ishiguro. Along the way, we view various film adaptations of Arthurian legends. All texts are read in modern English translation.


    • ENGL 242 - Individual Shakespeare Play
      FDRHL
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
      FacultyPickett

      A detailed study of a single Shakespearean play, including its sources, textual variants, performance history, film adaptations and literary and cultural legacy. The course includes both performance-based and analytical assignments.


    • ENGL 250 - Medieval and Early Modern British Literature
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
      FacultyKao

      This course is a survey of English literature from the Early Middle Ages to the Early Modern period. We read works in various genres--verse, drama, and prose--and understand their specific cultural and historical contexts. We also examine select modern film adaptations of canonical works as part of the evolving history of critical reception.


    • ENGL 252 - Shakespeare
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
      FacultyStaff

      A study of the major genres of Shakespeare's plays, employing analysis shaped by formal, historical, and performance-based questions. Emphasis is given to tracing how Shakespeare's work engages early modern cultural concerns, such as the nature of political rule, gender, religion, and sexuality. A variety of skills are developed in order to assist students with interpretation, which may include verse analysis, study of early modern dramatic forms, performance workshops, two medium-length papers, reviews of live play productions, and a final, student-directed performance of a selected play.


    • FILM 255 - Seven-Minute Shakespeare
      FDRHA
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteCompletion of the FDR FW and HL requirements
      FacultyDobin

      After intensive collective reading and discussion of four Shakespeare plays in the first week, students organize into four-person groups with the goal of producing a seven-minute video version of one of the plays by the end of the term, using only the actual text of the play. The project requires full engagement and commitment, and includes tasks such as editing and selecting from the text to produce the film script, creating storyboards, casting and recruiting actors, rehearsing, filming, editing, adding sound tracks and effects. We critique and learn from each other's efforts.


    • GERM 318 - German Medieval and Renaissance Literature
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGERM 262 or equivalent
      FacultyCrockett

      An examination of selected works and a study of literary history through the 16th century. Medieval literary readings include the Hildebrandslied, Nibelungenlied, Parzival, and Tristan, as well as the Minnesang. Consideration is also given to the history of the German literary language during the period covered. Conducted in German.


    • HIST 100 - European Civilization, 325-1517
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyPeterson

      An introductory survey, featuring lectures and discussions of European culture, politics, religion and social life, and of Europe's relations with neighboring societies, from the rise of Christianity in Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages and the Italian Renaissance, to the beginnings of the 16th-century Protestant and Catholic Reformations.


    • HIST 101 - European Civilization, 1500-1789
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyStaff

      An individual who died in 1500 would have been surprised, if not bewildered, by many aspects of European life and thought in 1800. What changed over these three centuries? What stayed the same? Why should we in the 21st century, care? This course examines the history of Europe from the Renaissance through the beginning of the French Revolution. It explores the interplay of religion, politics, society, culture, and economy at a time when Europe underwent great turmoil and change: the Reformation, the consolidation of state power, the rise of constitutionalism, global expansion and encounters with "others," perpetual warfare, the rise of the market economy, the spread of the slave trade, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. This course discusses how these processes transformed Europe into the Western world of today, while also challenging ideas about what "Western," "European," and "Civilization" actually mean.


    • HIST 170 - History of Islamic Civilization I: Origins to 1500
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBlecher

      This course surveys the political, social, and cultural history of the Islamic World from the 7th to 15th centuries, with particular attention paid to the diverse geographical and cultural contexts in which pre-modern Islamic civilization flourished. Topics include the origins of Islam in late Antiquity; the development of Islamic religious, political, and cultural institutions; the flourishing of medieval Islamic education, science, and literature; the tension among state, ethnic, sectarian, and global Muslim identities; and the emergence of a distinctly Muslim approach to historiography.


    • LIT 203 - Greek Literature from Homer to the Early Hellenistic Period
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
      FacultyCrotty

      Readings in translation from Homer, Hesiod, the tragedians, the comedians, and the lyric and pastoral poets, including selections from Herodotus and Thucydides, and from Plato's and Aristotle's reflections on literature. The course includes readings from modern critical writings. We read some of the most famous stories of the Western world--from the Iliad and the Odyssey, to Milton's Paradise Lost and Joyce's Ulysses, via Virgil's Aeneid and Lucan's Civil War. All of these works are epic narratives, each presenting a different concept of the hero, and yet, at the same time, participating in a coherent, on-going and unfinished tradition. We consider such questions as the role of violence in literature; the concept of the heroic as it reflects evolving ideas of the individual and society; and the idea of a literary tradition.
       


    • LIT 218 - Pre-Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW FDR requirement
      FacultyFu

      A survey of Chinese literature from the earliest period to the founding of the Republic in 1912. Taught in English, the course presupposes no previous knowledge of China or Chinese culture. The literature is presented in the context of its intellectual, philosophical and cultural background. Texts used may vary from year to year and include a wide selection of fiction, poetry, historical documents, Chinese drama (opera) and prose works. Audiovisual materials are used when appropriate and available.


    • LIT 219 - Augustine and the Literature of Self, Soul, and Synapses
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
      FacultyKosky

      A careful reading of the depiction of the restless soul in Augustine's Confessions is followed by study of fictional, philosophical, religious, and/or scientific literature. Students reflect on the state of the soul in a world made of selves or the fate of the self in a soulless world ... and whether there might be other options


    • MRST 252 - Introduction to Shakespeare
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteComplete of the FDR FW writing requirement
      FacultyDobin

      A study of the major genres of Shakespeare's plays, employing analysis shaped by formal, historical, and performance-based questions. Emphasis is given to tracing how Shakespeare's work engages early modem cultural concerns, such as the nature of political rule, gender, religion, and sexuality. A variety of skills are developed in order to assist students with interpretation, which may include verse analysis, study of early modem dramatic forms, performance workshops, two medium-length papers, reviews of live play productions, and eight final, student-directed performance of a selected play.


    • MUS 201 - Music History I
      FDRHA
      Credits3
      FacultyGaylard

      A survey of music from the Middle Ages through the Baroque period.


    • REL 101 - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyMarks

      An introduction to the history, literature and interpretation of the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament).


    • REL 102 - New Testament
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBrown

      An introduction to the history, literature and interpretation of the New Testament.


    • REL 105 - Introduction to Islam
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyAtanasova

      This course familiarizes students with the foundations of the Islamic tradition and the diverse historical and geographical manifestations of belief and practice built upon those foundations. Throughout the course, the role of Islam in shaping cultural, social, gender, and political identities is explored. Readings are drawn from the writings of both historical and contemporary Muslim thinkers.


    • REL 106 - Judaism: Tradition and Modernity
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyMarks

      Through a variety of sources, including Talmudic debate, fiction, drama, liturgy, memoirs, film, and history, this course introduces the main concepts, literature, and practices of the classical forms of Judaism that began in the first centuries C.E., and then examines how Judaism has changed during the past two centuries, in modernist movements (Reform, Neo-Orthodoxy, Zionism) and contemporary fundamentalist movements (Ultra-Orthodoxy, messianic settler Zionism), as well as current ideas and issues.


    • REL 108 - The Qur'an
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent required
      FacultyAtanasova

      This course approaches the Qur'an from a range of modern and pre-modern perspectives: as an oral recitation; as a material object; as a historical document; as a literary text; as it relates to the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament; as a foundation for Islamic law, theology and mysticism; and as a source for ethics and social activism. Particular attention is devoted to issues of gender and politics raised by the Qur'an, supplemented by a number of film screenings. Prior knowledge of Islam is not required.


    • REL 131 - Buddhism
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyLubin

      A survey of the historical development of the doctrines and practices of Buddhism. After a discussion of the Hindu origins of Buddhism, the course focuses on the development of the Theravada, Vajrayana and Mahayana traditions. A class trip to at least one Buddhist center is included.


    • REL 132 - God and Goddess in Hinduism
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyLubin

      This course explores the many ways in which Hindus visualize and talk about the divine and its manifestations in the world through mythic stories, use of images in worship, explanations of the nature of the soul and body in relation to the divine, and the belief in human embodiments of the divine in Hindu holy men and women. Topics include: the religious meanings of masculine and feminine in the divine and human contexts; the idea of local, family, and "chosen" divinities; and differing forms of Hindu devotion for men and women.


    • THTR 210 - Ancient and Global Theater
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      FacultySandberg, Levy

      This course examines the history of theater and dramatic literature from its foundations in ancient world cultures through the Renaissance. Since this history course covers over 2000 years of time, class meetings sometimes move at a fast pace. Students gain a general world-wide cultural understanding of the art and history of the theater from its beginnings, and how theater spread as a phenomenon across the globe. Since theater is primarily a cultural institution, we simultaneously examine politics, philosophy, religion, science, and other factors that influence how the art form is created, maintained, and culturally preserved. We also examine history itself as an important cultural tool for assessing the events of the past.


    • or when appropriate,
    • ARTH 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteFirst-year seminar. Prerequisite: First-year standing

      Topics vary by term.


    • CLAS 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteFirst-Year seminar. Prerequisite: First-Year standing

      Topic varies by term.


    • ENGL 299 - Seminar for Prospective Majors
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW composition requirement and at least one course chosen from English courses numbered from 201 to 295

      A study of a topic in literature issuing in a research process and sustained critical writing. Some recent topics have been Detective Fiction; American Indian Literatures; Revenge; and David Thoreau and American Transcendentalism.

      Fall 2018, ENGL 299A-01: Seminar for Prospective Majors: Utopia, Science Fiction, and the Idea of America(s) (3). What value does the utopian/dystopian text hold in the development of alternative thought? This course, grounded in science fiction and the African American and Latin American contexts, addresses this question via the thoughtful examination of a range of theoretical, fictional, and cinematic texts. Works studied throughout the term come from, among others, Carlos Fuentes, Thomas More, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Frederick Jameson, W.E.B. DuBois, Frances Bodomo, Alfonso Cuarón, Octavia Butler, and Samuel Delany. (HL) Wilson.


    • FILM 195 - Topics in Film Studies
      FDRHA
      Credits3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW FDR requirement, and other prerequisites may vary with topic

      Selected topic in film studies, focused on one or more of film history, theory, production, or screenwriting. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • FILM 196 - Topics in Film and Literature
      FDRHL
      Credits3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW FDR requirement, and other prerequisites may vary with topic

      Selected topics in film and literature. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • FREN 281 - Civilisation et culture françaises: Traditions et changements
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteFREN 162, FREN 164, or equivalent

      A study of significant aspects of French culture and civilization, seen in a diachronic perspective. Emphasis on economic, sociological and historical changes that shaped present-day institutions and national identity. Readings, discussions and papers in French for further development of communication skills.


    • FREN 283 - Histoire des idées
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteFREN 162, FREN 164 or equivalent
      FacultyStaff

      This course retraces the evolution of thought in France across centuries through the examination of intellectual, cultural and artistic movements. Readings, discussions and paper in French for further development of communication skills.


    • FREN 285 - Spring Term Topics in French Civilization
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteFREN 162, FREN 164, or equivalent

      A study of significant aspects of culture and civilization through direct experience abroad in France and/or Francophone countries. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • HIST 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteFirst-year seminar. Prerequisite: First-year standing

      Topics vary by term and instructor.

      Fall 2018, HIST 180A-01: FS: Uncovering W&L's Past HIST (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing. 180A-01 is a research seminar that will be reading and writing intensive, and focus on the African American past of W&L and other colleges. We will focus solely on archival research and the issues that eastern colleges have dealt with in reclaiming this past. (HU) DeLaney.

      Fall 2018, HIST 180B-01: FS: Plague: A Medieval Pandemic (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-Year class standing only. An exploration of the causes, experiences, and consequences of the disease colloquially referred to as 'The Black Death.' Students develop the core skills of historical inquiry by critically engaging with primary sources and discussing questions such as: How did Europeans explain and respond to the disease? Did their society collapse in the face of such devastation or did it spark the Renaissance? How can we use modern science in our work as historians and what contributions might historians bring to the scientists' bench? By the end of this course, students are able to articulate informed perspectives on these topics, while providing compelling and balanced arguments for their interpretations. (HU) Vise.


    • HIST 195 - Topics in History for First-years and Sophomores
      FDRHU
      Credits3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring
      PrerequisiteVaries with topic

      Selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      Fall 2018, HIST 195A-01: Muhammad: the Prophet of Islam throughout History (3). Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. Other students may register for HIST 289A. To Muslims, Muhammad is a prophetic figure whose model life is to be emulated; to non-Muslims, a controversial figure that has stirred the imagination for centuries. Through an analysis of the earliest non-Muslim sources on Muhammad, to insider Muslim narratives of his miraculous life, to contemporary controversies about visual depictions of Muhammad -- even bans on celebrations of his birthday -- this course challenges common misconceptions about Muhammad as a historical and a religious figure, while fostering critical historical literacy and familiarity with theoretical questions in the study of religion. (HU) Atanasova.


