Course Offerings

Spring 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Scenes from Chinese History

HIST 105 - Bello, David A.

Film is one of the 20th century's most influential forms of mass communication and, consequently, has been one medium for the creation and maintenance of nation-states. In this sense, no film can be considered as mere entertainment entirely divorced from the social, political, economic and, ultimately, historical context in which it was produced. This is particularly true of modern nation-states "invented" during the 20th century like the People's Republic of China (PRC). This course is intended to explore how contemporary PRC cinema has interpreted Chinese history, as represented by some of that history's pre-PRC milestones of conflict in the Qin and Qing dynasties as well as the Republican period. Students evaluate the films critically as historical products of their own times as well as current historical narratives of the past by examining each event through a pair of films produced at different times in PRC history. Students also examine post-1949 changes in China and its interpretation of its pre-1949 history, and so, by seeing how a country interprets its history at a given time.

Paris: History, Image, Myth, Part II

HIST 210 - Horowitz, Sarah

Students may not take this course and ARTS 223. Participants in this course spend four weeks in Paris asking the following questions: how has history shaped Parisian life and Parisian spaces? How can we use photography to document the city's changing landscape as well as understand its rich past? Indeed, how has photography--the development of which is closely tied to Paris's history--altered the fabric of the city? Topics include the social and political transformations of the 19th century, the shifting geography of artistic Paris, and contemporary trends such as immigration and gentrification. This course is taught in close collaboration with ARTS 223, creating an interdisciplinary context for students to explore the relationship of photography to the modern history and contemporary issues of Paris.

Decline and Fall of the Soviet Union and the Resurgence of Russia

HIST 222 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

This course analyzes the reasons for the decline of the Soviet Union commencing in the latter part of the Brezhnev era and its collapse under the weight of the failed reforms of Gorbachev. It further traces the fragmentation of the USSR into fifteen republics and the simultaneous devolution of authority within the Russian Republic under Yeltsin. The course concludes with the remarkable reassertion of state power under Putin up to the present. Students write an essay assessing the Yeltsin transition and engage in a class debate at the end of the term on the prospects for Russia's future.

Discover Scotland: History and Culture through Theatre

HIST 227 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki) / Levy, Jemma A.

Spring Term Abroad. For a small nation of just over 5 million, Scotland looms remarkably large in our historical, cultural, and artistic imagination. This course travels to Edinburgh, Glasgow, and the Highlands to allow students to go beyond the mythologizing and romance to discover Scotland as it has been experienced and performed by the Scottish people. Using Scotland's vibrant and remarkably political theater scene as our jumping-off point, we study this country's history and culture, examining the powerful intersections of myth and reality that shape Scottish identity past and present. We pay particular attention to the dichotomies -- Highland and Lowland; urban and rural; separatist and unionist; poor and rich; Protestant and Catholic, etc. -- that make modern Scotland such a fascinating subject of historical and artistic inquiry.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - Richier, Leah A.

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, HIST 269-01: Death in 19th-Century United States (3). A study of the death and dying during the 19th century in the United States. Topics include Presidential deaths, massacres of Native Americans, African-American cemeteries, Edgar Allen Poe, the 1878 Yellow Fever Epidemic, the murder of New York City prostitutes, and the American Civil War. Includes investigation of gravestones, memorials, and family plots at Stonewall Jackson Cemetery in Lexington, Virginia, and Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia. (HU) Richier.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - Stoler, Mark A.

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, HIST 269-02: Winning World War II: U.S. and Allied Grand Strategies, 1940-1945 (3). Prerequisite: Intiail registration open to sophomores, juniors, or seniors. Open to first-years with instructor consent. The United States fought World War II as part of a coalition, one of the most successful wartime coalitions in history. This seminar explores how and why it did so, and why the Allied effort was so successful. Emphasis is placed on U.S. strategic planning, its relationship to U.S. foreign policies, the ensuing conflicts between U.S. strategies and policies and those desired by its British and Soviet allies, and the ways in which these conflicts were resolved by Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin. Students also focus on civil-military relations and Allied diplomacy during the war, as well as how and why the alliance collapsed after victory had been achieved. Readings include key primary and secondary sources. (HU)  Stoler.

Speaking and Being Zulu in South Africa

HIST 277 - Tallie, Tyrone H., Jr. (T.J.)

