Degree Requirements

2017 - 2018 Catalog

The Journalism department has the following degrees:

Journalism major leading to BA degree

A major in journalism leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 46 credits, including at least 31 credits in journalism and mass communications and at least 72 credits outside the department.

Courses required for the major: JOUR 101, 190, 201, 202, 258, 301, 344, 356, POL 203,and at least two credits of internship (JOUR 451-452), and completion of one of the following sequences:

  1. Journalism
    1. One course chosen from JOUR 280, 371, 372, 395
    2. Either JOUR 351 or 362
    3. Completion of a minor other than mass communications or of four courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in another discipline.
  2. Business Journalism
    1. Additional required courses: ECON 101 and 102 (by the end of the sophomore year), ACCT 201, JOUR 371, 372
    2. Either JOUR 351 or 362
    3. One economics course at the 200 level or above
    4. Three courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in accounting, business administration, or economics, including one course with an international focus selected from among the following: ACCT 371, 372; BUS 305, 330, 333, 335, 337, 357, 372, 390; ECON 233, 259, 270, 271, 280, 282, 288, 319, 356, and, when appropriate, ECON 295, ECON 395, and other courses with approval of the department head
  1. Courses required for the major:
    • JOUR 101 - Introduction to Mass Communications

      Credits: 3

      This course serves as a gateway for both majors and non-majors to examine the role that the mass media play in society. The course examines the pervasiveness of mass media in our lives, and the history and roles of different media and their societal functions, processes, and effects. Students learn to tell the difference between fact and opinion and examine the links among theory, research and professional experience, while analyzing the ethics, methods, and motivations of the media and the expectations of their audiences. We discuss how media cover diversity issues and evaluate the policies and freedoms that guide and shape the mass media and the news media in the United States. Students complete the course as better informed consumers and interpreters of mass media and their messages.


    • JOUR 190 - Beyond Google and Wikipedia: Finding and Evaluating Information Sources in the Digital Age

      Credits: 1

      An introduction to information sources that academic researchers, journalists, public relations and advertising professionals rely on increasingly in the digital age to conduct scholarly research, report and write news stories, and to find, analyze and present research on trends in mass communications. Students learn how to evaluate sources of information for credibility and quality, while they strengthen their basic research skills to go beyond Google and dig below the surface of today's high-tech world.


    • JOUR 201 - Introduction to Reporting

      Credits: 3

      The principles and techniques of information gathering and news writing, with emphasis on fulfilling the role of the news media in a democratic society. Extensive laboratory work preparing assignments for print, electronic and online media, stressing accuracy, clarity and the appropriate use of the different media.


    • JOUR 202 - Introduction to Digital Journalism

      Credits: 3

      Concepts and practices of news gathering and presentation in a multimedia, interactive environment. Combines classroom instruction with a converged news media lab in which students contribute to a website, television newscast, and newspaper. Note: The laboratory requirement is limited to three sessions during the term, as arranged with the instructor.


    • JOUR 258 - Beat Reporting

      Credits: 4

      Using the community as the laboratory, students develop competence in the principles and techniques of reporting and writing news for print, broadcast, online and social media in a democratic society. Working on assigned beats, students learn source development, news judgment, information gathering, news presentation and time management. Work is published and aired on the Rockbridge Report website and broadcast.


    • JOUR 301 - Law and Communications

      Credits: 3

      An examination of the development of First Amendment jurisprudence, the law of defamation, privacy, access, free press-fair trial, journalists' privilege, obscenity and pornography. The case study approach is used, but the emphasis is on the principles that underlie the landmark cases. This course can serve as an introduction to and preparation for further studies in communications law and/or the legal system in general.


    • JOUR 344 - Ethics of Journalism

      Credits: 3

      A study of the moral issues arising from the practice of modern journalism and communications. Includes examination of philosophical and theoretical foundations of ethics, the place and role of journalism in the larger society, and moral choices in the newsroom. Topics include: First Amendment freedoms, privacy, confidentiality of sources, conflicts of interest, cooperation with law enforcement, free press/fair trial, photojournalism, and issues of accountability.


    • JOUR 356 - In-depth Reporting

      Credits: 4

      The principles and techniques of developing and creating enterprising, heavily researched journalistic work for the mass media. Students produce in-depth work for newspapers, magazines, radio, television and the World Wide Web. Extensive group work is required.


