Course Offerings

Fall 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Topics in Creative Writing: Fiction

ENGL 203 - Fuentes, Freddy O.

A course in the practice of writing short fiction, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.

Topics in Creative Writing: Fiction

ENGL 203 - Gavaler, Christopher P. (Chris)

A course in the practice of writing short fiction, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.

Topics in Creative Writing: Fiction

ENGL 203 - Oliver, Bill

A course in the practice of writing short fiction, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.

Topics in Creative Writing: Poetry

ENGL 204 - Ball, Gordon V.

A course in the practice of writing poetry, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.

The Novel

ENGL 232 - STAFF / Adams, Edward A.

An introductory study of the novel written in English. The course may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of modern narrative.

Arthurian Legend

ENGL 240 - Kao, Wan-Chuan

Why does King Arthur continue to fascinate and haunt our cultural imagination? This course surveys the origins and histories of Arthurian literature, beginning with Celtic myths, Welsh tales, and Latin chronicles. We then examine medieval French and English traditions that include Chrétien de Troyes's Perceval , the lais of Marie de France, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight , the Alliterative Morte Arthure , and Malory's Le Morte Darthur . In addition to historical and literary contexts, we explore theoretical issues surrounding the texts, especially the relationship between history and fantasy, courtly love and adultery, erotic love and madness, romance and chivalry, gender and agency, and Europe and its Others. Finally, we investigate Arthurian medievalisms in Victorian England and in American (post)modernity through Tennyson, Twain, Barthelme, and Ishiguro. Along the way, we view various film adaptations of Arthurian legends. All texts are read in modern English translation.

Southern American Literature

ENGL 253 - Smout, Kary

A study of selected fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction by Southern writers in their historical and literary contexts. We practice multiple approaches to critical reading, and students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers.

Topics in British Literature

ENGL 292A - Walle, Taylor F.

Studies in British literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2017, ENGL 292A-01: Topics in British Literature: Literature of the British Slave Trade, 1688-2016 (3). The British slave trade lasted from the mid-1600s until 1807, but its legacy is more tenacious: more than 200 years after the abolition of the slave trade, novelists like Yaa Gyasi are still writing about the horrors and indignities of this violent institution. To study British literature, however, is often to encounter the slave trade as a shadow or a gap, something that lurks in the background of our favorite 18th- and 19th-century novels but never quite breaks through the surface. By placing novels like Mansfield Park (1814) and Jane Eyre (1847) alongside works that deal more explicitly with slavery, this course aims to disrupt that image of cozy, "civilized" England and demonstrate that British literature cannot be separated out from the Atlantic slave trade and British imperialism. (HL) Walle .

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293A - Smith, Rodney T.

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2017, ENGL 293A-01: Topics in American Literature: Literary Editing (3). An apprenticeship in editing for one or more students with the editor of Shenandoah, Washington and Lee's nationally prominent literary magazine. This is a course for anyone interested in editing literary journals, writing for the literary community (blogs, news releases, two book reviews, features, business correspondence), and how both print and on-line journals operate. Often a stepping stone to a publication career, the course involves an introduction to the creation, design, and maintenance of WordPress web sites, as well as a survey of current magazines. The course also offers opportunities for students to practice generating and editing their own texts and those of their peers. Each student oversees one facet of the journal (Poem of the Week, blog, submissions management, contests, social media), and each makes a presentation to the class on the nature and practices of two other current literary journals. Students work in pairs toward an understanding of the role journals play in contemporary literature and engage in peer editing. (HL) Smith .

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293B - STAFF / Adams, Edward A.

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2017, ENGL 293B-01:  Topics in American Literature:  Utopia, Science Fiction, and the Idea of America(s) (3).   What value does the utopian/dystopian text hold in the development of alternative thought?  This course, grounded in science fiction and the African American and Latin American contexts, addresses this question via the thoughtful examination of a range of theoretical, fictional, and cinematic texts.  Works studied throughout the term come from, among others, Carlos Fuentes, Thomas More, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Frederick Jameson, W.E.B. DuBois, Frances Bodomo, Alfonso Cuarón, Octavia Butler, and Samuel Delany. (HL) Wilson.

Seminar for Prospective Majors

ENGL 299 - Keen, Suzanne P.

A study of a topic in literature issuing in a research process and sustained critical writing. Some recent topics have been Detective Fiction; American Indian Literatures; Revenge; and David Thoreau and American Transcendentalism.

Seminar for Prospective Majors

ENGL 299 - Adams, Edward A.

