Course Offerings

Winter 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

European Civilization, 1789 to the Present

HIST 102 - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

The French Revolution and Napoleon, the era of nationalism, the rise of socialism, imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and European Union.

European Civilization, 1789 to the Present

HIST 102 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

The French Revolution and Napoleon, the era of nationalism, the rise of socialism, imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and European Union.

Japan: Origins to Atomic Aftermath

HIST 104 - Bello, David A.

This course traces the span of Japan's historical development from its origins through the Cold War, with a special, but not exclusive, emphasis on an environmental perspective. The first half of the course covers the emergence of indigenous Japanese society and its adaptation to cultural and political influences from mainland East Asia, including Buddhism, Confucianism, and Chinese concepts of empire. The second half covers Japan's successful transition from a declining Tokugawa Shogunate to a modern imperial nation to a reluctant U.S. Cold War ally from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries.

History of the United States Since 1876

HIST 108 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

A survey of United States History from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, domestic and international developments, wars, and social and cultural movements.

History of the United States Since 1876

HIST 108 - Senechal, Roberta H.

A survey of United States History from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, domestic and international developments, wars, and social and cultural movements.

Modern Latin America: Túpak Katari to Tupac Shakur

HIST 131 - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A survey of Latin America from the 1781 anticolonial rebellion led by indigenous insurgent Túpak Katari to a globalized present in which Latin American youth listen to Tupac Shakur yet know little of his namesake. Lectures are organized thematically (culture, society, economics, and politics) and chronologically, surveying the historical formation of people and nations in Latin America. Individual countries (especially Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, and Peru) provide examples of how local and transnational forces have shaped the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries of North and South America and the Caribbean, and the cultural distinctions and ethnic diversity that characterize a region too often misperceived as homogeneous.

The Italian Renaissance in Its Historical Setting

HIST 203 - Peterson, David S.

Examines, through lectures and discussions, the Italian Renaissance within the framework of European religious, political and cultural development. The rise and impact of commercial and urban values on religious and political life in the Italian communes to the time of Dante. Cultural and political life in the "despotic" signorie and in republics such as Florence and Venice. The diffusion of Renaissance cultural ideals from Florence to the other republics and courts of 15th-century Italy, to the papacy, and to Christian humanists north of the Alps. Readings from Dante, Petrarch, Leonardo Bruni, Pico della Mirandola and Machiavelli.

Women and Gender in Modern Europe

HIST 206 - Horowitz, Sarah

This course investigates the history of Europe from the late 18th century to the present day through the lens of women's lives, gender roles, and changing notions of sexuality. We examine how historical events and movements (industrialization, the world wars, etc.) had an impact on women, we look at how ideas about gender shaped historical phenomena, such as imperialism and totalitarianism. We also consider the rise of new ideas about sexuality and the challenge of feminism.

Dictatorship and Democracy in Germany, 1914-2000

HIST 214 - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

The failure of Germany's first attempt at democracy in the Weimar Republic, the interaction between art and politics, the mentality of the Nazis, the institutions of the Third Reich, the Second World War and Holocaust, the occupation and partition of Germany in 1945, the reasons for the success of democratic institutions in the Federal Republic, the origins of modern feminism, the economic collapse of the German Democratic Republic, and the process of national reunification in 1989-91.

Soviet Russia, 1917 to 1991

HIST 221 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

The revolutions of 1917, the emergence of the Soviet system, the Stalinist period, Stalin's successors, and the eventual collapse of the USSR.

Topics in European History

HIST 229A - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2019, HIST 229A-01: England in the Age of Shakespeare (3). William Shakespeare (1564-1616) lived during a fascinating time of political turmoil, religious change, artistic expression, and global expansion. This course explores the history of England in these years, which span the important reigns of Elizabeth I and James I. Together, we examine the era of personal monarchy and the growing resistance of parliament, the mechanisms of national consolidation and imperial growth, the discoveries and encounters with "others" beyond England's shores, the spread of religious convictions and contradictions, and the great literary and artistic figures of the day. We also investigate what life was like for the average men and women who lived and died during England's "golden age." (HU). Brock .
 