    • POL 203 - State and Local Government

      FDR: SS2
      Credits: 3

      An introduction to the structures and functions of United States subnational governments, with particular emphasis on the policy-making process and on the relationships between policy makers and the public. Computer-assisted analysis of survey-research data is included.


    • and at least two credits of internship from
    • JOUR 451 - News Internship

      Credits: 1

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, with newspapers, radio and television stations, online news sites, or other news media or business institutions, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by November 15 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship. Students undertaking an internship in the summer may receive credit in the following fall term only as an overload.


    • JOUR 452 - News Internship

      Credits: 2

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, with newspapers, radio and television stations, online news sites, or other news media or business institutions, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by November 15 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship. Students undertaking an internship in the summer may receive credit in the following fall term only as an overload.


  2. Completion of one of the following sequences:
    • Journalism
      • Take one course chosen from:
        • JOUR 280 - Covering Courts and the Law

          Credits: 3

          Courthouses make the best beats by providing a window on what is important to the American people. This course introduces students to the U.S. court system, its players, language and impact on the public at large. Students learn how to identify newsworthy legal stories, read court documents, and make sense of them in order to write clear, compelling, fair and accurate news stories for mass audiences.


        • JOUR 371 - Reporting on Business

          Credits: 3

          Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of business, focusing especially on companies and their employees and customers. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business majors.


        • JOUR 372 - Reporting on the Economy

          Credits: 3

          Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of economics and business, focusing especially on the economy and financial markets. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business and economics majors.


        • JOUR 395 - Specialty Reporting

          Credits: 3

          An advanced reporting course in which students develop expertise in a particular area of public significance. Topics rotate as faculty resources allow, and are likely to include education, politics, environment, religion, or education. Through reporting and writing, students learn about key institutions, terms, and sources related to the particular field. They learn how to identify newsworthy stories and write clear, compelling, fair, and accurate news stories for mass audiences. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Appropriate for non-majors.


      • Take either
        • JOUR 351 - Editing for Print and Online Media

          Credits: 3

          The principles and techniques of editing copy and producing publications for the print media and the World Wide Web, with emphasis on clarity of thought, legal and moral responsibilities, and effective communication. Extensive laboratory work. Attention is given to the latest computer-based production and editing applications, as students participate in producing prototype newspaper pages, the Rockbridge Report cablecast and website.


        • or
        • JOUR 362 - Producing for Broadcast and Online Media

          Credits: 3

          Preparation for leadership roles in electronic media. Extensive work in decision making and management in the newsroom through television news producing and Internet content construction.


      • Completion of a minor other than mass communications or of four courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in another discipline.

         
         
         

    • Business Journalism
      • Additional required courses:
        • ACCT 201 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

          Credits: 3

          This course covers the fundamental principles of financial accounting and provides an introduction to the process of accumulating, classifying, and presenting financial information. Primary emphasis is given to understanding the financial statements of a business enterprise.


        • ECON 101 - Principles of Microeconomics

          FDR: SS1
          Credits: 3

          Survey of economic principles and problems with emphasis on analysis of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy. The first half of a two-term survey of economics. Should be followed by ECON 102.


        • ECON 102 - Principles of Macroeconomics (by the end of the sophomore year)

          FDR: SS1
          Credits: 3

          Emphasis on performance of the aggregate economy. Analysis of unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.


        • JOUR 371 - Reporting on Business

          Credits: 3

          Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of business, focusing especially on companies and their employees and customers. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business majors.


        • JOUR 372 - Reporting on the Economy

          Credits: 3

          Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of economics and business, focusing especially on the economy and financial markets. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business and economics majors.


      • Take either
        • JOUR 351 - Editing for Print and Online Media

          Credits: 3

          The principles and techniques of editing copy and producing publications for the print media and the World Wide Web, with emphasis on clarity of thought, legal and moral responsibilities, and effective communication. Extensive laboratory work. Attention is given to the latest computer-based production and editing applications, as students participate in producing prototype newspaper pages, the Rockbridge Report cablecast and website.


        • or
        • JOUR 362 - Producing for Broadcast and Online Media

          Credits: 3

          Preparation for leadership roles in electronic media. Extensive work in decision making and management in the newsroom through television news producing and Internet content construction.