A study of a topic in literature issuing in a research process and sustained critical writing. Some recent topics have been Detective Fiction; American Indian Literatures; Revenge; and David Thoreau and American Transcendentalism.

Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

ENGL 306 - Smith, Rodney T.

Previous workshop experience recommended. Students who have successfully completed either ENGL 204 or 205 should inform the department's administrative assistant, who will grant them permission to enroll. All others should email a short sample of their poetry to the professor. A workshop in writing poems, requiring regular writing and outside reading.

Gender, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

ENGL 312 - Kao, Wan-Chuan

A study of the complex nexus of gender, love, and marriage in medieval legal, theological, political, and cultural discourses. Reading an eclectic range of texts--such as romance, hagiography, fabliau, (auto)biography, conduct literature, and drama--we consider questions of desire, masculinity, femininity, and agency, as well as the production and maintenance of gender roles and of emotional bonds within medieval conjugality. Authors include Chaucer, Chretien de Troyes, Heldris of Cornwall, Andreas Capellanus, Margery Kempe, and Christine de Pisan. Readings in Middle English or in translation. No prior knowledge of medieval languages necessary.

Shakespearean Genres

ENGL 320 - Pickett, Holly C.

In a given term, this course focuses on one or two of the major genres explored by Shakespeare (e.g., histories, tragedies, comedies, tragicomedies/romances, lyric and narrative poetry), in light of Renaissance literary conventions and recent theoretical approaches. Students consider the ways in which Shakespeare's generic experiments are variably inflected by gender, by political considerations, by habitat, and by history.

20th-Century British and Irish Poetry

ENGL 353 - Wheeler, Lesley M.

Selected readings in British poetry from the turn of the century to the present, including the English tradition, international modernism, Irish, and other Commonwealth poetry. We will examine how many poets handle inherited forms, negotiate the world wars, and express identity amid changing definitions of gender and nation.

Topics in Literature in English from 1700-1900

ENGL 393A - Adams, Edward A.

Enrollment limited. A seminar course on literature written in English from 1700 to 1900 with special emphasis on research and discussion. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2017, ENGL 393A-01: Moby Dick: Its Origins, Legacy, and Environmental Context (3). Prerequisite: ENGL 299. This course centers upon Melville's famous quest narrative, which many critics regard as having the best claim to the title of "Great American Novel". We first look to such major British influences as Romantic poet S.T. Coleridge, Victorian prose master Thomas Carlyle, Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness , Hemingway's Old Man and the Sea , and Spielberg's Jaws . The literary and theoretical emphasis, however, stresses Moby Dick's generic status as both an epic and a georgic, that is, a heroic tale of humankind's effort to conquer the natural world through technological prowess—and the tragic results of that (in)glorious aspiration for both humanity and the environment. In this regard, both genre theory and eco-criticism are central to this course's effort to contextualize and comprehend the larger achievement of Melville's masterpiece. (HL) Adams .

Topics in Literature in English since 1900

ENGL 394A - Walle, Taylor F.

Enrollment limited. A seminar course on literature written in English since 1900 with special emphasis on research and discussion. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2017, ENGL 394A-01: Topics in Literature in English since 1900: Between the Acts: The Life and Writing of Virginia Woolf (3). Virginia Woolf is one of the most important writers of the 20th century. She is best remembered for contributions to the modern British novel, but she was also an astute (and prolific) literary critic, as well as an influential feminist thinker. This course considers Woolf in context, reading her work alongside key examples of modernist fiction. Born into a world of strict Victorian morals but coming of age among the vibrant avant-garde, Woolf's life mirrors the fast-paced changes of the early 20th century, and thus her biography and her literary coterie are focal points of our discussion. In addition to canonical works like Mrs. Dalloway (1925) and To the Lighthouse (1927), we also read Between the Acts (1941) and Orlando (1928), as well as selections of Woolf's feminist theory and literary criticism. (HL) Walle .

Senior Research and Writing

ENGL 413 - Gavaler, Christopher P. (Chris)

A collaborative group research and writing project for senior majors, conducted in supervising faculty members' areas of expertise, with directed independent study culminating in a substantial final project. Possible topics include ecocriticism, literature and psychology, material conditions of authorship, and documentary poetics.

