Lee Chapel – A Study in Architecture SOLs

Thank you for considering a visit to Lee Chapel and Museum. This document contains SOLs connected to this particular lesson, pre-visit and post-visit activity. You'll notice that together they can cover a variety of SOLs and skill sets for grades 4-7. SOLs are listed under each grade level, organized by subject. Each SOL has been bold-faced, and is followed by a list of skill sets for that SOL. You may see that a SOL is listed as "Introduction to," this means while the entire SOL is important for your class to learn, our institution may not be able to cover all aspects of it. Instead, we can act as an introduction to that subject or we could reiterate points already made in the classroom. Lastly, you'll notice Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents), these are helpful words and phrases our docents will use during your visit to Lee Chapel. Our goal is to use these to reiterate information, actions and behaviors necessary to accomplishing SOLs. Skip ahead to your grade or subject by clicking on the links below.

GRADE 4 GRADE 5 GRADE 6 GRADE 7

GRADE 4

English (4.1, Intro 4.4, Intro 4.5)

  • 4.1 SOL: The student will use effective oral communication skills in a variety of settings.
    • a) Present accurate directions to individuals in small groups.
    • b) Contribute to group discussions across content areas.
    • c) Seek ideas and opinions of others.
    • d) Use evidence to support opinions.
    • e) Use grammatically correct language and specific vocabulary to communicate ideas.
    • f) Communicate new ideas to others.
    • g) Demonstrate the ability to collaborate with diverse teams.
    • h) Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
  • 4.1 Skills:
    • Participate in a range of discussions building on others' ideas and clearly expressing their own. 
    • Participate in a variety of partner and/or group discussions by:
      • Following the rules for discussions and assigned partner or group roles;
      • Offering comments that are relevant to the topic of discussion;
      • Asking appropriate questions to solicit knowledge and opinions of others;
      • Supporting opinions with appropriate examples and details;
      • Identifying reasons and evidence a speakers provides to support particular points;
      • Communicating new ideas to others;
      • Responding to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others;
      • Reviewing key ideas expressed in discussions and explaining their own ideas and understandings;
      • Distinguishing fact from opinion;
      • Avoiding hindering the progress of the discussion;
      • Taking turns speaking during a discussion;
      • Maintaining appropriate eye contact and attentive body language while listening: and
      • Respecting the comments of others, especially if the comments express opinions that are different from one's own.
    • Use grammatically correct language.
    • Use specific vocabulary to enhance oral communication.
    • Work independently and with diverse teams in a variety of settings.
  • 4.1 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • Collaborate with your team.
    • Let's be attentive while listening.
    • Take turns.
    • Contribute.
    • Communicate.
    • Demonstrate your ability to... (Work as a team, raise your hand, etc.)
    • Let's be respectful.
  • Introduction to 4.4 SOL: The student will expand vocabulary when reading.
    • a) Use context to clarify meanings of unfamiliar words.
    • b) Use knowledge of roots, affixes, synonyms, antonyms, and homophones.
    • c) Use word-reference materials, including the glossary, dictionary, and thesaurus.
    • d) Develop vocabulary by listening to and reading a variety of texts.
    • e) Use vocabulary from other content areas.
  • 4.4 Skills:
    • Use context as a clue to clarify the meaning of unfamiliar words or phrases.
    • Use clues in the context of a sentence, paragraph, or reading selection to predict and explain the meanings of words that have more than one definition. 
    • Use their knowledge of affixes to read and understand the meanings of words.
    • Use their knowledge of synonyms and antonyms to understand the meanings of unfamiliar words.
    • Derive word meaning by using their knowledge of homophones.
    • Develop vocabulary by listening to and reading a variety of texts
    • Determine the meaning of general academic and content-specific words or phrases in text.
    • Study word meaning across content areas.
  • 4.4 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • Are you familiar with that word?
    • Did you come across an unfamiliar word?
    • What is that meaning?
    • Clarify.
  • Introduction to 4.5 SOL: The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fictional texts, narrative nonfiction texts, and poetry. 
    • a) explain the author's purpose
    • b) Describe how the choice of language, setting, characters and information contributes to the author's purpose.
    • c) Identify the main idea.
    • d) Summarize supporting details.
    • e) Identify the problem and the solution.
    • f) Describe the relationship between text and previously read materials.
    • g) Identify sensory words.
    • h) Draw conclusions/make inferences about the text.
    • i) Make, confirm, or revise predictions.
    • j) Identify cause and effect relationships.
    • k) Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.
    • i) Read with fluency.
  • 4.5 Skills:
    • Describe in depth a character, setting, or event drawing on specific details from the text.
    • Understand that narrative nonfiction is a story based on facts.
    • Identify the facts contained in a piece of narrative nonfiction.
    • Identify the main idea or theme of a text and summarize using supporting details.
    • Identify the problem and solution.
    • Discuss the similarities and differences between text and previously read materials.
    • Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.
    • Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says, drawing conclusions/making inferences from text.
    • Identify cause and effect relationships.
    • Make, confirm, or revise predictions.
    • Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
    • Become aware of when they do not understand.
  • 4.5 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • Summarize... (Lee Chapel's history, the steps to constructing a building, what you learned, etc.)
    • Who are the main characters of our story? (Who played a part in building Lee Chapel?)
    • Where is the setting?
    • Connect.
    • Let's predict. (Why do you think it's important to have a level foundation? What happens when you don't care for a building? Etc.)
    • Before, During, After
    • Does everyone understand?

Math (Intro 4.4, Intro 4.7)

  • Introduction to 4.4 SOL: The student will:
    • a) estimate sums, differences, products, and quotients of whole numbers;
    • b) add, subtract, and multiple whole numbers;
    • c) divide whole numbers, finding quotients with and without remainders; and
    • d) solve single-step and multiple step and multistep addition, subtraction, and multiplication problems with whole numbers.
  • 4.4 Skills:
    • Estimate whole numbers, sums, differences, products, and quotients
    • Solve single-step and multistep problems using whole number operations.
  • 4.5 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • The 4.4 SOLs and skills are primarily covered in the architecture scavenger hunt used by Lee Chapel staff during your school's visit, the full lesson plan and the post-visit activity.
    • What does "sum" mean? How do we find it? (What is the sum of the pews in Lee Chapel?)
    • What does difference mean? (What is the difference in the amount of pews in the balcony versus the main level?)
      Estimate. (How long and wide do you think the statue chamber is? Trying counting off steps to get an estimate.)
  • Introduction to 4.7 SOL: The student will:
    • a) estimate and measure length, and describe the result in both metric and U.S. Customary unites; and
    • b) identify equivalent measurements units within the U.S. Customary system (inches and feet; feet and yards; inches and yards; yards and miles" and between units within the metric system (millimeters and centimeters; centimeters and meters; and millimeters and meters.
  • 4.7 Skills:
    • Determine an appropriate unit of measure (e.g., inch, foot, yard, mile, millimeter, centimeter, and meter) to use when measuring everyday objects in both metric and U.S. Customary units.
    • Estimate the length of everyday objects (e.g., books, windows, tables) in both metric and U.S. Customary units of measure.
    • Measure the length of objects in both metric and U.S. Customary units, measuring to the nearest inch, foot, yard, mile, millimeter, centimeter, or meter, and record the length including the appropriate unit of measure.
  • 4.7 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents)
    • The 4.7 SOLs and skills are primarily covered in the architecture scavenger hunt used by Lee Chapel staff during your school's visit, the full lesson plan and the post-visit activity.
    • Measure/Measurement (What do we use to measure items? How can we get accurate measurements?)
    • Inches, feet, yards, etc. (How long do you think the chapel is? Estimate in yards. How wide do you think the windows are? Estimate in inches.)

Science (Intro 4.7)

*While Astronomy is not the focus of this tour, talking about the orrery in our museum can be done, if time is available. Our orrery connects with the 4.7 science SOL and is an important piece of scientific equipment. The orrery also represents the use of small scale models. The orrery makes it possible to measure the planets movements around the sun.

  • 4.7 SOL: The student will investigate and understand the organization of the solar system. Key concepts include:
    • a) the planets in our solar system;
    • b) the order of the planets in the solar system; and
    • c) the relative sizes of the planets.
  • 4.7 Skills:
    • Names the eight planets and describe whether they are a terrestrial planet or gas giant.
    • Sequence the eight planets in the solar system based on their position from the sun. 
    • Sequence the eight plants in the solar system based on size.
  • 4.7 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • What planets do we see on our orrery?
    • How do they compare to each other? (Planet size, distance from each other, etc.)
    • Can the orrery relate to math? (An orrery represents the distances between planets in our solar system and it measures the movements of planets.)
    • The orrery is a scale model of our solar system. Many design firms use scale models to show what a building or home may look like.

History and Social Science: Virginia Studies (Intro VS.8a)

  • Introduction to VS.8a SOL: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the reconstruction of Virginia following the Civil War by:
    • a) Identifying the effects of Reconstruction on life in Virginia.
  • VS.8a Skills:
    • Determine cause-and-effect relationships. (VS.1b)
    • Draw conclusions and make generalizations (VS.1d)
    • Make connections between past and present. (VS.1e)
    • Sequence events in Virginia history. (VS.1f)
  • VS.8a Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • How did the war affect Lee and the town of Lexington?
    • How could the reconstruction period affect the construction of new buildings?
    • What does using local Lexington labor and materials do for the town's economy?


GRADE 5

English (5.1, Intro 5.5, Intro 5.6)

  • 5.1 SOL: The student will listen, draw conclusions, and share responses in subject related group learning activities.
    • a) Participate in and contribute to discussions across content areas.
    • b) Organize information gathering in group activities.
    • c) Summarize information gathered in group activities.
    • d) Communicate new ideas to others.
    • e) Demonstrate the ability to collaborate with diverse teams.
    • f) Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
  • 5.1 Skills:
    • Participate in a range of discussions building on others' ideas and clearly expressing their own.
    • Follow rules for discussions and assigned group roles.
    • Participate as active listeners in group learning activities by:
      • Listening to the main ideas; and
      • Listening for sequence of idea
    • Participate as informed contributors in subject-related group learning activities by:
      • Asking and answering questions at appropriate times;
      • Responding to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborating on the remarks of others;
      • Communicating new ideas to others;
      • Clarifying confusing points; and
      • Summarizing main ideas
  • 5.1 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • Discussion
    • Participate
    • Elaborating on...
    • Demonstrate the ability to...
  • Introduction to 5.4 SOL: The student will expand vocabulary when reading.
    • a) Use context to clarify meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases.
    • b) Use context and sentence structure to determine meanings and differentiate among multiple meanings of words.
    • c) Use knowledge of roots, affixes, synonyms, antonyms, and homophones.
    • d) Identify an author's use of figurative language.
    • e) Use dictionary, glossary, thesaurus, and other word-reference materials.
    • f) Develop vocabulary by listening to and reading a variety of texts.
    • g) Study word meanings across content areas.
  • 5.4 Skills:
    • Use context as a clue to infer the correct meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases.
    • Use context and sentence structure to determine meanings and differentiate among the multiple meanings of words.
    • Use word references and context clues to determine which meaning is appropriate in a given situation.
    • Develop vocabulary by listening to and reading a variety of texts.
  • 5.4 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • What is the meaning of...? (What in your surroundings can you pull context from to define this?) 
    • Have you heard that/this word elsewhere? Do you think it has a similar meaning?
    • Clarify.
  • Introduction to 5.5 SOL: The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fictional texts, narrative nonfiction, and poetry.
    • a) Describe the relationship between text and previously read materials.
    • b) Describe character development.
    • c) Describe the development of a plot and explain the resolution of conflict(s).
    • d) Describe the characteristics of free verse, rhymed, and patterned poetry.
    • e) Describe an author's choice of vocabulary contributes to the author's style.
    • f) Identify and ask questions that clarify various points of view.
    • g) Identify main idea.
    • h) Summarize supporting details from text.
    • i) Draw conclusions and make inferences from text.
    • j) Identify cause and effect relationships.
    • k) Make, confirm, or revise predications.
    • l) Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.
    • m) Read with fluency and accuracy.
  • 5.5 Skills:
    • Understand that characters are developed by:
      • What is directly stated in the text;
      • Their speech and actions; and
      • What other characters in the story say or think about them.
    • Understand that some characters change during the story or poem and some characters stay the same.
    • Identify the conflict or problem of the plot.
    • Understand that plot is developed through a series of events.
    • Identify the sequence that lead to resolution of the conflict.
    • Identify main idea or theme.
    • Summarize supporting details from text.
    • Identify cause and effect relationships.
    • Make, confirm, or revise predictions.
    • Become aware of when they do not understand.
    • Read familiar text with fluency, accuracy, and expressions to support comprehension.
  • 5.5 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • Identify and resolve. 
    • Summarize... (How do you construct a building, what you learned from our museum, etc)
    • Who are the main characters of our story? (Who called for the chapel? Who designed it? What type of people construct buildings?)
    • Where is the setting? (Where is Lee Chapel? Why was there a need for the chapel? In what period was the chapel built?)
    • Connect.
    • Let's predict. (How easy is it to construct a building during reconstruction, what are some the challenges in constructing a building, etc.)