Topics in European History

HIST 229A - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2019, HIST 229A-02: England in the Age of Shakespeare (3). William Shakespeare (1564-1616) lived during a fascinating time of political turmoil, religious change, artistic expression, and global expansion. This course explores the history of England in these years, which span the important reigns of Elizabeth I and James I. Together, we examine the era of personal monarchy and the growing resistance of parliament, the mechanisms of national consolidation and imperial growth, the discoveries and encounters with "others" beyond England's shores, the spread of religious convictions and contradictions, and the great literary and artistic figures of the day. We also investigate what life was like for the average men and women who lived and died during England's "golden age." (HU). Brock.

Topics in European History

HIST 229B - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2019, HIST 229B-01: 'The 'War to End War': The First World War in History and Literature (3). Open to all class years and majors. No course prerequisite. Progressives in Britain and the USA justified participation in the First World War with the argument that the defeat of Imperial Germany would make the world "safe for democracy" and bring about the end of warfare. The horrific reality of combat defied their expectations, however, and left the world more bitterly divided after 1918 than it ever had been. In this discussion- and writing-intensive course, we focus on different forms of personal testimony about the experience of war, beginning with the autobiography of a British officer who became a pacifist in the trenches, a memoir by a patriotic German soldier who never lost faith in his nation's cause, and a collection of poems by British women who served as munitions workers or nurses. Students write a term paper to analyze a body of testimony about the war experience of particular interest to them. Our goal is to analyze how war changes individuals and societies, and to ponder what lessons can be learned today from the "Great War" of 1914-1918. (HU) Patch.

The Evolution of American Warfare

HIST 243 - Myers, Barton A.

This course examines U.S. military history from the colonial period to the post-9/11 American military experience. Since this is a period of more than four hundred years, the course limits its focus to major topics and central questions facing the men and women who have fought in American wars. We trace the course of American military history by focusing on three themes: the early development of American military institutions, the evolution of military policy toward civilian populations, and the changing face of battle in which Americans have fought. All three of these themes relate to the central goal of this course, which is to gain a better understanding of how America's military developed in conjunction with and sometimes in conflict with American democracy.

The History of Violence in America

HIST 256 - Senechal, Roberta H.

An examination of the social origins, evolution, and major forms of extralegal, violent conflict in the United States, including individual and collective violence and conflict related to race, class, gender, politics, and ethnicity, especially emphasizing the 19th and 20th centuries. Major topics include theories of social conflict, slavery and interracial violence, predatory crime, labor strife, and inter-ethnic violence.

The History of the African-American People since 1877

HIST 260 - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

An intensive study of the African-American experience from 1877 to the present. Special emphasis is given to the development of black intellectual and cultural traditions, development of urban communities, emergence of the black middle class, black nationalism, the civil rights era, and the persistence of racism in American society.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269A - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2019, HIST 269A-01: The Harlem Renaissance and the Jazz Age (3). This class focuses on two separate and simultaneous African-American movements of the 1920s: the Harlem Renaissance and the Jazz Age. Both entailed black proficiency in the arts, and embodied, in 1920s parlance, "The New Negro Movement". It was the period of an African-American cultural revolution centered in Harlem. The movement occurred in other American cities and also in places outside the United States. The Harlem Renaissance and the Jazz Age paralleled the era of F. Scott Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby. It was a period of excitement, hope, glamour, and self-determination. "Little wonder," writes historian Nathan Huggins, "Harlemites anticipated the flowering of Negro culture into a racial renaissance." (HU) DeLaney.

Islam in America: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness

HIST 271 - Atanasova, Kameliya N.

From the discourse on the War on Terror, to debates about Muslim women's dress, Islam in America has attracted the attention of journalists, activists, government officials, and scholars of religion. This course takes a critical-historical approach to the topic by examining key themes in the history of Islam in America: the lives of enslaved African Muslims in the Antebellum period and the Founding Fathers' visions of Islam; the immigrant experience of Arab Muslims at the turn of the 20th century; the role of Muslim organizations in the Civil Rights movement; and, the changing representations of American Muslims after the Gulf War and post-9/11. In interrogating the history of Islam in America, we specifically pay attention to the ways in which religion, gender, class, race, and citizenship continue to inform representations of Muslims in the U.S.

Great Moments in the History of Medicine

HIST 278 - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

Significant aspects of medicine's development through the ages. Great doctors and the plight of patients are considered, along with major breakthroughs in diagnostic practice and clinical treatment, benefits and costs to humanity, failures and ethical dilemmas. We explore medicine as a situated practice by dealing with its institutionalization, hospitals, psychiatric institutions, and biomedical laboratories. Special attention is paid to some of the many points of friction that are evident when looking at the changing place of medicine in society. 