Fall 2017, ENGL 413-01: Senior Research and Writing: The Art of Narrative (3). This seminar focuses on the development of narrative strategies in short stories and narrative essays. You identify specific literary techniques, analyze them, and apply them in your own writing—fiction, non-fiction, or a combination. A literary technique is any use of language that can be studied in the context of a literary work, abstracted into a general method, and then recreated in an entirely new work. During the term, you develop two major pieces of writing simultaneously, each worth one third of your final grade: (1) a portfolio of original short fiction and/or personal essays that employs some of the identified techniques; and (2) an analytical essay exploring literary techniques from a range of published works. The essay establishes patterns of technique use and argues why certain techniques are employed for similar or contrasting effects in varying contexts. The remaining third of your final grade is the accumulative average of smaller and process assignments leading up to the major pieces. (HL) Gavaler.

Internship in Literary Editing with Shenandoah

ENGL 453 - Smith, Rodney T.

An apprenticeship in editing for one or more students each 12-week term with the editor of Shenandoah , Washington and Lee's literary magazine. Students are instructed in and assist in these facets of the editor's work: evaluation of manuscripts, proofreading/copyediting, the arrangement of work within an issue, selection of cover art, composing contributor's notes, responding to queries, and issuing news releases. Interns also work toward an understanding of the role of journals in contemporary literature. May be applied once to the English major or Creative Writing Minor and repeated for a maximum of six additional elective credits, as long as the specific projects undertaken are different.

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Conner, Marc C.

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Gavaler, Christopher P. (Chris)

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Gertz, Genelle C.

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Keen, Suzanne P.

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Pickett, Holly C.

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Walle, Taylor F.

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Wheeler, Lesley M.

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).

Spring 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Topics in Creative Writing: Playwriting

ENGL 202 - Gavaler, Christopher P. (Chris)

A course in the practice of writing plays, involving workshops, literary study, critical writing, and performance.

Eco-Writing

ENGL 207 - Green, Leah N.

An expeditionary course in environmental creative writing. Readings include canonical writers such as Frost, Emerson, Auden, Rumi, and Muir, as well as contemporary writers such as W.S. Merwin, Mary Oliver, Janice Ray, Gary Snyder, Annie Dillard, Tich Nhat Hanh, Wendell Berry, and Robert Hass. We take weekly "expeditions" including creative writing hikes, a landscape painting exhibit, and a Buddhist monastery. "Expeditionary courses" sometimes involve moderate to challenging hiking. We research the science and social science of the ecosystems explored, as well as the language of those ecosystems. The course has two primary aspects: (1) reading and literary analysis of eco-literature (fiction, non-fiction, and poetry) and (2) developing skill and craft in creating eco-writing through the act of writing in these genres and through participation in weekly "writing workshop."

Children's Literature

ENGL 234 - Bufkin, Sydney M.

A study of works written in English for children. The course treats major writers, thematic and generic groupings of texts, and children's literature in historical context. Readings may include poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction, and illustrated books, including picture books that dispense with text.

Children's Literature

ENGL 234 - Harrington, Jane F.

A study of works written in English for children. The course treats major writers, thematic and generic groupings of texts, and children's literature in historical context. Readings may include poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction, and illustrated books, including picture books that dispense with text.

The Bible as Literature: Exile and Return

ENGL 237 - Gertz, Genelle C.

Students may not take for degree credit both this course and ENGL 236.  Stories of leaving, and one day returning, are found in nearly every book of the Bible.  Leaving Eden, Ur, or Israel; being sold from one's homeland into slavery; losing the messiah—all of these exiles are critical to any study of the Bible, as well as later literature based on the Bible.  As the poet John Milton well understood, exile, by its nature, includes longing for a return—either to Paradise, to one's homeland, or to the deity's presence on earth; it can also include desire for a new settlement, and a new historical era.  Themes of exile and return connect the Bible to the genre of epic, another ancient literary form, where homecoming and settlement sometimes hail the beginning of a new people, nation, or age.  In this class we explore themes of exile and return in Genesis and Exodus, I and II Kings, Ezekiel, the Gospels of Matthew and John, and the books of Acts and Revelation.  Exile and return feature not just as recurrent themes in separate books, but as narrative forms themselves (such as epic, or even the law, which exiles narrative), as metaphors, spiritual states, and central tropes of Biblical literature.  In addition to focused literary study, we engage with Biblical forms through the history of the book and in local religious contexts.  We study rare Bibles available in special collections and facsimile, becoming familiar with how the bible was experienced in earlier historical periods.  Finally, students engage in fieldwork involving attendance and observance of how local religious communities (outside of one's own faith tradition) read scripture today.

Topics in British Literature

ENGL 292 - Keen, Suzanne P.