"Sanibonani, abangani bami!" ("Greetings, my friends!") Want to learn more about an African language and culture? We spend the first two weeks intensively learning isiZulu, a language spoken by over 10 million people in South Africa. We also learn about the history of the Zulu people in southern Africa, covering topics from colonialism, racial discrimination, gender and sexuality, and music, and we enjoy Zulu music and film. "Masifunde ngamaZulu!" ("Let's learn about the Zulus!")

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295 - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, HIST 295-01: Place and Race: Euro-Exceptionalism in Late-Modern Science (3). The notion of Euro-exceptionalism has been critically discussed ever since the decades following WW II when decolonization, post-colonialism, and anti-racism began to attract widespread scholarly attention. Much of the critical literature has focused on the economics and politics of European imperialism. Little attention has been paid to the fact that Eurocentricity and Caucasian-supremacist thought received significant scientific input during the period 1750-1950. In this course, the involvement of science in the construction of Euro-exceptionalism are comprehensively explored, in particular the role played by Humboldtian geographical science and Darwinian evolution theory. (HU) Rupke.

Seminar: 9/11 and Modern Terrorism

HIST 367 - Senechal, Roberta H.

Terrorism is a form of collective violence famously illustrated in the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon near Washington on September 11, 2001. This course provides an intensive interdisciplinary examination of the origins of the 9/11 attacks and the terrorist organization that launched them. The course also addresses the impact of the attacks and the future prospects of mass violence against civilians, as well as the role of the media in covering (and dramatizing) terrorism. Much of the course focuses on the social divisions and conflicts that lead to terrorism and its increasingly lethal nature over time. Topics include "old terrorism" (as seen in Northern Ireland and Algeria), "new terrorism" (such as that associated with Al Qaeda), the logic of terrorist recruitment, and the nature of and spread of weapons of mass destruction.

Winter 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

European Civilization, 1789 to the Present

HIST 102 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

The French Revolution and Napoleon, the era of nationalism, the rise of socialism, imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and European Union.

History of the United States Since 1876

HIST 108 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

A survey of United States History from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, domestic and international developments, wars, and social and cultural movements.

History of the United States Since 1876

HIST 108 - Senechal, Roberta H.

A survey of United States History from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, domestic and international developments, wars, and social and cultural movements.

Modern Latin America: Túpak Katari to Tupac Shakur

HIST 131 - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A survey of Latin America from the 1781 anticolonial rebellion led by indigenous insurgent Túpak Katari to a globalized present in which Latin American youth listen to Tupac Shakur yet know little of his namesake. Lectures are organized thematically (culture, society, economics, and politics) and chronologically, surveying the historical formation of people and nations in Latin America. Individual countries (especially Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, and Peru) provide examples of how local and transnational forces have shaped the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries of North and South America and the Caribbean, and the cultural distinctions and ethnic diversity that characterize a region too often misperceived as homogeneous.

History of Islamic Civilization II: 1500 to the Present

HIST 171 - Atanasova, Kameliya N.

This course surveys the political, social, and cultural history of the Islamic World from the 16th to 21st centuries, with particular attention paid to the diverse experiences of the various regions that make up the Islamic world. Topics include the emergence of the early modern centralizing states in Iran, Turkey, India, and elsewhere; the spread of Islamic religious and political practices in Africa and Asia; the colonial and post-colonial confrontation between the Islamic World and Europe; and the evolution of new political, cultural, and intellectual movements as Muslim nations in the context of globalization.

Paris: History, Image, Myth, Part I

HIST 207 - Horowitz, Sarah

This course is the prerequisite for the spring course, HIST 210. Students may not take this course and ARTS 222. The history of Paris in the modern era is intimately linked to the history of photography, an artistic medium born out of the intellectual and cultural ferment of the 19th century. This interdisciplinary course, taught in conjunction with ARTS 222, examines both the history of Paris and the city's long photographic tradition. We cover how photography offers insight into the shaping of Paris in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as how the medium has been transformed by the changing landscape of the city.

France in the 19th and 20th Centuries

HIST 209 - Horowitz, Sarah

Historical study of France from the Revolution through the present, tracing France's revolutionary tradition and the continuing "Franco-French" war it spawned, and the construction of and challenges to French national identity. Topics include the successive revolutions of the 19th century, the acquisition and loss of two empires, and the transformations in French society brought by wars, industrialization, and immigration.