      • One economics course at the 200 level or above
      • Three courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in:

        accounting, business administration, or economics, including at least one course with an international focus selected from among the following:

        • ACCT 371 - Tax Service Learning in South Africa

          Credits: 4

          This service-learning course culminates in a 10-day trip to South Africa to conduct training workshops on SEC reporting requirements for financial statements related to the income taxes of U.S. multinational corporations. The specific class topics include: international tax planning strategies; SEC reporting requirements; attorney-client privilege; ASC 740; and tax social justice. While on campus, students develop workshop training materials through a series of research projects and homework assignments. While in South Africa, students conduct two workshops and participate in activities designed to foster a deeper understanding of South Africa's culture, history, ecology, and business environment.


        • ACCT 372 - Management Accounting in China

          Credits: 4

          The objective of this course is to expose students to management accounting practices in China. Students (i) visit multinational companies and Chinese enterprises to discuss with business leaders to understand management accounting practices in businesses of different structures in China; (ii) attend lectures and listen to guest speakers to understand historical, cultural, economic, political, labor, resources, and environmental contexts that shape China's business environment and management accounting practices; (iii) conduct field trips to explore China's long history, distinctive culture, and its recent economic development. This unique learning experience prepares students for future accounting and business engagement with China.


        • BUS 305 - Seminar in International Business

          Credits: 3 credits in fall and winter, 4 in spring

          Offered from time to time when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • BUS 330 - Global Human-Resource Management

          Credits: 3

          Human-resource management (HRM) is concerned with how to best attract, select, develop, and retain employees in organizations. This course examines HRM in the global context. Topics include employee selection, training, performance management, compensation, health, safety, and security, and termination. We focus on designing HRM practices in the context of the global social, legal, and technological environments.


        • BUS 333 - International Production and Operations Management

          Credits: 4

          This is a course about "stuff" - how "stuff" is made, shipped, and used. More specifically, this course focuses on how executives, managers, and line workers manage manufacturing and related processes necessary to compete internationally. As such, this is an important course, since few students (or others) actually see or know how "stuff" is made anymore. More formally, this course examines international manufacturing and production operations in organizations. Applying a managerial approach, it is intended to introduce concepts such as project management, supply chain management, total quality management, lean systems, and operations strategy, all of which are necessary for an understanding of the international management of operations. Case analysis and manufacturing plant tours, supplemented by extensive use of classroom discussion and written work, are emphasized as a means of understanding the decisions faced in these operations settings.


        • BUS 335 - Ethics of Globalization

          Credits: 3

          This seminar examines a number of ethical issues raised by the phenomenon of globalization. Though globalization is not new, recent business, technological, and policy developments have made the world more integrated and interdependent than ever before. Increasing economic, cultural, and political interconnections have created a host of new questions about how to conceive of the moral rights and responsibilities of individuals, multi-national corporations, nation-states, and global institutions within this new global framework. This course identifies and clarifies some of these questions, and considers how they have been addressed from a variety of different disciplinary perspectives. Questions concerning the ethics of globalization are approached through an analysis of a few specific topics, such as immigration, humanitarian intervention, and global poverty and inequality. Because the issues raised by the phenomenon of globalization cross disciplinary boundaries, readings are drawn from a wide variety of fields, including philosophy, business, economics, political science, and anthropology.


        • BUS 337 - Economic Globalization and Multinational Corporations

          Credits: 3

          This course focuses on the historical and present effects and issues of economic globalization, and the role of multinational corporations in a global economy. Topics covered may include: production, supply chain, technology, trade, finance, natural environment, labor, development, poverty and inequality, privatization of utilities, immigration, and state sovereignty. Emphasis is on understanding the costs and benefits of economic globalization and the role business plays in contributing to these outcomes.


        • BUS 357 - Multinational Business Finance

          Credits: 3

          A study of the critical aspects of managerial finance in a multinational setting, covering both theoretical and practical issues. Emphasis is placed on identifying the unique risk-return opportunities faced by corporations that maintain business units across national borders. Topics included are foreign exchange and exchange rate determination, international capital markets, the environment of multinational corporate finance, risk management, and cross-border investment decisions. Text, readings, and projects.