    • LIT 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteFirst-year seminar. Prerequisite: First-year standing. Completion of FW FDR requirement or this may vary with the topic

      First-year seminar.

      Winter 2019, LIT 180-01: First-Year Seminar: From Page and Stage to Celluloid: Carmen (4). Prerequsite: First-year class standing only. Bizet's opera, Carmen, based on the so-named novella by French author Mérimée, popularized the character of the fiery gypsy abroad more than in France. We trace her sisters in French, Spanish, and Russian literature, opera, and art, and her reincarnations in film, including Charlie Chaplin's A Burlesque on Carmen, Otto Preminger's Carmen Jones, Federico Rosi's filmed opera Carmen, J.-L. Godard's Prénom Carmen, Carlos Saura's Carmen. We study how the world stage, the artistic trends, the mores, and the concerns of the times shape and renew this enduring character and the men she beguiles. (HL) Frégnac-Clave.

      Fall 2018, LIT 180-02: FS: Living by the Code: Honor, Love, and War in the Literature of the High Middle Ages (3). First-year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only and completion of the FDR requirement in writing (FW). An exploration of notions of honor and honorable behavior in European aristocratic culture of the High Middle Ages, as represented in literary texts of the 11th and 12th centuries. Students chart the transformation in court literature of the Germanic and feudal warrior (Hildebrandslied, Song of Roland) into the chivalric knight (Arthurian romances), whose adventures are motivated by the quest for honor and the love for an ideal woman. We also study the ways in which warrior and courtly codes of conduct, the ethos of chivalry and courtly love, and conceptions of the feminine ideal were articulated, constructed, and critiqued. (HL) Prager.


    • LIT 295 - Special Topics in Literature in Translation
      FDRHL
      Credits3-4
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement

      A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      Spring 2019, LIT 295-01: Literary Reflections on National Socialism (3). Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement. The literature of post World War II Germany that reflects on and attempts to come to terms with the atrocities of the Nazi regime. Readings, discussion, and writing in English. (HL). Crockett.

      Spring 2019, LIT 295-03: Topic: The African Child-Soldier (3). Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement. Who is a child? Who is a child-soldier? Did the child have a childhood in a home and family before becoming a soldier? What is childhood? How does the definition of childhood (legal or otherwise) jibe with the child's own perception or understanding of his/her place in society? Does s/he return home, and to a family after combat? Are home and family still the same? This course engages these and other questions as they relate to the representation of the child-soldier in African literary texts and in film. In so doing, we interrogate the larger question of agency, victimhood, and the human capacity to transcend adversity, focusing specifically on how the child (or child-soldier) negotiates the meandering road upon which s/he has been thrusted by people and circumstances, with no properly functioning compass. (HL) Kamara.

      Fall 2018, LIT 295B-01: Arabic Literature in Translation: The Arab Spring in Literature and Media (3). Prerequisites: Completion of FW requirement. The year 2011 marked the moment in which demonstrations and sit-ins against tyranny erupted simultaneously throughout the Arab World. Revolutionaries, mostly under the age of 30, demanded freedom of speech, an end to corruption, and the establishment of democratic states. These uprisings, called The Arab Spring, left a strong footprint on Arabic literature and media. This course introduces students to political, social, and economic issues in the Arab World through different literary genres (such as novels and short stories, political satire, movies, music, poetry and social media) that reflect the aspirations, disappointments, and concerns of the Arabs before, during, and after the revolutions. (HL). Hala Abdelmobdy.

       


    • REL 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
      Credits3 credits in Fall and Winter, 4 credits in Spring
      PrerequisiteFirst-Year class standing

      First-year seminar. Topics vary by term.

      Fall 2018, REL 180-01: FS: Exodus and Exile: Oppression, Liberation, and Diaspora in Jewish Tradition (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. Assumes no prior knowledge of the Bible, and all readings are in English translation. The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) is bookended by two epic stories, the Israelites' exodus from Egypt and, later, their exile to Babylon. These ancient stories confront important political and ideological questions of their time: what is the role of God in warfare? Why do God's people sometimes suffer defeat? What happens to a people uprooted from their homeland? Indeed, these issues continue to resonate among religious communities today. This course traces the interpretation of the biblical Exodus and Exile by writers working in different historical periods, examining these interpretations through the lenses of myth and memory—how do writers in these periods use the biblical narratives to construct their own history of Israel, Jews, and themselves? What are the social and political factors that shape such interpretations? Beginning with a close reading of the biblical stories in their ancient context, we consider the reinterpretation of the Exodus and Exile among later writers working in the Hellenistic, Roman, Late Antique, and Medieval periods. We conclude by examining the role of these biblical stories in American religious traditions, including the Passover Seder and the Civil Rights Movement. (HU) Sonia.


    • SPAN 211 - Spanish Civilization and Culture
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteSPAN 162, 164 or the equivalent in language skills
      FacultyStaff

      A survey of significant developments in Spanish civilization. The course addresses Spanish heritage and the present-day cultural patterns formed by its legacies. Readings, discussions and papers, primarily in Spanish, for further development of communication skills.


    • SPAN 220 - Introducción a la literatura española
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteSPAN 162 or 164 or equivalent
      FacultyStaff

      Spanish literary masterpieces from the Poema del Cid through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.


    • THTR 121 - Script Analysis for Stage and Screen
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      FacultySandberg, Levy, Collins, Evans

      The study of selected plays and screenplays from the standpoint of the theatre and screen artists. Emphasis on thorough examination of the scripts preparatory to production. This course is focused on developing script analysis skills directly applicable to work in production. Students work collaboratively in various creative capacities to transform texts into productions.


    • THTR 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteFirst-year seminar. Prerequisite: First-year standing

      First-year seminar.


    • WRIT 100 - Writing Seminar for First-Years
      FDRFW
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteFirst-year standing

      Concentrated work in composition with readings ranging across modes, forms, and genres in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. The sections vary in thematic focus across disciplines, but all students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing  several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-01: Writing Seminar for First Years: Terror and Violence (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Using cross-cultural examples, we investigate violence and terror in historical and contemporary societies. We use ethnography (books and articles) as our guides in this seminar. What are the causes and effects of violent behavior on both individual and collective levels? What are the economic, political, and social institutions that cause violence? How do terror and terrorism transform society? Finally, we discuss possible ways to subvert, as well as heal from, physical and emotional trauma. (FW) Goluboff.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-02: Writing Seminar for First Years: Opium Lessons (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Through this seminar, you learn how to research and write about the opiate crisis that has evolved through decades of ethical and medical concerns complicated by the misuse of scientific information within the pharmaceutical industry. As journalistic readings guide us through the issues, we examine the data and sources behind the stories to reveal the techniques of writing. For the assignments, you investigate an opium-related topic in an area of your interest. Opium and its derivatives are nothing new. History and literature demonstrate that the milky sap of the poppy (papever somniferum) gained notoriety long before now. The course ends with student-led discussions about the lessons learned (and not yet learned) by government, industry, and society. (FW) Barry.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-03: Writing Seminar for First Years: Adaptation X2 (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Film adaptations of stories, novels, plays, and even historical events or persons (see, for example, the long career of Oliver Stone and films such as his Snowden, World Trade Center, and JFK) have proven a mainstay of a multibillion-dollar industry along with a perennial concern of newspaper reviews, cultural debates, and dinner-table conversations. We explore this phenomenon through a series of case studies and raise the stakes by looking at instances in which there have been multiple adaptations (here limited to two) of the source. Such material allows for productive classroom discussion meant to prepare students for their individual papers, but furthers this central purpose by foregrounding complex, varying, sometimes contradictory perspectives that at once require and aid careful thinking, analysis, and writing. The course focuses upon four examples drawn from numerous possibilities—a myth or fairy tale such as "Hercules" or "Cinderella," A Christmas Carol, Dangerous Liaisons, Jane Eyre, a Sherlock Holmes detective story, The Picture of Dorian Gray, True Grit, Murder on the Orient Express, The Maltese Falcon, Talented Mr. Ripley, Casino Royale, and The Shining. (FW) Adams.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-04: Writing Seminar for First Years: Wicked Women (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This seminar begins with Chaucer's Wife of Bath and ends with recent essays on Hillary Clinton. In between, we examine witches, femme fatales and prostitutes, considering representations of difficult women in literature, journalism, and film. The course is not for women only—for instance, our discussion of witchcraft and wizardry runs from Miller's The Crucible through excerpts from Harry Potter. (FW) Brodie.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-05: Writing Seminar for First Years: Misfits, Rebels, and Outcasts (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. The title of this seminar leaves out a lot. If extended, it might include strangers, visionaries, fanatics, prophets, artists, lovers, criminals, transients, deviants, freaks, and monsters. We read stories and plays, as well as view films, about individuals challenging the status quo, either directly or indirectly, deliberately or inadvertently. Among other things, we consider what happens to the individual in the process, and what happens to the status quo. (FW) Oliver.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-06: Writing Seminar for First Years: Environmental Thought and Food Justice (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This seminar is an exploration of the human relationship to nature. How do writers and environmental thinkers understand their relationships to "the natural world"? How can we understand our own? We read widely within environmental literature with a focus on environmental justice and food justice. Wendell Berry, Walt Whitman, Annie Dillard, Michael Pollan, and Vandana Shiva, among others, provide scaffolding for our discussion of "nature," "interdependence," "poverty," "food justice," "life," "death," "knowledge," and "mystery," and the relationships these ideas have to one another. We explore the implications of these ideas for the individual as well as for a globalized world in which ecological concern is a matter of daily news and attention. (FW) Green.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-07: Writing Seminar for First Years: The Good Wife, or How to Survive a Marriage, Run a Household, and Save a Kingdom (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This seminar examines two iconic wives in literature: Griselda and Scheherazade. One is known for her sacrificial patience, the other, cunning fabrication. Yet both share the status of female paragons around whom a community coheres. Reading an eclectic range of texts from the medieval to the postmodern, we ask how gender shapes representation, and vice versa. We chart the various transformations of the two female archetypes through literary history and are on the lookout for moments of breakdown under the burden of exemplarity. And if their goodness resides in securing common profit, how do Griselda and Scheherazade compare to other figures of femininity, such as the diva and the whore? Throughout the seminar, our emphasis is on learning the craft of academic writing via close reading, research, and engagement with critical sources. That is, we read, think, and write like Griselda and Scheherazade—with fortitude and deftness. (FW) Kao.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-08: Writing Seminar for First Years: Nonconformity and Community (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. What is the proper role of nonconformity in the healthy community? How much conformity is needed to sustain a culture? Are complete nonconformity and strict conformity even possible? Through readings by classic and contemporary writers, we explore the importance of sameness and difference within the various communities to which we belong. In the process, the seminar includes an examination of some of Washington and Lee's core values, including honor and integrity. (FW) Pickett.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-09: Writing Seminar for First Years: Immigrant Voices (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. The voices of recent immigrants speak of new social struggles, identity, race, isolation, discovery, xenophobia, transition, and freedom. In this seminar, we examine the lives and experiences, cultural misinterpretations, and challenges of different immigrant communities and different generations within immigrant families. Through focused readings, film viewings, personal interviews, class discussion, and reflective writing assignments, students address an intrinsic, shared human experience and construct critical, clear, organized, and well-supported articulations of their understanding of the texts and issues at hand. (FW) Ruiz.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-10: Writing Seminar for First Years: Wicked Women (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This seminar begins with Chaucer's Wife of Bath and ends with recent essays on Hillary Clinton. In between, we examine witches, femme fatales and prostitutes, considering representations of difficult women in literature, journalism, and film. The course is not for women only—for instance, our discussion of witchcraft and wizardry runs from Miller's The Crucible through excerpts from Harry Potter. (FW) Brodie.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-11: Writing Seminar for First Years: Monsters Among Us (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Beginning with the first gothic novel in 1764, the gothic has thrilled readers for centuries. Featuring a variety of foes, the gothic novel offers readers a way to explore their deepest fears, especially the fear that monsters (real and imaginary) lurk among us. In this seminar, we read a wide range of texts—from Mary Shelley's classic gothic novel Frankenstein (1818) to Emil Ferris's recently-published graphic novel My Favorite Thing is Monsters—in order to explore the notion of monstrosity and the persistence of monsters in our cultural imagination. Even in our scientific and rational age, we continue to be drawn to the monsters that haunt the pages of Twilight or darken the scenes of True Blood. Similarly, in journalism and pop culture the language of monstrosity is used to discuss criminals, terrorists, political figures, and more. What function do these monsters serve? Why do we continually resort to the monster in order to make sense of the world around us? While the topic of the course is monsters, the main focus is writing: our readings, class discussions, and assignments are all designed specifically to help you cultivate and refine your skills as a writer. (FW) Walle.

