Degree Requirements

2017 - 2018 Catalog

The Journalism department has the following degrees:

Journalism major leading to BA degree

A major in journalism leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 53 credits, including at least 35 credits in journalism and mass communications, and at least 72 credits outside the department.

  1. Courses required for the major: JOUR 101, 190, 201, 202, 258, 301, 344, 356, POL 203,and at least two credits of internship (JOUR 451-452)
  2. Diversity of Experience: Take one course chosen from the following: ECON 231, 232, 233; ENGL 262, 359, 361, 366; HIST 253, 260, 268; JOUR 266, 268; PHIL 235, 238, 242, 243, 244, 254; POV 101; SOAN 228, 268, 275, 280, or when appropriate, PSYC 296;
  3. Completion of one of the following sequences:

a. Journalism

i. One course chosen from JOUR 280, 371, 372, 395
ii. Either JOUR 220 or 341
iii. Either JOUR 351 or 362
iv. Completion of a minor other than mass communications or of four additional courses of at least three
credits at the 200 level or above in another discipline.

b. Business Journalism

i. Additional required courses: ACCT 201, JOUR 371, 372
ii. ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102 (by the end of the sophomore year),
iii. Either JOUR 351 or 362
iv. One additional course in economics at the 200 level or above
v. Three additional courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in accounting, business administration, or economics, including one course with an international focus selected from among the following: ACCT 371, 372; BUS 305, 330, 333, 335, 337, 357, 372, 390; ECON 233, 259, 270, 271, 280, 282, 288, 319, 356, and, when appropriate, ECON 295, ECON 395, or other courses with approval of the department head

  1. Courses required for the major:
    • JOUR 101 - Introduction to Mass Communications
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNot open to seniors
      FacultyStaff

      This course serves as a gateway for both majors and non-majors to examine the role that the mass media play in society. The course examines the pervasiveness of mass media in our lives, and the history and roles of different media and their societal functions, processes, and effects. Students learn to tell the difference between fact and opinion and examine the links among theory, research and professional experience, while analyzing the ethics, methods, and motivations of the media and the expectations of their audiences. We discuss how media cover diversity issues and evaluate the policies and freedoms that guide and shape the mass media and the news media in the United States. Students complete the course as better informed consumers and interpreters of mass media and their messages.


    • JOUR 190 - Beyond Google and Wikipedia: Finding and Evaluating Information Sources in the Digital Age
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteJOUR 101
      FacultyGrefe, Journalism faculty

      An introduction to information sources that academic researchers, journalists, public relations and advertising professionals rely on increasingly in the digital age to conduct scholarly research, report and write news stories, and to find, analyze and present research on trends in mass communications. Students learn how to evaluate sources of information for credibility and quality, while they strengthen their basic research skills to go beyond Google and dig below the surface of today's high-tech world.


    • JOUR 201 - Introduction to Reporting
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 101.
      FacultyStaff

      The principles and techniques of information gathering and news writing, with emphasis on fulfilling the role of the news media in a democratic society. Extensive laboratory work preparing assignments for print, electronic and online media, stressing accuracy, clarity and the appropriate use of the different media.


    • JOUR 202 - Introduction to Digital Journalism
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 201
      FacultyArtwick, Coddington

      Concepts and practices of news gathering and presentation in a multimedia, interactive environment. Combines classroom instruction with a converged news media lab in which students contribute to a website, television newscast, and newspaper. Note: The laboratory requirement is limited to three sessions during the term, as arranged with the instructor.


    • JOUR 258 - Beat Reporting
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteJOUR 202
      FacultyStaff

      Using the community as the laboratory, students develop competence in the principles and techniques of reporting and writing news for print, broadcast, online and social media in a democratic society. Working on assigned beats, students learn source development, news judgment, information gathering, news presentation and time management. Work is published and aired on the Rockbridge Report website and broadcast.


    • JOUR 301 - Law and Communications
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJunior standing
      FacultyAbah

      An examination of the development of First Amendment jurisprudence, the law of defamation, privacy, access, free press-fair trial, journalists' privilege, obscenity and pornography. The case study approach is used, but the emphasis is on the principles that underlie the landmark cases. This course can serve as an introduction to and preparation for further studies in communications law and/or the legal system in general.


    • JOUR 344 - Ethics of Journalism
      Credits3
      PrerequisitePOL 203 and at least junior standing. Appropriate for nonmajors
      FacultyColón

      A study of the moral issues arising from the practice of modern journalism and communications. Includes examination of philosophical and theoretical foundations of ethics, the place and role of journalism in the larger society, and moral choices in the newsroom. Topics include: First Amendment freedoms, privacy, confidentiality of sources, conflicts of interest, cooperation with law enforcement, free press/fair trial, photojournalism, and issues of accountability.


    • JOUR 356 - In-depth Reporting
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteJOUR 258 and JOUR 351 or 362
      FacultyLocy

      The principles and techniques of developing and creating enterprising, heavily researched journalistic work for the mass media. Students produce in-depth work for newspapers, magazines, radio, television and the World Wide Web. Extensive group work is required.


    • POL 203 - State and Local Government
      FDRSS2
      Credits3
      FacultyFinch

      An introduction to the structures and functions of United States subnational governments, with particular emphasis on the policy-making process and on the relationships between policy makers and the public. Computer-assisted analysis of survey-research data is included.


    • and at least two credits of internship from
    • JOUR 451 - News Internship
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteJOUR 201 and permission of the department. Limited to declared Journalism or Strategic Communication majors
      FacultyStaff

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, with newspapers, radio and television stations, online news sites, or other news media or business institutions, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by November 15 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship.


    • JOUR 452 - News Internship
      Credits2
      PrerequisiteJOUR 202 and permission of the department. Limited to declared Journalism or Strategic Communication majors
      FacultyStaff

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, with newspapers, radio and television stations, online news sites, or other news media or business institutions, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by November 15 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship.


  2. Diversity of Experience:
  3. Take one course chosen from the following:

    • ENGL 262 - Literature, Race, and Ethnicity
      FDRHL
      Credits3 in fall, winter; 4 in spring
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
      FacultyStaff

      A course that uses ethnicity, race, and culture to develop readings of literature. Politics and history play a large role in this critical approach; students should be prepared to explore their own ethnic awareness as it intersects with other, often conflicting, perspectives. Focus will vary with the professor's interests and expertise, but may include one or more literatures of the English-speaking world: Chicano and Latino, Native American, African-American, Asian-American, Caribbean, African, sub-continental (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka), and others.


    • ENGL 359 - Literature by Women of Color
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGL 299
      FacultyMiranda

      This course focuses on the intersection of race and gender as they meet in the lives and identities of contemporary women of color via literature: African-Americans, Native Americans, Chicanas, Asian-Americans, and mixed bloods, or 'mestizas.' Our readings, discussions and writings focus on the work that "coming to voice" does for women of color, and for our larger society and world. Students read a variety of poetry, fiction, and autobiography in order to explore some of the issues most important to and about women of color: identity, histories, diversity, resistance and celebration. Literary analyses-i.e., close readings, explications and interpretations-are key strategies for understanding these readings.