Seminar: The Age of the Witch Hunts

HIST 219 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

This course introduces students to one of the most fascinating and disturbing events in the history of the Western world: the witch hunts in early-modern Europe and North America. Between 1450 and 1750, more than 100,000 individuals, from Russia to Salem, were prosecuted for the crime of witchcraft. Most were women and more than half were executed. In this course, we examine the political, religious, social, and legal reasons behind the trials, asking why they occurred in Europe when they did and why they finally ended. We also explore, in brief, global witch hunts that still occur today in places like Africa and India, asking how they resemble yet differ from those of the early-modern world.

Soviet Russia, 1917 to 1991

HIST 221 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

The revolutions of 1917, the emergence of the Soviet system, the Stalinist period, Stalin's successors, and the eventual collapse of the USSR.

International Relations, 1919-2000: The End of European Hegemony

HIST 224 - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

Topics include the Versailles peace settlement of 1919, the spread of the British Empire to the Middle East and birth of Palestinian nationalism, the impact of the Great Depression and totalitarianism on international relations, the outbreak of the Second World War, the Holocaust and foundation of the State of Israel, the Nuremberg Trials, decolonization in Africa and Asia, the origins of the Cold War, and the foundation of the European Economic Community. What have Europeans learned about conflict resolution from their experience of two world wars and numerous colonial wars?

Topics in European History

HIST 229A - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, HIST 229A-01: The History of Poverty in Britain from the Tudors to the Tories (3). This class explores the history of poverty in Britain from the 16th century to the present. We begin with changes to poor relief wrought by the Protestant Reformation and end with contemporary debates about the scope and function of the welfare state. Along the way, we examine Enlightenment ideas about labor and wealth, the Industrial Revolution, the development of class consciousness, debtors' prisons and the rise of workhouses, issues of crime and punishment, and modern intersections between race, poverty, and policy. Throughout, we pay close attention to the experiences of those living in poverty. As we trace the varied ways that British culture has depicted, caricatured, and treated "the poor", this class asks how such depictions have shaped both British social policy and our own assumptions and attitudes. (HU). Brock.

Topics in European History

HIST 229B - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, HIST 229B-01: The Scientist as National Hero (3). We discuss the place of science and its practitioners in Western society, from the time of the Victorian professionalization of science until today, and focus on the formation of a 20th-century elite of Nobel laureates and their role in national politics and, to a lesser extent, international affairs. How/why have some scientists gained extraordinary leadership status in our culture? How/why have some become national heroes, a few even international ones? Can scientists provide the moral and political leadership to deal with the challenges in society that their very successes have created? (HU) Rupke.

Topics in European History

HIST 229C - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, HIST 229C-01: Animal Behavior and Human Morality (3). We trace the history of the study of animal behavior in its bearing on human morality, from the beginning of the professionalization of the subject around 1800 until the present day. Often, tentative connections have been made between the ways animals behave and how humans conduct themselves, thus conferring legitimacy on shared traits. Issues of gender and sexuality traditionally have been at the forefront of these considerations. Animal examples have also been used as the basis of arguments for and against institutions of marriage, family, slavery, systems of government (monarchy, republic, etc.), war, aggression, altruism, and more. (HU) Rupke.

Topics in European History

HIST 229D - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, HIST 229D-01: Nazism and the Third Reich (3). Common readings introduce students to some of the most lively debates among scholars about the causes of the failure of democracy in the Weimar Republic, the mentality of Nazi leaders and followers, the nature of the regime created by the Nazis in 1933, the impact of the Third Reich on the position of women in German society, and the degree to which the German people supported this regime's policies of war and racial persecution. (HU) Patch.

America in the Gilded Age, 1870-1900

HIST 247 - Senechal, Roberta H.

A survey of the transformation of American society under the impact of industrialization and urbanization. It examines how business leaders, workers, farmers, and the middle class attempted to shape the new industrial society to their own purposes. Emphasis is given to social, intellectual, and cultural experiences and to politics.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269A - Richier, Leah A.

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, HIST 269A-01: The New South (3). Henry Grady coined the phrase "The New South" in a 1886 New York City speech. The New South meant free labor industry based on successful Northern economic practices, leaving behind the slave-based agrarian Old South. However, the era of the New South instead witnessed the rise of sharecropping, tenant farming, and convict labor; reimagined Southern cities as sites of historical memory, partially accurate, often mythological, all designed to attract Northern tourism and investment; systemic violence enacted against African-Americans as the South rejected racial equality; and a region-wide re-envisioning of the Old South and the Confederacy now known as Lost Cause ideology. (HU) Richier.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269B - Richier, Leah A.