      Winter 2019, WRIT 100-12: Writing Seminar for First-Years: Controversies in Children's Literature (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this seminar, students engage with works written for children (some classic and some modern; some fiction and some nonfiction) and apply a critical lens to issues involving violent content, gender representation, racial stereotyping, religious objections, and historical accuracy. Instruction in research methods and proper use of information is also included. Students can expect a dynamic environment with a lot of small-group discussion and activities. (FW) Harrington.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-01: Writing Seminar for First Years: War Is Hell: Literary Depictions of the Second World War (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. General William T. Sherman famously told a crowd in Columbus, Ohio, in the year 1880 that, "There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell." In this seminar we read, discuss, and write about three famous novels by authors who agreed with Sherman but chose very different strategies to convey that message: The Naked and the Dead by Norman Mailer (1948), Joseph Heller's dark comedy, Catch-22 (1961), and Thomas Keneally's carefully researched Schindler's List (1982). We compare these novels with oral histories collected from veterans and women who served on the home front to investigate what motivated support for the war effort, the different forms of suffering caused by the Second World War, its long-term psychological impact, and its role in causing social change in postwar America. We also compare the book version of Schindler's List with the film directed by Steven Spielberg. (FW) Patch.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-02: Writing Seminar for First Years: Homeward Bound (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. "Home" is an enduring topic in literature, in part, because of its broad appeal and applicability. It can refer to both a physical structure as well as the emotional bonds that hold us together. Building on both of these meanings, homes become symbols for broader social configurations—the unit whose safeguarding represents the security of the nation. Moreover, imaginings of home, literary or otherwise, offer us a window through which to consider how normative and alternative families form. In this course, we explore varying, often contradicting, expressions of the domestic. We explore how "home" intersects with markers of identity, such as race, class, and gender. Possible topics and genres include: kinship, sexuality, alienation, homelessness, memory/nostalgia, the gothic, and horror/home invasion. In addition to non-fictional accounts and sources, possible texts include: The Garies and Their Friends (Webb), House of Mirth (Wharton), Home (Morrison), Fun Home (Bechdel), Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (Albee), and A Raisin in the Sun (Hansberry). (FW) Millan.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-03: Writing Seminar for First Years: The Absolutely True Story of Literary Memoir (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Patricia Hampl says, "True memoir is an attempt to find not only a self but a world." Over the course of the semester, we explore the diverse ways that memoir represents the interactions between self and world. What goes into this complicated act of interpreting "the truth," particularly considering how "selves" exist in/are shaped by issues of gender, race, age, ethnicity, nationality, class, and culture? We analyze novels, short prose, graphic novels and poetry by writers using memoir/life-writing as a tool to construct and inhabit an identity. (FW) Miranda.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-04: Writing Seminar for First Years: Faith, Doubt and Identity (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this seminar, we explore the topic of belief and how it shapes a person's selfhood. How does being a part of a religious community, or a variety of religious communities, shape one's identity? How does identity change with the adoption of either belief, skepticism, or another culture? We ask these questions primarily through the genres of novels and short stories, examining lives of faith and doubt in several religious contexts. Students also create a personal digital story in their final assignment that builds on ideas of the seminar. Authors studied include Paul Kalanithi, Marilynne Robinson, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Ian McEwan, and Orhan Pamuk. (FW) Gertz.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-05: Writing Seminar for First Years: Race, Memory, Nation (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This seminar explores our collective national consciousness in relation to ideas of race. We examine archival texts, as well as 20th- and 21st-century fiction, poetry, and film. Authors and artists considered throughout the term include James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Claudia Rankine, Steven Spielberg, and Quentin Tarantino. Multiple writing assignments deal with Washington and Lee's legacy regarding slavery, integration, and civil rights. As we interact with a wide variety of mediums, emphasis is placed on critical reading and writing (and rewriting), as well as on research skills. In addition to traditional scholarly writing, an option exists for students to produce a creative project responding to the ideas of the seminar. (FW) Wilson.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-06: Writing Seminar for First Years: Civil Rights and the Press (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This seminar explores the news media's role in the Civil Rights Movement of the South in the 1950s and '60s. Using the Pulitzer Prize winning history The Race Beat as guide, the course initiates students into college-level expectations for writing, reading, and classroom discussion. Combining the professor's interests in American press history and experience in newspapers and magazines for 25 years, we cover both academic and journalistic styles of writing. (FW) Cumming.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-07: Writing Seminar for First Years: Writing in Public (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Fifty years ago, getting your writing into print could be tough. Now, anyone with a keyboard and an internet connection can publish their thoughts. But how do you get people to read what you've written? And what makes good public writing? How do you make your opinions about pop culture or politics or animal cruelty interesting and persuasive? How do you join the public conversation, instead of screaming into the internet void? This class investigates public writing on topics as varied as Kim Kardashian, Black Lives Matter, September 11, and Internet trolls. We examine ways authors use evidence and analysis to build persuasive arguments and learn strategies for identifying and engaging with public audiences. We also produce public writing in response to the essays we read and learn the skills for setting up, maintaining and promoting blogs and websites. (FW) Bufkin.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-08: Writing Seminar for First Years: Other Worlds (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. This course focuses on fiction and poetry about borders and boundary states. Many readings come from the edges of literary genre: serious fiction with dystopian elements, poetry based on fairy tales, and more. The core skill you hone is critical writing, but you also try other modes and media, including creative writing and digital storytelling. (FW) Wheeler.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-09: Writing Seminar for First Years: Aspects of Elizabeth (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. Queen Elizabeth I (1533-1603) is among history's most fascinating figures. She ruled a small island, beset by threats both external and internal, during a period of tremendous political, religious and cultural change. Her 45-year reign saw the conspiracies and eventual execution of Mary, Queen of Scots, the consolidation of the Church of England, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and the flowering of English culture in such figures as Shakespeare, Donne, and Marlowe. We learn about both the public and private Elizabeth by focusing on four distinct topics: her own poetry, letters and speeches; the portraits of her as princess and queen; her controversial personal and political relationship with Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex; and films about Elizabeth. The primary texts of the course are each other's essays; we learn about our topic by reading what other students have written, while focusing most of our class time on improving our writing skills. (FW) Dobin.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-10: Writing Seminar for First Years: Don't "I" Me: Privilege, Otherness, and Writing Good (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this seminar, we examine "One of these things is not like the others" (a.k.a impostor) syndrome and its effect on the human quest to feel good enough. Our reading and writing explores the complexities of and correspondence between inferiority and otherness based on factors such as color, gender, privilege and language. We dig into works from, among others, James Baldwin, Peggy McIntosh, Claudia Rankine, Tucker Carlson and Isabel Allende. (FW) Fuentes.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-11: Writing Seminar for First Years: Misfits, Rebels, and Outcasts (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. The title of this section leaves out a lot. If extended, it might include strangers, visionaries, fanatics, criminals, prophets, artists, lovers, freaks, and monsters. We read stories and plays, as well as view films, about individuals challenging the status quo, either directly or indirectly, deliberately or inadvertently. We consider, among other things, what happens to the individual in the process, and what happens to the status quo. (FW) Oliver.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-12: Writing Seminar for First Years: A Whole New World (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this age of global travel, economics, and politics, people can go almost anywhere and find similar technology and consumer goods, experiencing a new place as a comfortable and in some ways familiar variation on home. At other times visitors and newcomers really have discovered a whole new world. In this section, students study novels, movies, and other accounts of cultural encounters between people who have been in the same place but experienced very different worlds. Works may include James Welch's Fools Crow about white men first meeting the Blackfeet Indians in Montana, Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart about the English first coming to Nigeria, and Cormac McCarthy's The Road about the breakdown of shared culture in a post-apocalyptic world. We also think about how such encounters are depicted in popular culture, from Disney movies to advertisements to music videos. We compare these fictional encounters with international experiences, issues, and conflicts today. (FW) Smout.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-13: Writing Seminar for First Years: Superheroes (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. In this section, students analyze the evolution of the character type from Superman's first appearance in 1938 Action Comics to contemporary superheroes in 21st-century short stories, poetry, films, and graphic novels. (FW) Gavaler.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-14: Writing Seminar for First Years: Business Writing Essentials (3). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Concentrated work in composition. All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process. All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. From emails to pitch books, writing remains a foundation of modern business communication. This section offers students the essential theories, skills, strategies, and tactics to become effective written communicators in modern business settings. Students taking this course develop written work purposefully designed to engage readers within a business context with well-researched information and well-founded arguments. Students analyze, discuss, and produce various forms of professional documentation as they develop their abilities to ethically and effectively write. Projects involve chirographic, print, digital, verbal, and non-verbal forms of business writing. (FW) Lind.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-15:  Writing Seminar for First Years:  Shut Up and Play:  Black Athletes and Activism (3).  Prerequisite:  First-year standing.  Concentrated work in composition.  All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process.  All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style.  Jessie Owens—a legendary African American participant in the 1936 Olympics—told Tommie Smith and John Carlos, two black Olympic sprinters who held a protest during the 1968 games, that "the black fist is a meaningless symbol...The only time the black fist has significance is when there's money inside."  In this seminar, we ponder Owens's observation by looking at black athletes and activism between 1968 and 2018.  We examine case studies that focus on Smith & Carlos, Curt Flood, Muhammad Ali, Arthur Ashe, Michael Jordan, Jackie Joyner Kersee, Venus Williams, Serena Williams, Colin Kapaernick, and LeBron James.  As we study these different athletes, we stress critical reading and writing, research skills, revision, and historical awareness.  Students write blogs, essays, and a traditional scholarly article.  In addition, students have the option to produce a podcast.  (FW) Hill.

      Fall 2018, WRIT 100-16: Writing Seminar for First Years: Modern French Theater and Film (3). Prerequisite:  First-year standing.  Concentrated work in composition.  All students write at least four revised essays in addition to completing several exercises emphasizing writing as a process.  All sections stress active reading, argumentation, the appropriate presentation of evidence, various methods of critical analysis, and clarity of style. An incursion into some of the most representative dramatic and cinematographic works in modern and contemporary France. Thematically, the readings and films focus on representations of love, romance, and the couple. Some of the playwrights studied include Eugene Ionesco, Yasmina Reza, and Erik Emmanuel Schmidt. Films by Francois Truffaut and Claude Lelouche, among others, form the cinema component of the course. (HL) Radulescu.


  2. 27 credits chosen from courses in the following four areas.
  3. Majors must complete four courses in one area, two courses in each of two other areas, and one course in the fourth area.

    • History and History of Science:
      • CLAS 224 - The World of Late Antiquity
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyStaff

        This course introduces students to the historical period between the close of the ancient world and the rise of the Middle Ages ca. 250 to 650 AD). Students read primary sources and explore the historical evidence in order to investigate the reigning historical model of "Decline and Fall" inherited from Edward Gibbon and others, and study the development of Christianity and Judaism during this period. Finally, the course investigates the formation of Europe and the rise of Islam.


      • HIST 100 - European Civilization, 325-1517
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyPeterson

        An introductory survey, featuring lectures and discussions of European culture, politics, religion and social life, and of Europe's relations with neighboring societies, from the rise of Christianity in Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages and the Italian Renaissance, to the beginnings of the 16th-century Protestant and Catholic Reformations.


      • HIST 101 - European Civilization, 1500-1789
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyStaff

        An individual who died in 1500 would have been surprised, if not bewildered, by many aspects of European life and thought in 1800. What changed over these three centuries? What stayed the same? Why should we in the 21st century, care? This course examines the history of Europe from the Renaissance through the beginning of the French Revolution. It explores the interplay of religion, politics, society, culture, and economy at a time when Europe underwent great turmoil and change: the Reformation, the consolidation of state power, the rise of constitutionalism, global expansion and encounters with "others," perpetual warfare, the rise of the market economy, the spread of the slave trade, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. This course discusses how these processes transformed Europe into the Western world of today, while also challenging ideas about what "Western," "European," and "Civilization" actually mean.

         


      • HIST 170 - History of Islamic Civilization I: Origins to 1500
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyBlecher

        This course surveys the political, social, and cultural history of the Islamic World from the 7th to 15th centuries, with particular attention paid to the diverse geographical and cultural contexts in which pre-modern Islamic civilization flourished. Topics include the origins of Islam in late Antiquity; the development of Islamic religious, political, and cultural institutions; the flourishing of medieval Islamic education, science, and literature; the tension among state, ethnic, sectarian, and global Muslim identities; and the emergence of a distinctly Muslim approach to historiography.


      • HIST 201 - Europe in the Early Middle Ages, 325-1198
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyPeterson

        Examines, through lectures and discussions, the culture and society of late Roman antiquity; the rise of Christianity and the formation of the Western church; Europe's relations with Byzantium and Islam, Germanic culture, monasticism, Charlemagne's empire; the Vikings, feudalism, manorialism, agriculture and the rise of commerce; gender roles and family structures; warfare and the Crusades; the growth of the papacy and feudal monarchies, the conflict between church and state; the revival of legal studies and theology; and the development of chivalric and romantic ideals in the cultural renewal of the 11th and 12th centuries.