Seminar: The Yin and Yang of Gender in Late Imperial China (10th-19th centuries)

HIST 285 - Bello, David A.

Relations between men and women are the basis of any human society, but the exact nature and interpretation of these relations differ from time to time and from place to place. The concepts of Yin (female) and Yang (male) were integral to the theory and practice of Chinese gender relations during the late imperial period, influencing marriage, medicine and law. This course examines the historical significance of late-imperial gender relations across these, and other, categories from both traditional and modern perspectives.

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295A - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2019, HIST 295A-01: Seminar: Darwin and His Critics (3). Not open to students with credit for HIST 395: Darwin and His Critics. One of the most influential scientific theories is the theory of organic evolution. Its history has largely been written by Darwin and his followers. This course looks at the "Darwin industry" and at a revisionist history that incorporates the non-Darwinian approach to the origin of life and species. Giving close attention to the scientific facts and the different theories, we also raise such questions as "Where were these theories situated?" and "What socio-political purposes and religious connotations did they have?" The course ends with bringing to bear the historical perspective on today's ongoing controversies about evolution theory. (HU) Rupke .

Religion and the Church in Medieval and Renaissance Politics and Society

HIST 305 - Peterson, David S.

Using texts and documents from the period itself, this seminar surveys the history of the Christian church in Western Europe and its relations with its neighbors from its emergence in Late Antiquity to the eve of the Protestant Reformation. Topics include the evolution of religious orders, relations with secular powers, scholastic theology, mysticism, humanism, lay religious movements, gender, heresy, and the recurring problem of reform.

Seminar: The French Revolution

HIST 309 - Horowitz, Sarah

The French Revolution is one of the most fascinating and momentous events in European history. At once "the best of times" and "the worst of times," the Revolution was both the origin of modern democracy and a period of tremendous political violence - indeed, some say it is the origins of totalitarianism. In this seminar, we study the following questions: What are the origins of the Revolution? How did a revolution that began with proclamations of human rights turn into one of mass bloodshed in just a few short years? How did a desire for democracy lead to political violence? What was the nature of the Terror, and how can we understand it? We also examine how various schools of history have interpreted the Revolution, as well as the legacy of the Revolution.

Seminar: Slavery in the Americas

HIST 366 - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

An intensive examination of slavery, abolition movements and emancipation in North America, the Caribbean and Latin America. Emphasis is on the use of primary sources and class discussion of assigned readings.

Advanced Seminar

HIST 395A - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2019, HIST 395A-01: Advanced Seminar: Darwin and His Critics (3). Not open to students with credit for HIST 295: Darwin and His Critics. One of the most influential scientific theories is the theory of organic evolution. Its history has largely been written by Darwin and his followers. This course looks at the "Darwin industry" and at a revisionist history that incorporates the non-Darwinian approach to the origin of life and species. Giving close attention to the scientific facts and the different theories, we also raise such questions as "Where were these theories situated?" and "What socio-political purposes and religious connotations did they have?" The course ends with bringing to bear the historical perspective on today's ongoing controversies about evolution theory. Students in this section are required to produce a greater research component in their assignments. (HU) Rupke.

Advanced Seminar

HIST 395B - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2019, HIST 395B-01: Advanced Seminar: Race and Racism in Latin America (3). Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, or 15 credits in history, or consent of the instructor. This seminar examines the history of race and racism in the Americas from 1492 to the present. During the first half, we situate race within the history of ideas and trace its development across the Americas during the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment, analyzing how religion, science, colonialism and capitalism influenced European conceptions of "the Other." In the second half, we examine specific national case studies from the 19th and 20th centuries to explore "the work that race does"—that is, how race has operated in distinct local-historical contexts to generate social exclusion. (HU). Gildner.

Directed Individual Study

HIST 401 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered by other courses. May be repeated for degree credit with permission.

Winter 2019, HIST 401-01: Directed Individual Study:Gender and Heresy in Early Modern Europe (1). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Brock.

Directed Individual Study

HIST 401 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered by other courses. May be repeated for degree credit with permission.

Senior Thesis

HIST 473 - Horowitz, Sarah

This course serves as an alternative for HIST 493. Please consult the department head for more details.

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .

Fall 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

European Civilization, 325-1517

HIST 100 - Vise, Melissa E.

An introductory survey, featuring lectures and discussions of European culture, politics, religion and social life, and of Europe's relations with neighboring societies, from the rise of Christianity in Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages and the Italian Renaissance, to the beginnings of the 16th-century Protestant and Catholic Reformations.

European Civilization, 1500-1789

HIST 101 - Horowitz, Sarah

An individual who died in 1500 would have been surprised, if not bewildered, by many aspects of European life and thought in 1800. What changed over these three centuries? What stayed the same? Why should we in the 21st century, care? This course examines the history of Europe from the Renaissance through the beginning of the French Revolution. It explores the interplay of religion, politics, society, culture, and economy at a time when Europe underwent great turmoil and change: the Reformation, the consolidation of state power, the rise of constitutionalism, global expansion and encounters with "others," perpetual warfare, the rise of the market economy, the spread of the slave trade, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. This course discusses how these processes transformed Europe into the Western world of today, while also challenging ideas about what "Western," "European," and "Civilization" actually mean.

 

China: Origins to 20th-Century Reforms

HIST 103 - Bello, David A.

China's history embodies the full range of experience -as domain of imperial dynasties, target of imperial aggression, dissident member of the cold war Communist bloc, and current regional superpower in East Asia. This course tracks these transitions in political and social organization that, among other things, terminated history's longest lasting monarchical system, ignited two of its largest revolutions, began World War II and produced the most populous nation on earth. A wide range of cultural, political and intellectual stereotypes of China are challenged in the process of exploring its particular historical experience.

History of the United States to 1876

HIST 107 - Myers, Barton A.

A survey of United States history from the colonial period through Reconstruction with emphasis on the American Revolution, the formation of the Constitution, the rise of parties, western expansion, the slavery controversy, sectionalism, secession, Civil War and Reconstruction.

History of the United States to 1876

HIST 107 - Senechal, Roberta H.

A survey of United States history from the colonial period through Reconstruction with emphasis on the American Revolution, the formation of the Constitution, the rise of parties, western expansion, the slavery controversy, sectionalism, secession, Civil War and Reconstruction.

Latin America: Mayas to Independence

HIST 130 - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

An introduction to the "Indian" and Iberian people active from Florida to California through Central and South America between 1450 and 1750.

FS: First-Year Seminar

HIST 180A - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

Topics vary by term and instructor.

Fall 2018, HIST 180A-01: FS: Uncovering W&L's Past HIST (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing. 180A-01 is a research seminar that will be reading and writing intensive, and focus on the African American past of W&L and other colleges. We will focus solely on archival research and the issues that eastern colleges have dealt with in reclaiming this past. (HU) DeLaney.

FS: First-Year Seminar

HIST 180B - Vise, Melissa E.

Topics vary by term and instructor.

Fall 2018, HIST 180B-01: FS: Plague: A Medieval Pandemic (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-Year class standing only. An exploration of the causes, experiences, and consequences of the disease colloquially referred to as 'The Black Death.' Students develop the core skills of historical inquiry by critically engaging with primary sources and discussing questions such as: How did Europeans explain and respond to the disease? Did their society collapse in the face of such devastation or did it spark the Renaissance? How can we use modern science in our work as historians and what contributions might historians bring to the scientists' bench? By the end of this course, students are able to articulate informed perspectives on these topics, while providing compelling and balanced arguments for their interpretations. (HU) Vise.

Topics in History for First-years and Sophomores

HIST 195A - Atanasova, Kameliya N.

Selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2018, HIST 195 A-01: Muhammad: the Prophet of Islam throughout History (3). Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. Other students may register for HIST 289A. To Muslims, Muhammad is a prophetic figure whose model life is to be emulated; to non-Muslims, a controversial figure that has stirred the imagination for centuries. Through an analysis of the earliest non-Muslim sources on Muhammad, to insider Muslim narratives of his miraculous life, to contemporary controversies about visual depictions of Muhammad -- even bans on celebrations of his birthday -- this course challenges common misconceptions about Muhammad as a historical and a religious figure, while fostering critical historical literacy and familiarity with theoretical questions in the study of religion. (HU) Atanasova .

Germany, 1815-1914

HIST 213 - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

The impact of the French Revolution on Germany, the onset of industrialization, the revolution of 1848, the career of Bismarck and Germany's wars of national unification, the Kulturkampf between Protestants and Catholics, the rise of the socialist labor movement, liberal feminism and the movement for women's rights, the origins of "Imperialism" in foreign policy, and Germany's role in the outbreak of the First World War.

The Reformation in Britain: Blood, Sex, and Sermons

HIST 225 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

The Reformation of the 16th century shattered the once unitary religious cultures of England and Scotland. Although important continuities remained, the introduction of Protestantism wrought dramatic effects in both countries, including intense conflict over nature of salvation, the burning of martyrs, the hunting of witches, religious migrations, a reorientation of foreign policy, changes in baptismal and burial practices, and more. Students explore these changes and the lives and legacies of some of history's most fascinating figures, from Henry VIII and Thomas Cromwell in England to Mary Queen of Scots and John Knox in Scotland, while also constantly asking how ordinary English and Scottish men and women experienced the Reformation and its aftermath.

Topics in European History

HIST 229A - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2018, HIST 229A-01: Saints and Sinners in the Puritan Atlantic (3) . May be counted as an American elective toward the major with department head notification to the University Registrar. In the mid-20th century, H.L. Mencken famously defined Puritanism as "the haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy". The popular memory of Puritans has deviated little from this caricature. But what were these devoted English (and early American) Protestants really like? This class explores the history of the Puritans—a term that was itself derisive— on both sides of the Atlantic, as well as the legacy of Puritanism in Britain and America. Topics include the development of Puritanism after the English Reformation, the settlement of Massachusetts, the dramatic trial of Anne Hutchison, relationships and conflicts with Native Americans, the English Civil War and rule of Oliver Cromwell, and the infamous Salem Witch Trials. (HU) Brock .

Topics in European History

HIST 229B - Horowitz, Sarah

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2018, HIST 229B-01: Making Modern Sexuality (3). From where do we get our ideas about sex and sexuality? Are they based in evidence, or do they speak to cultural forces and anxieties of long standing? This course investigates these questions by examining selected topics in the history of sexuality in the modern West, as well as contemporary clinical understandings of these issues and how moral, economic, and cultural forces serve to shroud sexual expression and identities in metaphor and myth. (HU) Horowitz.

The American Civil War

HIST 245 - Myers, Barton A.

The sectional crisis. The election of 1860 and the secession of the southern states. Military strategy and tactics. Weapons, battles, leaders. Life of the common soldier. The politics of war. The economics of growth and destruction. Emancipation. Life behind the lines. Victory and defeat.

 

History of Women in America, 1870 to the Present

HIST 258 - Senechal, Roberta H.

A survey of some of the major topics and themes in American women's lives from the mid-19th century to the present, including domestic and family roles, economic contributions, reproductive experience, education, suffrage, and the emergence of the contemporary feminist movement. The influence on women's roles, behavior, and consciousness by the social and economic changes accompanying industrialization and urbanization and by variations in women's experience caused by differences in race, class, and region.

The U.S. in the Era of World War II

HIST 265 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

This course studies the history of the Second World War, with particular attention to its consequences for the United States. Major topics include the political and economic origins of the war, the American debate over intervention, American military and diplomatic strategy, the effect of the war on the U.S. economy, the consequences for mobilization for American society, and the myth and reality of the "Greatest Generation."

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269A - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2018, HIST 269A-01: Uncovering W&L History (3). Not open to students who have credit for HIST 180 on the same topic . A seminar focusing primarily on Washington College history as it relates to slavery, and placing it within the larger context of local and state history. Student focus intensely on historical methodology and analysis through the use of primary and secondary research. (HU) DeLaney.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269B - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2018, HIST 269B-01: Indigenous Social Movements (3). An analysis of the role that indigenous peoples have played in the historical formation of nation-states in modern Latin America. First, we examine theoretical approaches to indigenous mobilization more broadly. We then analyze specific indigenous movements in Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Guatemala, and Peru. (HU) Gildner.

Key Thinkers on the Environment

HIST 288 - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

"Key thinkers on the environment" are central to this course, ranging from ancient greats such as Aristotle to modern writers such as David Suzuki and E.O. Wilson about the ecosystem crises of the Anthropocene. We highlight certain 19th-century icons of environmentalist awareness and nature preservation, such as Alexander von Humboldt in Europe and Humboldtians in America, including Frederic Edwin Church and Henry David Thoreau.

Topics in Asian, African, or Islamic History

HIST 289A - Atanasova, Kameliya N.

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in Asian or African history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2018, HIST 289A-01: Muhammad: the Prophet of Islam throughout History (3). Prerequisite: Sophomore, junior, or senior class standing only. First-years may register for HIST 195A. To Muslims, Muhammad is a prophetic figure whose model life is to be emulated; to non-Muslims, a controversial figure that has stirred the imagination for centuries. Through an analysis of the earliest non-Muslim sources on Muhammad, to insider Muslim narratives of his miraculous life, to contemporary controversies about visual depictions of Muhammad -- even bans on celebrations of his birthday -- this course challenges common misconceptions about Muhammad as a historical and a religious figure, while fostering critical historical literacy and familiarity with theoretical questions in the study of religion. Students conduct independent research as part of this course. (HU) Atanasova .

 

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295A - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2019, HIST 295A-01: Seminar: Science and Religion (3). The encounter of science and Christian belief in the Western tradition. This encounter is not interpreted as warfare but in terms of several parallel discourses, only one of which is to be understood as conflict. A number of thematic topics are to pass the revue, ranging from early-modern physico-theology to current controversies over Darwinian evolution vs. Intelligent Design. (HU) Rupke.

Seminar: America in the 1960s: History and Memory

HIST 355 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

Hippies, Flower Power, Panthers, Berkeley, Free Love, Free Speech, Freedom Rides, Dylan, Woodstock, Vietnam, Jimi, Janice, Bobby and Martin. The events and images of the 1960s remain a powerful and often divisive force in America's recent history and national memory. This course moves beyond these stereotypical images of the "Sixties" to examine the decade's politics, culture and social movements. Topics include: the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, the Great Society and the War on Poverty, Vietnam, the Anti-War movement and the Counterculture, Massive Resistance, the "Silent Majority" and the Rise of the Conservative Right.

Seminar: Managing Mongols, Manchus, and Muslims: China's Frontier History (16th-20th Centuries)

HIST 386 - Bello, David A.

The unprecedented expansionism of China's last dynasty, the Qing (1644-1911), produced an ethnically and geographically diverse empire whose legacy is the current map and multiethnic society of today's People's Republic of China. The Qing Empire's establishment, extension and consolidation were inextricably bound up with the ethnic identity of its Manchu progenitors. The Manchu attempt to unify diversity resulted in a unique imperial project linking East, Inner and Southeast Asia. This course explores the multiethnic nature and limits of this unification, as well as its 20th-century transformations.

Advanced Seminar

HIST 395A - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki)

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history .

Spring 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Scenes from Chinese History

HIST 105 - Bello, David A.

Film is one of the 20th century's most influential forms of mass communication and, consequently, has been one medium for the creation and maintenance of nation-states. In this sense, no film can be considered as mere entertainment entirely divorced from the social, political, economic and, ultimately, historical context in which it was produced. This is particularly true of modern nation-states "invented" during the 20th century like the People's Republic of China (PRC). This course is intended to explore how contemporary PRC cinema has interpreted Chinese history, as represented by some of that history's pre-PRC milestones of conflict in the Qin and Qing dynasties as well as the Republican period. Students evaluate the films critically as historical products of their own times as well as current historical narratives of the past by examining each event through a pair of films produced at different times in PRC history. Students also examine post-1949 changes in China and its interpretation of its pre-1949 history, and so, by seeing how a country interprets its history at a given time.

Paris: History, Image, Myth, Part II

HIST 210 - Horowitz, Sarah

Students may not take this course and ARTS 223. Participants in this course spend four weeks in Paris asking the following questions: how has history shaped Parisian life and Parisian spaces? How can we use photography to document the city's changing landscape as well as understand its rich past? Indeed, how has photography--the development of which is closely tied to Paris's history--altered the fabric of the city? Topics include the social and political transformations of the 19th century, the shifting geography of artistic Paris, and contemporary trends such as immigration and gentrification. This course is taught in close collaboration with ARTS 223, creating an interdisciplinary context for students to explore the relationship of photography to the modern history and contemporary issues of Paris.

Decline and Fall of the Soviet Union and the Resurgence of Russia

HIST 222 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

This course analyzes the reasons for the decline of the Soviet Union commencing in the latter part of the Brezhnev era and its collapse under the weight of the failed reforms of Gorbachev. It further traces the fragmentation of the USSR into fifteen republics and the simultaneous devolution of authority within the Russian Republic under Yeltsin. The course concludes with the remarkable reassertion of state power under Putin up to the present. Students write an essay assessing the Yeltsin transition and engage in a class debate at the end of the term on the prospects for Russia's future.