    • ENGL 361 - Native American Literatures
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGL 299
      FacultyMiranda

      A study of American Indian literature, primarily from the 20th century but including some historical and prehistorical foundations (oral storytelling, early orations and essays). Texts and topics may vary, but this course poses questions about nation, identity, indigenous sovereignty, mythology and history, and the powers of story as both resistance and regeneration. Readings in poetry, fiction, memoir, and nonfiction prose. Authors may include Alexie, Harjo, Hogan, Erdrich, Silko, Chrystos, Ortiz, LeAnne Howe and Paula Gunn Allen.


    • ENGL 366 - African-American Literature
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGL 299
      FacultyStaff

      A focused engagement with the African-American literary tradition, from its beginnings in the late 18th century through its powerful assertions in the 21st. The focus of each term's offering may vary; different versions of the course might emphasize a genre, author, or period such as poetry, Ralph Ellison, or the Harlem Renaissance.


    • HIST 260 - The History of the African-American People since 1877
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyDeLaney

      An intensive study of the African-American experience from 1877 to the present. Special emphasis is given to the development of black intellectual and cultural traditions, development of urban communities, emergence of the black middle class, black nationalism, the civil rights era, and the persistence of racism in American society.


    • HIST 268 - Building a Suburban Nation: Race, Class, and Politics in Postwar America
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyMichelmore

      Together, the overdevelopment of the suburbs and the underdevelopment of urban centers have profoundly shaped American culture, politics and society in the post-WWII period. This course examines the origins and consequences of suburbanization after 1945. Topics include the growth of the national state, the origins and consequences of suburbanization, the making of the white middle class, the War on Poverty, welfare and taxpayers "rights" movements, "black power," and how popular culture has engaged with questions about race and class. In the process of understanding the historical roots of contemporary racial and class advantage and disadvantage, this course will shed new light on contemporary public policy dilemmas.


    • JOUR 266 - Cross-Cultural Documentary Filmmaking
      Credits3
      FacultyFinch

      The United States is a melting pot of nationalities and cultures. As people move to the U.S. from other countries they go through cross-cultural adaptation, and identity becomes an issue for everyone. Students in this course work in three-person teams to produce five-minute documentaries on cross-cultural adaptation by an ethnic community in our region or by selected international students at Washington and Lee. Students are expected to immerse themselves in learning about the home countries and current communities of their subjects. The course includes instruction in the techniques of documentary film-making, allowing students to develop their writing, storytelling, shooting and editing skills.


    • JOUR 268 - News Media, Race and Ethnicity
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least sophomore standing
      FacultyColón

      This course examines how the news media cover race and ethnicity. How accurate is the portrayal of racial and ethnic groups? How do news media deal with clichés, ignorance and fear when it comes to differences? Do they offer a comprehensive and contextual view? The course highlights some of the best examples of reporting on race and ethnicity and how such reporting delves into the complexity of culture that can educate and surprise.


    • PHIL 235 - The Second Sex: Beauvoir on the Power of Gender
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyVerhage

      Sixty years after its initial publication, The Second Sex is as eye-opening and relevant as ever. Simone de Beauvoir's masterpiece weaves together history, philosophy, economics, biology, and a host of other disciplines to analyze the Western notion of "woman" and to explore the making and the power of gender and sexuality. The Second Sex is an important philosophical and political document about inequality and enforced "otherness." Referring to the history of philosophy, new developments in existential thought, and drawing on extensive interviews with women, Beauvoir synthesizes research about women's bodies and psyches as well as their historic and economic roles.


    • PHIL 238 - Existentialism: Meaning and Existence
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyVerhage

      Overview of existential thought in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course presents core existentialist thinkers and their critics - e.g. Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Fanon, Heidegger, Camus - and explores important existential themes such as human experience, anxiety, freedom, authenticity, and absurdity.


    • PHIL 242 - Social Inequality and Fair Opportunity
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBell

      An exploration of the different range of opportunities available to various social groups, including racial, ethnic and sexual minorities, women, and the poor. Topics include how to define fair equality of opportunity; the social mechanisms that play a role in expanding and limiting opportunity; legal and group-initiated strategies aimed at effecting fair equality of opportunity and the theoretical foundations of these strategies; as well as an analysis of the concepts of equality, merit and citizenship, and their value to individuals and society.


    • PHIL 243 - Martin Luther King Jr.: Poverty, Justice, and Love
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyPickett

      This course offers students the opportunity to examine the ethics and theology that informed the public arguments about poverty made by one of the 20th century's most important social justice theorists and activists, Martin Luther King Jr., as well as the competing views of his contemporaries, critics, forebears, and heirs. The course asks the following questions, among others: How do justice and love relate to one another and to poverty reduction? What role should religion play in public discussions and policies about poverty and justice? Are the dignity and the beloved community King championed the proper goal of anti-poverty efforts?


    • PHIL 244 - Feminist Social and Political Philosophy
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBell

      This course critically examines the gender norms that pervade our identities, govern our everyday behavior, and organize our social life. Questions addressed may include: What is gender? In what ways does it affect the quality of women's and men's lives? Is gender difference natural? Is it valuable? Can it contribute to, or interfere with, human flourishing? Can a gendered society be just? What can any of us do to promote good relations among women and men?


    • PHIL 254 - Philosophy of the Family: Beyond Tradition
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBell

      This course considers philosophical issues raised by family as a social institution and as a legal institution. Topics addressed include the social and personal purposes served by the institution of family, the nature of relationships between family members, the various forms that family can take, the scope of family privacy or autonomy, and how family obligations, mutual support, and interdependency affect individual members of families.


    • POV 101 - Poverty and Human Capability: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyPickett, Staff

      An exploration of the nature, scope, causes, effects and possible remedies for poverty as a social, moral, political and policy, economic, legal, psychological, religious, and biological problem. The course focuses on domestic poverty but also considers poverty as a global problem.

      Fall 2017:

      POV 101A: FS: Poverty and Human Capability: An Interdisciplinary Introduction (3). First-Year seminar.


    • SOAN 228 - Race and Ethnic Relations
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least junior standing. Instructor consent required
      FacultyNovack

      An analysis of minority groups in America. Theories of ethnicity are examined focusing on the relationship between class and ethnicity, and on the possible social and biological significance of racial differences. Attention is also given to prejudice and discrimination, as well as to consideration of minority strategies to bring about change.


    • SOAN 268 - Migration, Identity, and Conflict
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteSOAn 102, POV 101, or POL 105
      FacultyEastwood

      This course focuses on the complex relationship between migration, political institutions, group identities, and inter-group conflict. The course is a hybrid of a seminar and research lab in which students (a) read some of the key social-scientific literature on these subjects, and (b) conduct team-based research making use of existing survey data about the integration of migrant populations into various polities.


    • SOAN 275 - Feminist Anthropology
      Credits3
      FacultyGoluboff

      This course covers the complex and sometimes "awkward" relationship between feminism and anthropology. We explore topics such as the place of feminist theory and politics within the discipline of anthropology, the problems involved in being a feminist and an anthropologist, and the creation of feminist ethnography.


    • SOAN 280 - Gender and Sexuality
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent required on section 01, but not on section 02 for Winter 2018
      FacultyNovack

      An anthropological and sociological investigation of sex roles in preliterate and modern societies. Special consideration is given to the role of innate sexual differences, cultural variation, technology, and power in determining patterns of male dominance. Emphasis is placed on real and mythical female and male power in the context of changing relationships between men and women in American society.


    • or when appropriate,
    • PSYC 296 - Spring-Term Topics in Psychology
      FDRSS3
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteVaries with topic

      Topics and prerequisites vary with instructor and term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      Spring 2018, PSYC 296-01: Spring Term Topics in Psychology: The Psychology of Self-Control: "Humans in Lexington" (3). This seminar focuses on understanding different theoretical approaches to self-control, critically analyzing the research applying these self-control models to different behavioral domains, and evaluating the effectiveness of self-control interventions based on their theoretical assumptions. Students evaluate and apply the theories through empirical reports and reviews published in peer-reviewed scientific journals and popular-press articles. Students apply what they are learning in class to themselves through a self-directed, behavior-change program, and to the world around them through application assignments. (SS3) Scherschel.


  4. Completion of one of the following sequences:
    • Journalism
      • Take one course chosen from:
        • JOUR 280 - Covering Courts and the Law
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteAt least sophomore standing. Appropriate for non-majors
          FacultyLocy

          Courthouses make the best beats by providing a window on what is important to the American people. This course introduces students to the U.S. court system, its players, language and impact on the public at large. Students learn how to identify newsworthy legal stories, read court documents, and make sense of them in order to write clear, compelling, fair and accurate news stories for mass audiences.


        • JOUR 371 - Reporting on Business
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteAt least junior standing
          FacultySwasy

          Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of business, focusing especially on companies and their employees and customers. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business majors.


        • JOUR 372 - Reporting on the Economy
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteAt least junior standing
          FacultySwasy

          Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of economics and business, focusing especially on the economy and financial markets. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business and economics majors.


        • JOUR 395 - Specialty Reporting
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteJournalism 201 and junior standing, or instructor consent

          An advanced reporting course in which students develop expertise in a particular area of public significance. Topics rotate as faculty resources allow, and are likely to include education, politics, environment, religion, or education. Through reporting and writing, students learn about key institutions, terms, and sources related to the particular field. They learn how to identify newsworthy stories and write clear, compelling, fair, and accurate news stories for mass audiences. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Appropriate for non-majors.

          Winter 2018, JOUR 395-01: Specialty Reporting: Covering Education (3). Prerequistes: Open to majors and non-majors. Politicians, business leaders and parents claim they care about the education of our children. But the topic is complex because it touches on the biggest issues of our time, including race, immigration and democratic citizenship. Approaching education through nonfiction storytelling will enable students to find the human element behind the bureaucratic fog that often surrounds schools. This course is designed for journalism and non-journalism majors who want to learn how to tell a compelling education story for a general audience, and for students who want to teach, or are curious about education. Cumming.


      • Take either:
        • JOUR 220 - Social Media: Principles and Practice
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteJOUR 201 or instructor consent
          FacultyCoddington

          In this course, students dive deep into social media, learning how to use it as thoughtful and ethical professionals, and examining its growing roles in society, politics, identity, and relationships. Students get hands-on experience in producing news for social media by running a multi-platform social news service. They also learn how to plan a strategic social media campaign, how to use metrics to analyze social media effectiveness, and how to use social media in reporting.


        • or
        • JOUR 341 - Multimedia Storytelling Design
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteAt least junior class standing
          FacultyBarry, Locy

          Have you ever wondered how news organizations put together their Pulitzer Prize-winning interactive stories? This course introduces students to tools that help them imagine, design, and create powerful interactive features with audio, video, graphics, and words on the cutting edge of journalism and mass communications. Students learn web design and programming skills using HTML CSS and JavaScript. This course is for students with little or no coding experience but who want to know, "How they did that."


      • Take either:
        • JOUR 351 - Editing for Print and Online Media
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteJOUR 201 and at least junior standing
          FacultyStaff

          The principles and techniques of editing copy and producing publications for the print media and the World Wide Web, with emphasis on clarity of thought, legal and moral responsibilities, and effective communication. Extensive laboratory work. Attention is given to the latest computer-based production and editing applications, as students participate in producing prototype newspaper pages, the Rockbridge Report cablecast and website.


        • or
        • JOUR 362 - Producing for Broadcast and Online Media
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteJOUR 258 or instructor consent and at least junior standing
          FacultyFinch

          Preparation for leadership roles in electronic media. Extensive work in decision making and management in the newsroom through television news producing and Internet content construction.


      • Completion of a minor other than mass communications or of four additional courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in another discipline.

         
         
         

    • Business Journalism
      • Additional required courses:
        • ACCT 201 - Introduction to Financial Accounting
          Credits3
          Prerequisite
          FacultyStaff

          This course covers the fundamental principles of financial accounting and provides an introduction to the process of accumulating, classifying, and presenting financial information. Primary emphasis is given to understanding the financial statements of a business enterprise.


        • JOUR 371 - Reporting on Business
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteAt least junior standing
          FacultySwasy

          Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of business, focusing especially on companies and their employees and customers. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business majors.


        • JOUR 372 - Reporting on the Economy
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteAt least junior standing
          FacultySwasy

          Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of economics and business, focusing especially on the economy and financial markets. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business and economics majors.


      • Take (by the end of the sophomore year):
        • ECON 100 - Introduction to Economics
          FDRSS1
          Credits3
          FacultyStaff

          Open only to students who have not taken ECON 101 and/or ECON 102. Economics is the study of how a society (individuals, firms, and governments) allocates scarce resources to the production and consumption of goods and services. The course includes a survey of the fundamental principles used to approach microeconomic and macroeconomic questions.


        • or both
        • ECON 101 - Principles of Microeconomics
          FDRSS1
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteOpen only to members of the Class of 2020 and earlier
          FacultyStaff

          Survey of economic principles and problems with emphasis on analysis of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy. The first half of a two-term survey of economics. Should be followed by ECON 102.


        • and
        • ECON 102 - Principles of Macroeconomics
          FDRSS1
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteECON 101. Open only to members of the Class of 2020 and earlier
          FacultyStaff

          Emphasis on performance of the aggregate economy. Analysis of unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.


      • Take either:
        • JOUR 351 - Editing for Print and Online Media
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteJOUR 201 and at least junior standing
          FacultyStaff

          The principles and techniques of editing copy and producing publications for the print media and the World Wide Web, with emphasis on clarity of thought, legal and moral responsibilities, and effective communication. Extensive laboratory work. Attention is given to the latest computer-based production and editing applications, as students participate in producing prototype newspaper pages, the Rockbridge Report cablecast and website.


        • or
        • JOUR 362 - Producing for Broadcast and Online Media
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteJOUR 258 or instructor consent and at least junior standing
          FacultyFinch

          Preparation for leadership roles in electronic media. Extensive work in decision making and management in the newsroom through television news producing and Internet content construction.


      • One additional course in economics at the 200 level or above
      • Three additional courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in:

        accounting, business administration, or economics, including one course with an international focus selected from among the following:

        • ACCT 371 - Tax Service Learning in South Africa
          Credits4
          PrerequisiteACCT 321 and ACCT 356
          FacultyAlexander

          This service-learning course culminates in a 10-day trip to South Africa to conduct training workshops on SEC reporting requirements for financial statements related to the income taxes of U.S. multinational corporations. The specific class topics include: international tax planning strategies; SEC reporting requirements; attorney-client privilege; ASC 740; and tax social justice. While on campus, students develop workshop training materials through a series of research projects and homework assignments. While in South Africa, students conduct two workshops and participate in activities designed to foster a deeper understanding of South Africa's culture, history, ecology, and business environment.


        • ACCT 372 - Management Accounting in China
          Credits4
          PrerequisiteACCT 202
          FacultyStaff

          The objective of this course is to expose students to management accounting practices in China. Students (i) visit multinational companies and Chinese enterprises to discuss with business leaders to understand management accounting practices in businesses of different structures in China; (ii) attend lectures and listen to guest speakers to understand historical, cultural, economic, political, labor, resources, and environmental contexts that shape China's business environment and management accounting practices; (iii) conduct field trips to explore China's long history, distinctive culture, and its recent economic development. This unique learning experience prepares students for future accounting and business engagement with China.


        • BUS 305 - Seminar in International Business
          Credits3 credits in fall and winter, 4 in spring
          PrerequisitePreference to BSADM or JMCB majors during the first round of registration

          Offered from time to time when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


        • BUS 330 - Global Human-Resource Management
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteBUS 217 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM or JMCB majors during first round of registration
          FacultyDean

          Human-resource management (HRM) is concerned with how to best attract, select, develop, and retain employees in organizations. This course examines HRM in the global context. Topics include employee selection, training, performance management, compensation, health, safety, and security, and termination. We focus on designing HRM practices in the context of the global social, legal, and technological environments.


        • BUS 335 - Ethics of Globalization
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteAt least junior standing.
          FacultyReiter and Smith

          This seminar examines a number of ethical issues raised by the phenomenon of globalization. Though globalization is not new, recent business, technological, and policy developments have made the world more integrated and interdependent than ever before. Increasing economic, cultural, and political interconnections have created a host of new questions about how to conceive of the moral rights and responsibilities of individuals, multi-national corporations, nation-states, and global institutions within this new global framework. This course identifies and clarifies some of these questions, and considers how they have been addressed from a variety of different disciplinary perspectives. Questions concerning the ethics of globalization are approached through an analysis of a few specific topics, such as immigration, humanitarian intervention, and global poverty and inequality. Because the issues raised by the phenomenon of globalization cross disciplinary boundaries, readings are drawn from a wide variety of fields, including philosophy, business, economics, political science, and anthropology.


        • BUS 337 - Economic Globalization and Multinational Corporations
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteAt least junior standing. Preference to BSADM or JMCB majors during first round of registration
          FacultyReiter

          This course focuses on the historical and present effects and issues of economic globalization, and the role of multinational corporations in a global economy. Topics covered may include: production, supply chain, technology, trade, finance, natural environment, labor, development, poverty and inequality, privatization of utilities, immigration, and state sovereignty. Emphasis is on understanding the costs and benefits of economic globalization and the role business plays in contributing to these outcomes.


        • BUS 357 - Multinational Business Finance
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteBUS 221 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM, ACCB, PACC, or JMCB majors during first round of registration
          FacultyStaff

          A study of the critical aspects of managerial finance in a multinational setting, covering both theoretical and practical issues. Emphasis is placed on identifying the unique risk-return opportunities faced by corporations that maintain business units across national borders. Topics included are foreign exchange and exchange rate determination, international capital markets, the environment of multinational corporate finance, risk management, and cross-border investment decisions. Text, readings, and projects.


        • BUS 372 - Cross-Cultural Issues in Marketing
          Credits3
          PrerequisitePreference to BSADM or JMCB majors during first round of registration
          FacultyStraughan

          A study of cultural theories and their effects on a variety of international management and international marketing practices. The course uses extensive readings and discussions of various cross-cultural theories and methods of inquiry from the social sciences, general management, marketing, and consumer/organizational behavior literature. Emphasis is placed on understanding both the theoretical dimensions of culture and the impact these dimensions have on a variety of business activities. Students develop and lead seminar sessions and develop an in-depth research proposal applying their understanding of cultural theories to some unexplored phenomena within marketing, or another functional area of management. Readings, discussion, written project, and presentation.


        • BUS 390 - Supervised Study Abroad
          Credits4
          PrerequisiteInstructor consent, other prerequisites as specified by the instructor, and approval of the International Education Committee

          These upper-level courses cover topics of current interest in business administration for which international travel provides a unique opportunity for enhancing understanding. Emphasis changes from year to year and is announced well in advance of registration.


        • ECON 259 - Supervised Study Abroad: The Environment and Economic Development in Amazonas
          Credits4
          PrerequisiteECON 100, ECON 101 or ENV 110, and instructor consent
          FacultyKahn

          Spring Term Abroad course. Amazonas is a huge Brazilian state of 1.5 million sq. kilometers which retains 94 percent of its original forest cover. This course examines the importance of the forest for economic development in both the formal and informal sectors of the economy, and how policies can be develop to promote both environmental protection and an increase in the quality life in both the urban and rural areas of Amazonas. The learning objectives of this course integrate those of the economics and environmental studies majors. Students are asked to use economic tools in an interdisciplinary context to understand the relationships among economic behavior, ecosystems and policy choices. Writing assignments focus on these relationships and look towards the development of executive summary writing skills.


        • ECON 270 - International Trade
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteECON 100 or 101. Preference to ECON majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years
          FacultyAnderson, Davies

          Specialization of production, the gains from trade, and their distribution, nationally and internationally. Theory of tariffs. Commercial policy from the mercantilist era to the present. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Transnational economic integration: the European Community and other regional blocs.


        • ECON 271 - International Finance
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102. Preference to ECON majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years
          FacultyAnderson, Davies

          International monetary arrangements, balance-of-payments adjustment processes, and the mutual dependence of macroeconomic variables and policies in trading nations. The International Monetary Fund (IMF), international investment, and the World Bank. International cooperation for economic stability.


        • ECON 280 - Development Economics
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102. Preference to ECON majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years
          FacultyCasey, Blunch

          A survey of the major issues of development economics. Economic structure of low-income countries and primary causes for their limited economic growth. Economic goals and policy alternatives. Role of developed countries in the development of poor countries. Selected case studies.


        • ECON 282 - Economic Governance & Institutional Design
          Credits4
          PrerequisiteInstructor consent
          FacultyGrajzl

          Spurred by developmental disasters in the third world, turbulent post-socialist transition, and challenges of globalization, the structure and functioning of economic, political, legal, and social institutions supporting a market economy has become a central topic for economists and policy-makers across the globe. What are appropriate market-oriented institutions and how can societies acquire them? Can good economic governance be engineered top down, through foreign aid? What institutional solutions ensure sound economic governance in a globally interdependent world? This course adopts an economic approach and embraces interdisciplinary analysis to provide an in-depth inquiry into fundamental issues of institutional design, and its impact on economic governance and behavior.


        • ECON 288 - Supervised Study Abroad
          Credits4
          PrerequisiteECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102, instructor consent, and other prerequisites as specified by the instructor(s)

          For advanced students, the course covers a topic of current interest for which foreign travel provides a unique opportunity for significantly greater understanding. Emphasis and location changes from year to year and is announced each year, well in advance of registration. Likely destinations are Europe, Latin America, Africa, or Asia. This course may not be repeated.


        • ECON 319 - The Great Recession: An Oxford Tutorial
          Credits4
          FacultyDavies

          This course provides fundamental insight into the causes and consequences of the Great Recession through the lens of the theory and application of international finance. Students gain an understanding of international interactions through trade in goods and assets, government policy, and the transmission of shocks: specifically of the fundamental determinants of the balance of payments and exchange rates; the theory and evidence relating to exchange rate behavior and to alternative exchange rate arrangements; the international context within which domestic macroeconomic policy is designed and conducted; international macroeconomic linkages; and the importance of international macroeconomic policy coordination.


        • ECON 356 - Economics of the Environment in Developing Countries
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteECON 203 and either ECON 255 or 280, or obtain instructor consent. Preference to ECON or ENV majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years
          FacultyKahn, Casey

          This course focuses on the unique characteristics of the relationship between the environment and the economy in developing nations. Differences in economic structure, political structure, culture, social organization and ecosystem dynamics are emphasized as alternative policies for environmental and resource management are analyzed.


        • and, when appropriate,
        • ECON 295 - Special Topics in Economics
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteNormally ECON 100 or both ECON 101 and 102 but may vary with topic. Preference to ECON majors during the first round of registration. Other majors are encouraged to add to the waiting list after registration re-opens for all class years

          Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

          Winter 2018, ECON 295-01: Food Economics (3). Prerequsite: ECON 100 or ECON 101.  Household food choice has many determinants, such as culture, socio-economic status, and the food environment. This course explores the economic determinants of food choice and how economists have adapted household models over time to account for the increased complexity of the food market. Early in the term, microeconomic theory and empirical literature are used to explain current issues in household food choice centered around poverty (money or time) and low access/availability. After a brief quantitative-methods boot camp, we use publicly available data to address research questions around household food economics. Scharadin.


        • ECON 395 - Special Topics in Economics
          Credits3
          PrerequisiteECON 203 or varies with topic

          Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and will be announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

          Winter 2018, ECON 395A-01: Macro Forecasting (3). Prerequisite: ECON 100 or ECON 102, and ECON 203. This course is focused on time series analysis and forecasting methodologies that are applied to issues in business, finance, and economics. It covers various analytical techniques used by economists to model and forecast the macro and micro levels of economic activity. Topics include smoothing techniques, time series decomposition methods, regression-based forecasting, ARMA models, and unit-root and structural-change tests. Students learn to perform time series regressions, undertake forecasting exercises, and test a variety of hypotheses involving time series data. Stata and Excel software are used throughout. Collins.

          Winter 2018, ECON 395B-01: Environmental Valuation (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203 and 210. Recommended: ECON 255. A broad overview of environmental valuation, with an emphasis on choice modeling. Environmental valuation is an important subfield of environmental economics, and very important to informing the decision-making process in the formulation of environmental policy. Both the USEPA and its counterpart in Australia require choice modeling to examine environmental impacts of proposed policies or projects. Students acquire advanced quantitative skills, including multinomial regression analysis (including complex versions such as random parameter models) and experimental design.Kahn.

          Fall 2017, ECON 395A-01: Topic: Economic Culture and Development (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. Economic development is deeply rooted in cultural factors, such as identity, belief, trust, and religion. These cultural factors in turn are rooted in history and economic development. The course explores historic origins of cultural factors and how those cultural factors have direct implication for economic development.   Development, as such, is understood within the backdrop of slow-changing, structural, and systematic elements. We also make use of data availability, methodological improvements, and empirical literature to advance our understanding of the economics of being poor. Silwal.

          Fall 2017, ECON 395B-01: Topic: U.S. Economic History (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. This course examines selected topics in the economic development of the U.S. economy.  The goals are to review major themes in U.S. economic history, to study professional research papers to learn how economists develop and interpret historical evidence, and to give students hands-on experience analyzing historical data.  Major themes include: migration flows to and within the U.S.; slavery and African-American economic progress since emancipation; transportation and industrialization; the Great Depression; and long-run changes in education, income, and urbanization. Shester.

          Fall 2017, ECON 395C-01: International Trade (3). Prerequisite: ECON 203. This course examines a set of topics in International Economics, with an emphasis on policy.  We examine the current debates on who wins and who loses from trade and immigration, as well as the role of trade agreements like NAFTA in the U.S. economy.  We focus on a narrower range of topics in order to investigate issues in greater depth including examining primary research. Anderson.


        • and other courses with approval of the department head

Strategic Communication major leading to a BA degree

A major in strategic communication leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 55 credits, including at least 27 credits in journalism and mass communications and at least 72 credits outside the department.

1. Courses required for the major: INTR 201, 202 (by the end of the sophomore year); JOUR 101, 190, 201, 227, 231, 273, 301, 345
2. Diversity of Experience: Take one course chosen from the following: ECON 231, 232, 233; ENGL 262, 359, 361, 366; HIST 253, 260, 268; JOUR 266, 268; PHIL 235, 238, 242, 243, 244, 254; POV 101; SOAN 228, 268, 275, 280; or, when appropriate, PSYC 296;
3. Take either: JOUR 202 or BUS 321
4. One course chosen from: JOUR 220, 341, 351, 362, 365, 371, 372
5. One course chosen from: JOUR 325, 332; BUS 370, 371
6. One course chosen from: PSYC 111, 112, 114
7. Two credits of internship from: JOUR 451, 452, 461, 462
8. Completion of a minor other than mass communications or of four additional courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in another discipline.
9. Completion of a portfolio in the senior year for assessment.

  1. Courses required for the major:
    • INTR 201 - Information Technology Literacy
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteFirst-year or sophomore standing
      FacultyBallenger, Boylan (administrator)

      Through the use of interactive online tutorials, students gain proficiency in and a working knowledge of five distinct areas of information technology literacy: Windows Operating System, spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel), word processing (Microsoft Word), presentation software (Microsoft PowerPoint), and basic networking (the Washington and Lee network, basic Web browsing, and Microsoft Outlook). Lessons, exercises, practice exams and exams mix online efforts and hands-on activities.


    • INTR 202 - Applied Statistics (by the end of the sophomore year)
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteINTR 201

      An examination of the principal applications of statistics in accounting, business, economics, and politics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.

       


    • JOUR 101 - Introduction to Mass Communications
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteNot open to seniors
      FacultyStaff

      This course serves as a gateway for both majors and non-majors to examine the role that the mass media play in society. The course examines the pervasiveness of mass media in our lives, and the history and roles of different media and their societal functions, processes, and effects. Students learn to tell the difference between fact and opinion and examine the links among theory, research and professional experience, while analyzing the ethics, methods, and motivations of the media and the expectations of their audiences. We discuss how media cover diversity issues and evaluate the policies and freedoms that guide and shape the mass media and the news media in the United States. Students complete the course as better informed consumers and interpreters of mass media and their messages.


    • JOUR 190 - Beyond Google and Wikipedia: Finding and Evaluating Information Sources in the Digital Age
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteJOUR 101
      FacultyGrefe, Journalism faculty

      An introduction to information sources that academic researchers, journalists, public relations and advertising professionals rely on increasingly in the digital age to conduct scholarly research, report and write news stories, and to find, analyze and present research on trends in mass communications. Students learn how to evaluate sources of information for credibility and quality, while they strengthen their basic research skills to go beyond Google and dig below the surface of today's high-tech world.


    • JOUR 201 - Introduction to Reporting
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 101.
      FacultyStaff

      The principles and techniques of information gathering and news writing, with emphasis on fulfilling the role of the news media in a democratic society. Extensive laboratory work preparing assignments for print, electronic and online media, stressing accuracy, clarity and the appropriate use of the different media.


    • JOUR 231 - Communication Theory
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 101; at least sophomore standing; restricted to journalism and strategic communication majors and mass communications minors; or instructor consent
      FacultyArtwick

      A critical overview of leading theoretical traditions in communication studies. Examination of the concepts of general and thematic theories in use, describing the similarities and differences among the concepts and applying them in practical situations. Some attention is paid to epistemological foundations, the structure of communication theory as a field, and examining the relationship between communication theory and sociocultural practice.


    • JOUR 227 - Public Relations Writing
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 201
      FacultyStaff

      A writing course to teach the many forms of persuasive writing used by public relations practitioners to reach diverse audiences. Through frequent writing assignments and revisions, students master the art of press releases, media pitches, media alerts, features, public service announcements, newsletters, press kits, backgrounders, and coverage memos for appropriate media outlets. Students are exposed to social media and video skills as well as writing.


    • JOUR 273 - Principles of Public Relations
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 227 or instructor consent
      FacultyAbah

      This class focuses on understanding what public relations is and what those who practice public relations do. Students examine the origins of public relations, the nature and role of public relations, the major influences that affect organizational behavior, the ethics of public relations, and the professional development of public-relations professionals. Emphasis is placed on the planning, writing, and management functions, working with media and developing effective public-relations strategies.


    • JOUR 301 - Law and Communications
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJunior standing
      FacultyAbah

      An examination of the development of First Amendment jurisprudence, the law of defamation, privacy, access, free press-fair trial, journalists' privilege, obscenity and pornography. The case study approach is used, but the emphasis is on the principles that underlie the landmark cases. This course can serve as an introduction to and preparation for further studies in communications law and/or the legal system in general.


    • JOUR 345 - Media Ethics
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 201 and at least junior standing. Preference given to strategic communication majors, mass communications minors, and seniors during initial registration
      FacultyColón

      This course enables students to explore ethical challenges that arise within the various communication practices of contemporary media: journalism, public relations, advertising, documentary film, blogging and fictional programming. The course offers a grounding in moral reasoning and an understanding of professional ethics as an evolving response to changing social and industrial conditions in the media industries.


  2. Diversity of Experience:
  3. Take one course chosen from the following:

    • ENGL 262 - Literature, Race, and Ethnicity
      FDRHL
      Credits3 in fall, winter; 4 in spring
      PrerequisiteCompletion of FW requirement
      FacultyStaff

      A course that uses ethnicity, race, and culture to develop readings of literature. Politics and history play a large role in this critical approach; students should be prepared to explore their own ethnic awareness as it intersects with other, often conflicting, perspectives. Focus will vary with the professor's interests and expertise, but may include one or more literatures of the English-speaking world: Chicano and Latino, Native American, African-American, Asian-American, Caribbean, African, sub-continental (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka), and others.


    • ENGL 359 - Literature by Women of Color
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGL 299
      FacultyMiranda

      This course focuses on the intersection of race and gender as they meet in the lives and identities of contemporary women of color via literature: African-Americans, Native Americans, Chicanas, Asian-Americans, and mixed bloods, or 'mestizas.' Our readings, discussions and writings focus on the work that "coming to voice" does for women of color, and for our larger society and world. Students read a variety of poetry, fiction, and autobiography in order to explore some of the issues most important to and about women of color: identity, histories, diversity, resistance and celebration. Literary analyses-i.e., close readings, explications and interpretations-are key strategies for understanding these readings.


    • ENGL 361 - Native American Literatures
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGL 299
      FacultyMiranda

      A study of American Indian literature, primarily from the 20th century but including some historical and prehistorical foundations (oral storytelling, early orations and essays). Texts and topics may vary, but this course poses questions about nation, identity, indigenous sovereignty, mythology and history, and the powers of story as both resistance and regeneration. Readings in poetry, fiction, memoir, and nonfiction prose. Authors may include Alexie, Harjo, Hogan, Erdrich, Silko, Chrystos, Ortiz, LeAnne Howe and Paula Gunn Allen.


    • ENGL 366 - African-American Literature
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteENGL 299
      FacultyStaff

      A focused engagement with the African-American literary tradition, from its beginnings in the late 18th century through its powerful assertions in the 21st. The focus of each term's offering may vary; different versions of the course might emphasize a genre, author, or period such as poetry, Ralph Ellison, or the Harlem Renaissance.


    • HIST 260 - The History of the African-American People since 1877
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyDeLaney

      An intensive study of the African-American experience from 1877 to the present. Special emphasis is given to the development of black intellectual and cultural traditions, development of urban communities, emergence of the black middle class, black nationalism, the civil rights era, and the persistence of racism in American society.


    • HIST 268 - Building a Suburban Nation: Race, Class, and Politics in Postwar America
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyMichelmore

      Together, the overdevelopment of the suburbs and the underdevelopment of urban centers have profoundly shaped American culture, politics and society in the post-WWII period. This course examines the origins and consequences of suburbanization after 1945. Topics include the growth of the national state, the origins and consequences of suburbanization, the making of the white middle class, the War on Poverty, welfare and taxpayers "rights" movements, "black power," and how popular culture has engaged with questions about race and class. In the process of understanding the historical roots of contemporary racial and class advantage and disadvantage, this course will shed new light on contemporary public policy dilemmas.


    • JOUR 266 - Cross-Cultural Documentary Filmmaking
      Credits3
      FacultyFinch

      The United States is a melting pot of nationalities and cultures. As people move to the U.S. from other countries they go through cross-cultural adaptation, and identity becomes an issue for everyone. Students in this course work in three-person teams to produce five-minute documentaries on cross-cultural adaptation by an ethnic community in our region or by selected international students at Washington and Lee. Students are expected to immerse themselves in learning about the home countries and current communities of their subjects. The course includes instruction in the techniques of documentary film-making, allowing students to develop their writing, storytelling, shooting and editing skills.


    • JOUR 268 - News Media, Race and Ethnicity
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least sophomore standing
      FacultyColón

      This course examines how the news media cover race and ethnicity. How accurate is the portrayal of racial and ethnic groups? How do news media deal with clichés, ignorance and fear when it comes to differences? Do they offer a comprehensive and contextual view? The course highlights some of the best examples of reporting on race and ethnicity and how such reporting delves into the complexity of culture that can educate and surprise.


    • PHIL 235 - The Second Sex: Beauvoir on the Power of Gender
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyVerhage

      Sixty years after its initial publication, The Second Sex is as eye-opening and relevant as ever. Simone de Beauvoir's masterpiece weaves together history, philosophy, economics, biology, and a host of other disciplines to analyze the Western notion of "woman" and to explore the making and the power of gender and sexuality. The Second Sex is an important philosophical and political document about inequality and enforced "otherness." Referring to the history of philosophy, new developments in existential thought, and drawing on extensive interviews with women, Beauvoir synthesizes research about women's bodies and psyches as well as their historic and economic roles.


    • PHIL 238 - Existentialism: Meaning and Existence
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyVerhage

      Overview of existential thought in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course presents core existentialist thinkers and their critics - e.g. Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Fanon, Heidegger, Camus - and explores important existential themes such as human experience, anxiety, freedom, authenticity, and absurdity.


    • PHIL 242 - Social Inequality and Fair Opportunity
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBell

      An exploration of the different range of opportunities available to various social groups, including racial, ethnic and sexual minorities, women, and the poor. Topics include how to define fair equality of opportunity; the social mechanisms that play a role in expanding and limiting opportunity; legal and group-initiated strategies aimed at effecting fair equality of opportunity and the theoretical foundations of these strategies; as well as an analysis of the concepts of equality, merit and citizenship, and their value to individuals and society.


    • PHIL 243 - Martin Luther King Jr.: Poverty, Justice, and Love
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyPickett

      This course offers students the opportunity to examine the ethics and theology that informed the public arguments about poverty made by one of the 20th century's most important social justice theorists and activists, Martin Luther King Jr., as well as the competing views of his contemporaries, critics, forebears, and heirs. The course asks the following questions, among others: How do justice and love relate to one another and to poverty reduction? What role should religion play in public discussions and policies about poverty and justice? Are the dignity and the beloved community King championed the proper goal of anti-poverty efforts?


    • PHIL 244 - Feminist Social and Political Philosophy
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBell

      This course critically examines the gender norms that pervade our identities, govern our everyday behavior, and organize our social life. Questions addressed may include: What is gender? In what ways does it affect the quality of women's and men's lives? Is gender difference natural? Is it valuable? Can it contribute to, or interfere with, human flourishing? Can a gendered society be just? What can any of us do to promote good relations among women and men?


    • PHIL 254 - Philosophy of the Family: Beyond Tradition
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyBell

      This course considers philosophical issues raised by family as a social institution and as a legal institution. Topics addressed include the social and personal purposes served by the institution of family, the nature of relationships between family members, the various forms that family can take, the scope of family privacy or autonomy, and how family obligations, mutual support, and interdependency affect individual members of families.


    • POV 101 - Poverty and Human Capability: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyPickett, Staff

      An exploration of the nature, scope, causes, effects and possible remedies for poverty as a social, moral, political and policy, economic, legal, psychological, religious, and biological problem. The course focuses on domestic poverty but also considers poverty as a global problem.

      Fall 2017:

      POV 101A: FS: Poverty and Human Capability: An Interdisciplinary Introduction (3). First-Year seminar.


    • SOAN 228 - Race and Ethnic Relations
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least junior standing. Instructor consent required
      FacultyNovack

      An analysis of minority groups in America. Theories of ethnicity are examined focusing on the relationship between class and ethnicity, and on the possible social and biological significance of racial differences. Attention is also given to prejudice and discrimination, as well as to consideration of minority strategies to bring about change.


    • SOAN 268 - Migration, Identity, and Conflict
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteSOAn 102, POV 101, or POL 105
      FacultyEastwood

      This course focuses on the complex relationship between migration, political institutions, group identities, and inter-group conflict. The course is a hybrid of a seminar and research lab in which students (a) read some of the key social-scientific literature on these subjects, and (b) conduct team-based research making use of existing survey data about the integration of migrant populations into various polities.


    • SOAN 275 - Feminist Anthropology
      Credits3
      FacultyGoluboff

      This course covers the complex and sometimes "awkward" relationship between feminism and anthropology. We explore topics such as the place of feminist theory and politics within the discipline of anthropology, the problems involved in being a feminist and an anthropologist, and the creation of feminist ethnography.


    • SOAN 280 - Gender and Sexuality
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteInstructor consent required on section 01, but not on section 02 for Winter 2018
      FacultyNovack

      An anthropological and sociological investigation of sex roles in preliterate and modern societies. Special consideration is given to the role of innate sexual differences, cultural variation, technology, and power in determining patterns of male dominance. Emphasis is placed on real and mythical female and male power in the context of changing relationships between men and women in American society.


    • or when appropriate,
    • PSYC 296 - Spring-Term Topics in Psychology
      FDRSS3
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteVaries with topic

      Topics and prerequisites vary with instructor and term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      Spring 2018, PSYC 296-01: Spring Term Topics in Psychology: The Psychology of Self-Control: "Humans in Lexington" (3). This seminar focuses on understanding different theoretical approaches to self-control, critically analyzing the research applying these self-control models to different behavioral domains, and evaluating the effectiveness of self-control interventions based on their theoretical assumptions. Students evaluate and apply the theories through empirical reports and reviews published in peer-reviewed scientific journals and popular-press articles. Students apply what they are learning in class to themselves through a self-directed, behavior-change program, and to the world around them through application assignments. (SS3) Scherschel.

       


  4. Take either:
    • JOUR 202 - Introduction to Digital Journalism
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 201
      FacultyArtwick, Coddington

      Concepts and practices of news gathering and presentation in a multimedia, interactive environment. Combines classroom instruction with a converged news media lab in which students contribute to a website, television newscast, and newspaper. Note: The laboratory requirement is limited to three sessions during the term, as arranged with the instructor.