Studies in British literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, ENGL 292-01: Topic in British Literature: Utopian or Dystopian? (4). Prerequisite: Completion of the FW requirement. Over a decade ago, celebrated contemporary British science fiction and fantasy writer Gwyneth Jones's Bold as Love sequence anticipated both devolution and "Brexit" in an award-winning series published between 2001-2006. With titles drawn from Jimi Hendrix tunes and allusions to Arthurian legend, Shakespeare's history plays, English folk-tales, American westerns, and Chinese opera, the Bold as Love novels defy generic categories. Theories explored and tested include intertextuality and intermediality, sources and influences, and generic hybrids. (HL) Keen. Spring 2017 only

Topics in British Literature

ENGL 292 - Adams, Edward A.

Studies in British literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, ENGL 292-02:  Middlemarch & Devoted Readers (4). Not open to students who have taken ENGL 299. Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement. This seminar begins with and centers upon George Eliot's Middlemarch, a novel often regarded as one of the greatest and most ambitious produced in the era of the novel's securest cultural dominance and famously described by Virginia Woolf as one of the "few English novels written for grown-up people." It then problematizes this encounter by setting it in light of Rebecca's Mead's critically-acclaimed My Life in Middlemarch, a memoir of her devoted lifelong reading and reading of it, not just for pleasure but for its profound wisdom and insight. The question of such intense admiration verging on fandom is one that has received increasing scholarly attention, particularly in relation to the so-called Janeite phenomenon, that is, the love of Jane Austen fans for her novels, but extends to numerous other novelists, poets, playwrights, fun-makers, and their fans. Students supplement this focus of the course by researching and presenting their own exemplary case studies of such readerly devotion, obsession, or fandom. (HL) Adams.

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293 - Smout, Kary

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, ENGL 293-01: Topics in American Literature: Business in American Literature (4). In his 1776 book The Wealth of Nations , Adam Smith tells a powerful story of the free market as a way to organize our political and economic lives, a story that has governed much of the world ever since. This course studies that story, considers alternate stories of human economic organization, such as those of American Indian tribes, and sees how these stories have been acted out in American business and society. We study novels, films, short stories, non-fiction essays, autobiographies, advertisements, websites, some big corporations, and some local businesses in the Lexington area. Our goal is not to attack American business but to understand its characteristic strengths and weaknesses so we can make the best choices about how to live and work happily in a free market society. (HL) Smout.

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293 - Oliver, Bill

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, ENGL 293-02: Topics in American Literature: The American Short Story (4). Prerequisite: Completion of the FW requirement. Initially limited to First-Years. This course is a study of the evolution of the short story in America from its roots, both domestic and international, tracing the main branches of its development in the 20th century. We also explore more recent permutations of the genre, such as magical realism, new realism, and minimalism. Having gained an appreciation for the history and variety of this distinctly modern genre, we focus our attention on the work of two American masters of the form, contemporaries and erstwhile friends who frequently read and commented on each other's work--Hemingway and Fitzgerald. We examine how they were influenced by their predecessors and by each other and how each helped to shape the genre. (HL) Oliver .

Fresh/Local/Wild: The Poetics of Food

ENGL 307 - Miranda, Deborah A.

This class visits fresh/local/wild food venues each week, where sensory explorations focus on all aspects of foraging, creating, adapting and eating food. Coursework includes guided writing exercises based on the landscape/geography of food both in the field and classroom, with in-depth readings that help us turn topics like food politics, food insecurity, sustainable agriculture and genetically modified foods into poetry. Individual handmade chapbooks of the term's poems serve as the final product. A service learning component is also included in the course through Campus Kitchen.

Middlemarch and Devoted Readers

ENGL 349 - Adams, Edward A.

This seminar begins with and centers upon George Eliot's Middlemarch , a novel often regarded as one of the greatest and most ambitious produced in the era of the novel's securest cultural dominance and famously described by Virginia Woolf as one of the "few English novels written for grown-up people." It then problematizes this encounter by setting it in light of Rebecca's Mead's critically-acclaimed My Life in Middlemarch , a memoir of her devoted lifelong reading and reading of it, not just for pleasure but for its profound wisdom and insight. The question of such intense admiration verging on fandom is one that has received increasing scholarly attention, particularly in relation to the so-called Janeite phenomenon, that is, the love of Jane Austen fans for her novels, but extends to numerous other novelists, poets, playwrights, fun-makers, and their fans. Students supplement this focus of the course by researching and presenting their own exemplary case studies of such readerly devotion, obsession, or fandom.