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, HIST 269B-01: Gender, Sex, and Sexuality in the Civil War (3). This course centers around issues of women, gender, family, heterosexuality, homosexuality, and transgendered peoples during a time period traditionally imagined as a sexless military endeavor. Going beyond female nurses in the Civil War, the course addresses prostitution, venereal disease, sexual violence, Bread Riots, infant mortality, masculinity models, interracial relations, enslaved families, and LGBTQ issues. (HU) Richier.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269C - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269D - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Africa in the Western Imagination

HIST 279 - Tallie, Tyrone H., Jr. (T.J.)

From benefit concerts to AIDS charities to study abroad literature, Africa is everywhere. And yet it is frequently explained only in absence or in suffering. Rather than being a place that is defined by what it is, often Africa is viewed by what it is not, and the term 'Afro-pessimism' has been coined by some to criticize such solely negative depictions of a vast and varied continent. What, then, is 'Africa': a location on a map, a geographical boundary? Who are 'Africans'? What does the idea mean and how is it used? This course draws on literature and popular culture to discuss the very idea of 'Africa' and how the concept has been created, redefined, re-imagined, and (de)constructed in differing times and spaces.

Seminar on Nazism and the Third Reich

HIST 312 - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

Common readings introduce students to some of the most lively debates among scholars about the causes of the failure of democracy in the Weimar Republic, the mentality of Nazi leaders and followers, the nature of the regime created by the Nazis in 1933, the impact of the Third Reich on the position of women in German society, and the degree to which the German people supported this regime's policies of war and racial persecution. Students develop a research topic related to one of these debates for analysis in a substantial research paper utilizing both primary and secondary sources.

Seminar: Slavery in the Americas

HIST 366 - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

An intensive examination of slavery, abolition movements and emancipation in North America, the Caribbean and Latin America. Emphasis is on the use of primary sources and class discussion of assigned readings.

Queering Colonialism

HIST 379 - Tallie, Tyrone H., Jr. (T.J.)

This course seeks to examine the many intersectional and overlapping threads in the histories of colonialism, gender, and sexuality. As authors like Achmat and Cohen have argued, colonialism has simultaneously supported and been supported by heteronormative, patriarchal, and white-supremacist regimes. This course looks at three avenues in which the 'normal' has been both created and contested in colonial histories: the body, belonging, and becoming. We read from a variety of disciplines, eras, and locations in order to understand how bodies can be made normal or 'queer.' We also examine how imperial structures of rule impact the daily lived experiences of people as they attempt to find spaces of belonging and potential for becoming part of a larger group. movement. or idea.

Advanced Seminar

HIST 395A - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, HIST 395A-01: Seminar: The Scientist as National Hero (3). We discuss the place of science and its practitioners in Western society, from the time of the Victorian professionalization of science until today, and focus on the formation of a 20th-century elite of Nobel laureates and their role in national politics and, to a lesser extent, international affairs. How/why have some scientists gained extraordinary leadership status in our culture? How/why have some become national heroes, a few even international ones? Can scientists provide the moral and political leadership to deal with the challenges in society that their very successes have created? (HU) Rupke.

Advanced Seminar

HIST 395B - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, HIST 395B-01: Seminar: Animal Behavior and Human Morality (3). We trace the history of the study of animal behavior in its bearing on human morality, from the beginning of the professionalization of the subject around 1800 until the present day. Often, tentative connections have been made between the ways animals behave and how humans conduct themselves, thus conferring legitimacy on shared traits. Issues of gender and sexuality traditionally have been at the forefront of these considerations. Animal examples have also been used as the basis of arguments for and against institutions of marriage, family, slavery, systems of government (monarchy, republic, etc.), war, aggression, altruism, and more. (HU) Rupke.