    • or
    • BUS 321 - Multimedia Design and Development
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteINTR 201 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM or JMCS majors during initial registration
      FacultyBallenger

      This course is an introduction to the study and creation of multimedia content primarily used in business. Students explore the steps used to plan and create multimedia content that effectively targets and delivers business information. This is a hands-on, project-oriented course with emphasis on the design and creation of media elements such as interactive web, graphic, audio, and video content. The course focuses on using WordPress development using Headway Themes with emphasis on Cascading Style Sheets, Adobe Photoshop, Reaper, and Final Cut Pro X as the foundation for creating online multimedia content.


  5. One course chosen from:
    • JOUR 220 - Social Media: Principles and Practice
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 201 or instructor consent
      FacultyCoddington

      In this course, students dive deep into social media, learning how to use it as thoughtful and ethical professionals, and examining its growing roles in society, politics, identity, and relationships. Students get hands-on experience in producing news for social media by running a multi-platform social news service. They also learn how to plan a strategic social media campaign, how to use metrics to analyze social media effectiveness, and how to use social media in reporting.


    • JOUR 341 - Multimedia Storytelling Design
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least junior class standing
      FacultyBarry, Locy

      Have you ever wondered how news organizations put together their Pulitzer Prize-winning interactive stories? This course introduces students to tools that help them imagine, design, and create powerful interactive features with audio, video, graphics, and words on the cutting edge of journalism and mass communications. Students learn web design and programming skills using HTML CSS and JavaScript. This course is for students with little or no coding experience but who want to know, "How they did that."


    • JOUR 351 - Editing for Print and Online Media
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 201 and at least junior standing
      FacultyStaff

      The principles and techniques of editing copy and producing publications for the print media and the World Wide Web, with emphasis on clarity of thought, legal and moral responsibilities, and effective communication. Extensive laboratory work. Attention is given to the latest computer-based production and editing applications, as students participate in producing prototype newspaper pages, the Rockbridge Report cablecast and website.


    • JOUR 362 - Producing for Broadcast and Online Media
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 258 or instructor consent and at least junior standing
      FacultyFinch

      Preparation for leadership roles in electronic media. Extensive work in decision making and management in the newsroom through television news producing and Internet content construction.


    • JOUR 365 - The Broadcast News Magazine
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 201
      FacultyStaff

      The principles and techniques involved in developing and creating enterprising longer-form journalistic work for a converged environment, principally television and the World Wide Web. Students research, write, and produce news and feature packages similar to those of network television news magazines for broadcast on the local cable-access channel.


    • JOUR 371 - Reporting on Business
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least junior standing
      FacultySwasy

      Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of business, focusing especially on companies and their employees and customers. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business majors.


    • JOUR 372 - Reporting on the Economy
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least junior standing
      FacultySwasy

      Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of economics and business, focusing especially on the economy and financial markets. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business and economics majors.


  6. One course chosen from:
    • JOUR 325 - Crisis Communications
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 273 or instructor consent; at least junior standing
      FacultyAbah

      A case-study approach to current methods of forecasting problems and responding effectively to crises and consequences in the public and private sectors. Topics include identifying and communicating effectively with stakeholders during crises, effective media-relations strategies during emergencies, building an effective crisis-response plan, regaining public credibility following a crisis, and avoiding public relations mistakes during litigation.


    • JOUR 332 - Research Methods in Mass Communication
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteJOUR 101 or instructor consent; at least sophomore standing
      FacultyArtwick

      This course introduces students to the systematic study of communication, including quantitative and qualitative research methodologies in both theory-building and applied contexts. Students examine the research process, conceptualization, design, measurement, and analysis. Modes of inquiry studied include survey research, content analysis, experimental research, focus groups, depth interviewing, ethnography, and historical research. The class also engages students in a research project that may serve a local nonprofit agency.


    • BUS 370 - Integrated Marketing Communications
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteAt least junior standing and instructor consent
      FacultyBower

      Nature and contributions of the elements of marketing communications (e.g., advertising, sales promotions, the Web) in creating brand equity and stimulating demand. A project-oriented course with an emphasis on the strategic application of concepts resulting in an integrated communication plan for products and/or services. Course has a complementary lab component to teach technical skills and reinforce concepts via practicum.


    • BUS 371 - Creative Strategic Planning
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteAt least sophomore standing. Preference to BSADM or JMCB majors during first round of registration
      FacultyBower

      Strategic planning (also called account or brand planning) is a philosophy of consumer research that fully incorporates the consumer in strategic developments. The course includes the types of qualitative techniques traditionally associated with social sciences (e.g., anthropology, sociology and psychology) in order to arrive at a brand (or other) strategy. The students must think creatively, independently, and interdependently as they apply the variety of research techniques, develop the strategic recommendations and present and defend both the research and recommendations. In addition to research techniques, students receive an orientation in relevant software (video editing, photo manipulation) and learn effective and persuasive presentation skills. The course is project-based, and the course culminates in the opportunity to present their work to the client (usually an advertising/marketing professional) for whom they've been working the course of the term.


  7. One course chosen from:
    • PSYC 111 - Brain and Behavior
      FDRSC
      Credits3

      An introduction to behavioral neuroscience, including the physiological bases of sensation, learning and memory, motivation, cognition, and abnormal behavior.


    • PSYC 112 - Cognition
      FDRSC
      Credits3
      FacultyJohnson, Whiting

      An introduction to human information processing, including an examination of perception, attention, memory, problem solving, and language.


    • PSYC 114 - Introduction to Social Psychology
      FDRSS3
      Credits3
      FacultyWoodzicka

      The scientific study of how individuals' feelings, thoughts, and behavior are affected by others. Topics include prejudice, the self, interpersonal attraction, helping, aggression, attitudes, and persuasion.


  8. Two credits of internship from:
    • JOUR 451 - News Internship
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteJOUR 201 and permission of the department. Limited to declared Journalism or Strategic Communication majors
      FacultyStaff

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, with newspapers, radio and television stations, online news sites, or other news media or business institutions, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by November 15 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship.


    • JOUR 452 - News Internship
      Credits2
      PrerequisiteJOUR 202 and permission of the department. Limited to declared Journalism or Strategic Communication majors
      FacultyStaff

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, with newspapers, radio and television stations, online news sites, or other news media or business institutions, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by November 15 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship.


    • JOUR 461 - Communications Internship
      Credits1
      PrerequisiteJOUR 201 and permission of the department. Limited to declared Journalism or Strategic Communication majors
      FacultyStaff

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, in public relations, advertising, corporate communications, or other mass media-related businesses, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by March 1 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship.


    • JOUR 462 - Communications Internship
      Credits2
      PrerequisiteJOUR 201 and permission of the department. Limited to declared Strategic Communication majors
      FacultyStaff

      Professional service, arranged and supervised individually, in public relations, advertising, corporate communications, or other mass media-related businesses, as appropriate. Students proposing to undertake an internship must meet and coordinate their plans with the department's internship supervisor by March 1 of the year in which they plan to serve the internship.


  9. Completion of a minor other than mass communications or of four additional courses of at least three credits at the 200 level or above in another discipline
  10. Completion of a portfolio in the senior year for assessment