        • BUS 372 - Cross-Cultural Issues in Marketing

          Credits: 3

          A study of cultural theories and their effects on a variety of international management and international marketing practices. The course uses extensive readings and discussions of various cross-cultural theories and methods of inquiry from the social sciences, general management, marketing, and consumer/organizational behavior literature. Emphasis is placed on understanding both the theoretical dimensions of culture and the impact these dimensions have on a variety of business activities. Students develop and lead seminar sessions and develop an in-depth research proposal applying their understanding of cultural theories to some unexplored phenomena within marketing, or another functional area of management. Readings, discussion, written project, and presentation.


        • BUS 390 - Supervised Study Abroad

          Credits: 4

          These upper-level courses cover topics of current interest in business administration for which international travel provides a unique opportunity for enhancing understanding. Emphasis changes from year to year and is announced well in advance of registration.

          Spring 2017, BUS 390-01: Supervised Study Abroad: Business in Ireland (4). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Twenty-five years ago, Ireland was regarded as the "poorest of the rich nations". Then it grew to one of the richest and strongest economies in the world. During these "Celtic Tiger" years, Ireland benefited from partnerships with government, business, and labor unions, and received significant direct foreign investments. However, at the end of 2008 Ireland encountered severe economic difficulties. This course, based in County Galway, has two primary objectives: 1. To immerse students into the culture (history, literature, theater, religion, social norms) of Ireland, via lectures and field trips to sites of historic and cultural significance, including a course-concoluding medieval banquet and traditional Irish entertainment at a historic castle; and 2. To study the economy, management practices, and business climate of modern Ireland including its role in the European Union via lectures, meetings with business leaders, and visits to national and international businesses. Dean.

          Spring 2017, BUS 390-02: Supervised Study Abroad: Leadership and Cross-Cultural Management (4). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. This course focuses on developing both leadership and cross-cultural management skills through immersing students in an intensive, leadership rich, and culturally diverse environment. Students and faculty live onboard a 50-foot bareboat yacht while travelling in the British Virgin Islands and the Leeward Islands. Living and learning on board a yacht for 21 days is quite a transformative experience. Students are required to adapt to new and unfamiliar surroundings, both in terms of the yacht and the cultures visited. Moreover, students are required to assume many roles and responsibilities on a daily basis, ranging from leading the crew as their skipper to utilizing newly developed navigational skills to plot the course to the next harbor and assure that the yacht arrives safely to preparing and serving meals for the crew. To enrich the onboard experience for participants, students complete readings and engage in discussions on leadership and cross-cultural management. At each location students engage with local businesses and business leaders. In addition, each student is required to maintain a daily analytical journal that applies the readings to their experience onboard. No prior sailing experience is required as students develop sailing, navigation, and yacht management proficiencies through living and learning onboard the yacht. Shay.


        • ECON 233 - Colorism

          Credits: 4

          Colorism is the allocation of privilege and disadvantage according to the lightness or darkness of one's skin. The practices of colorism tend to favor lighter skin over darker skin, although in rare cases the opposite practice also occurs. Colorism is present both within and among racial groups, a testament to its role as something related to but different than race. Colorism is enacted among racial groups in various contexts, from preferences in classroom settings and hiring decisions to patterns in sentencing. This course draws on analytical structures and insights from the social sciences -- especially economics, sociology, anthropology, and psychology -- as well as material from the humanities to explore the socio-economic consequences. The investigation is global in perspective and makes use of film and music in to enrich insights gained from course readings and classroom discussion. The course fosters the development and use of critical thinking, effective writing, and oral presentation skills while exploring the colorism.


        • ECON 259 - Supervised Study Abroad: The Environment and Economic Development in Amazonas

          Credits: 4

          Spring Term Abroad course. Amazonas is a huge Brazilian state of 1.5 million sq. kilometers which retains 94 percent of its original forest cover. This course examines the importance of the forest for economic development in both the formal and informal sectors of the economy, and how policies can be develop to promote both environmental protection and an increase in the quality life in both the urban and rural areas of Amazonas. The learning objectives of this course integrate those of the economics and environmental studies majors. Students are asked to use economic tools in an interdisciplinary context to understand the relationships among economic behavior, ecosystems and policy choices. Writing assignments focus on these relationships and look towards the development of executive summary writing skills.


        • ECON 270 - International Trade

          Credits: 3

          Specialization of production, the gains from trade, and their distribution, nationally and internationally. Theory of tariffs. Commercial policy from the mercantilist era to the present. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Transnational economic integration: the European Community and other regional blocs.