Fall 2017, HIST 395A-01: Darwin and his Critics: the History of Evolutionary Biology (3). HIST 295A is for all class years and all majors. HIST 395A is for history majors, with additional required writing and research. The theory of organic evolution is widely considered one of the greatest discoveries of modern science, impacting science and society alike. By and large, the theory has been identified with Darwin and his famous On the Origin of Species . Yet, to what extent is Darwinian theory a cultural construct rather than a factual discovery? In opposition to orthodox Darwinians, such as Ernst Mayr and Richard Dawkins, there have been many critics, ranging from intelligent design advocates in the Anglo-American world to structuralist evolutionary thinkers in the Germanic world, the latter often allied to liberal Christianity. (HU) Rupke.

Directed Individual Study

HIST 401 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered by other courses. May be repeated for degree credit with permission.

Directed Individual Study

HIST 403 - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit each term of the junior and senior year.

Winter 2018, HIST 403-01: Directed Individual Study (3). DeLaney.

Directed Individual Study

HIST 403 - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit each term of the junior and senior year.

Winter 2018, HIST 403-02: Directed Individual Study: History of Education (3). This course surveys the history of education with an inter-American perspective, focusing specifically on the prevailing pedagogical theories embraced by educators and policymakers over the course of the 20th century. During the first half of the course, we read the works of influential pedagogists John Dewey, Paulo Freire, and Gonzalo Rubio Orbe, as well as historical surveys of the education systems in the United States and Latin America at large. The second half of the semester, we focus on the education system in Bolivia,  especially various rural education initiatives. Gildner.

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .

Fall 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

European Civilization, 1500-1789

HIST 101 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

An individual who died in 1500 would have been surprised, if not bewildered, by many aspects of European life and thought in 1800. What changed over these three centuries? What stayed the same? Why should we in the 21st century, care? This course examines the history of Europe from the Renaissance through the beginning of the French Revolution. It explores the interplay of religion, politics, society, culture, and economy at a time when Europe underwent great turmoil and change: the Reformation, the consolidation of state power, the rise of constitutionalism, global expansion and encounters with "others," perpetual warfare, the rise of the market economy, the spread of the slave trade, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. This course discusses how these processes transformed Europe into the Western world of today, while also challenging ideas about what "Western," "European," and "Civilization" actually mean.

China: Origins to 20th-Century Reforms

HIST 103 - Bello, David A.

China's history embodies the full range of experience -as domain of imperial dynasties, target of imperial aggression, dissident member of the cold war Communist bloc, and current regional superpower in East Asia. This course tracks these transitions in political and social organization that, among other things, terminated history's longest lasting monarchical system, ignited two of its largest revolutions, began World War II and produced the most populous nation on earth. A wide range of cultural, political and intellectual stereotypes of China are challenged in the process of exploring its particular historical experience.

History of the United States to 1876

HIST 107 - Richier, Leah A.

A survey of United States history from the colonial period through Reconstruction with emphasis on the American Revolution, the formation of the Constitution, the rise of parties, western expansion, the slavery controversy, sectionalism, secession, Civil War and Reconstruction.

History of the United States to 1876

HIST 107 - Senechal, Roberta H.

A survey of United States history from the colonial period through Reconstruction with emphasis on the American Revolution, the formation of the Constitution, the rise of parties, western expansion, the slavery controversy, sectionalism, secession, Civil War and Reconstruction.

History of Islamic Civilization I: Origins to 1500

HIST 170 - Atanasova, Kameliya N.

This course surveys the political, social, and cultural history of the Islamic World from the 7th to 15th centuries, with particular attention paid to the diverse geographical and cultural contexts in which pre-modern Islamic civilization flourished. Topics include the origins of Islam in late Antiquity; the development of Islamic religious, political, and cultural institutions; the flourishing of medieval Islamic education, science, and literature; the tension among state, ethnic, sectarian, and global Muslim identities; and the emergence of a distinctly Muslim approach to historiography.

FS: First-Year Seminar

HIST 180 - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

Topics vary by term and instructor.

Fall 2017, HIST 180-01: FS: Uncovering W&L's Past HIST (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing.   180-01 is a research seminar that will be reading and writing intensive, and focus on the African American past of W&L and other colleges. We will focus solely on archival research and the issues that eastern colleges have dealt with in reclaiming this past. (HU) DeLaney .

FS: First-Year Seminar

HIST 180 - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

Topics vary by term and instructor.