      • HIST 202 - Europe in the Late Middle Ages, 1198-1500
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyPeterson

        Examines, through lectures and discussions, the high medieval papacy; the rise of new lay religious movements; Franciscans and Dominicans; dissent and heresy; the Inquisition; Jews and minorities; the rise of universities; scholasticism and humanism; the development of law; Parliament and constitutionalism; the Hundred Years War; the Black Death; the papal schism and conciliarism; gender roles; family structures and child rearing; Europe's relations with Islam and Byzantium; and the rise of commerce, cities and urban values, as well as of the "new monarchies."


      • HIST 203 - The Italian Renaissance in Its Historical Setting
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyPeterson

        Examines, through lectures and discussions, the Italian Renaissance within the framework of European religious, political and cultural development. The rise and impact of commercial and urban values on religious and political life in the Italian communes to the time of Dante. Cultural and political life in the "despotic" signorie and in republics such as Florence and Venice. The diffusion of Renaissance cultural ideals from Florence to the other republics and courts of 15th-century Italy, to the papacy, and to Christian humanists north of the Alps. Readings from Dante, Petrarch, Leonardo Bruni, Pico della Mirandola and Machiavelli.


      • HIST 204 - The Age of Reformation
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyPeterson

        Examines the origins, development, and consequences of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations of the 16th century. The late medieval religious environment; the emergence of new forms of lay religious expression; the impact of urbanization; and the institutional dilemmas of the church. The views of leading reformers, such as Luther, Calvin, and Loyola; and the impact of differing social and political contexts; and technological innovations, such as printing, on the spread of reform throughout Europe. The impact of reform and religious strife on state development and the emergence of doctrines of religious toleration and philosophical skepticism; recent theses and approaches emphasizing "confessionalization," "social discipline," and "microhistory."


      • HIST 217 - History of the British Isles to 1688: Power, Plague, and Prayer
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyBrock

        The history of the British Isles to 1688 tells the story of how an island remote from the classical world came to dominate much of the modern one. This course ventures from Britain during Roman occupation and Anglo-Saxon migration, to the expansion of the Church and tales of chivalry during the Middle Ages, then finally to exploration and conflict during the Tudor and Stuart dynasties. Topics include the development of Christianity, Viking invasions, the Scottish wars of independence, the evolution of parliament, the Black Death, the Wars of the Roses, the Reformation, the beginnings of Empire, and the 17th-century revolutions. 


      • HIST 219 - Seminar: The Age of the Witch Hunts
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteOpen to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. First-years may request instructor consent
        FacultyBrock

        This course introduces students to one of the most fascinating and disturbing events in the history of the Western world: the witch hunts in early-modern Europe and North America. Between 1450 and 1750, more than 100,000 individuals, from Russia to Salem, were prosecuted for the crime of witchcraft. Most were women and more than half were executed. In this course, we examine the political, religious, social, and legal reasons behind the trials, asking why they occurred in Europe when they did and why they finally ended. We also explore, in brief, global witch hunts that still occur today in places like Africa and India, asking how they resemble yet differ from those of the early-modern world.


      • HIST 305 - Religion and the Church in Medieval and Renaissance Politics and Society
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyPeterson

        Using texts and documents from the period itself, this seminar surveys the history of the Christian church in Western Europe and its relations with its neighbors from its emergence in Late Antiquity to the eve of the Protestant Reformation. Topics include the evolution of religious orders, relations with secular powers, scholastic theology, mysticism, humanism, lay religious movements, gender, heresy, and the recurring problem of reform.


      • HIST 306 - Seminar: Politics and Providence: Medieval and Renaissance Political Thought
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyPeterson

        How did religion shape politics and the development of political institutions in the Middle Ages? This seminar surveys the evolution of political thought from St. Augustine to Machiavelli. We examine Christianity's providential view of history, church-state relations, scholasticism, the revivals of Greek and Roman philosophy, humanism, and the origins of the modern state. Readings include St. Augustine, John of Salisbury, St. Thomas Aquinas, Marsilius of Padua, Leonardo Bruni, and Niccolò Machiavelli.


      • HIST 307 - Politics and History: The Machiavellian Moment
        FDRHU
        Credits4
        FacultyPeterson

        Is it better to be loved or feared? How much of our destiny do we control? When are societies fit for self-rule? Can people be forced to be good? Niccolò Machiavelli, arguably the first and most controversial modern political theorist, raises issues of universal human and political concern. Yet he did so in a very specific context--the Florence of the Medici, Michelangelo, and Savonarola--at a time when Renaissance Italy stood at the summit of artistic brilliance and on the threshold of political collapse. We draw on Machiavelli's personal, political, historical, and literary writings, and readings in history and art, as a point of entry for exploring Machiavelli's republican vision of history and politics as he developed it in the Italian Renaissance and how it addresses such perennial issues as the corruption and regeneration of societies.


      • PHYS 150 - The Immense Journey: Harmonices Mundi
        FDRSL
        Credits4
        FacultyStaff

        Appropriate for non-science majors. The classical astronomy of the solar system is traced by a study of Greek astronomy and the revolutionary ideas of Kepler and Newton. The apparent and real motions of the earth, moon, and planets are studied in detail, as well as special phenomena such as eclipses, tides, and objects such as comets and asteroids. Emphasis is on comprehension and application of principles rather than memorization of facts. The laboratory stresses the observational aspects of astronomy. Elementary geometry, algebra, and trigonometry are used in the course. Laboratory course with fee.


      • SPAN 333 - El Cid in History and Legend
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteSPAN 220 and SPAN 275
        FacultyBailey

        A study of the most significant portrayals of the Castilian warrior Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar, El Cid (1045-1099), from his 12th-century biography Historia Roderici to the Hollywood blockbuster El Cid. Epic poems, late medieval ballads, and Renaissance drama all recreate the legendary life of El Cid. This course examines the relevant narratives in an effort to determine the heroic values and attributes recreated by authors and their audiences for nearly a thousand years.


      • And, when appropriate:
        • HIST 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
          FDRHU
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteFirst-year seminar. Prerequisite: First-year standing

          Topics vary by term and instructor.

          Fall 2018, HIST 180A-01: FS: Uncovering W&L's Past HIST (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing. 180A-01 is a research seminar that will be reading and writing intensive, and focus on the African American past of W&L and other colleges. We will focus solely on archival research and the issues that eastern colleges have dealt with in reclaiming this past. (HU) DeLaney.

          Fall 2018, HIST 180B-01: FS: Plague: A Medieval Pandemic (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-Year class standing only. An exploration of the causes, experiences, and consequences of the disease colloquially referred to as 'The Black Death.' Students develop the core skills of historical inquiry by critically engaging with primary sources and discussing questions such as: How did Europeans explain and respond to the disease? Did their society collapse in the face of such devastation or did it spark the Renaissance? How can we use modern science in our work as historians and what contributions might historians bring to the scientists' bench? By the end of this course, students are able to articulate informed perspectives on these topics, while providing compelling and balanced arguments for their interpretations. (HU) Vise.


        • HIST 195 - Topics in History for First-years and Sophomores
          FDRHU
          Credits3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring
          PrerequisiteVaries with topic

          Selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Fall 2018, HIST 195A-01: Muhammad: the Prophet of Islam throughout History (3). Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. Other students may register for HIST 289A. To Muslims, Muhammad is a prophetic figure whose model life is to be emulated; to non-Muslims, a controversial figure that has stirred the imagination for centuries. Through an analysis of the earliest non-Muslim sources on Muhammad, to insider Muslim narratives of his miraculous life, to contemporary controversies about visual depictions of Muhammad -- even bans on celebrations of his birthday -- this course challenges common misconceptions about Muhammad as a historical and a religious figure, while fostering critical historical literacy and familiarity with theoretical questions in the study of religion. (HU) Atanasova.


        • HIST 229 - Topics in European History
          FDRHU
          Credits3 credit in fall or winter; 4 in spring

          A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Winter 2019, HIST 229A-01: England in the Age of Shakespeare (3). William Shakespeare (1564-1616) lived during a fascinating time of political turmoil, religious change, artistic expression, and global expansion. This course explores the history of England in these years, which span the important reigns of Elizabeth I and James I. Together, we examine the era of personal monarchy and the growing resistance of parliament, the mechanisms of national consolidation and imperial growth, the discoveries and encounters with "others" beyond England's shores, the spread of religious convictions and contradictions, and the great literary and artistic figures of the day. We also investigate what life was like for the average men and women who lived and died during England's "golden age." (HU). Brock.
           
          Winter 2019, HIST 229A-02: England in the Age of Shakespeare (3). William Shakespeare (1564-1616) lived during a fascinating time of political turmoil, religious change, artistic expression, and global expansion. This course explores the history of England in these years, which span the important reigns of Elizabeth I and James I. Together, we examine the era of personal monarchy and the growing resistance of parliament, the mechanisms of national consolidation and imperial growth, the discoveries and encounters with "others" beyond England's shores, the spread of religious convictions and contradictions, and the great literary and artistic figures of the day. We also investigate what life was like for the average men and women who lived and died during England's "golden age." (HU). Brock.

          Winter 2019, HIST 229B-01: 'The 'War to End War': The First World War in History and Literature (3). Open to all class years and majors. No course prerequisite. Progressives in Britain and the USA justified participation in the First World War with the argument that the defeat of Imperial Germany would make the world "safe for democracy" and bring about the end of warfare. The horrific reality of combat defied their expectations, however, and left the world more bitterly divided after 1918 than it ever had been. In this discussion- and writing-intensive course, we focus on different forms of personal testimony about the experience of war, beginning with the autobiography of a British officer who became a pacifist in the trenches, a memoir by a patriotic German soldier who never lost faith in his nation's cause, and a collection of poems by British women who served as munitions workers or nurses. Students write a term paper to analyze a body of testimony about the war experience of particular interest to them. Our goal is to analyze how war changes individuals and societies, and to ponder what lessons can be learned today from the "Great War" of 1914-1918. (HU) Patch.

          Fall 2018, HIST 229A-01: Saints and Sinners in the Puritan Atlantic (3). May be counted as an American elective toward the major with department head notification to the University Registrar. In the mid-20th century, H.L. Mencken famously defined Puritanism as "the haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy". The popular memory of Puritans has deviated little from this caricature. But what were these devoted English (and early American) Protestants really like? This class explores the history of the Puritans—a term that was itself derisive— on both sides of the Atlantic, as well as the legacy of Puritanism in Britain and America. Topics include the development of Puritanism after the English Reformation, the settlement of Massachusetts, the dramatic trial of Anne Hutchison, relationships and conflicts with Native Americans, the English Civil War and rule of Oliver Cromwell, and the infamous Salem Witch Trials. (HU) Brock.

          Fall 2018, HIST 229B-01: Making Modern Sexuality (3). From where do we get our ideas about sex and sexuality? Are they based in evidence, or do they speak to cultural forces and anxieties of long standing? This course investigates these questions by examining selected topics in the history of sexuality in the modern West, as well as contemporary clinical understandings of these issues and how moral, economic, and cultural forces serve to shroud sexual expression and identities in metaphor and myth. (HU) Horowitz.


        • HIST 395 - Advanced Seminar
          FDRHU
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteJunior or senior standing, or 15 credits in history, or consent of the instructor. Prerequisites may vary by topic

          A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Winter 2019, HIST 395A-01: Advanced Seminar: Darwin and His Critics (3). Not open to students with credit for HIST 295: Darwin and His Critics. One of the most influential scientific theories is the theory of organic evolution. Its history has largely been written by Darwin and his followers. This course looks at the "Darwin industry" and at a revisionist history that incorporates the non-Darwinian approach to the origin of life and species. Giving close attention to the scientific facts and the different theories, we also raise such questions as "Where were these theories situated?" and "What socio-political purposes and religious connotations did they have?" The course ends with bringing to bear the historical perspective on today's ongoing controversies about evolution theory. Students in this section are required to produce a greater research component in their assignments. (HU) Rupke.

          Winter 2019, HIST 395B-01: Advanced Seminar: Race and Racism in Latin America (3). Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, or 15 credits in history, or consent of the instructor. This seminar examines the history of race and racism in the Americas from 1492 to the present. During the first half, we situate race within the history of ideas and trace its development across the Americas during the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment, analyzing how religion, science, colonialism and capitalism influenced European conceptions of "the Other." In the second half, we examine specific national case studies from the 19th and 20th centuries to explore "the work that race does"—that is, how race has operated in distinct local-historical contexts to generate social exclusion. (HU). Gildner.


        • HIST 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteCumulative grade-point average of 3.250 in all history courses, completion of three 200- or 300-level history courses, and instructor consent

          A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit each term of the junior and senior year.