        • ECON 271 - International Finance

          Credits: 3

          International monetary arrangements, balance-of-payments adjustment processes, and the mutual dependence of macroeconomic variables and policies in trading nations. The International Monetary Fund (IMF), international investment, and the World Bank. International cooperation for economic stability.


        • ECON 280 - Development Economics

          Credits: 3

          A survey of the major issues of development economics. Economic structure of low-income countries and primary causes for their limited economic growth. Economic goals and policy alternatives. Role of developed countries in the development of poor countries. Selected case studies.


        • ECON 282 - Economic Governance & Institutional Design

          Credits: 4

          Spurred by developmental disasters in the third world, turbulent post-socialist transition, and challenges of globalization, the structure and functioning of economic, political, legal, and social institutions supporting a market economy has become a central topic for economists and policy-makers across the globe. What are appropriate market-oriented institutions and how can societies acquire them? Can good economic governance be engineered top down, through foreign aid? What institutional solutions ensure sound economic governance in a globally interdependent world? This course adopts an economic approach and embraces interdisciplinary analysis to provide an in-depth inquiry into fundamental issues of institutional design, and its impact on economic governance and behavior.


        • ECON 288 - Supervised Study Abroad

          Credits: 4

          For advanced students, the course covers a topic of current interest for which foreign travel provides a unique opportunity for significantly greater understanding. Emphasis and location changes from year to year and is announced each year, well in advance of registration. Likely destinations are Europe, Latin America, Africa, or Asia. This course may not be repeated.


        • ECON 319 - The Great Recession: An Oxford Tutorial

          Credits: 4

          This course provides fundamental insight into the causes and consequences of the Great Recession through the lens of the theory and application of international finance. Students gain an understanding of international interactions through trade in goods and assets, government policy, and the transmission of shocks: specifically of the fundamental determinants of the balance of payments and exchange rates; the theory and evidence relating to exchange rate behavior and to alternative exchange rate arrangements; the international context within which domestic macroeconomic policy is designed and conducted; international macroeconomic linkages; and the importance of international macroeconomic policy coordination.


        • ECON 356 - Economics of the Environment in Developing Countries

          Credits: 3

          This course focuses on the unique characteristics of the relationship between the environment and the economy in developing nations. Differences in economic structure, political structure, culture, social organization and ecosystem dynamics are emphasized as alternative policies for environmental and resource management are analyzed.


        • and, when appropriate,
        • ECON 295 - Special Topics in Economics

          Credits: 3

          Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.


        • ECON 395 - Special Topics in Economics

          Credits: 3

          Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and will be announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.


        • and other courses with approval of the department head

Strategic Communication major leading to a BA degree

A major in strategic communication leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 49 credits, including at least 24 credits in journalism and mass communications and at least 72 credits outside the department.

1. INTR 201, 202 (by the end of the sophomore year); JOUR 101, 190, 201, 231, 273, 301, 345
2. JOUR 202 or BUS 321
3. One course chosen from JOUR 227, 351, 362, 365, 371, 372
4. One course chosen from JOUR 325, 332; BUS 370, 371
5. One course chosen from PSYC 111, 112, 114
6. Two credits of internship from JOUR 451, 452, 461, 462
7. Completion of a minor other than mass communications or of four additional courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in another discipline.
8. Completion of a portfolio in the senior year for assessment.

  1. Required courses:
    • INTR 201 - Information Technology Literacy

      Credits: 1

      Through the use of interactive online tutorials, students gain proficiency in and a working knowledge of five distinct areas of information technology literacy: Windows Operating System, spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel), word processing (Microsoft Word), presentation software (Microsoft PowerPoint), and basic networking (the Washington and Lee network, basic Web browsing, and Microsoft Outlook). Lessons, exercises, practice exams and exams mix online efforts and hands-on activities.


    • INTR 202 - Applied Statistics (by the end of the sophomore year)

      Credits: 3

      An examination of the principal applications of statistics in accounting, business, economics, and politics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.

       


    • JOUR 101 - Introduction to Mass Communications

      Credits: 3

      This course serves as a gateway for both majors and non-majors to examine the role that the mass media play in society. The course examines the pervasiveness of mass media in our lives, and the history and roles of different media and their societal functions, processes, and effects. Students learn to tell the difference between fact and opinion and examine the links among theory, research and professional experience, while analyzing the ethics, methods, and motivations of the media and the expectations of their audiences. We discuss how media cover diversity issues and evaluate the policies and freedoms that guide and shape the mass media and the news media in the United States. Students complete the course as better informed consumers and interpreters of mass media and their messages.