Fall 2017, HIST 180-02:  FS: The War to End All Wars. First-Year Seminar (3). Prerequisite: First-year class standing. Idealists in Britain and the USA justified participation in the First World War by arguing that it would end all wars, but the horrific reality of battle confounded their expectations. In this writing-intensive seminar, we analyze four very different literary accounts of the experience of war: an autobiography of a British officer who became a pacifist in the trenches; an autobiographical novel by a patriotic German who never lost faith in his nation's cause; a collection of poems by British women who served as munitions workers or nurses; and the memoir of the "Arab Revolt" against Ottoman Turkish rule by "Lawrence of Arabia". Students are asked to ponder what lessons can be learned today from the "Great War" of 1914-1918. (HU) Patch.

France: Old Regime and Revolution

HIST 208 - Horowitz, Sarah

Historical study of France from the reign of Louis XIV to the Revolution, tracing the changes to French society, culture and politics in the 17th and 18th centuries. Topics include absolutism under Louis XIV, the Enlightenment, socioeconomic changes during the 18th century, and the Revolution.

Scandal, Crime, and Spectacle in the 19th Century

HIST 211 - Horowitz, Sarah

This course examines the intersection between scandal, crime, and spectacle in 19th-century France and Britain. We discuss the nature of scandals, the connection between scandals and political change, and how scandals and ideas about crime were used to articulate new ideas about class, gender, and sexuality. In addition, this class covers the rise of new theories of criminality in the 19th century and the popular fascination with crime and violence. Crime and scandal also became interwoven into the fabric of the city as sources of urban spectacle. Students are introduced to text analysis and data mining for the humanities.

The Making of Modern Scotland

HIST 216 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

This course surveys the history of the Scottish people from the medieval period up to the current debates surrounding the possibility of Scottish Independence and the future of Great Britain.  Along the way, we examine the Wars of Independence, the Renaissance and Reformation, the Scottish Enlightenment, the Highland clearances, emigration to North America, involvement in the British Empire, and the development of Scottish nationalism. This course asks two interrelated questions: How has the history of Scotland been made, manipulated, and romanticized over the last seven centuries, and why do we remain fascinated by this small country across the Atlantic? This class, then, is both an introduction to Scottish history, and an exploration of the thin lines between history, myth, and reality.

Imperial Russia, 1682 to 1917

HIST 220 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

From the rise to power of Peter the Great, Russia's first emperor, through the fall of the Romanov dynasty.

International Relations, 1815-1918: Europe and the World

HIST 223 - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

Topics include the "Metternich system" for maintaining peace, strains in that system caused by the rise of nationalism, European relations with Africa and Asia during the era of Free Trade, the dramatic expansion of Europe's colonial empires in the late-19th century (with special emphasis on the partition of Africa), the development of rival alliance systems within Europe, and the causes of the First World War. Our goal is to understand the causes of international conflict and the most successful strategies for maintaining peace.

Discovering W&L's Origins Using Historical Archaeology

HIST 230 - Gaylord, Donald A.

Not open to students who have taken SOAN 181 with the same description. This course introduces students to the practice of historical archaeology using W&L's Liberty Hall campus and ongoing excavations there as a case study. With archaeological excavation and documentary research as our primary sources of data. we use the methods of these two disciplines to analyze our data using tools from the digital humanities to present our findings. Critically, we explore the range of questions and answers that these data and methods of analysis make possible. Hands-on experience with data collection and analysis is the focus of this course, with students working together in groups deciding how to interpret their findings to a public audience about the university's early history. The final project varies by term but might include a short video documentary. a museum display, or a web page.

Early American History to 1788

HIST 240 - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

An intensive study of the political, constitutional, economic and social development of British North America from European discovery through the American Revolution and the years of the Confederation government.

History of Women in America, 1609-1870

HIST 257 - Senechal, Roberta H.

An examination of women's social, political, cultural and economic positions in America through the immediate post-Civil War. Changes in women's education, legal status, position in the family, and participation in the work force with emphasis on the diversity of women's experience, especially the manner in which class and race influenced women's lives. The growth of organized women's rights.

The History of the African-American People to 1877

HIST 259 - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

An intensive study of the African-American experience from the colonial period through Reconstruction. Special emphasis is given to the slave experience, free blacks, black abolitionists, development of African-American culture, Emancipation, Black Reconstruction, and racial attitudes.

The Old South to 1860

HIST 262 - Richier, Leah A.

A study of the making of the Old South. Slavery. Antebellum political, economic, social, and cultural developments. The origins and growth of sectionalism.