Discover Scotland: History and Culture through Theater

HIST 227 - Brock, Michelle D. (Mikki) / Levy, Jemma A.

Spring Term Abroad. For a small nation of just over 5 million, Scotland looms remarkably large in our historical, cultural, and artistic imagination. This course travels to Edinburgh, Glasgow, and the Highlands to allow students to go beyond the mythologizing and romance to discover Scotland as it has been experienced and performed by the Scottish people. Using Scotland's vibrant and remarkably political theater scene as our jumping-off point, we study this country's history and culture, examining the powerful intersections of myth and reality that shape Scottish identity past and present. We pay particular attention to the dichotomies -- Highland and Lowland; urban and rural; separatist and unionist; poor and rich; Protestant and Catholic, etc. -- that make modern Scotland such a fascinating subject of historical and artistic inquiry.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - Richier, Leah A.

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, HIST 269-01: Death in 19th-Century United States (3). A study of the death and dying during the 19th century in the United States. Topics include Presidential deaths, massacres of Native Americans, African-American cemeteries, Edgar Allen Poe, the 1878 Yellow Fever Epidemic, the murder of New York City prostitutes, and the American Civil War. Includes investigation of gravestones, memorials, and family plots at Stonewall Jackson Cemetery in Lexington, Virginia, and Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia. (HU) Richier.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - Stoler, Mark A.

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, HIST 269-02: Winning World War II: U.S. and Allied Grand Strategies, 1940-1945 (3). Prerequisite: Intiail registration open to sophomores, juniors, or seniors. Open to first-years with instructor consent. The United States fought World War II as part of a coalition, one of the most successful wartime coalitions in history. This seminar explores how and why it did so, and why the Allied effort was so successful. Emphasis is placed on U.S. strategic planning, its relationship to U.S. foreign policies, the ensuing conflicts between U.S. strategies and policies and those desired by its British and Soviet allies, and the ways in which these conflicts were resolved by Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin. Students also focus on civil-military relations and Allied diplomacy during the war, as well as how and why the alliance collapsed after victory had been achieved. Readings include key primary and secondary sources. (HU)  Stoler.

Speaking and Being Zulu in South Africa

HIST 277 - Tallie, Tyrone H., Jr. (T.J.)

"Sanibonani, abangani bami!" ("Greetings, my friends!") Want to learn more about an African language and culture? We spend the first two weeks intensively learning isiZulu, a language spoken by over 10 million people in South Africa. We also learn about the history of the Zulu people in southern Africa, covering topics from colonialism, racial discrimination, gender and sexuality, and music, and we enjoy Zulu music and film. "Masifunde ngamaZulu!" ("Let's learn about the Zulus!")

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295 - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, HIST 295-01: Place and Race: Euro-Exceptionalism in Late-Modern Science (3). The notion of Euro-exceptionalism has been critically discussed ever since the decades following WW II when decolonization, post-colonialism, and anti-racism began to attract widespread scholarly attention. Much of the critical literature has focused on the economics and politics of European imperialism. Little attention has been paid to the fact that Eurocentricity and Caucasian-supremacist thought received significant scientific input during the period 1750-1950. In this course, the involvement of science in the construction of Euro-exceptionalism are comprehensively explored, in particular the role played by Humboldtian geographical science and Darwinian evolution theory. (HU) Rupke.

Seminar: 9/11 and Modern Terrorism

HIST 367 - Senechal, Roberta H.

Terrorism is a form of collective violence famously illustrated in the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon near Washington on September 11, 2001. This course provides an intensive interdisciplinary examination of the origins of the 9/11 attacks and the terrorist organization that launched them. The course also addresses the impact of the attacks and the future prospects of mass violence against civilians, as well as the role of the media in covering (and dramatizing) terrorism. Much of the course focuses on the social divisions and conflicts that lead to terrorism and its increasingly lethal nature over time. Topics include "old terrorism" (as seen in Northern Ireland and Algeria), "new terrorism" (such as that associated with Al Qaeda), the logic of terrorist recruitment, and the nature of and spread of weapons of mass destruction.

Directed Individual Study

HIST 401 - Bidlack, Richard H. (Rich)

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered by other courses. May be repeated for degree credit with permission.

Directed Individual Study

HIST 401 - Bello, David A.

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered by other courses. May be repeated for degree credit with permission.