    • JOUR 190 - Beyond Google and Wikipedia: Finding and Evaluating Information Sources in the Digital Age

      Credits: 1

      An introduction to information sources that academic researchers, journalists, public relations and advertising professionals rely on increasingly in the digital age to conduct scholarly research, report and write news stories, and to find, analyze and present research on trends in mass communications. Students learn how to evaluate sources of information for credibility and quality, while they strengthen their basic research skills to go beyond Google and dig below the surface of today's high-tech world.


    • JOUR 201 - Introduction to Reporting

      Credits: 3

      The principles and techniques of information gathering and news writing, with emphasis on fulfilling the role of the news media in a democratic society. Extensive laboratory work preparing assignments for print, electronic and online media, stressing accuracy, clarity and the appropriate use of the different media.


    • JOUR 231 - Communication Theory

      Credits: 3

      A critical overview of leading theoretical traditions in communication studies. Examination of the concepts of general and thematic theories in use, describing the similarities and differences among the concepts and applying them in practical situations. Some attention is paid to epistemological foundations, the structure of communication theory as a field, and examining the relationship between communication theory and sociocultural practice.


    • JOUR 273 - Principles of Public Relations

      Credits: 3

      This class focuses on understanding what public relations is and what those who practice public relations do. Students examine the origins of public relations, the nature and role of public relations, the major influences that affect organizational behavior, the ethics of public relations, and the professional development of public-relations professionals. Emphasis is placed on the planning, writing, and management functions, working with media and developing effective public-relations strategies.


    • JOUR 301 - Law and Communications

      Credits: 3

      An examination of the development of First Amendment jurisprudence, the law of defamation, privacy, access, free press-fair trial, journalists' privilege, obscenity and pornography. The case study approach is used, but the emphasis is on the principles that underlie the landmark cases. This course can serve as an introduction to and preparation for further studies in communications law and/or the legal system in general.


    • JOUR 345 - Media Ethics

      Credits: 3

      This course enables students to explore ethical challenges that arise within the various communication practices of contemporary media: journalism, public relations, advertising, documentary film, blogging and fictional programming. The course offers a grounding in moral reasoning and an understanding of professional ethics as an evolving response to changing social and industrial conditions in the media industries.


  2. Either
    • JOUR 202 - Introduction to Digital Journalism

      Credits: 3

      Concepts and practices of news gathering and presentation in a multimedia, interactive environment. Combines classroom instruction with a converged news media lab in which students contribute to a website, television newscast, and newspaper. Note: The laboratory requirement is limited to three sessions during the term, as arranged with the instructor.


    • or
    • BUS 321 - Multimedia Design and Development

      Credits: 3

      This course is an introduction to the study and creation of multimedia content primarily used in business. Students explore the steps used to plan and create multimedia content that effectively targets and delivers business information. This is a hands-on, project-oriented course with emphasis on the design and creation of media elements such as interactive web, graphic, audio, and video content. The course focuses on using WordPress development using Headway Themes with emphasis on Cascading Style Sheets, Adobe Photoshop, Reaper, and Final Cut Pro X as the foundation for creating online multimedia content.


  3. One course chosen from:
    • JOUR 227 - Public Relations Writing

      Credits: 3

      A writing course to teach the many forms of persuasive writing used by public relations practitioners to reach diverse audiences. Through frequent writing assignments and revisions, students master the art of press releases, media pitches, media alerts, features, public service announcements, newsletters, press kits, backgrounders, and coverage memos for appropriate media outlets. Students are exposed to social media and video skills as well as writing.


    • JOUR 351 - Editing for Print and Online Media

      Credits: 3

      The principles and techniques of editing copy and producing publications for the print media and the World Wide Web, with emphasis on clarity of thought, legal and moral responsibilities, and effective communication. Extensive laboratory work. Attention is given to the latest computer-based production and editing applications, as students participate in producing prototype newspaper pages, the Rockbridge Report cablecast and website.


    • JOUR 362 - Producing for Broadcast and Online Media

      Credits: 3

      Preparation for leadership roles in electronic media. Extensive work in decision making and management in the newsroom through television news producing and Internet content construction.


    • JOUR 365 - The Broadcast News Magazine

      Credits: 3

      The principles and techniques involved in developing and creating enterprising longer-form journalistic work for a converged environment, principally television and the World Wide Web. Students research, write, and produce news and feature packages similar to those of network television news magazines for broadcast on the local cable-access channel.


    • JOUR 371 - Reporting on Business

      Credits: 3

      Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of business, focusing especially on companies and their employees and customers. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business majors.


    • JOUR 372 - Reporting on the Economy

      Credits: 3

      Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of economics and business, focusing especially on the economy and financial markets. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business and economics majors.


  4. One course chosen from:
    • JOUR 325 - Crisis Communications

      Credits: 3

      A case-study approach to current methods of forecasting problems and responding effectively to crises and consequences in the public and private sectors. Topics include identifying and communicating effectively with stakeholders during crises, effective media-relations strategies during emergencies, building an effective crisis-response plan, regaining public credibility following a crisis, and avoiding public relations mistakes during litigation.


    • JOUR 332 - Research Methods in Mass Communication

      Credits: 3

      This course introduces students to the systematic study of communication, including quantitative and qualitative research methodologies in both theory-building and applied contexts. Students examine the research process, conceptualization, design, measurement, and analysis. Modes of inquiry studied include survey research, content analysis, experimental research, focus groups, depth interviewing, ethnography, and historical research. The class also engages students in a research project that may serve a local nonprofit agency.


    • BUS 370 - Integrated Marketing Communications

      Credits: 4

      Nature and contributions of the elements of marketing communications (e.g., advertising, sales promotions, the Web) in creating brand equity and stimulating demand. A project-oriented course with an emphasis on the strategic application of concepts resulting in an integrated communication plan for products and/or services. Course has a complementary lab component to teach technical skills and reinforce concepts via practicum.


    • BUS 371 - Creative Strategic Planning

      Credits: 4

      Strategic planning (also called account or brand planning) is a philosophy of consumer research that fully incorporates the consumer in strategic developments. The course includes the types of qualitative techniques traditionally associated with social sciences (e.g., anthropology, sociology and psychology) in order to arrive at a brand (or other) strategy. The students must think creatively, independently, and interdependently as they apply the variety of research techniques, develop the strategic recommendations and present and defend both the research and recommendations. In addition to research techniques, students receive an orientation in relevant software (video editing, photo manipulation) and learn effective and persuasive presentation skills. The course is project-based, and the course culminates in the opportunity to present their work to the client (usually an advertising/marketing professional) for whom they've been working the course of the term.


  5. One course chosen from:
    • PSYC 111 - Brain and Behavior

      FDR: SC
      Credits: 3

      An introduction to behavioral neuroscience, including the physiological bases of sensation, learning and memory, motivation, cognition, and abnormal behavior.


    • PSYC 112 - Cognition

      FDR: SC
      Credits: 3

      An introduction to human information processing, including an examination of perception, attention, memory, problem solving, and language.


    • PSYC 114 - Introduction to Social Psychology

      FDR: SS3
      Credits: 3

      The scientific study of how individuals' feelings, thoughts, and behavior are affected by others. Topics include prejudice, the self, interpersonal attraction, helping, aggression, attitudes, and persuasion.


  6. Two credits of internship from:
    • JOUR 451 - News Internship

      Credits: 1

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, with newspapers, radio and television stations, online news sites, or other news media or business institutions, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by November 15 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship. Students undertaking an internship in the summer may receive credit in the following fall term only as an overload.


    • JOUR 452 - News Internship

      Credits: 2

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, with newspapers, radio and television stations, online news sites, or other news media or business institutions, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by November 15 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship. Students undertaking an internship in the summer may receive credit in the following fall term only as an overload.


    • JOUR 461 - Communications Internship

      Credits: 1

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, in public relations, advertising, corporate communications, or other mass media-related businesses, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by March 1 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship. Students undertaking an internship during the summer may receive credit in the following fall term only as an overload.


    • JOUR 462 - Communications Internship

      Credits: 2

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, in public relations, advertising, corporate communications, or other mass media-related businesses, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by March 1 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship. Students undertaking an internship during the summer may receive credit in the following fall term only as an overload.


  7. Completion of a minor other than mass communications or of four additional courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in another discipline
  8. Completion of a portfolio in the senior year for assessment