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295A - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2017, HIST 295A-01: Darwin and his Critics: the History of Evolutionary Biology (3). HIST 295A is for all class years and all majors. HIST 395A is for history majors, with additional required writing and research. The theory of organic evolution is widely considered one of the greatest discoveries of modern science, impacting science and society alike. By and large, the theory has been identified with Darwin and his famous On the Origin of Species . Yet, to what extent is Darwinian theory a cultural construct rather than a factual discovery? In opposition to orthodox Darwinians, such as Ernst Mayr and Richard Dawkins, there have been many critics, ranging from intelligent design advocates in the Anglo-American world to structuralist evolutionary thinkers in the Germanic world, the latter often allied to liberal Christianity. (HU) Rupke.

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295B - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2017, HIST 295B-01: Science, the Paranormal and the Supernatural (3). HIST 295B is for all class years and all majors. HIST 395B is for history majors, with additional required writing and research. This course explores the fascinating history of the uneasy relationship between science and its contested boundaries where fact and fiction overlap. In modern - especially late-modern - times, science has become the adjudicator of truth - truth in terms of fact and law-like rationality. The result has been a retreat of the occult, of many superstitions, and the uncovering of fallacies and frauds. Yet large sectors of modern society have remained enamored of the paranormal. Even scientific practitioners themselves, including Nobel Laureates, have kept alive a belief in telepathy, precognition and such-like phenomena. Equally persistent, especially in religious circles, has been the conviction that miracles do happen; and, again, great scientists and medical practitioners have supported these and similar notions. More recently, the study of "wonders" has emerged as a separate field of inquiry: anomalistics.  (HU) Rupke.

Seminar in Russian History

HIST 322 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

Selected topics in Russian history, including but not limited to heroes and villains, Soviet biography, Stalin and Stalinism, the USSR in the Second World War and origins of the Cold War, the KGB, and the decline and fall of the Soviet Union and the re-emergence of Russia. May be repeated for degree and major credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2017, HIST 322-01: Seminar In Russian History: USSR in World War II and The Origins Of The Cold War, 1939-1953 (3).  Counts toward a history major, the Russian area studies major, and the Russian culture and language minor. An examination of the role of the Soviet Union in the Second World War and in the origins of the Cold War through analysis of original Soviet documents (in English translation), scholarly studies, and documentary film. Students discuss all assigned readings in class and write a research paper on a topic of their choice with the instructor's approval. (HU) Bidlack.

Seminar: Cold War Politics and Culture

HIST 350 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

This seminar offers a topical survey of the popular culture, social changes, and domestic politics of the Cold War United States. Themes covered in this course include the dawn of the atomic age, the social and cultural anxieties produced by the Cold War, the privatization of suburban family life, the problems of historical memory, the boundaries of political dissent, and the relationship between international and domestic politics. This course pays special attention to how popular culture responded to, interpreted, and shaped key episodes in the recent national past.

Seminar: The Struggle Over China's Environment

HIST 387 - Bello, David A.

The course covers the more recent periods of China's so-called "3,000 years of unsustainable growth" from about A.D. 618 into the present. Themes focus on China's historical experience with sedentary agriculture, fossil fuel and nuclear energy, wildlife and forest management, disease, water control, and major construction projects like the Great Wall.

Advanced Seminar

HIST 395A - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Advanced Seminar

HIST 395B - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2017, HIST 395B-01: Science, the Paranormal and the Supernatural (3). HIST 295B is for all class years and all majors. HIST 395B is for history majors, with additional required writing and research. This course explores the fascinating history of the uneasy relationship between science and its contested boundaries where fact and fiction overlap. In modern - especially late-modern - times, science has become the adjudicator of truth - truth in terms of fact and law-like rationality. The result has been a retreat of the occult, of many superstitions, and the uncovering of fallacies and frauds. Yet large sectors of modern society have remained enamored of the paranormal. Even scientific practitioners themselves, including Nobel Laureates, have kept alive a belief in telepathy, precognition and such-like phenomena. Equally persistent, especially in religious circles, has been the conviction that miracles do happen; and, again, great scientists and medical practitioners have supported these and similar notions. More recently, the study of "wonders" has emerged as a separate field of inquiry: anomalistics.  (HU) Rupke.

Senior Thesis

HIST 473 - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

This course serves as an alternative for HIST 493. Please consult the department head for more details.

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Bello, David A.

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .