MRST Major Requirements

2016 - 2017 Catalog

Medieval and Renaissance Studies major leading to BA degree

A major in Medieval and Renaissance Studies leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 33 credits as follows:

  1. Students must complete one of the following language sequences:
    1. Six credits at the third-year level in French, German, Italian, Latin, Russian, or Spanish
    2. The FL requirement (i.e. qualified to enter third-year study) in French, German, Italian, Latin, Russian or Spanish and complete the first year of study in a second of these languages
  2. MRST 110 (also, HIST 100 and 101 and REL 101 and 102 are strongly recommended)
  3. 27 credits chosen from courses in the following four areas. Majors must complete four courses in one area, two courses in each of two other areas, and one course in the fourth area.
    1. History and History of Science: CLAS 224; HIST 100, 170, 201, 202, 203, 204, 217, 219, 305, 307; PHYS 150; SPAN 333; and, when appropriate, HIST 229, 395, and 403; INTR 296; MRST 395, 403; PHYS 403; and ROML 295
    2. Literature: ENGL 240, 242, 243, 250, 311, 312, 313, 314, 316, 319, 320, 326, 330; FREN 281; GERM 318; LATN 327; LIT 255; SPAN 210, 211, 220, 312, 320, 322, 323, 333; and, when appropriate, ENGL 299, 392, 403; FREN 341, 403; GERM 395, 403; INTR 296; ITAL 403; LIT 295, 395; MRST 395, 403, ROML 295; and SPAN 397, 403
    3. History of Ideas: ARTH 385; HIST 306, 307; PHIL 221 (CLAS 221), 222; REL 151, 215, 250, 271, 282, 283; SPAN 210, and, when appropriate, FREN 341; HIST 395, 403; INTR 296; MRST 395, 403; PHIL 395, 403; POL 396, 403; REL 180, 260, 350, 403; and ROML 295; SPAN 210
    4. Fine Arts: ARTH 253, 254, 255, 256, 285, 350, 353, 354, 355, 384; MUS 201, 331; and, when appropriate, ARTH 394, 403; INTR 296; MRST 395, 403; MUS 374, 423; ROML 295; THTR 341
  4. MRST 473 or 493 (3-3).
  1. Students must complete one of the following language sequences:
    • Six credits at the third-year level in French, German, Italian, Latin, Russian, or Spanish
    • The FL requirement (i.e. qualified to enter third-year study) in French, German, Italian, Latin, Russian or Spanish and complete the first year of study in a second of these languages
  2. Required course
    • MRST 110 - Medieval and Renaissance Culture

      FDR: Offered as 110A when HL; or as 110 when HU; depending on topic
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter

      An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of the Medieval and Renaissance periods through the study of a particular topic. Recent studies: The Crusades, Monasticism, Chivalry, Elizabethan England, the Birth of Italian Literature, Pilgrimage, and European Encounters with Islam.

      Winter 2017, MRST 110-01: Life and Death in Dante's Florence (3). People ate and slept and worked and played in the city of Florence during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, just as they do today. They studied and prayed and fought with each other, too, and they read books and considered images and sang songs to their heroes and advocates right up to the day they died. In this introduction to the history of European culture on the cusp of the early modern era, we examine the way common people, communal leaders, and spiritual guides conducted themselves on a daily basis. We read contemporary critiques of a socio-economic system that favored some (but not others) and see representations of concepts that held together the fabric of this society. We consider lay spirituality, art for common people, and the realities of life for women and children in their homes and in their neighborhoods. We wince at Dante's bitter condemnation of his fellow Florentines in the Inferno and laugh at Boccaccio's bawdy tales of vice and villainy in the Decameron. Specific events that challenged, confirmed, or changed this society serve as landmarks to help us construct a loose narrative of one of the region's most influential and important centers, and help us understand how it came to be known as "the Cradle of the Renaissance". (HU) Bent.


    • Also strongly recommended:
      • HIST 100 - European Civilization, 325-1517

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall

        An introductory survey, featuring lectures and discussions of European culture, politics, religion and social life, and of Europe's relations with neighboring societies, from the rise of Christianity in Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages and the Italian Renaissance, to the beginnings of the 16th-century Protestant and Catholic Reformations.


      • HIST 101 - European Civilization, 1500-1789

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall

        An individual who died in 1500 would have been surprised, if not bewildered, by many aspects of European life and thought in 1800. What changed over these three centuries? What stayed the same? Why should we in the 21st century, care? This course examines the history of Europe from the Renaissance through the beginning of the French Revolution. It explores the interplay of religion, politics, society, culture, and economy at a time when Europe underwent great turmoil and change: the Reformation, the consolidation of state power, the rise of constitutionalism, global expansion and encounters with "others," perpetual warfare, the rise of the market economy, the spread of the slave trade, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. This course discusses how these processes transformed Europe into the Western world of today, while also challenging ideas about what "Western," "European," and "Civilization" actually mean.


      • REL 101 - Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3

        An introduction to the history, literature and interpretation of the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament).


      • REL 102 - New Testament

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall

        An introduction to the history, literature and interpretation of the New Testament.


  3. 27 credits chosen from courses in the following four areas.
  4. Majors must complete four courses in one area, two courses in each of two other areas, and one course in the fourth area.

    • History and History of Science:
      • CLAS 224 - The World of Late Antiquity

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Not offered in 2016-2017

        This course introduces students to the historical period between the close of the ancient world and the rise of the Middle Ages ca. 250 to 650 AD). Students read primary sources and explore the historical evidence in order to investigate the reigning historical model of "Decline and Fall" inherited from Edward Gibbon and others, and study the development of Christianity and Judaism during this period. Finally, the course investigates the formation of Europe and the rise of Islam.


      • HIST 100 - European Civilization, 325-1517

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall

        An introductory survey, featuring lectures and discussions of European culture, politics, religion and social life, and of Europe's relations with neighboring societies, from the rise of Christianity in Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages and the Italian Renaissance, to the beginnings of the 16th-century Protestant and Catholic Reformations.


      • HIST 170 - History of Islamic Civilization I: Origins to 1500

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall

        This course surveys the political, social, and cultural history of the Islamic World from the 7th to 15th centuries, with particular attention paid to the diverse geographical and cultural contexts in which pre-modern Islamic civilization flourished. Topics include the origins of Islam in late Antiquity; the development of Islamic religious, political, and cultural institutions; the flourishing of medieval Islamic education, science, and literature; the tension among state, ethnic, sectarian, and global Muslim identities; and the emergence of a distinctly Muslim approach to historiography.


      • HIST 201 - Europe in the Early Middle Ages, 325-1198

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall

        Examines, through lectures and discussions, the culture and society of late Roman antiquity; the rise of Christianity and the formation of the Western church; Europe's relations with Byzantium and Islam, Germanic culture, monasticism, Charlemagne's empire; the Vikings, feudalism, manorialism, agriculture and the rise of commerce; gender roles and family structures; warfare and the Crusades; the growth of the papacy and feudal monarchies, the conflict between church and state; the revival of legal studies and theology; and the development of chivalric and romantic ideals in the cultural renewal of the 11th and 12th centuries.


      • HIST 202 - Europe in the Late Middle Ages, 1198-1500

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter

        Examines, through lectures and discussions, the high medieval papacy; the rise of new lay religious movements; Franciscans and Dominicans; dissent and heresy; the Inquisition; Jews and minorities; the rise of universities; scholasticism and humanism; the development of law; Parliament and constitutionalism; the Hundred Years War; the Black Death; the papal schism and conciliarism; gender roles; family structures and child rearing; Europe's relations with Islam and Byzantium; and the rise of commerce, cities and urban values, as well as of the "new monarchies."


      • HIST 203 - The Italian Renaissance in Its Historical Setting

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall

        Examines, through lectures and discussions, the Italian Renaissance within the framework of European religious, political and cultural development. The rise and impact of commercial and urban values on religious and political life in the Italian communes to the time of Dante. Cultural and political life in the "despotic" signorie and in republics such as Florence and Venice. The diffusion of Renaissance cultural ideals from Florence to the other republics and courts of 15th-century Italy, to the papacy, and to Christian humanists north of the Alps. Readings from Dante, Petrarch, Leonardo Bruni, Pico della Mirandola and Machiavelli.


      • HIST 204 - The Age of Reformation

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter

        Examines the origins, development, and consequences of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations of the 16th century. The late medieval religious environment; the emergence of new forms of lay religious expression; the impact of urbanization; and the institutional dilemmas of the church. The views of leading reformers, such as Luther, Calvin, and Loyola; and the impact of differing social and political contexts; and technological innovations, such as printing, on the spread of reform throughout Europe. The impact of reform and religious strife on state development and the emergence of doctrines of religious toleration and philosophical skepticism; recent theses and approaches emphasizing "confessionalization," "social discipline," and "microhistory."


      • HIST 217 - History of the British Isles to 1688: Power, Plague, and Prayer

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2016

        The history of the British Isles to 1688 tells the story of how an island remote from the classical world came to dominate much of the modern one. This course ventures from Britain during Roman occupation and Anglo-Saxon migration, to the expansion of the Church and tales of chivalry during the Middle Ages, then finally to exploration and conflict during the Tudor and Stuart dynasties. Topics include the development of Christianity, Viking invasions, the Scottish wars of independence, the evolution of parliament, the Black Death, the Wars of the Roses, the Reformation, the beginnings of Empire, and the 17th-century revolutions. 


      • HIST 219 - Seminar: The Age of the Witch Hunts

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2018 and alternate years

        This course introduces students to one of the most fascinating and disturbing events in the history of the Western world: the witch hunts in early-modern Europe and North America. Between 1450 and 1750, more than 100,000 individuals, from Russia to Salem, were prosecuted for the crime of witchcraft. Most were women and more than half were executed. In this course, we examine the political, religious, social, and legal reasons behind the trials, asking why they occurred in Europe when they did and why they finally ended. We also explore, in brief, global witch hunts that still occur today in places like Africa and India, asking how they resemble yet differ from those of the early-modern world.


      • HIST 305 - Seminar: Religion, Church, and Politics in Medieval and Renaissance Society

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3

        The seminar draws on primary and secondary sources to examine the rise of Christianity in Europe, church-state relations, scholastic theology, mendicant piety, lay religious life, mysticism, heresy, humanism, gender and religion, urban and rural contexts, and church reform.


      • HIST 307 - Politics and History: The Machiavellian Moment

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Not offered in 2016-2017

        Is it better to be loved or feared? How much of our destiny do we control? When are societies fit for self-rule? Can people be forced to be good? Niccolò Machiavelli, arguably the first and most controversial modern political theorist, raises issues of universal human and political concern. Yet he did so in a very specific context--the Florence of the Medici, Michelangelo, and Savonarola--at a time when Renaissance Italy stood at the summit of artistic brilliance and on the threshold of political collapse. We draw on Machiavelli's personal, political, historical, and literary writings, and readings in history and art, as a point of entry for exploring Machiavelli's republican vision of history and politics as he developed it in the Italian Renaissance and how it addresses such perennial issues as the corruption and regeneration of societies.


      • PHYS 150 - The Immense Journey: Harmonices Mundi

        FDR: SL
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

        The classical astronomy of the solar system is traced by a study of Greek astronomy and the revolutionary ideas of Kepler and Newton. The apparent and real motions of the earth, moon, and planets are studied in detail, as well as special phenomena such as eclipses, tides, and objects such as comets and asteroids. Emphasis is on comprehension and application of principles rather than memorization of facts. The laboratory stresses the observational aspects of astronomy. Elementary geometry, algebra, and trigonometry are used in the course. Laboratory course.


      • SPAN 333 - El Cid in History and Legend

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: 2018 and alternate years

        A study of the most significant portrayals of the Castilian warrior Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar, El Cid (1045-1099), from his 12th-century biography Historia Roderici to the Hollywood blockbuster El Cid. Epic poems, late medieval ballads, and Renaissance drama all recreate the legendary life of El Cid. This course examines the relevant narratives in an effort to determine the heroic values and attributes recreated by authors and their audiences for nearly a thousand years.


      • And, when appropriate:
        • HIST 229 - Topics in European History

          FDR: HU
          Credits: 3 credit in fall or winter; 4 in spring

          A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • HIST 395 - Advanced Seminar

          FDR: HU
          Credits: 3

          A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Winter 2017, HIST 395-01: The Devil in the Western World (3). The devil is one of the most recognizable figures in Europe and America, appearing in religion, art, popular culture, and even political rhetoric. This course explores how Western understandings of the devil and his role in the cosmos have changed from late antiquity to the present. Together, we ask why the devil became (and remains) such an influential part of Western culture. Topics covered include the biblical origins of Satan, medieval demonology, the impact of the Reformation and Enlightenment, cases of possession and witchcraft, depictions of the devil in literature and film, and modern discussions about the nature of evil. (HU) Brock.


        • HIST 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit each term of the junior and senior year.


        • INTR 296 - Spring Studies in Culture and Society

          FDR: FDR designation to be determined each year
          Credits: 4

          A topical seminar that focuses on an interdisciplinary examination of a given society through formal study and direct exposure to its people and culture. The seminar takes place in the target location during the spring term, for which four credits are awarded. May be repeated for credit if the topic and location of the seminar are different.


        • MRST 395 - Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies

          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          A seminar concentrating on topics or concepts relevant to Medieval and Renaissance studies. Topics are offered according to the interests of participating faculty. This course may be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MRST 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          Individual study of selected topics in Medieval and Renaissance studies. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • PHYS 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          Advanced work and reading in topics selected by the instructor to fit special needs of advanced students. This course may be repeated with permission for a total of six credits.


        • ROML 295 - Topics in Romance Languages

          Credits: 1-3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          Nature and content of the course is determined by the interests of the instructor(s) and student(s). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


           


    • Literature:
      • ENGL 240 - Arthurian Legend

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2018 and alternate years

        Why does King Arthur continue to fascinate and haunt our cultural imagination? This course surveys the origins and histories of Arthurian literature, beginning with Celtic myths, Welsh tales, and Latin chronicles. We then examine medieval French and English traditions that include Chrétien de Troyes's Perceval, the lais of Marie de France, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the Alliterative Morte Arthure, and Malory's Le Morte Darthur. In addition to historical and literary contexts, we explore theoretical issues surrounding the texts, especially the relationship between history and fantasy, courtly love and adultery, erotic love and madness, romance and chivalry, gender and agency, and Europe and its Others. Finally, we investigate Arthurian medievalisms in Victorian England and in American (post)modernity through Tennyson, Twain, Barthelme, and Ishiguro. Along the way, we view various film adaptations of Arthurian legends. All texts are read in modern English translation.


      • ENGL 242 - Individual Shakespeare Play

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Spring 2017 and alternate years

        A detailed study of a single Shakespearean play, including its sources, textual variants, performance history, film adaptations and literary and cultural legacy. The course includes both performance-based and analytical assignments.


      • ENGL 250 - Medieval and Early Modern British Literature

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter

        This course is a survey of English literature from the Early Middle Ages to the Early Modern period. We read works in various genres--verse, drama, and prose--and understand their specific cultural and historical contexts. We also examine select modern film adaptations of canonical works as part of the evolving history of critical reception.


      • ENGL 311 - History of the English Language

        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Spring 2018 and alternate years

        In The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer's Friar can "make his Englissh sweete upon his tonge."  This course examines not only the alleged "sweetness" of English but also the evolution of the language from its origins to the present.  We study basic terms and concepts of linguistics and trace the changes in structure, pronunciation, and vocabulary from Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English to Modern English.  We consider how historical and cultural forces—invasion, revolution, migration, colonization, and assimilation—shape the language.  Moreover, we examine language myths, the construction of standard English, issues of correctness, orality, pidgins and creoles, and the variety of Englishes in their diverse configurations.  Finally, we ask how new media and technological praxes—hypertext, email, texting, and tweeting—have changed the English language, and if English may or may not be the lingua franca of our increasingly globalized world.


      • ENGL 312 - Gender, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2017

        A study of the complex nexus of gender, love, and marriage in medieval legal, theological, political, and cultural discourses. Reading an eclectic range of texts--such as romance, hagiography, fabliau, (auto)biography, conduct literature, and drama--we consider questions of desire, masculinity, femininity, and agency, as well as the production and maintenance of gender roles and of emotional bonds within medieval conjugality. Authors include Chaucer, Chretien de Troyes, Heldris of Cornwall, Andreas Capellanus, Margery Kempe, and Christine de Pisan. Readings in Middle English or in translation. No prior knowledge of medieval languages necessary.

         


      • ENGL 313 - Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years

        This course considers the primary work on which Chaucer's reputation rests: The Canterbury Tales. We pay sustained attention to Chaucer's Middle English at the beginning of the semester to ease the reading process. Then we travel alongside the Canterbury pilgrims as they tell their tales under the guise of a friendly competition. The Canterbury Tales is frequently read as a commentary on the social divisions in late medieval England, such as the traditional estates, religious professionals and laity, and gender hierarchies. But despite the Tales' professed inclusiveness of the whole of English society, Chaucer nonetheless focuses inordinately on those individuals from the emerging middle classes. Our aim is to approach the Tales from the practices of historicization and theorization; that is, we both examine Chaucer's cultural and historical contexts and consider issues of religion, gender, sexuality, marriage, conduct, class, chivalry, courtly love, community, geography, history, power, spirituality, secularism, traditional authority, and individual experience. Of particular importance are questions of voicing and writing, authorship and readership. Lastly, we think through Chaucer's famous Retraction at the "end" of The Canterbury Tales, as well as Donald R. Howard's trenchant observation that the Tale is "unfinished but complete." What does it mean for the father of literary "Englishness" to end his life's work on the poetic principle of unfulfilled closure and on the image of a society on the move?


      • ENGL 316 - The Tudors

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years

        Famous for his mistresses and marriages, his fickle treatment of courtiers, and his vaunting ambition, Henry VIII did more to change English society and religion than any other king. No one understood Henry's power more carefully than his daughter Elizabeth, who oversaw England's first spy network and jealously guarded her throne from rebel contenders. This course studies the writers who worked for the legendary Tudors, focusing on the love poetry of courtiers, trials, and persecution of religious dissidents, plays, and accounts of exploration to the new world. We trace how the ambitions of the monarch, along with religious revolution and colonial expansion, figure in the work of writers like Wyatt, Surrey, and Anne Askew; Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Southwell; and Thomas More and Walter Ralegh.


      • ENGL 319 - Shakespeare and Company

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years

        Focusing on the repertory and working conditions of the two play companies with which he was centrally involved, this course examines plays by Shakespeare and several of his contemporary collaborators and colleagues (Jonson, Middleton, Fletcher). Attentive to stage history and the evolution of dramatic texts within print culture, students consider the degree to which Shakespeare was both a representative and an exceptional player in Renaissance London's "show business."


      • ENGL 320 - Shakespearean Genres

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2017 and alternate years

        In a given term, this course focuses on one or two of the major genres explored by Shakespeare (e.g., histories, tragedies, comedies, tragicomedies/romances, lyric and narrative poetry), in light of Renaissance literary conventions and recent theoretical approaches. Students consider the ways in which Shakespeare's generic experiments are variably inflected by gender, by political considerations, by habitat, and by history.


      • ENGL 326 - 17th-Century Poetry

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2016 and alternate years

        Readings of lyric and epic poetry spanning the long 16th century, and tracing the development of republican and cavalier literary modes. Genres include the metaphysical poetry of Donne, Herbert, Katherine Philips, and Henry Vaughan; erotic verse by Mary Wroth, Herrick, Thomas Carew, Marvell, Aphra Behn, and the Earl of Rochester; elegy by Jonson and Bradstreet; and epic by Milton.


      • ENGL 330 - Milton

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years

        This course surveys one of the most talented and probing authors of the English language -- a man whose reading knowledge and poetic output has never been matched, and whose work has influenced a host of writers after him, including Alexander Pope, William Blake, William Wordsworth, and Mary Shelley. In this course, we read selections from Milton's literary corpus, drawing from such diverse genres as lyric, drama, epic and prose polemic. As part of their study of epic form, students create a digital humanities project rendering Paradise Lost in gaming context. Quests, heroes,ethical choices and exploration of new worlds in Paradise Lost are rendered as a game. Students read Milton in the context of literary criticism and place him within his historical milieu, not the least of which includes England's dizzying series of political metamorphoses from Monarchy to Commonwealth, Commonwealth to Protectorate, and Protectorate back to Monarchy.


      • FREN 281 - Civilisation et culture françaises: Traditions et changements

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter

        A study of significant aspects of French culture and civilization, seen in a diachronic perspective. Emphasis on economic, sociological and historical changes that shaped present-day institutions and national identity. Readings, discussions and papers in French for further development of communication skills.


      • GERM 318 - German Medieval and Renaissance Literature

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

        An examination of selected works and a study of literary history through the 16th century. Medieval literary readings include the Hildebrandslied, Nibelungenlied, Parzival, and Tristan, as well as the Minnesang. Consideration is also given to the history of the German literary language during the period covered. Conducted in German.


      • LATN 327 - Medieval and Renaissance Writers

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3

        Readings from Augustine, Bede, the Crusader historians, medieval hymns, the Carmina Burana , Petrarch, and texts proposed by students.


      • SPAN 210 - The Road to Santiago

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Spring

        Spring Term Abroad course. A study of Spanish culture and language conducted entirely in Spain. During the first three weeks of the course, students live in Madrid with Spanish-speaking families and study language at Estudio Internacional Sampere. At the same time, students engage in an in-depth study of the history and legend of the eight-centuries-old pilgrimage to the shrine of Santiago de Compostela, the burial site of St James, apostle of Christ. During the last week of the course, students travel to northwestern Spain to visit and study the monuments associated with the Santiago pilgrimage as well as experience the art, architecture, and culture of pilgrimage as they hike the last portion of the trail.


      • SPAN 211 - Spanish Civilization and Culture

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall, Winter

        A survey of significant developments in Spanish civilization. The course addresses Spanish heritage and the present-day cultural patterns formed by its legacies. Readings, discussions and papers, primarily in Spanish, for further development of communication skills.


      • SPAN 220 - Introducción a la literatura española

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall, Winter

        Spanish literary masterpieces from the Poema del Cid through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.


      • SPAN 312 - Medieval Spanish Cultures in Context

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Spring

        Spring Term Abroad course. Muslims, Jews, and Christians co-existed for eight-hundred years on the Iberian Peninsula. This course examines these diverse cultures through the texts (literary, historical, religious, and philosophical), the art, and the architecture from the period prior to the arrival of the Arabs in 711, up to and beyond the expulsion of the Jews in 1492. The objective of the course is to glean from the remnants of the experience of their co-existence insights into their distinctive characteristics and how they understood and influenced each other.


      • SPAN 320 - Don Quijote

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2018 and every third year

        Close reading and discussion of this Early Modern novel. May include close reading and discussion of additional narrative and poetic genres of the Golden Age, as represented in or contributing to the Cervantine work


      • SPAN 322 - Spanish Golden-Age Drama

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: 2018-2019 and every third year

        Close reading and discussion of a variety of selected Golden Age dramas of the 17th century. Representative dramatists may include Calderón de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, Lope de Vega, and María de Zayas.
         


      • SPAN 323 - Golden Age Spanish Women Writers

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2017 and every third year

        A study of the comedia and the novela corta and the manner in which the secular women writers inscribe themselves within and beyond these genres. Close reading and discussion of representative works that may include the short stories and plays by María de Zayas, Ana Caro, Leonor de Meneses, Mariana de Carvajal, and Angela de Azevedo.


      • SPAN 333 - El Cid in History and Legend

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: 2018 and alternate years

        A study of the most significant portrayals of the Castilian warrior Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar, El Cid (1045-1099), from his 12th-century biography Historia Roderici to the Hollywood blockbuster El Cid. Epic poems, late medieval ballads, and Renaissance drama all recreate the legendary life of El Cid. This course examines the relevant narratives in an effort to determine the heroic values and attributes recreated by authors and their audiences for nearly a thousand years.


      • And, when appropriate:
        • ENGL 291 - Seminar

          FDR: HL
          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Fall, Winter

          This course studies a group of works related by theme, by culture, by topic, by genre, or by the critical approach taken to the works. Some recent topics have been the Southern Short Story; Gender and Passion in the 19th-Century Novel; Chivalry, Honor, and the Romance; and Appalachian Literature. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • ENGL 299 - Seminar for Prospective Majors

          FDR: HL
          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Fall, Winter

          A study of a topic in literature issuing in a research process and sustained critical writing. Some recent topics have been Detective Fiction; American Indian Literatures; Revenge; and David Thoreau and American Transcendentalism.

          Winter 2017, ENGL 299-01: Seminar for Prospective Majors: Divinity and Desire in the English Renaissance (3). In this gateway seminar, we study portrayals of secular and divine love in the English Renaissance. We read love poets of Henry VIII's court—Wyatt and Surrey—along with accounts of the last English mystic, Elizabeth Barton, whose way of life ended with the dissolution of the monasteries. We trace discourses of divinity and love through the sonnets of Anne Locke, a Protestant exile in the reign of Mary, along with a host of secular writers in Elizabeth's court—Spenser, Shakespeare, Sidney—culminating with the holy eroticism of metaphysical poet John Donne. Drawing from readings on Tudor courts and discourses of love and romance, students practice the skills of research writing in stages, preparing for the essay requirements of upper-level English courses. (HL) Gertz.

          Winter 2017, ENGL 299-02: Seminar for Prospective Majors: Poetry's Otherworlds (3). "Speculative fiction" encompasses science fiction and fantasy, but can it include poetry, too? In this gateway seminar, we read recent poetry that departs from consensus reality and estranges the familiar. As students study verse by Anne Sexton, James Merrill, Tracy K. Smith, and Anne Carson in conjunction with theories of the fantastic, they also practice the skills of research writing in stages, preparing for the essay requirements of upper-level English courses. (HL) Wheeler.

          Fall 2016, ENGL 299A-01: Seminar for Prospective Majors: Revenge (3). Prerequisites: Completion of FW composition requirement and at least one course chosen from English courses numbered from 203 to 295. In this seminar, preparatory to more advanced study in the English Department, we sharpen our skills as close readers of texts and as clear and compelling writers about literature and film. Our topic is one of the most common themes and sources of conflict in world literature: revenge. From Greek drama (such as Medea), to the Old Testament, to English Renaissance drama (The Spanish Tragedy, Hamlet), to contemporary film (Kill Bill), to world literature and film (Chushingura, The Virgin Spring), the revenge motive has propelled plots and characters and has spun off sub-genres, such as detective fiction, gangster violence, and legal drama. The course culminates in a longer paper on the topic and texts of your choice that showcase your skills in textual analysis, application of pertinent theory, and research. (HL) Dobin.


        • ENGL 392 - Topics in Literature in English before 1700

          Credits: 3 in fall or winter, 4 in spring
          Planned Offering: Fall, Winter, Spring

          Enrollment limited. A seminar course on literature written in English before 1700 with special emphasis on research and discussion. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • ENGL 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          A course designed for special students who wish to continue a line of study begun in an earlier advanced course. Their applications approved by the department and accepted by their proposed directors, the students may embark upon directed independent study which must culminate in acceptable papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • FREN 341 - La France de l'Ancien Régime

          FDR: HL
          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Fall

          Readings in French literature and civilization from before the Revolution of 1789. May be repeated for degree credit if the topic is different.


        • FREN 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          Nature and content of course to be determined by students' needs and by instructors acquainted with their earlier preparation and performance. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Fall 2016, FREN 403-01: Directed Individual Study (3). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. An examination of current issues in the French Press. Frégnac-Clave


        • GERM 395 - Seminar

          FDR: HL
          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Winter

          A seminar on a particular author, period, or genre. The subject changes annually. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Conducted in German.


        • GERM 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          A course that permits students to follow a program of directed reading or research. The nature and content of the course is determined by their needs and by the instructors acquainted with their earlier preparation and performance. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • INTR 296 - Spring Studies in Culture and Society

          FDR: FDR designation to be determined each year
          Credits: 4

          A topical seminar that focuses on an interdisciplinary examination of a given society through formal study and direct exposure to its people and culture. The seminar takes place in the target location during the spring term, for which four credits are awarded. May be repeated for credit if the topic and location of the seminar are different.


        • ITAL 403 - Directed Individual Study

          FDR: HL: only when the subject is literary
          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          Advanced study in Italian. The nature and content of the course is determined by the students' needs and by an evaluation of their previous work. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • LIT 295 - Special Topics in Literature in Translation

          FDR: HL
          Credits: 3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Winter 2017, LIT 295B-01: Displacement, Home, and the Immigrant Experience in Francophone, Hispanic, and Romanian Novel and Film. (3). Taught in English. Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement. An incursion into the aesthetic of exile, displacement, and loss in narrative works by Francophone writers such as Assia Djebar, Maryse Conde, Julia Alvarez, Sandra Cisneros, Marjorie Agosin, and Matei Visniec, and in the cinematographic works of some of the most acclaimed post-communist film directors from the Romanian Nouvelle Vague such as Cristian Mungiu, Cristi Puiu, and Corneliu Porumboiu. At the core of the course are questions regarding the ways in which contemporary art deals artistically with the experience of immigration, political violence, the loss of country and home, and the need to belong. (HL) Radulescu.

          Fall 2016, LIT 295A-01: Germanic Heroes and Arthurian Legends (3). Prerequisite: Completion of the FDR FW requirement. The German Middle ages gave us beautiful courtly love poetry, a blossoming of Arthurian legends, and the larger than life Nibelungen heroes. Readings include the amorous, playful and sometimes naughty Minnesang, Wolfram's epic of the Grail Parzival, Gottfried's tragic love story Tristan and Isolde and the German national epic Song of the Nibelungen. We also trace the late Medieval origins of the Faust legend and view the early years of the Reformation through the lens of Martin Luther and of the shoemaker-poet Hans Sachs. (HL) Crockett.


        • MRST 395 - Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies

          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          A seminar concentrating on topics or concepts relevant to Medieval and Renaissance studies. Topics are offered according to the interests of participating faculty. This course may be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MRST 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          Individual study of selected topics in Medieval and Renaissance studies. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • ROML 295 - Topics in Romance Languages

          Credits: 1-3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          Nature and content of the course is determined by the interests of the instructor(s) and student(s). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


           


        • SPAN 397 - Peninsular Seminar

          FDR: HL
          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Fall, Winter

          A seminar focusing on a single period, genre, motif, or writer. The specific topic will be determined jointly according to student interest and departmental approval. Recent topics have included "The Female Voice in Hispanic Literature", "19th- and 20th-Century Spanish drama", "Women Writers of the Golden Age", and "Romanticism and the Generation of '98". May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Fall 2016, SPAN 397A-01: Peninsular Seminar: Medieval Spanish Literature (3). Prerequisites: SPAN 220 and 275. This course studies three major works: Poema del Cid, Libro de buen amor, and La Celestina. In order to experience the widest possible sampling of medieval literary forms and authors, the course also surveys mozarabic love poetry (jarchas), Galician-Portuguese lyric poetry, Marian miracle stories, wisdom literature, pre-Renaissance love lyric, and ballads (romances). We examine the social and historical contexts of all works, the author's purpose and audience expectations and responses. The three primary texts are read in modern Castilian, while the secondary samplings are read in their original languages. (HL) Bailey.


        • SPAN 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          Nature and content of course to be determined by students' needs and by instructors acquainted with their earlier preparation and performance. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • History of Ideas:
      • ARTH 385 - Leonardo da Vinci: Art, Science and Innovation in Renaissance Europe

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Spring 2019 and alternate years

        Leonardo da Vinci has for years been considered the consummate "Renaissance Man," equally skilled as a painter, anatomist, engineer, and military scientist. This course examines the contextual background from which this true genius was sprung, the works he produced, the people for whom he produced them, and the visions of the artist both realized and unrealized that have captured the imaginations of people around the world since Leonardo's death in 1519.


      • HIST 306 - Seminar: Politics and Providence: Medieval and Renaissance Political Thought

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Not offered in 2016-2017

        How did religion shape politics and the development of political institutions in the Middle Ages? This seminar surveys the evolution of political thought from St. Augustine to Machiavelli. We examine Christianity's providential view of history, church-state relations, scholasticism, the revivals of Greek and Roman philosophy, humanism, and the origins of the modern state. Readings include St. Augustine, John of Salisbury, St. Thomas Aquinas, Marsilius of Padua, Leonardo Bruni, and Niccolò Machiavelli.


      • HIST 307 - Politics and History: The Machiavellian Moment

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Not offered in 2016-2017

        Is it better to be loved or feared? How much of our destiny do we control? When are societies fit for self-rule? Can people be forced to be good? Niccolò Machiavelli, arguably the first and most controversial modern political theorist, raises issues of universal human and political concern. Yet he did so in a very specific context--the Florence of the Medici, Michelangelo, and Savonarola--at a time when Renaissance Italy stood at the summit of artistic brilliance and on the threshold of political collapse. We draw on Machiavelli's personal, political, historical, and literary writings, and readings in history and art, as a point of entry for exploring Machiavelli's republican vision of history and politics as he developed it in the Italian Renaissance and how it addresses such perennial issues as the corruption and regeneration of societies.

         


      • PHIL 221 - Plato (CLAS 221)

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years

        An in-depth examination of the philosophy of Plato. We look at Plato's epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, ethics, and political philosophy through a careful analysis of several dialogues, including some or all of the following: Euthyphro, Laches, Apology, Gorgias, Meno, Phaedo, Symposium, Phaedrus, and Republic. In addition, we consider certain challenges posed by Plato's use of the dialogue form, such as whether we are justified in assuming that Socrates is a mouthpiece for Plato's own views, and how we should interpret Plato's frequent appeal to myths and other literary devices within his dialogues. 


      • PHIL 222 - Aristotle

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Offered occasionally

        A study of Aristotle's comprehensive philosophy of man and nature, including his logic, physics, metaphysics, psychology, ethics, and aesthetics.


      • REL 108 - The Qur'an

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2016 and alternate years

        This course approaches the Qur'an from a range of modern and pre-modern perspectives: as an oral recitation; as a material object; as a historical document; as a literary text; as it relates to the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament; as a foundation for Islamic law, theology and mysticism; and as a source for ethics and social activism. Particular attention is devoted to issues of gender and politics raised by the Qur'an, supplemented by a number of film screenings. Prior knowledge of Islam is not required.


      • REL 215 - Female and Male in Western Religious Traditions

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3

        An investigation of views about the body, human sexuality, and gender in Western religious traditions, especially Judaism and Christianity, and of the influences of these views both on the religious traditions themselves and on the societies in which they develop. The course focuses on religion and society in antiquity and the Middle Ages, but also considers the continuing influence of religious constructions of the body and sexuality on succeeding generations to the present.


      • REL 250 - Early Christian Thought: Orthodoxy and Heresy

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Not offered in 2016-2017

        An exploration of the uncertain boundaries between orthodoxy and heresy in early Christian movements. Questions addressed include, "Who decides what is orthodox and what is heretical, how are these decisions made, and what impact do they have on institutional structures? What perennial problems in Christian thought and practice emerge in the early debates about orthodoxy and heresy, and how are those problems being addressed today?" Readings include selections from the Hebrew Scriptures, the New Testament, "Gnostic gospels" and other so-called heretical texts, writings from the Church Fathers (with special attention to St. Augustine) and recent scholarly treatments of orthodoxy and heresy.


      • REL 283 - Sufism: Islamic Mysticism

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3

        This course explores the mystical expressions and institutions known as Sufism within the Islamic community. Topics include the elaboration of Sufism from the core tenets of Islam; Sufi practices of ecstasy and discipline; the artistic and literary products of the Sufi experience; the institutions of Sufi orders, saints, shrines, and popular practices; and the debates among Muslims over the place of Sufism within the greater tradition of Islam.


      • SPAN 210 - The Road to Santiago

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Spring

        Spring Term Abroad course. A study of Spanish culture and language conducted entirely in Spain. During the first three weeks of the course, students live in Madrid with Spanish-speaking families and study language at Estudio Internacional Sampere. At the same time, students engage in an in-depth study of the history and legend of the eight-centuries-old pilgrimage to the shrine of Santiago de Compostela, the burial site of St James, apostle of Christ. During the last week of the course, students travel to northwestern Spain to visit and study the monuments associated with the Santiago pilgrimage as well as experience the art, architecture, and culture of pilgrimage as they hike the last portion of the trail.


      • And, when appropriate:
        • FREN 341 - La France de l'Ancien Régime

          FDR: HL
          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Fall

          Readings in French literature and civilization from before the Revolution of 1789. May be repeated for degree credit if the topic is different.


        • HIST 395 - Advanced Seminar

          FDR: HU
          Credits: 3

          A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Winter 2017, HIST 395-01: The Devil in the Western World (3). The devil is one of the most recognizable figures in Europe and America, appearing in religion, art, popular culture, and even political rhetoric. This course explores how Western understandings of the devil and his role in the cosmos have changed from late antiquity to the present. Together, we ask why the devil became (and remains) such an influential part of Western culture. Topics covered include the biblical origins of Satan, medieval demonology, the impact of the Reformation and Enlightenment, cases of possession and witchcraft, depictions of the devil in literature and film, and modern discussions about the nature of evil. (HU) Brock.


        • HIST 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit each term of the junior and senior year.


        • INTR 296 - Spring Studies in Culture and Society

          FDR: FDR designation to be determined each year
          Credits: 4

          A topical seminar that focuses on an interdisciplinary examination of a given society through formal study and direct exposure to its people and culture. The seminar takes place in the target location during the spring term, for which four credits are awarded. May be repeated for credit if the topic and location of the seminar are different.


        • MRST 395 - Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies

          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          A seminar concentrating on topics or concepts relevant to Medieval and Renaissance studies. Topics are offered according to the interests of participating faculty. This course may be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MRST 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          Individual study of selected topics in Medieval and Renaissance studies. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • PHIL 395 - Advanced Seminar

          FDR: HU
          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Fall, Winter

          An intensive and critical study of selected issues or major figures in philosophy. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Fall 2016, PHIL 395A-01: Advanced Seminar: Environmentalism for the Anthropocene (3). Many people believe we have entered a new geological epoch: The Anthropocene, or Age of Human Domination. Some of the central questions explored in this seminar include: What does it mean to be an environmentalist in the Anthropocene? Are the traditional goals of wilderness preservation and conservation of biodiversity still appropriate? Should conservation biology shift its goals in the direction of conserving valuable ecosystem goods and services? Should our attitudes towards introduced and/or invasive species be transformed?  Should we assist the migration of species that are unable to respond on their own to the habitat shifts that will result from global warming? Has the planet become, in effect, one large human garden to be managed as best we can?  (HU) Cooper.


        • PHIL 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Fall, Winter

          May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • POL 396 - Seminar in Political Philosophy

          FDR: SS2
          Credits: 3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          An examination of selected questions and problems in political philosophy and/or political theory. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

          Winter 2017, POL 396A-01: Seminar in Political Philosophy: Gandhi and His Critics (3). Prerequisite: POL 111. Who was Mahatma Gandhi, and how should we think of him as a political activist and thinker? Interestingly, Gandhi continues to be one of the most admired and influential, yet polarizing, figures in modern political theory. His ideas and activism have motivated an intense, sympathetic following as well as ardent critics on topics such as colonialism, political leadership, caste politics, and gender relations. In this course, we carefully examine Gandhi's influences, political activity and writings, and some of the most significant criticisms of his ideas in pre- and post-independence India. We also explore how Gandhian ideas have been used in creative ways to address pressing contemporary issues. Examining Gandhi through the medium of literature, scholarship, and film, we unpack the tremendous complexity of Gandhian political thought, its impact, and how we should view Gandhi in the 21st century. (SS2) Gray.


        • POL 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          This course permits a student to follow a program of directed reading, library research, or data collection and analysis in some area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • REL 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar

          Credits: 3-4
          Planned Offering: Offered occasionally. Each first-year seminar topic is approved by the Dean of The College and the Committee on Courses and Degrees. Applicability to FDRs and other requirements varies

          Topics vary by term. 


        • REL 260 - Seminar in the Christian Tradition

          FDR: HU
          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          An introduction to perduring issues in Christian theology and ethics through study of one or more of the classical Christian theologians.


        • REL 295 - Special Topics in Religion

          FDR: HU
          Credits: 3 credits in fall or winter, 4 in spring

          A course offered from time to time in a selected problem or topic in religion. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • REL 350 - Seminar in Biblical Studies

          FDR: HU
          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Not offered in 2016-2017

          An exploration of a topic in Biblical studies, focusing on ancient texts and their interpreters from antiquity to the present. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • REL 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          Subject to departmental approval and available departmental resources, this course provides an opportunity for individuals to pursue significant lines of independent study in the field of religion. May be repeated for degree credit with permission and if the topics are different.


        • ROML 295 - Topics in Romance Languages

          Credits: 1-3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          Nature and content of the course is determined by the interests of the instructor(s) and student(s). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


           


    • Fine Arts:
      • ARTH 253 - Medieval Art in Southern Europe

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2019 and alternate years

        Examination of the art and culture of Italy and Greece from the rise of Christianity to the first appearance of bubonic plague in 1348. Topics include early Christian art and architecture; Byzantine imagery in Ravenna and Constantinople during the Age of Justinian; iconoclasm; mosaics in Greece, Venice and Sicily; sculpture in Pisa; and the development of panel and fresco painting in Rome, Florence, Siena and Assisi.


      • ARTH 254 - Medieval Art in Northern Europe

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2016 and alternate years

        Survey of the art of France, Spain, Germany, and the British Isles from circa 700 to circa 1400. Discussions include Carolingian and Ottonian painting and architecture, Celtic and Anglo-Saxon manuscripts, and French cathedral design and decoration during the Romanesque and Gothic periods.


      • ARTH 255 - Northern Renaissance Art

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years

        A survey of Northern painting from 1300 to 1600, examined as symbols of political, religious, and social concerns of painters, patrons, and viewers. Among the artists covered are Campin, van Eyck, van der Weyden, Dürer, Holbein, and Brueghel. Emphasis placed on interpretation of meaning and visual analysis.


      • ARTH 256 - Italian Renaissance Art

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter

        Survey of the art and architecture of Italy during the 15th and 16th centuries. The course focuses on innovations of the Early, High, and Late Renaissance through the work of Brunelleschi, Donatello, Masaccio, Alberti, Leonardo, Bramante, Raphael, and Michelangelo. Images are considered as exponents of contemporary political, social, and religious events and perceptions.


      • ARTH 350 - Medieval Art in Italy

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Not offered in 2016-2017

        Art and architecture of the Italian peninsula, from circa 1200 to 1400. This seminar addresses issues of patronage, artistic training and methods of production, iconography, and the function of religious and secular imagery. Topics of discussion include the construction of Tuscan cathedrals and civic buildings; sculpture in Siena, Pisa, and Rome; and painting in Assisi, Padua, and Florence.


      • ARTH 354 - The Early Renaissance in Italy

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years

        Examination of the intellectual, cultural, and artistic movements dominant in Florence between ca. 1400 and ca. 1440. Images and structures produced by Ghiberti, Brunelleschi, Masaccio, Donatello, and Fra Angelico are considered within the context of Florentine social traditions and political events.


      • ARTH 355 - The High Renaissance in Italy

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter (not offered in 2016-17)

        This seminar addresses issues of patronage, artistic production, criticism and art theory, and the uses and abuses of images during the High Renaissance. Works by Botticelli, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael and Bramante are considered as emblems of larger cultural movements popular in Italian courts between 1470 and 1520.


      • ARTH 384 - Renaissance Art in Venice

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Spring (not offered in 2016-2017)

        This course addresses issues of patronage, artistic production, uses of ancient themes and sources, criticism and art theory, and the uses and abuses of images during the High Renaissance. We focus our attention on the art and architecture of Northern Italy from about 1460 to 1575, with particular emphasis placed on images and structures produced in Venice and its territorial possessions ("The Veneto") and by those who considered la serennissima their home.


      • MUS 201 - Music History I

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter

        A survey of music from the Middle Ages through the Baroque period.


      • And, when appropriate:
        • ARTH 394 - Seminar in Art History

          FDR: HA
          Credits: 3 in fall or winter, 4 in spring
          Planned Offering: Fall, Winter, Spring

          Research in selected topics in art history with written and oral reports. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • ARTH 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          Individual or class study of special topics in art history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • INTR 296 - Spring Studies in Culture and Society

          FDR: FDR designation to be determined each year
          Credits: 4

          A topical seminar that focuses on an interdisciplinary examination of a given society through formal study and direct exposure to its people and culture. The seminar takes place in the target location during the spring term, for which four credits are awarded. May be repeated for credit if the topic and location of the seminar are different.


        • MRST 395 - Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies

          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          A seminar concentrating on topics or concepts relevant to Medieval and Renaissance studies. Topics are offered according to the interests of participating faculty. This course may be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MRST 403 - Directed Individual Study

          Credits: 3

          Individual study of selected topics in Medieval and Renaissance studies. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • MUS 423 - Directed Individual Project

          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Fall, Winter

          May be repeated for degree credit with permission.


        • ROML 295 - Topics in Romance Languages

          Credits: 1-3
          Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

          Nature and content of the course is determined by the interests of the instructor(s) and student(s). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


           


        • THTR 341 - Acting 3: Styles

          Credits: 3
          Planned Offering: Winter 2018 and alternate years

          An advanced acting class focused on performing the work of a particular playwright or playwrights. In this course, students enhance their scene work by examining the theatrical and historical context in which the plays were written, thereby achieving a deeper understanding of a performance style other than contemporary realism. Topics change regularly. May be repeated twice for degree credit if the topics are different. 


    • MRST 473 - Senior Thesis

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall or Winter

      Individual research devoted to an original topic dealing with issues pertinent to Medieval and Renaissance studies. The focus of this thesis should coincide with the area of study in which the student has done the most work and should be grounded in interdisciplinary themes. Projects should be approved no later than September 30 of the senior year.


    • or
    • MRST 493 - Honors Thesis (3-3)

      Credits: 3-3
      Planned Offering: Fall-Winter

      Honors thesis devoted to a specialized topic in Medieval and Renaissance studies. Applications for honors should be submitted to the program head no later than March 1 of the junior year.