Course Offerings

Fall 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Border Art: Contemporary Chicanx and U.S. Latinx Art

ARTH 378 - Lepage, Andrea C.

This course fulfills the Arts and Humanities requirement for the LACS minor. This seminar engages broad-ranging debates that have looked at the Mexico-US border as a fruitful site of identity formation. In this seminar, we examine artworks with an emphasis on location, critical standpoint, interrelatedness, and the geopolitics of identity. Through readings and class discussions, students investigate protest art and arts activism. Students develop methods of "critical seeing" through image analysis, art historical analysis, and cultural critique. We consider artworks produced by Chicanx, U.S. Latinx, and other transnational artists in a wide range of formats including printmaking, performance art, mural painting, photography, film and video, books, comics, public art projects, and an array of post-conceptual practices..

Latin America: Mayas to Independence

HIST 130 - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

An introduction to the "Indian" and Iberian people active from Florida to California through Central and South America between 1450 and 1750.

Advanced Seminar

HIST 395A - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2019, HIST 395A-01: Advanced Seminar: United States and Latin American History (3). Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, or 15 credits in history, or consent of the instructor. Senior seminar focused on the historical interaction between Latin America and the United States from Spanish-American Independence to the present. Explores the political, social, cultural, economic, and ecological dimensions of this relationship, focusing on such key themes as imperialism, development, military-state relations, the environment, the war on drugs, science and technology, and human rights. (HU) Gildner.

 

Introduction to Latin American and Caribbean Studies

LACS 101 - Mayock, Ellen C.

A multidisciplinary, introductory course designed to familiarize students with the pertinent issues that determine or affect the concept of identity in Latin American and Caribbean societies through a study of their geography, history, politics, economics, literature, and culture. The purpose of the course is to provide a framework or overview to enhance understanding in the students' future courses in particular disciplines and specific areas of Latin American and Caribbean study.

Latin American Politics

POL 247 - Ponce de Leon Seijas, Zoila

This course focuses on Latin American politics during the 20th and 21st centuries. Major topics include: democracy and authoritarianism; representation and power; populism, socialism, and neoliberalism; and economic development and inequality. The course places particular emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Venezuela, Peru, and Cuba. In addition, the course examines political relations between the United States and Latin America.

Revolutions and Revolutionaries

SOAN 250 - Perez, Marcos E.

An exploration of the experiences of activists, radicals, and revolutionaries in a wide variety of settings. Throughout history, individuals have organized with others to bring about different forms of social change. What is it like to be on the front lines fighting for social transformation? Why do people risk life and limb to do so? How do activists advance their goals? We examine sociological research, biographical studies, political theory, and historical sources for insights into the lives of those who make social and revolutionary movements possible.

Poverty and Marginality in the Americas

SOAN 263 - Perez, Marcos E.

In recent decades, some global transformations have increased inequality and marginality in various regions of the world. Neoliberalism has generated both opportunities and challenges to human development In different countries. This course focuses on how the undermining of safety nets, the decline of models of economic growth centered on state intervention, and the internationalization of labor markets have affected societies in Latin America and the United States. Students analyze the structural causes of marginality and how the experience of poverty varies for people in both regions. We rely on anthropological and sociological studies to address key questions. How do disadvantaged individuals and families in the Americas deal with the challenges brought about by deindustrialization, violence, and environmental degradation? How do their communities struggle to sustain public life? What are the processes causing many people to migrate from one region to the other?

Introducción a la literatura hispanoamericana

SPAN 240 - Michelson, Seth R.

Spanish-American literary masterpieces from colonial times through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.

Spanish Language Theory and Practice

SPAN 392A - Barnett, Jeffrey C. (Jeff)

A topics course that approaches language study through theories of language use and meaning, as well as their practical application through extensive writing exercises. Topics may include translation theory, analysis of theoretical approaches to language study, and advanced grammar. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2019, SPAN 392A-01: Spanish Language Theory and Practice in Literary Translation (3). Prerequisite: SPAN 275 . An advanced seminar devoted to the application, methods, and theories of literary translation. Initial attention is given to the translation of English narrative into Spanish. For this portion, we compare our own translations of oft-translated authors—such as those of Hemingway or Poe—to existing and divergent versions. The majority of the course however is devoted to producing artistic renderings of Spanish and Spanish-American literary texts into English. Students produce individual and collaborative translations of poetry by Pablo Neruda, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, and García Lorca, among others, as well as narrative passages from Ana María Matute, Julio Cortázar, Gabriel García Márquez, and Jorge Luis Borges. As an example of cross-genre production, we also render 17th-century epic poetry into English prose. The central activity of the course involves the collaborative production of an original translation of a previously non-translated Spanish text into English. Barnett.

Spanish-American Seminar

SPAN 398A - Botta, Monica B.

A seminar focusing on a single period, genre, motif, or writer. Recent topics have included "Spanish American Women Writers: From America into the 21st Century," "20th Century Latin America Theater," and "Past, Memory, and Identity in Contemporary Argentina's Cultural Products." May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2019, SPAN 398A-01 (3): Spanish-American Seminar: La representación del yo en escritos y documentales latinoamericanos. (3). Prerequisites: SPAN 240 and SPAN 275. The course examines the practices of self-representation through the study of literary and non-literary works, oral narratives, and documentaries. In addition to conceptual discussions of how individuals use fictionalized forms of self-portraiture in diverse Latin-American contexts, special attention is paid to issues of memory, subjectivity, self-empowerment, authority, and audience and addressee, among others. Primary texts focus mainly on the 20th and 21th centuries. (HL) Botta.

Spring 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Chicana/o Art and Muralism: From the Street to the (Staniar) Gallery

ARTH 276 - Lepage, Andrea C.

This class examines the process by which Chicana/o artists have garnered public attention and respect, and have taken their artworks from the peripheries of the art world to more traditional museum and gallery spaces. Using the Great Wall of Los Angeles as a connecting thread, this class considers the broad theme of identity creation and transformation as expressed by Chicana/o artists from the 1970s to the present.

Winter 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Economic Globalization and Multinational Corporations

BUS 337 - Reiter, Sandra L. (Sandy)

This course focuses on the historical and present effects and issues of economic globalization, and the role of multinational corporations in a global economy. Topics covered may include: production, supply chain, technology, trade, finance, natural environment, labor, development, poverty and inequality, privatization of utilities, immigration, and state sovereignty. Emphasis is on understanding the costs and benefits of economic globalization and the role business plays in contributing to these outcomes.

World Dance Technique

DANC 215 - Meythaler, Sandra P. / Davies, Jenefer M.

This dance class reflects the world dance form that is the specialty of the dance artist-in-residence. The basic dance techniques of that specific form are taught and movement is tied to the historical narrative of the country.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 295A - Kahn, James R. (Jim)

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Winter 2019, ECON 295A-01: The Economy of Brazil (3). Prerequisite: ECON 100 or 101. This course examines economic development in Brazil, with the purpose of identifying the factors that have prevented Brazil from developing the type of economy and standard of living level associated with a North American or European country. Recommendations are made for future policy directions, and implications for other emerging economy countries are examined. The class has three distinct phases. In the first phase, we have four hours of lectures per week. Following this, there is a weekend workshop with distinguished speakers. After the workshop, the research phase of the class begins, with students responsible for contributing to a white paper on the topic of the course. During the research phase, there will be weekly class meeting to discuss progress. Kahn.

Modern Latin America: Túpak Katari to Tupac Shakur

HIST 131 - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A survey of Latin America from the 1781 anticolonial rebellion led by indigenous insurgent Túpak Katari to a globalized present in which Latin American youth listen to Tupac Shakur yet know little of his namesake. Lectures are organized thematically (culture, society, economics, and politics) and chronologically, surveying the historical formation of people and nations in Latin America. Individual countries (especially Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, and Peru) provide examples of how local and transnational forces have shaped the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries of North and South America and the Caribbean, and the cultural distinctions and ethnic diversity that characterize a region too often misperceived as homogeneous.

Seminar: Slavery in the Americas

HIST 366 - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

An intensive examination of slavery, abolition movements and emancipation in North America, the Caribbean and Latin America. Emphasis is on the use of primary sources and class discussion of assigned readings.

Advanced Seminar

HIST 395B - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2019, HIST 395B-01: Advanced Seminar: Race and Racism in Latin America (3). Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, or 15 credits in history, or consent of the instructor. This seminar examines the history of race and racism in the Americas from 1492 to the present. During the first half, we situate race within the history of ideas and trace its development across the Americas during the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment, analyzing how religion, science, colonialism and capitalism influenced European conceptions of "the Other." In the second half, we examine specific national case studies from the 19th and 20th centuries to explore "the work that race does"—that is, how race has operated in distinct local-historical contexts to generate social exclusion. (HU). Gildner.

Capstone Seminar in Latin American and Caribbean Studies

LACS 396 - Mayock, Ellen C.

This capstone course builds upon the foundations developed in LACS 101 and related coursework in the distribution areas. Students discuss assigned readings centered around a key theme or themes of Latin American Studies in connection with an individualized research project. This project is carried out with continual mentoring by a faculty member and in collaboration with peer feedback. Each student presents his/her findings in a formal paper, or other approved end-product, and summarizes the results in an oral presentation.

Accelerated Intermediate Portuguese

PORT 163 - Pinto-Bailey, Ana C. (Cristina)

This course develops intermediate communicative Portuguese vocabulary and active intermediate competence in the language. The traditional skills of foreign language instruction (structure, listening comprehension, reading, writing, and speaking) are stressed. This course meets five days per week.

Migration, Identity, and Conflict

SOAN 268 - Eastwood, Jonathan R. (Jon)

This course focuses on the complex relationship between migration, political institutions, group identities, and inter-group conflict. The course is a hybrid of a seminar and research lab in which students (a) read some of the key social-scientific literature on these subjects, and (b) conduct team-based research making use of existing survey data about the integration of migrant populations into various polities.

Introducción a la literatura hispanoamericana

SPAN 240 - Mayock, Ellen C.

Spanish-American literary masterpieces from colonial times through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.

20th-Century Mexican Literature: Beyond Revolution

SPAN 341 - Barnett, Jeffrey C. (Jeff)

This course examines the artistic reaction to the 1910 Mexican Revolution and seeks to understand its aesthetic impact on 20th-century Mexican artists from a variety of genres. Seminal works from narrative, poetry, and essay as well as the visual arts reveal how some artists promoted the ideals of the Revolution, others became disenchanted, and still others invented revolutionary styles of expression in order to convey a new cultural self-perception and worldview.

Spanish-American Poetry

SPAN 344 - Michelson, Seth R.

Analysis of the most relevant poetic texts of Spanish-America, including U.S. Hispanic poetry, beginning with precursors of 20th-century poetry and spanning to contemporary works. Representative works include those by Octavio Paz, Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, Nicanor Parra, Ernesto Cardenal, Raúl Zurita, among others.