Math (Intro 5.8)

  • Introduction to 5.8 SOL: The student will:
    • a) find perimeter, area, and volume in standard units of measure;
    • b) differentiate among perimeter, area, and volume and identify whether the application of the concept of perimeter, area, or volume is appropriate for a given situation;
    • c) identify equivalent measurements within the metric system;
    • d) estimate and then measure to solve problems, using the U.S. Customary and metric units; and
    • e) choose an appropriate unit of measure for a given situation involving measurement using U.S. Customary and metric units.
  • 5.8 Skills: The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representation to:
    • Describe practical situations where area, perimeter, and volume are appropriate measures to use, and justify their choices orally or in writing.
    • Identify whether the application of the concept of perimeter, area, or volume is appropriate for a given situation.
  • 5.8 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • How can we measure area, perimeter, and volume using Lee Chapel? (Students can find the perimeter of a piece by adding the lengths of all of its sides. For example, a door at Lee Chapel Students can find the area of a space by measuring and multiplying its length x width. For example, the statue chamber. Students can find the volume of an object by measuring and multiplying its length, width and height. For example, the greeter desk.)
    • What are ways students can use their school's architecture to calculate area, perimeter, and volume? 
    • Why do architects need accurate measurements for a building?

History and Social Science: United States History to 1865 (Intro USI.9d)

  • Introduction to USI.9d SOL: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the causes, major events, and effects of the Civil War by:
    • d) Describing the roles of Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, and Frederick Douglass in events leading to and during the war.
  • USI.9d Skills:
    • Identify and interpret primary and secondary source documents to increase understanding of events and life in United States history. (USI.1a)
    • Sequence events in United States history. (USI.1c)
  • USI.9d Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • What role did Robert E. Lee play in the Civil War? 
    • What was the effect of the war on Lee and the city of Lexington? 
    • How could problems in the reconstruction period make it difficult to construct Lee Chapel?

Art (Intro 5.12, Intro 5.14)

  • Introduction to 5.12 SOL: The student will examine the influence of historic events on works of art.
  • 5.12 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • How could the effects of the Civil War influence labor and resources needed to construct a building?
    • What influence did the Civil War have on the career of Edward Valentine?
  • Introduction to 5.14 SOL: The student will compare and contrast contemporary and historical works of art, including architecture.
  • 5.14 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • How does the look of Lee Chapel compare to other buildings on campus? Are they similar in style or are they different? Why might they be that way?
    • How does their school compare to Lee Chapel? Is it more modern? Newer?


GRADE 6

English (6.1, Intro 6.5)

  • 6.1 SOL: The student will participate in and contribute to small-group activities.
    • a) Communicate as leader and contributor.
    • b) Evaluate own contributions to discussions.
    • c) Summarize and evaluate group activities.
    • d) Analyze the effectiveness of participant interactions.
  • 6.1 Skills:
    • Ensure that all group members participate in the exchange of information.
    • Use strategies that contribute to the discussion.
    • Receive and understand feedback from the others.
    • Pose and respond to questions.
    • Relate and retell information.
    • Restate briefly and critically the main idea(s) or theme(s) discussed within a group.
    • Use active listening to focus on what is said and what is implied.
    • Summarize what is heard.
    • Retain and rethink ideas based on what is heard.
  • 6.1 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • Actively listening.
    • Actively responding.
    • Summarize. (What did we learn about upstairs? How do you construct a building, etc.)
    • Contribute as a team.
    • Relay information back to us. 
  • Introduction to 6.5 SOL: The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of fictional texts, narrative nonfiction, and poetry.
    • a) Identify the elements of narrative structure, including setting, character, plot, conflict, and theme.
    • b) Mark, confirm and revise predictions.
    • c) Describe how word choice and imagery contribute to the meaning of a text.
    • d) Describe cause and effect relationships and their impact on plot.
    • e) Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning. 
    • f) Use information in the text to draw conclusions and make inferences.
    • g) Explain how character and plot development are used in a selection to support a central conflict or story line.
    • h) Identify the main idea.
    • i) Identify and summarize supporting details.
    • j) Identify and analyze the author's use of figurative language.
    • k) Identify transitional words and phrases that signal an author's organizational pattern.
    • l) Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.
  • 6.5 Skills:
    • Understand setting as time and place.
    • Understand plat as:
      • The development of the central conflict and resolution;
      • The sequence of events in a story; and 
      • The writer's map for what happens, how it happens, to whom it happens, and when it happens.
    • Understand that character traits are revealed by:
      • What a character says;
      • What a character thinks;
      • What a character does; and
      • How other characters respond the character.
  • 6.5 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • Conflict.
    • Identify and resolve. 
    • Summarize... (How do you construct a building? what you learned, etc.)
    • Who are the main characters of our story? (Who called for the chapel? Who designed it? What type of people construct buildings?)
    • Where is the setting? (Where is Lee Chapel? Why was there a need for the chapel? In what period was the chapel built?)
    • Connect. (How easy is it to construct a building during reconstruction, what are some the challenges in constructing a building, etc.)
    • Let's predict. (What would happen if the building's foundation walls are not straight?)

Math (Intro 6.9)

  • Introduction to 6.9 SOL: The student will make ballpark comparisons between measurements in the U.S. Customary System of measurement and measurements in the metric system.
  • 6.9 Skills:
    • Estimate measurements by comparing the object to be measured against a benchmark.
  • 6.9 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • What are the different types of measurements? (What do you think the mass of the Recumbent Lee is? What do you think Lee Chapel's area is? Why do you think the Chapel length is so long? Etc.)
    • How do architects know which measurement is appropriate to use when designing and building a space?

Science (Intro 6.8)

*While Astronomy is not the focus of this tour, talking about the orrery in our museum can be done, if time is available. Our orrery connects with the 6.8 science SOL and is an important piece of scientific equipment. The orrery also represents the use of small scale models. The orrery makes it possible to measure the planets movements around the sun.

  • Introduction to 6.8 SOL: The student will investigate and understand the organization of the solar system and the interaction among the various bodies that comprise it. Key concepts include:
    • a) the sun, moon, Earth, other planets and their moons, dwarf planets, meteors, asteroids, and comets;
    • b) relative size of and distance between planets;
    • c) the role of gravity;
    • d) revolution and rotation;
    • e) the mechanics of day and night and the phases of the moon;
    • f) the unique properties of Earth as a planet;
    • g) the relationship of Earth's tilt and the seasons;
    • h) the cause of tides; and
    • i) the history and technology of space exploration.
  • 6.8 Skills
    • Describe the planets and their relative position from the sun.
    • Design and interpret a scale model of the solar system.
    • Explain the role of gravity in the solar system.
    • Compare and contrast revolution and rotation and apply these terms to the relative movements of planets and their moons.
    • Describe the unique characteristics of Earth.
  • 6.8 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • My Very Excellent Mother Just Served Us Nachos! (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune...no Pluto.)
    • Distance. (Why doesn't our orrery show all the planets?)
    • What causes the planets to revolve? (Our orrery versus the actual solar system.)

History and Social Science: United States History 1865 to Present (Intro USII.3c)

  • Introduction to USII.3c SOL: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the effects on Reconstruction on American life by:
    • c) Describing the legacies of Abraham Lincoln, Robert E. Lee, and Frederick Douglas.
  • USII.3c Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • What sides were Abraham Lincoln and Robert E. Lee on?
    • Legacy. (Can buildings be part of a legacy? What educational concepts are emphasized in the design of Lee Chapel?)
    • What was Lee concerned with after the war? (How was Lee going to secure funding and resources to build Lee Chapel?)

*Lee as president of Washington College, is listed as essential knowledge for this SOL.

Art (Intro 6.9, Intro 6.11)

  • Introduction to 6.9 SOL: The student will identify the components of an artist's style, including materials, design, technique, subject matter and purpose.
  • 6.9 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • Architects goes through a similar artistic process when creating a building. What might influence an architects design? What are some common building materials? Why does an architect select certain materials? What is the technique behind putting a building together? Did the architect's design meet the purpose behind the building?
    • How can this process be applied to Lee Chapel?
  • Introduction to 6.11 SOL: The student will describe ways artists contribute to society through their work.
  • 6.11 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • How does an architect's art impact the economy or people?
    • How did Lee Chapel affect the school's students? What role did it play within the university? 


GRADE 7

English (Intro 7.1, 7.2, Intro 7.5)

  • Introduction to 7.1 SOL: The student will participate in and contribute to conversations, group discussions, and oral presentations.
    • a) Communicate ideas and information orally in an organized and succinct manner.
    • b) Ask probing questions to seek elaboration and clarification of ideas.
    • c) Make statements to communicate agreement or tactful disagreement with others' ideas.
    • d) Use language and style appropriate to audience, topic, and purpose.
    • e) Use a variety of strategies to listen actively.
  • 7.1 Skills:
    • Contribute relevant ideas, and opinions, and feelings in large and small diverse groups.
    • Select vocabulary, tone, and style with audience and purpose in mind.
    • State points clearly and directly.
    • Ask clarifying questions and respond appropriately to others' questions in order to encourage discussion, foster understanding, and bring the discussion back to the topic when needed.
    • Provide feedback to other group members, acknowledge new insights expressed by others, and when justified, modify their own views.
    • Use a variety of strategies to actively listen, including:
      • give speaker undivided attention;
      • use body language and gestures to show they are listening;
      • provide feedback or paraphrase;
      • allow the speaker to finish without interruptions; and
      • respond appropriately. 
  • 7.1 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • Actively listen.
    • Undivided attention.
    • Take turns sharing.
    • Encourage.
  • 7.2 SOL: The student will identify and demonstrate the relationship between a speaker's verbal and nonverbal messages.
    • a) Use verbal communication skills, such as word choice, pitch, feeling, tone, and voice appropriate for the intended audience.
    • b) Use nonverbal communication skills, such as eye contact, posture, and gestures to enhance verbal communication skills.
    • c) Compare/contrast a speaker's verbal and nonverbal messages.
  • 7.2 Skills:
    • Match vocabulary, tone, and volume to the audience, purpose, and topic of the message.
    • Use proper posture and stance when speaking.
    • Identify whether or not a nonverbal message complements the spoken message.
    • Use appropriate facial expressions and gestures or motions to add to what is being said.
  • 7.2 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • Respect other visitors (using proper behavior around others).
    • Communication.
  • Introduction to 7.5 SOL: The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of fictional texts, narrative nonfiction, and poetry.
    • a) Describe the elements of narrative structure including setting, character development, plot structure, theme, and conflict.
    • b) Compare and contrast various forms and genres of fictional text.
    • c) Identify conventional elements and characteristics of a variety of genres.
    • d) Describe the impact of word choice, imagery, and literary devices including figurative language.
    • e) Make, confirm, and revise predictions.
    • f) Use prior and background knowledge as a context for new learning.
    • g) Make inferences and draw conclusions based on text.
    • h) Identify the main idea.
    • i) Summarize text relating supporting details.
    • j) Identify the author's organizational pattern.
    • k) Identify cause and effect relationships.
    • l) Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.
  • 7.5 Skills:
    • Recognize the elements of narrative structure including:
      • Setting-time, place, and duration;
      • Character(s);
      • External conflicts, such as
        • Individual vs. individual
        • Individual vs. nature
        • Individual vs. society
        • Individual vs. supernatural
        • Individual vs. technology
      • Internal Conflict-individual vs. self
  • 7.5 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • What is Lee Chapel's setting?
    • Who are the characters in our story? (Who puts together a building?)
    • What external conflicts might Lee facing by becoming president? (What could prevent Lee from bettering the college and building Lee Chapel?)

History and Social Science: Civics & Economics (Intro CE.3e)

  • Introduction to CE.3e SOL: The student will demonstrate knowledge of citizen and the rights, duties, and responsibilities of citizens by 
    • e) evaluating how civic and social duties address community needs and serve the public good.
  • CE.3e Skills:
    • Skills not applicable.
  • CE.3e Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • What does it mean to be a good citizen?
    • How can buildings help address community needs?
    • What are some examples of buildings that serve the public good?

Art (Intro 7.13, Intro 7.16)

  • Introduction to 7.13 SOL: The student will compare and contrast various visual arts careers in relation to career preparation.
  • 7.13 Buzz Words, Phrases and Thoughts (for docents):
    • What kind of training and education to architects needs to be successful?
    • What kind of training and education do artists receive?
    • How can artists and architects work together?
  • Introduction to 7.16 SOL: The student will compare and contrast the processes artists use to create works of art.
    • How does the artist's process relate and differ from that of an architects?