        • MRST 395 - Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteInstructor consent
          FacultyStaff

          A seminar concentrating on topics or concepts relevant to Medieval and Renaissance studies. Topics are offered according to the interests of participating faculty. This course may be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MRST 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisitePermission of the instructor
          FacultyStaff

          Individual study of selected topics in Medieval and Renaissance studies. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • PHYS 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisitePermission of the instructor
          FacultyStaff

          Advanced work and reading in topics selected by the instructor to fit special needs of advanced students. This course may be repeated with permission for a total of six credits.


        • ROML 295 - Topics in Romance Languages
          Credits1-3
          Prerequisitevary with topic

          Nature and content of the course is determined by the interests of the instructor(s) and student(s). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


           


    • Literature:
      • CLAS 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteFirst-Year seminar. Prerequisite: First-Year standing

        Topic varies by term.


      • CLAS 201 - Classical Mythology
        FDRHL
        Credits3 in fall, winter; 4 in spring
        FacultyCrotty

        An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.


      • CLAS 203 - Greek Literature from Homer to the Early Hellenistic Period
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
        FacultyCrotty

        Readings in translation from Homer, Hesiod, the tragedians, the comedians, and the lyric and pastoral poets, including selections from Herodotus and Thucydides, and from Plato's and Aristotle's reflections on literature. The course includes readings from modern critical writings. We read some of the most famous stories of the Western world--from the Iliad and the Odyssey, to Milton's Paradise Lost and Joyce's Ulysses, via Virgil's Aeneid and Lucan's Civil War. All of these works are epic narratives, each presenting a different concept of the hero, and yet, at the same time, participating in a coherent, on-going and unfinished tradition. We consider such questions as the role of violence in literature; the concept of the heroic as it reflects evolving ideas of the individual and society; and the idea of a literary tradition.


      • CLAS 205 - Reading Rome: A Survey of Latin Literature
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        FacultyDance

        The course offers a survey of influential works composed in Latin between the 3rd century BCE and the 2nd century CE. Alongside poems, histories, and philosophical writings that were originally conceived of as literary projects, we also examine plays, military chronicles, speeches, and letters, all of which come down to the present as "literature" but may not have been created as such. The boundaries of "literature" is an ongoing topic of inquiry throughout the term. Students explore the literary traditions represented in the readings and consider their impact on other traditions, with the bulk of class sessions spent discussing the significance of the literary works and improving our knowledge of the contexts--historical and literary--in which they were composed.


      • CLAS 215 - Ancient Drama and Its Influence
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        FacultyCrotty

        In this course we study ancient tragedy and comedy, both Greek and Roman, and look, too, at the cultural forces shaping ancient drama and some of the influence on later drama and thought. In addition to later plays that hail from ancient drama, we consider some philosophical interpretations of the significance of drama, and, in particular, tragedy.


      • ENGL 240 - Arthurian Legend
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
        FacultyKao

        Why does King Arthur continue to fascinate and haunt our cultural imagination? This course surveys the origins and histories of Arthurian literature, beginning with Celtic myths, Welsh tales, and Latin chronicles. We then examine medieval French and English traditions that include Chrétien de Troyes's Perceval, the lais of Marie de France, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the Alliterative Morte Arthure, and Malory's Le Morte Darthur. In addition to historical and literary contexts, we explore theoretical issues surrounding the texts, especially the relationship between history and fantasy, courtly love and adultery, erotic love and madness, romance and chivalry, gender and agency, and Europe and its Others. Finally, we investigate Arthurian medievalisms in Victorian England and in American (post)modernity through Tennyson, Twain, Barthelme, and Ishiguro. Along the way, we view various film adaptations of Arthurian legends. All texts are read in modern English translation.


      • ENGL 242 - Individual Shakespeare Play
        FDRHL
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
        FacultyPickett

        A detailed study of a single Shakespearean play, including its sources, textual variants, performance history, film adaptations and literary and cultural legacy. The course includes both performance-based and analytical assignments.


      • ENGL 250 - Medieval and Early Modern British Literature
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
        FacultyKao

        This course is a survey of English literature from the Early Middle Ages to the Early Modern period. We read works in various genres--verse, drama, and prose--and understand their specific cultural and historical contexts. We also examine select modern film adaptations of canonical works as part of the evolving history of critical reception.


      • ENGL 252 - Shakespeare
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
        FacultyStaff

        A study of the major genres of Shakespeare's plays, employing analysis shaped by formal, historical, and performance-based questions. Emphasis is given to tracing how Shakespeare's work engages early modern cultural concerns, such as the nature of political rule, gender, religion, and sexuality. A variety of skills are developed in order to assist students with interpretation, which may include verse analysis, study of early modern dramatic forms, performance workshops, two medium-length papers, reviews of live play productions, and a final, student-directed performance of a selected play.


      • ENGL 311 - History of the English Language
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteTake one English course between 201 and 295, and one between 222 and 299
        FacultyKao

        In The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer's Friar can "make his Englissh sweete upon his tonge."  This course examines not only the alleged "sweetness" of English but also the evolution of the language from its origins to the present.  We study basic terms and concepts of linguistics and trace the changes in structure, pronunciation, and vocabulary from Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English to Modern English.  We consider how historical and cultural forces—invasion, revolution, migration, colonization, and assimilation—shape the language.  Moreover, we examine language myths, the construction of standard English, issues of correctness, orality, pidgins and creoles, and the variety of Englishes in their diverse configurations.  Finally, we ask how new media and technological praxes—hypertext, email, texting, and tweeting—have changed the English language, and if English may or may not be the lingua franca of our increasingly globalized world.


      • ENGL 312 - Gender, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteTake one English course between 201 and 295, and one between 222 and 299
        FacultyKao

        A study of the complex nexus of gender, love, and marriage in medieval legal, theological, political, and cultural discourses. Reading an eclectic range of texts--such as romance, hagiography, fabliau, (auto)biography, conduct literature, and drama--we consider questions of desire, masculinity, femininity, and agency, as well as the production and maintenance of gender roles and of emotional bonds within medieval conjugality. Authors include Chaucer, Chretien de Troyes, Heldris of Cornwall, Andreas Capellanus, Margery Kempe, and Christine de Pisan. Readings in Middle English or in translation. No prior knowledge of medieval languages necessary.

         


      • ENGL 313 - Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteTake one English course between 201 and 295, and one between 222 and 299
        FacultyKao

        This course considers the primary work on which Chaucer's reputation rests: The Canterbury Tales. We pay sustained attention to Chaucer's Middle English at the beginning of the semester to ease the reading process. Then we travel alongside the Canterbury pilgrims as they tell their tales under the guise of a friendly competition. The Canterbury Tales is frequently read as a commentary on the social divisions in late medieval England, such as the traditional estates, religious professionals and laity, and gender hierarchies. But despite the Tales' professed inclusiveness of the whole of English society, Chaucer nonetheless focuses inordinately on those individuals from the emerging middle classes. Our aim is to approach the Tales from the practices of historicization and theorization; that is, we both examine Chaucer's cultural and historical contexts and consider issues of religion, gender, sexuality, marriage, conduct, class, chivalry, courtly love, community, geography, history, power, spirituality, secularism, traditional authority, and individual experience. Of particular importance are questions of voicing and writing, authorship and readership. Lastly, we think through Chaucer's famous Retraction at the "end" of The Canterbury Tales, as well as Donald R. Howard's trenchant observation that the Tale is "unfinished but complete." What does it mean for the father of literary "Englishness" to end his life's work on the poetic principle of unfulfilled closure and on the image of a society on the move?


      • ENGL 316 - The Tudors
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteTake one English course between 201 and 295, and one between 222 and 299
        FacultyGertz

        Famous for his mistresses and marriages, his fickle treatment of courtiers, and his vaunting ambition, Henry VIII did more to change English society and religion than any other king. No one understood Henry's power more carefully than his daughter Elizabeth, who oversaw England's first spy network and jealously guarded her throne from rebel contenders. This course studies the writers who worked for the legendary Tudors, focusing on the love poetry of courtiers, trials, and persecution of religious dissidents, plays, and accounts of exploration to the new world. We trace how the ambitions of the monarch, along with religious revolution and colonial expansion, figure in the work of writers like Wyatt, Surrey, and Anne Askew; Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Southwell; and Thomas More and Walter Ralegh.


      • ENGL 319 - Shakespeare and Company
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteTake one English course between 201 and 295, and one between 222 and 299
        FacultyPickett

        Focusing on the repertory and working conditions of the two play companies with which he was centrally involved, this course examines plays by Shakespeare and several of his contemporary collaborators and colleagues (Jonson, Middleton, Fletcher). Attentive to stage history and the evolution of dramatic texts within print culture, students consider the degree to which Shakespeare was both a representative and an exceptional player in Renaissance London's "show business."


      • ENGL 320 - Shakespearean Genres
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteTake one English course between 201 and 295, and one between 222 and 299
        FacultyPickett

        In a given term, this course focuses on one or two of the major genres explored by Shakespeare (e.g., histories, tragedies, comedies, tragicomedies/romances, lyric and narrative poetry), in light of Renaissance literary conventions and recent theoretical approaches. Students consider the ways in which Shakespeare's generic experiments are variably inflected by gender, by political considerations, by habitat, and by history.


      • ENGL 326 - 17th-Century Poetry
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteTake one English course between 201 and 295, and one between 222 and 299
        FacultyGertz

        Readings of lyric and epic poetry spanning the long 16th century, and tracing the development of republican and cavalier literary modes. Genres include the metaphysical poetry of Donne, Herbert, Katherine Philips, and Henry Vaughan; erotic verse by Mary Wroth, Herrick, Thomas Carew, Marvell, Aphra Behn, and the Earl of Rochester; elegy by Jonson and Bradstreet; and epic by Milton.


      • ENGL 330 - Milton
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteTake one English course between 201 and 295, and one between 222 and 299
        FacultyGertz

        This course surveys one of the most talented and probing authors of the English language -- a man whose reading knowledge and poetic output has never been matched, and whose work has influenced a host of writers after him, including Alexander Pope, William Blake, William Wordsworth, and Mary Shelley. In this course, we read selections from Milton's literary corpus, drawing from such diverse genres as lyric, drama, epic and prose polemic. As part of their study of epic form, students create a digital humanities project rendering Paradise Lost in gaming context. Quests, heroes, ethical choices and exploration of new worlds in Paradise Lost are rendered as a game. Students read Milton in the context of literary criticism and place him within his historical milieu, not the least of which includes England's dizzying series of political metamorphoses from Monarchy to Commonwealth, Commonwealth to Protectorate, and Protectorate back to Monarchy.


      • FREN 281 - Civilisation et culture françaises: Traditions et changements
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteFREN 162, FREN 164, or equivalent

        A study of significant aspects of French culture and civilization, seen in a diachronic perspective. Emphasis on economic, sociological and historical changes that shaped present-day institutions and national identity. Readings, discussions and papers in French for further development of communication skills.


      • GERM 318 - German Medieval and Renaissance Literature
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteGERM 262 or equivalent
        FacultyCrockett

        An examination of selected works and a study of literary history through the 16th century. Medieval literary readings include the Hildebrandslied, Nibelungenlied, Parzival, and Tristan, as well as the Minnesang. Consideration is also given to the history of the German literary language during the period covered. Conducted in German.


      • LIT 203 - Greek Literature from Homer to the Early Hellenistic Period
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
        FacultyCrotty

        Readings in translation from Homer, Hesiod, the tragedians, the comedians, and the lyric and pastoral poets, including selections from Herodotus and Thucydides, and from Plato's and Aristotle's reflections on literature. The course includes readings from modern critical writings. We read some of the most famous stories of the Western world--from the Iliad and the Odyssey, to Milton's Paradise Lost and Joyce's Ulysses, via Virgil's Aeneid and Lucan's Civil War. All of these works are epic narratives, each presenting a different concept of the hero, and yet, at the same time, participating in a coherent, on-going and unfinished tradition. We consider such questions as the role of violence in literature; the concept of the heroic as it reflects evolving ideas of the individual and society; and the idea of a literary tradition.
         


      • LIT 218 - Pre-Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCompletion of FW FDR requirement
        FacultyFu

        A survey of Chinese literature from the earliest period to the founding of the Republic in 1912. Taught in English, the course presupposes no previous knowledge of China or Chinese culture. The literature is presented in the context of its intellectual, philosophical and cultural background. Texts used may vary from year to year and include a wide selection of fiction, poetry, historical documents, Chinese drama (opera) and prose works. Audiovisual materials are used when appropriate and available.


      • LIT 219 - Augustine and the Literature of Self, Soul, and Synapses
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
        FacultyKosky

        A careful reading of the depiction of the restless soul in Augustine's Confessions is followed by study of fictional, philosophical, religious, and/or scientific literature. Students reflect on the state of the soul in a world made of selves or the fate of the self in a soulless world ... and whether there might be other options


      • MRST 252 - Introduction to Shakespeare
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteComplete of the FDR FW writing requirement
        FacultyDobin

        A study of the major genres of Shakespeare's plays, employing analysis shaped by formal, historical, and performance-based questions. Emphasis is given to tracing how Shakespeare's work engages early modem cultural concerns, such as the nature of political rule, gender, religion, and sexuality. A variety of skills are developed in order to assist students with interpretation, which may include verse analysis, study of early modem dramatic forms, performance workshops, two medium-length papers, reviews of live play productions, and eight final, student-directed performance of a selected play.


      • SPAN 210 - The Road to Santiago
        FDRHU
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteSPAN 162, 164 or equivalent, and instructor consent
        FacultyStaff

        Spring Term Abroad course. A study of Spanish culture and language conducted entirely in Spain. During the first three weeks of the course, students live in Madrid with Spanish-speaking families and study language at Estudio Internacional Sampere. At the same time, students engage in an in-depth study of the history and legend of the eight-centuries-old pilgrimage to the shrine of Santiago de Compostela, the burial site of St James, apostle of Christ. During the last week of the course, students travel to northwestern Spain to visit and study the monuments associated with the Santiago pilgrimage as well as experience the art, architecture, and culture of pilgrimage as they hike the last portion of the trail.


      • SPAN 211 - Spanish Civilization and Culture
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteSPAN 162, 164 or the equivalent in language skills
        FacultyStaff

        A survey of significant developments in Spanish civilization. The course addresses Spanish heritage and the present-day cultural patterns formed by its legacies. Readings, discussions and papers, primarily in Spanish, for further development of communication skills.


      • SPAN 220 - Introducción a la literatura española
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteSPAN 162 or 164 or equivalent
        FacultyStaff

        Spanish literary masterpieces from the Poema del Cid through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.


      • SPAN 312 - Medieval Spanish Cultures in Context
        FDRHL
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteSPAN 211 or 220 and instructor consent
        FacultyBailey

        Spring Term Abroad course. Muslims, Jews, and Christians co-existed for eight-hundred years on the Iberian Peninsula. This course examines these diverse cultures through the texts (literary, historical, religious, and philosophical), the art, and the architecture from the period prior to the arrival of the Arabs in 711, up to and beyond the expulsion of the Jews in 1492. The objective of the course is to glean from the remnants of the experience of their co-existence insights into their distinctive characteristics and how they understood and influenced each other.


      • SPAN 320 - Don Quijote
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteSPAN 220 and SPAN 275
        FacultyCampbell

        Close reading and discussion of this Early Modern novel. May include close reading and discussion of additional narrative and poetic genres of the Golden Age, as represented in or contributing to the Cervantine work


      • SPAN 322 - Spanish Golden-Age Drama
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteSPAN 220 and SPAN 275
        FacultyCampbell

        Close reading and discussion of a variety of selected Golden Age dramas of the 17th century. Representative dramatists may include Calderón de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, Lope de Vega, and María de Zayas.
         


      • SPAN 323 - Golden Age Spanish Women Writers
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteSPAN 220 and SPAN 275
        FacultyCampbell

        A study of the comedia and the novela corta and the manner in which the secular women writers inscribe themselves within and beyond these genres. Close reading and discussion of representative works that may include the short stories and plays by María de Zayas, Ana Caro, Leonor de Meneses, Mariana de Carvajal, and Angela de Azevedo.


      • SPAN 333 - El Cid in History and Legend
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteSPAN 220 and SPAN 275
        FacultyBailey

        A study of the most significant portrayals of the Castilian warrior Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar, El Cid (1045-1099), from his 12th-century biography Historia Roderici to the Hollywood blockbuster El Cid. Epic poems, late medieval ballads, and Renaissance drama all recreate the legendary life of El Cid. This course examines the relevant narratives in an effort to determine the heroic values and attributes recreated by authors and their audiences for nearly a thousand years.


      • And, when appropriate:
        • ENGL 299 - Seminar for Prospective Majors
          FDRHL
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteCompletion of FW composition requirement and at least one course chosen from English courses numbered from 201 to 295

          A study of a topic in literature issuing in a research process and sustained critical writing. Some recent topics have been Detective Fiction; American Indian Literatures; Revenge; and David Thoreau and American Transcendentalism.

          Fall 2018, ENGL 299A-01: Seminar for Prospective Majors: Utopia, Science Fiction, and the Idea of America(s) (3). What value does the utopian/dystopian text hold in the development of alternative thought? This course, grounded in science fiction and the African American and Latin American contexts, addresses this question via the thoughtful examination of a range of theoretical, fictional, and cinematic texts. Works studied throughout the term come from, among others, Carlos Fuentes, Thomas More, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Frederick Jameson, W.E.B. DuBois, Frances Bodomo, Alfonso Cuarón, Octavia Butler, and Samuel Delany. (HL) Wilson.


        • ENGL 392 - Topics in Literature in English before 1700
          Credits3 in fall or winter, 4 in spring
          PrerequisiteTake one English course between 201 and 295, and one between 222 and 299

          Enrollment limited. A seminar course on literature written in English before 1700 with special emphasis on research and discussion. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • ENGL 394 - Topics in Literature in English since 1900
          Credits3 in fall or winter, 4 in spring
          PrerequisiteTake one English course between 201 and 295, and one between 222 and 299

          Enrollment limited. A seminar course on literature written in English since 1900 with special emphasis on research and discussion. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Winter 2019, ENGL 394A-01: Topics in Literature in English since 1900: James Baldwin and His Interlocutors (3). This seminar explores the life and writing of James Baldwin. Through an examination of both his fiction and nonfiction, the seminar charts his interrogation and development of ideas surrounding, among other topics, race, courage, love, nation, revolution, and belonging. We also trace his impact on our national consciousness by reading authors whose own bodies of work intersect with his. This list includes, but is not limited to, Norman Mailer, Amiri Baraka, Malcolm X, Lorraine Hansberry, Richard Wright, and Barry Jenkins. (HL) Wilson.

          Winter 2019, ENGL 394B-01: Topics in Literature in English since 1900: Environmental Persuasion (3). Students without the course prerequisites may gain entry with instructor consent.This course is open to all majors and class years and fulfills the humanities requirement for the major or minor in environmental studies. How do we resolve major environmental problems? How do we balance the science, economics, public policy, political, ethical, cultural, and other dimensions to create real solutions? Why is this so hard? This course studies strategies of persuasion used by participants in environmental debates to teach students how to enter and win these debates. We study some of the great environmental writers in many genres, look at key historical documents and multimedia works (documentaries, ads, movies, websites), and do some activities involving local leaders and issues. Students write short analytical papers and work on a big project that studies an important environmental debate historically, analyzing who won and why. How do we persuade others to join us in making the changes we want to make? (HL) Smout.

           


        • ENGL 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteInstructor consent
          FacultyStaff

          A course designed for special students who wish to continue a line of study begun in an earlier advanced course. Their applications approved by the department and accepted by their proposed directors, the students may embark upon directed independent study which must culminate in acceptable papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • FREN 341 - La France de l'Ancien Régime
          FDRHL
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteThree courses in French at the 200 level

          Readings in French literature and civilization from before the Revolution of 1789. May be repeated for degree credit if the topic is different.

          Winter 2019, FREN 341-01: Introduction à la légende arthurienne (3). Prerequisite: three FREN courses at the 200 level. An introduction to the Arthurian narrative tradition of the medieval francophone world. Students examine the origin and development of Arthur and the knights of the round table, the manuscript tradition in which these legends are transmitted, the concept of le merveilleux, and the role beasts and monsters play in the textual fabric of Arthurian material. Texts include works by Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, and other anonymous stories involving Camelot and Arthur's court. The main objectives of this course are to improve students' reading fluency in French and to give students an understanding of medieval culture, history, and civilization through literature. (HL) McCormick.


        • FREN 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteAt least nine credits of 300-level French and consent of the department head. Taught In French

          Nature and content of course to be determined by students' needs and by instructors acquainted with their earlier preparation and performance. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • ITAL 403 - Directed Individual Study
          FDRHL: only when the subject is literary
          Credits3
          PrerequisitePermission of the department head

          Advanced study in Italian. The nature and content of the course is determined by the students' needs and by an evaluation of their previous work. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • LIT 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
          FDRHL
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteFirst-year seminar. Prerequisite: First-year standing. Completion of FW FDR requirement or this may vary with the topic

          First-year seminar.

          Winter 2019, LIT 180-01: First-Year Seminar: From Page and Stage to Celluloid: Carmen (4). Prerequsite: First-year class standing only. Bizet's opera, Carmen, based on the so-named novella by French author Mérimée, popularized the character of the fiery gypsy abroad more than in France. We trace her sisters in French, Spanish, and Russian literature, opera, and art, and her reincarnations in film, including Charlie Chaplin's A Burlesque on Carmen, Otto Preminger's Carmen Jones, Federico Rosi's filmed opera Carmen, J.-L. Godard's Prénom Carmen, Carlos Saura's Carmen. We study how the world stage, the artistic trends, the mores, and the concerns of the times shape and renew this enduring character and the men she beguiles. (HL) Frégnac-Clave.

          Fall 2018, LIT 180-02: FS: Living by the Code: Honor, Love, and War in the Literature of the High Middle Ages (3). First-year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only and completion of the FDR requirement in writing (FW). An exploration of notions of honor and honorable behavior in European aristocratic culture of the High Middle Ages, as represented in literary texts of the 11th and 12th centuries. Students chart the transformation in court literature of the Germanic and feudal warrior (Hildebrandslied, Song of Roland) into the chivalric knight (Arthurian romances), whose adventures are motivated by the quest for honor and the love for an ideal woman. We also study the ways in which warrior and courtly codes of conduct, the ethos of chivalry and courtly love, and conceptions of the feminine ideal were articulated, constructed, and critiqued. (HL) Prager.


        • LIT 295 - Special Topics in Literature in Translation
          FDRHL
          Credits3-4
          PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement

          A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Spring 2019, LIT 295-01: Literary Reflections on National Socialism (3). Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement. The literature of post World War II Germany that reflects on and attempts to come to terms with the atrocities of the Nazi regime. Readings, discussion, and writing in English. (HL). Crockett.

          Spring 2019, LIT 295-03: Topic: The African Child-Soldier (3). Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement. Who is a child? Who is a child-soldier? Did the child have a childhood in a home and family before becoming a soldier? What is childhood? How does the definition of childhood (legal or otherwise) jibe with the child's own perception or understanding of his/her place in society? Does s/he return home, and to a family after combat? Are home and family still the same? This course engages these and other questions as they relate to the representation of the child-soldier in African literary texts and in film. In so doing, we interrogate the larger question of agency, victimhood, and the human capacity to transcend adversity, focusing specifically on how the child (or child-soldier) negotiates the meandering road upon which s/he has been thrusted by people and circumstances, with no properly functioning compass. (HL) Kamara.

          Fall 2018, LIT 295B-01: Arabic Literature in Translation: The Arab Spring in Literature and Media (3). Prerequisites: Completion of FW requirement. The year 2011 marked the moment in which demonstrations and sit-ins against tyranny erupted simultaneously throughout the Arab World. Revolutionaries, mostly under the age of 30, demanded freedom of speech, an end to corruption, and the establishment of democratic states. These uprisings, called The Arab Spring, left a strong footprint on Arabic literature and media. This course introduces students to political, social, and economic issues in the Arab World through different literary genres (such as novels and short stories, political satire, movies, music, poetry and social media) that reflect the aspirations, disappointments, and concerns of the Arabs before, during, and after the revolutions. (HL). Hala Abdelmobdy.

           


        • MRST 395 - Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteInstructor consent
          FacultyStaff

          A seminar concentrating on topics or concepts relevant to Medieval and Renaissance studies. Topics are offered according to the interests of participating faculty. This course may be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MRST 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisitePermission of the instructor
          FacultyStaff

          Individual study of selected topics in Medieval and Renaissance studies. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • ROML 295 - Topics in Romance Languages
          Credits1-3
          Prerequisitevary with topic

          Nature and content of the course is determined by the interests of the instructor(s) and student(s). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


           


        • SPAN 397 - Peninsular Seminar
          FDRHL
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteSPAN 220 and SPAN 275

          A seminar focusing on a single period, genre, motif, or writer. The specific topic will be determined jointly according to student interest and departmental approval. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • SPAN 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteAt least nine credits of 300-level Spanish and permission of the department head. Taught in Spanish
          FacultyStaff

          Nature and content of course to be determined by students' needs and by instructors acquainted with their earlier preparation and performance. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • History of Ideas:
      • ARTH 385 - Leonardo da Vinci: Art, Science and Innovation in Renaissance Europe
        FDRHA
        Credits4
        FacultyBent

        Leonardo da Vinci has for years been considered the consummate "Renaissance Man," equally skilled as a painter, anatomist, engineer, and military scientist. This course examines the contextual background from which this true genius was sprung, the works he produced, the people for whom he produced them, and the visions of the artist both realized and unrealized that have captured the imaginations of people around the world since Leonardo's death in 1519.


      • HIST 306 - Seminar: Politics and Providence: Medieval and Renaissance Political Thought
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyPeterson

        How did religion shape politics and the development of political institutions in the Middle Ages? This seminar surveys the evolution of political thought from St. Augustine to Machiavelli. We examine Christianity's providential view of history, church-state relations, scholasticism, the revivals of Greek and Roman philosophy, humanism, and the origins of the modern state. Readings include St. Augustine, John of Salisbury, St. Thomas Aquinas, Marsilius of Padua, Leonardo Bruni, and Niccolò Machiavelli.

         


      • HIST 307 - Politics and History: The Machiavellian Moment
        FDRHU
        Credits4
        FacultyPeterson

        Is it better to be loved or feared? How much of our destiny do we control? When are societies fit for self-rule? Can people be forced to be good? Niccolò Machiavelli, arguably the first and most controversial modern political theorist, raises issues of universal human and political concern. Yet he did so in a very specific context--the Florence of the Medici, Michelangelo, and Savonarola--at a time when Renaissance Italy stood at the summit of artistic brilliance and on the threshold of political collapse. We draw on Machiavelli's personal, political, historical, and literary writings, and readings in history and art, as a point of entry for exploring Machiavelli's republican vision of history and politics as he developed it in the Italian Renaissance and how it addresses such perennial issues as the corruption and regeneration of societies.

         


      • PHIL 221 - Plato
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultySmith

        An in-depth examination of the philosophy of Plato. We look at Plato's epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, ethics, and political philosophy through a careful analysis of several dialogues, including some or all of the following: Euthyphro, Laches, Apology, Gorgias, Meno, Phaedo, Symposium, Phaedrus, and Republic. In addition, we consider certain challenges posed by Plato's use of the dialogue form, such as whether we are justified in assuming that Socrates is a mouthpiece for Plato's own views, and how we should interpret Plato's frequent appeal to myths and other literary devices within his dialogues. 


      • PHIL 222 - Aristotle
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyStaff

        A study of Aristotle's comprehensive philosophy of man and nature, including his logic, physics, metaphysics, psychology, ethics, and aesthetics.


      • REL 108 - The Qur'an
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteInstructor consent required
        FacultyAtanasova

        This course approaches the Qur'an from a range of modern and pre-modern perspectives: as an oral recitation; as a material object; as a historical document; as a literary text; as it relates to the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament; as a foundation for Islamic law, theology and mysticism; and as a source for ethics and social activism. Particular attention is devoted to issues of gender and politics raised by the Qur'an, supplemented by a number of film screenings. Prior knowledge of Islam is not required.


      • REL 215 - Female and Male in Western Religious Traditions
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyBrown

        An investigation of views about the body, human sexuality, and gender in Western religious traditions, especially Judaism and Christianity, and of the influences of these views both on the religious traditions themselves and on the societies in which they develop. The course focuses on religion and society in antiquity and the Middle Ages, but also considers the continuing influence of religious constructions of the body and sexuality on succeeding generations to the present.


      • REL 250 - Truth, Belief, Dissent: Defining Insiders and Outsiders in Ancient, Medieval and Modern Religion
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteOpen to all students regardless of class year or major
        FacultyBrown

        Who decides what is orthodox [acceptable thought] and what is heretical [unacceptable], how are these decisions made, and what impact do they have on societal definitions of "insider" and "outsider?" What perennial questions emerge in debates about orthodoxy and heresy -- e.g., the powers of states to enforce religious orthodoxy, the joining of political ideologies with religious interests -- and how are those questions addressed in modernity? This course explores the shifting and perpetually uncertain boundaries of truth and identity in religion. The focal religion is Christianity, but comparative religions are in view. Readings include selections from the Hebrew Scriptures, the New Testament, "Gnostic gospels", and other so-called heretical texts, writings from the Church Fathers (with special attention to St. Augustine), medieval heresy trials, a contemporary American novel, and recent scholarly treatments of the boundaries that define "insiders" and "outsiders."


      • REL 283 - Sufism: Islamic Mysticism
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyAtanasova

        This course explores the mystical expressions and institutions known as Sufism within the Islamic community. Topics include the elaboration of Sufism from the core tenets of Islam; Sufi practices of ecstasy and discipline; the artistic and literary products of the Sufi experience; the institutions of Sufi orders, saints, shrines, and popular practices; and the debates among Muslims over the place of Sufism within the greater tradition of Islam.


      • CLAS 200 - Greek Art & Archaeology
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyLaughy

        An introduction to ancient Greek art and archaeology. We encounter some of the greatest works of art in human history, as we survey the development of painting, sculpture, architecture, and town planning of the ancient Greeks. We encounter the history of the people behind the objects that they left behind, from the material remains of the Bronze Age palaces and Classical Athenian Acropolis to the world created in the wake of Alexander the Great's conquests. We also consider how we experience the ancient Greek world today through archaeological practice, cultural heritage, and the antiquities trade.


      • CLAS 204 - Augustan Era
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        FacultyCarlisle

        An interdisciplinary course taught in English, using the tools of literature, history and art to examine a specific, complicated, and pivotally important period in the evolution of western culture, focused on the literary. Readings from the poets predominate (Virgil's Aeneid and Ovid's Metamorphosis, selections from Horace, Propertius, Tibullus and other poems of Ovid) and also including readings from ancient historians dealing with Augustus and the major events of his period (e.g., Suetonius, Plutarch, and Tacitus on such topics as Actium and problems of succession). The topic for each lecture is illustrated with slides of works of art and architecture from the period. Selections from historians and from material remains are chosen according to intersection points with the literature.


      • CLAS 210 - Sex, Gender and Power in Ancient Literature
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        FacultyStaff

        What does it mean to be a woman or a man and what power dynamic exists between the two genders? Definitions of gender and gender roles are not a modern phenomenon but have their origins in antiquity. Both literary and visual sources reveal to us the constant puzzling over issues of gender that preoccupied the ancient Greeks and Romans. In this course, we examine sources from various genres and media for example, philosophy, epic, drama, poetry, history, painting, and sculpture in an attempt to understand the various ways the Greeks and Romans conceived of gender. Readings include primary sources from antiquity (e.g., Homer, Aeschylus, Euripides, Plato, Terence, Cicero, Livy), as well as secondary sources from modern scholarship on gender in antiquity.


      • CLAS 221 - Plato
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultySmith

        An in-depth examination of the philosophy of Plato.  We look at Plato's epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, ethics, and political philosophy through a careful analysis of several dialogues, including some or all of the following:  Euthyphro, Laches, Apology, Gorgias, Meno, Phaedo, Symposium, Phaedrus, and Republic.  In addition, we consider certain challenges posed by Plato's use of the dialogue form, such as whether we are justified in assuming that Socrates is a mouthpiece for Plato's own views, and how we should interpret Plato's frequent appeal to myths and other literary devices within his dialogues.


      • FREN 341 - La France de l'Ancien Régime
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteThree courses in French at the 200 level

        Readings in French literature and civilization from before the Revolution of 1789. May be repeated for degree credit if the topic is different.

        Winter 2019, FREN 341-01: Introduction à la légende arthurienne (3). Prerequisite: three FREN courses at the 200 level. An introduction to the Arthurian narrative tradition of the medieval francophone world. Students examine the origin and development of Arthur and the knights of the round table, the manuscript tradition in which these legends are transmitted, the concept of le merveilleux, and the role beasts and monsters play in the textual fabric of Arthurian material. Texts include works by Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, and other anonymous stories involving Camelot and Arthur's court. The main objectives of this course are to improve students' reading fluency in French and to give students an understanding of medieval culture, history, and civilization through literature. (HL) McCormick.


      • HIST 200 - Dante: Renaissance and Redemption
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyPeterson

        A survey of the culture, society, and politics of early Renaissance Italy using the life of the Florentine poet Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) and his Divine Comedy. This period witnessed revolutions in Florence and Rome and the emergence of new artistic forms aimed at reconciling Christian beliefs with classical thought, notably that of the Greek philosopher Aristotle and the Roman poet Virgil. It also generated conflicts between popes, kings, and emperors that issued ultimately in modern European states. First, we survey Dante's historical setting using a chronicle by one of his contemporaries, Dino Compagni. We then follow Dante on his poetic pilgrimage of personal and collective redemption through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven as he synthesized the artistic, religious, philosophical and political challenges of his age.


      • PHIL 110 - Ancient Greek Philosophy
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyTaylor

        An examination of the metaphysics of the pre-Socratic philosophers, especially the Milesians, Pythagoras, Xenophanes, Heraclitus, Parmenides, Zeno of Elea, and the Atomists, and the ethics and political philosophy of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Topics include the origin and nature of the kosmos, the nature and existence of the god(s), the trial and execution of Socrates, theories of virtue, the nature of knowledge and truth, justice and the ideal state, the nature of eudaimonia (happiness, flourishing), and the possibility of akrasia (weakness of the will).


      • REL 101 - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyMarks

        An introduction to the history, literature and interpretation of the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament).


      • REL 102 - New Testament
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyBrown

        An introduction to the history, literature and interpretation of the New Testament.


      • REL 105 - Introduction to Islam
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyAtanasova

        This course familiarizes students with the foundations of the Islamic tradition and the diverse historical and geographical manifestations of belief and practice built upon those foundations. Throughout the course, the role of Islam in shaping cultural, social, gender, and political identities is explored. Readings are drawn from the writings of both historical and contemporary Muslim thinkers.


      • REL 106 - Judaism: Tradition and Modernity
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyMarks

        Through a variety of sources, including Talmudic debate, fiction, drama, liturgy, memoirs, film, and history, this course introduces the main concepts, literature, and practices of the classical forms of Judaism that began in the first centuries C.E., and then examines how Judaism has changed during the past two centuries, in modernist movements (Reform, Neo-Orthodoxy, Zionism) and contemporary fundamentalist movements (Ultra-Orthodoxy, messianic settler Zionism), as well as current ideas and issues.


      • REL 131 - Buddhism
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyLubin

        A survey of the historical development of the doctrines and practices of Buddhism. After a discussion of the Hindu origins of Buddhism, the course focuses on the development of the Theravada, Vajrayana and Mahayana traditions. A class trip to at least one Buddhist center is included.


      • REL 132 - God and Goddess in Hinduism
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyLubin

        This course explores the many ways in which Hindus visualize and talk about the divine and its manifestations in the world through mythic stories, use of images in worship, explanations of the nature of the soul and body in relation to the divine, and the belief in human embodiments of the divine in Hindu holy men and women. Topics include: the religious meanings of masculine and feminine in the divine and human contexts; the idea of local, family, and "chosen" divinities; and differing forms of Hindu devotion for men and women.


      • REL 216 - Sainthood in Four Traditions
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyLubin

        A survey of sainthood in a variety of religious contexts: Christian, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist. The course asks: "What makes someone holy? How do saints behave? How and why are they worshipped?" Readings include sacred biographies (hagiographies), studies of particular traditions of saint worship, and interpretations of sainthood in both theological and cross-cultural perspectives.


      • REL 219 - Augustine and the Literature of Self, Soul, and Synapses
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
        FacultyKosky

        A careful reading of the depiction of the restless soul in Augustine's Confessions is followed by study of fictional, philosophical, religious, and/or scientific literature. Students reflect on the state of the soul in a world made of selves or the fate of the self in a soulless world ... and whether there might be other options


      • REL 225 - Magic, Science, and Religion
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyLubin

        How do religious and scientific explanations and methods of inquiry differ? What are the roles of reason and authority in each case? This course draws together materials from antiquity to the present, from the West and from Asia, to illustrate a variety of types of "systems of knowledge." Theoretical readings are balanced with diverse case studies from diverse contexts: religious doctrines, mystical practices, alchemy, astrology, sorcery, "traditional medicines," and modern religious movements. Students research a system of their choice and analyze its claims and methods in comparison with those of other traditions covered in the course.


      • REL 260 - Seminar in the Christian Tradition
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyStaff

        An introduction to perduring issues in Christian theology and ethics through study of one or more of the classical Christian theologians.


      • REL 284 - Gender, Sexuality, and Islam
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        FacultyAtanasova

        How have issues of gender and sexuality in Medieval and Modern Islamic societies been debated across the Middle East, South Asia, and the West? Students examine scholarly and public discussions of gender and Islam, and they build a vocabulary in which to talk about women. queer, and intersex history as they concern Muslim societies and their foundational sources in their regional and historical contexts. No prior knowledge of Islam is necessary.


      • REL 350 - Seminar in Biblical Studies
        FDRHU
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteREL 101, 102, 151 250, or course work in ancient history or classics, or instructor consent

        An exploration of a topic in Biblical studies, focusing on ancient texts and their interpreters from antiquity to the present. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


      • And, when appropriate:
        • FREN 283 - Histoire des idées
          FDRHU
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteFREN 162, FREN 164 or equivalent
          FacultyStaff

          This course retraces the evolution of thought in France across centuries through the examination of intellectual, cultural and artistic movements. Readings, discussions and paper in French for further development of communication skills.


        • FREN 285 - Spring Term Topics in French Civilization
          Credits4
          PrerequisiteFREN 162, FREN 164, or equivalent

          A study of significant aspects of culture and civilization through direct experience abroad in France and/or Francophone countries. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MRST 395 - Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteInstructor consent
          FacultyStaff

          A seminar concentrating on topics or concepts relevant to Medieval and Renaissance studies. Topics are offered according to the interests of participating faculty. This course may be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MRST 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisitePermission of the instructor
          FacultyStaff

          Individual study of selected topics in Medieval and Renaissance studies. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • PHIL 395 - Seminar in History of Philosophy or Major Figures
          FDRHU
          Credits3 credits in fall-winter-spring, 4 in spring
          PrerequisiteUsually one course in philosophy other than PHIL 170. Varies by topic

          An intensive and critical study of selected issues or major figures in philosophy. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Fall 2018, PHIL 395A-01: Environmental Values and Environmental Policy (3). What values shape environmental decisions? In economic terms, we seek to allocate resources so as to maximize social utility. However, our policy decisions regarding the environment also pursue certain ecological goals, such as the preservation of biodiversity and the maintenance of healthy and functioning ecosystems. In addition, environmental policy is constrained by ethical concerns such as the pursuit of environmental justice and our responsibilities to future generations. This course addresses such questions as: To what degree are these three kinds of policy goals in tension with one another? How can we clarify our thinking about these policy goals so as to harmonize them where possible and reasonably negotiate the tradeoffs when they come into conflict? (HU) Cooper.


        • PHIL 195 - Seminar in History of Philosophy or Major Figures
          FDRHU
          Credits3 credits in fall-winter-spring, 4 in spring

          A consideration of selected issues in philosophy. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • PHIL 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisitePermission of the department
          FacultyStaff

          May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • POL 396 - Seminar in Political Philosophy
          FDRSS2
          Credits3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring
          PrerequisitePOL 111 or instructor consent

          An examination of selected questions and problems in political philosophy and/or political theory. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • POL 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteGrade-point average of 3.000 in politics and instructor consent

          This course permits a student to follow a program of directed reading, library research, or data collection and analysis in some area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • REL 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
          Credits3 credits in Fall and Winter, 4 credits in Spring
          PrerequisiteFirst-Year class standing

          First-year seminar. Topics vary by term.

          Fall 2018, REL 180-01: FS: Exodus and Exile: Oppression, Liberation, and Diaspora in Jewish Tradition (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. Assumes no prior knowledge of the Bible, and all readings are in English translation. The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) is bookended by two epic stories, the Israelites' exodus from Egypt and, later, their exile to Babylon. These ancient stories confront important political and ideological questions of their time: what is the role of God in warfare? Why do God's people sometimes suffer defeat? What happens to a people uprooted from their homeland? Indeed, these issues continue to resonate among religious communities today. This course traces the interpretation of the biblical Exodus and Exile by writers working in different historical periods, examining these interpretations through the lenses of myth and memory—how do writers in these periods use the biblical narratives to construct their own history of Israel, Jews, and themselves? What are the social and political factors that shape such interpretations? Beginning with a close reading of the biblical stories in their ancient context, we consider the reinterpretation of the Exodus and Exile among later writers working in the Hellenistic, Roman, Late Antique, and Medieval periods. We conclude by examining the role of these biblical stories in American religious traditions, including the Passover Seder and the Civil Rights Movement. (HU) Sonia.


        • REL 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          FacultyStaff

          Subject to departmental approval and available departmental resources, this course provides an opportunity for individuals to pursue significant lines of independent study in the field of religion. May be repeated for degree credit with permission and if the topics are different.


        • ROML 295 - Topics in Romance Languages
          Credits1-3
          Prerequisitevary with topic

          Nature and content of the course is determined by the interests of the instructor(s) and student(s). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


           


    • Fine Arts:
      • ARTH 101 - Survey of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyBent

        Chronological survey of Western art from the Paleolithic Age through the Middle Ages in Italy and Northern Europe. Examination of cultural and stylistic influences in the art and architecture of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Consideration of distinct interests of Early Christian, Byzantine, and Medieval Europe. Focus on major monuments and influential images produced up to circa 1400.


      • ARTH 102 - Survey of Western Art: Renaissance to the Present
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyKing, Lepage

        Chronological survey of Western art from the Renaissance through the present. Topics include the Renaissance, from its cultural and stylistic origins through the Mannerist movement; the Baroque and Rococo; the Neoclassical reaction; Romanticism and Naturalism; the Barbizon School and Realism; Impressionism and its aftermath; Fauvism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimalism, and the Postmodern reaction to Modernism.


      • ARTH 253 - Medieval Art in Southern Europe
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyBent

        Examination of the art and culture of Italy and Greece from the rise of Christianity to the first appearance of bubonic plague in 1348. Topics include early Christian art and architecture; Byzantine imagery in Ravenna and Constantinople during the Age of Justinian; iconoclasm; mosaics in Greece, Venice and Sicily; sculpture in Pisa; and the development of panel and fresco painting in Rome, Florence, Siena and Assisi.


      • ARTH 254 - Medieval Art in Northern Europe
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyBent

        Survey of the art of France, Spain, Germany, and the British Isles from circa 700 to circa 1400. Discussions include Carolingian and Ottonian painting and architecture, Celtic and Anglo-Saxon manuscripts, and French cathedral design and decoration during the Romanesque and Gothic periods.


      • ARTH 255 - Northern Renaissance Art
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyBent

        A survey of Northern painting from 1300 to 1600, examined as symbols of political, religious, and social concerns of painters, patrons, and viewers. Among the artists covered are Campin, van Eyck, van der Weyden, Dürer, Holbein, and Brueghel. Emphasis placed on interpretation of meaning and visual analysis.


      • ARTH 256 - Italian Renaissance Art
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyBent

        Survey of the art and architecture of Italy during the 15th and 16th centuries. The course focuses on innovations of the Early, High, and Late Renaissance through the work of Brunelleschi, Donatello, Masaccio, Alberti, Leonardo, Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo. Images are considered as exponents of contemporary political, social, and religious events and perceptions.


      • ARTH 350 - Medieval Art in Italy
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyBent

        Art and architecture of the Italian peninsula, from circa 1200 to 1400. This seminar addresses issues of patronage, artistic training and methods of production, iconography, and the function of religious and secular imagery. Topics of discussion include the construction of Tuscan cathedrals and civic buildings; sculpture in Siena, Pisa, and Rome; and painting in Assisi, Padua, and Florence.


      • ARTH 354 - The Early Renaissance in Italy
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyBent

        Examination of the intellectual, cultural, and artistic movements dominant in Florence between ca. 1400 and ca. 1440. Images and structures produced by Ghiberti, Brunelleschi, Masaccio, Donatello, and Fra Angelico are considered within the context of Florentine social traditions and political events.


      • ARTH 355 - The High Renaissance in Italy
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteARTH 256 or instructor consent
        FacultyBent

        This seminar addresses issues of patronage, artistic production, criticism and art theory, and the uses and abuses of images during the High Renaissance. Works by Botticelli, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael and Bramante are considered as emblems of larger cultural movements popular in Italian courts between 1470 and 1520.


      • ARTH 384 - Renaissance Art in Venice
        FDRHA
        Credits4
        PrerequisiteARTH 102 or 256
        FacultyBent

        This course addresses issues of patronage, artistic production, uses of ancient themes and sources, criticism and art theory, and the uses and abuses of images during the High Renaissance. We focus our attention on the art and architecture of Northern Italy from about 1460 to 1575, with particular emphasis placed on images and structures produced in Venice and its territorial possessions ("The Veneto") and by those who considered la serennissima their home.


      • MUS 201 - Music History I
        FDRHA
        Credits3
        FacultyGaylard

        A survey of music from the Middle Ages through the Baroque period.


      • THTR 210 - Ancient and Global Theater
        FDRHL
        Credits3
        FacultySandberg, Levy

        This course examines the history of theater and dramatic literature from its foundations in ancient world cultures through the Renaissance. Since this history course covers over 2000 years of time, class meetings sometimes move at a fast pace. Students gain a general world-wide cultural understanding of the art and history of the theater from its beginnings, and how theater spread as a phenomenon across the globe. Since theater is primarily a cultural institution, we simultaneously examine politics, philosophy, religion, science, and other factors that influence how the art form is created, maintained, and culturally preserved. We also examine history itself as an important cultural tool for assessing the events of the past.

         

         

         


      • THTR 341 - Acting 3: Styles
        Credits3
        PrerequisiteTHTR 141 or instructor consent

        An advanced acting class focused on performing the work of a particular playwright or playwrights. In this course, students enhance their scene work by examining the theatrical and historical context in which the plays were written, thereby achieving a deeper understanding of a performance style other than contemporary realism. Topics change regularly. May be repeated twice for degree credit if the topics are different. 


      • And, when appropriate:
        • ARTH 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteFirst-year seminar. Prerequisite: First-year standing

          Topics vary by term.


        • ARTH 394 - Seminar in Art History
          FDRHA
          Credits3-4
          PrerequisiteThree credits in art history and instructor consent

          Research in selected topics in art history with written and oral reports. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Fall 2018, ARTH 394-01:Owning the Past: Monuments, Sites, and Memory in Islamic India (3). Islam is a minority religion in India, but Muslim dynasties ruled large swathes of the country for centuries. How did these rulers legitimate and define themselves in a majority Hindu society? This course explores how art and architecture were used by the Sultanates and Mughals to mediate between past sources of authority and contemporary identities. Case studies and key issues shed light on practices of artistic appropriation and translation. Students investigate the complexity of how Muslims in India have found ways to communicate both their Islamic and Indian identities, roughly from the 7th to the 18th centuries. (HA) Gustafson.


        • ARTH 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisitePermission of the department
          FacultyStaff

          Individual or class study of special topics in art history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • FILM 195 - Topics in Film Studies
          FDRHA
          Credits3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring
          PrerequisiteCompletion of FW FDR requirement, and other prerequisites may vary with topic

          Selected topic in film studies, focused on one or more of film history, theory, production, or screenwriting. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • FILM 196 - Topics in Film and Literature
          FDRHL
          Credits3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring
          PrerequisiteCompletion of FW FDR requirement, and other prerequisites may vary with topic

          Selected topics in film and literature. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MRST 395 - Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteInstructor consent
          FacultyStaff

          A seminar concentrating on topics or concepts relevant to Medieval and Renaissance studies. Topics are offered according to the interests of participating faculty. This course may be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MRST 403 - Directed Individual Study
          Credits3
          PrerequisitePermission of the instructor
          FacultyStaff

          Individual study of selected topics in Medieval and Renaissance studies. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MUS 423 - Directed Individual Project
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteMusic major and instructor consent
          FacultyStaff

          May be repeated for degree credit with permission.


        • ROML 295 - Topics in Romance Languages
          Credits1-3
          Prerequisitevary with topic

          Nature and content of the course is determined by the interests of the instructor(s) and student(s). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


           


        • THTR 121 - Script Analysis for Stage and Screen
          FDRHL
          Credits3
          FacultySandberg, Levy, Collins, Evans

          The study of selected plays and screenplays from the standpoint of the theatre and screen artists. Emphasis on thorough examination of the scripts preparatory to production. This course is focused on developing script analysis skills directly applicable to work in production. Students work collaboratively in various creative capacities to transform texts into productions.


        • THTR 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteFirst-year seminar. Prerequisite: First-year standing

          First-year seminar.


  4. A directed study or thesis in another discipline may e used to meet this requirement if approved in advance by the MRST Advisory Committee through its chair.

    • MRST 403 - Directed Individual Study
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePermission of the instructor
      FacultyStaff

      Individual study of selected topics in Medieval and Renaissance studies. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • MRST 473 - Senior Thesis
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteSenior standing, consent of the program head and the major adviser
      FacultyStaff

      Individual research devoted to an original topic dealing with issues pertinent to Medieval and Renaissance studies. The focus of this thesis should coincide with the area of study in which the student has done the most work and should be grounded in interdisciplinary themes. Projects should be approved no later than September 30 of the senior year.


    • or
    • MRST 493 - Honors Thesis (3-3)
      Credits3-3
      PrerequisiteSenior standing, cumulative grade-point average of 3.300, and consent of the MRST head
      FacultyStaff

      Honors thesis devoted to a specialized topic in Medieval and Renaissance studies. Applications for honors should be submitted to the program head no later than March 1 of the junior year.