Visions and Beliefs of the West of Ireland

ENGL 387 - Brown, Alexandra R. (Alex) / Conner, Marc C.

This course immerses the student in the literature, religious traditions, history, and culture of Ireland. The primary focus of the course is on Irish literary expressions and religious beliefs and traditions, from the pre-historic period to the modem day, with a particular emphasis on the modem (early 20th-century) Irish world. Readings are coordinated with site visits, which range from prehistoric and Celtic sites to early and medieval Christian sites to modem Irish life. Major topics and authors include Yeats and Mysticism, St. Brendan's Pilgrimage, Folklore and Myth, Lady Gregory and Visions, Religion in Irish Art, the Blasket Island storytellers, the Mystic Island, and others.

Topics in Literature in English since 1900

ENGL 394 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

Enrollment limited. A seminar course on literature written in English since 1900 with special emphasis on research and discussion. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, ENGL 394-01: Advanced Seminar: Celluloid Shakespeare (4). Prerequisite: ENGL 299. The films adapted from or inspired by William Shakespeare's plays are a genre unto themselves. We study a selection of films, not focused on their faithfulness to the original playscript, but on the creative choices and meanings of the distinct medium of film. We see how the modern era has transmuted the plays through the lens of contemporary sensibility, politics, and culture—and through this new visual mode of storytelling. This course is very much an exploration of how to interpret and appreciate film broadly, as we learn the concepts and lexicon of film with Shakespeare as our case study. Our methods vary: sometimes we study the play in detail and compare several film versions, or we see a film fresh—without having read the play—to approach it as a work of art on its own terms. We hear reports from students about additional films to expand the repertoire of films we study and enjoy. The films we view range from multiple versions of Hamlet, Macbeth , and A Midsummer Night's Dream , to adaptations of As You Like It, Titus Andronicus , and Henry V , to original Shakespeare-inspired films such as Forbidden Planet, A Thousand Acres , and My Own Private Idaho . (HL) Dobin.

Winter 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Topics in Creative Writing: Fiction

ENGL 203 - Fuentes, Freddy O.

A course in the practice of writing short fiction, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.

Topics in Creative Writing: Fiction

ENGL 203 - Harrington, Jane F.

A course in the practice of writing short fiction, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.

Topics in Creative Writing: Poetry

ENGL 204 - Miranda, Deborah A.

A course in the practice of writing poetry, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.

Topics in Creative Writing: Nonfiction

ENGL 206 - Brodie, Laura F.

A course in the practice of writing nonfiction, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

The Novel

ENGL 232 - Walle, Taylor F.

An introductory study of the novel written in English. The course may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of modern narrative.

Winter 2017, ENGL 232-01: The Novel: Frantic and Sickly, Idle and Extravagant: The Gothic Novel from 1764 to 1979 (3). Though long considered "trash," "low-brow," or genre fiction, the gothic novel has enjoyed enduring popularity, from the 18th century to the present day. What is more, the gothic novel encompasses a wider variety of novelistic genres than its reputation generally allows; indeed, the history of the gothic is intimately connected to the history of the novel itself. Beginning with Horace Walpole's Castle of Otranto (1764) and ending with Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber (1979), this course surveys the history of the gothic and, in so doing, charts the evolution of the novel as a form. We read Ann Radcliffe's Sicilian Romance , Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey , Wilkie Collins's the Woman in White , and Oscar Wilde's Picture of Dorian Gray , among others. In addition to considering the basic elements of the novel as a genre, we also challenge the distinction between "literary" and "low-brow" and examine our continued fascination with the gothic mode. (HL) Walle .

Film

ENGL 233 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

An introductory study of film in English. The course may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of film.

Topics in British Literature

ENGL 292A - Walle, Taylor F.

Studies in British literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2017, ENGL 292A-01: Topics in British Literature: A Monstrous Creation: Frankenstein and its Intertexts (3). Much like the creature who haunts its pages, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is itself an assemblage of parts. Drawing on numerous literary and philosophical precedents, Shelley's groundbreaking novel is at once deeply familiar and shockingly new. Placing Frankenstein at its center, this course begins with texts that Shelley invokes—including Paradise Lost , Prometheus, Rousseau, and Coleridge, among others—and ends with texts that she inspires. In so doing, we consider not only the common mythology, questions, and concerns that all of these texts share, but also the nature of literary allusion, homage, and adaptation. Why does the Genesis story remain so central to the Western literary tradition? Why is Shelley's creature an especially compelling representation of humankind's fallen condition? Why does Shelley's novel continue to resonate with modern audiences, two hundred years after its publication? (HL) Walle .

Topics in British Literature

ENGL 292B - Harrington, Jane F.

Studies in British literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2017, ENGL 292B-01: Topics in British Literature: Children's Literature: Grimm, Wilde, and Peculiar (3). Enthusiasts of children's literature will appreciate this romp through the strange, uncut folklore of the Brothers Grimm and the beautiful, subversive fairy tales of Oscar Wilde. In addition to reading the original stories, participants engage with modern picture book versions and academic discourse on the texts and contexts. Lastly, students hunt for the "Grimm" and the "Wilde" in young adult works, including the short stories of Neil Gaiman and the book Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children ." (HL) Harrington

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293A - Ball, Gordon V.

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2017, ENGL 293A-01: Topics in American Literature: The Literature of the Beat Generation (3). A study of a particular movement, focusing on the ways in which cultural and historical context have influenced the composition of and response to literature in the United States. This course examines the writings of such authors as Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs, Anne Waldman, Amiri Baraka, Bob Dylan, Gregory Corso, and Gary Snyder, who wrote starting in the mid-1940s, continuing through later decades, and becoming loosely known as the Beat Generation. What cultural, literary, historical, and religious influences from the U.S. and other parts of the world have shaped their work? What challenges did their boldly different writings face, and how did their reception change over time? What are their themes? Their notions of style? What have they contributed to American (and world) life and letters? The goal of this course is to lay a strong foundation from which such questions can be richly addressed and answered. (HL) Ball.

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293B - Smith, Rodney T.

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2017, ENGL 293B-01: Topics in American Literature: Subverting Stereotypes: Modern Appalachian Literature (3). The stereotype of the Appalachian dweller—a dirty, lazy, ignorant, moonshining, feuding, but musical and comic fundamentalist—is so inaccurate one wonders how it was contrived, as well as why anyone would believe it. However, the residents of the Appalachian Mountains have long struggled to throw off the images foisted upon them in film and print. In this course we examine the counter-narratives presented by recent fiction writers and poets of the region in their effort to probe beyond the highlanders' notorious peculiarities and reach the recognizably human mysteries—diversity, humor, spiritual conflict, divided loyalties—which complicate the nature and experiences of the native mountain people. Our reading includes work by the Appalachian poets, Charles Wright, Ann Pancake, Denise Giardina, Charles Frazier, Robert Morgan, Lynn Powell, Ron Rash and others, and we supplement the reading with films and music. Each student is required to keep a reading journal, make an oral presentation to the class, and write both a short paper and a longer, research-based paper, with an option to substitute creative work for the short paper. (HL) Smith .

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293C - Bufkin, Sydney M.

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2017, ENGL 293C-01: Topics in American Literature: American Gilded Ages (3). It's become something of a commonplace that the beginning of the 21st century looks very much like a second Gilded Age. Thomas Piketty calls our current moment a second Belle Epoque in Capital in the Twenty-First Century , Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein joke on Portlandia that "The dream of the 1890s is alive in Portland," and the Comedy Central series Another Period mines the first Gilded Age for laughs by depicting the Vanderbilt-like Bellacourt family in the reality-TV mode of Keeping Up with the Kardashians or the Real Housewives of Orange County . This course examines the connections between the literature, history, and popular culture of the late-19th and early-20th centuries and that of today. We consider muckraking texts, environmental writing, and the literary forms of naturalism and serialization to compare the cultural forms, historical contexts and political and social issues that resonate both today and at the turn of the previous century. Possible course texts include Upton Sinclair's The Jungle , Barbara Ehrenreich's Nickle and Dimed , Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth , Paolo Bacigalupi's The Water Knife , and the HBO series The Wire . (HL) Bufkin .

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293D - Smith, Rodney T.

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2017, ENGL 293D-01: Topics in American Literature: Introduction to Literary Editing (3). An apprenticeship in editing for one or more students with the editor of Shenandoah, Washington and Lee's nationally prominent literary magazine. This is a course for anyone interested in editing literary journals, writing for the literary community (blogs, news releases, two book reviews, features, business correspondence), and how both print and on-line journals operate. Often a stepping stone to a publication career, the course involves an introduction to the creation, design, and maintenance of WordPress web sites, as well as a survey of current magazines. The course also offers opportunities for students to practice generating and editing their own texts and those of their peers. Each student oversees one facet of the journal (Poem of the Week, blog, submissions management, contests, social media), and each makes a presentation to the class on the nature and practices of two other current literary journals. Students work in pairs toward an understanding of the role journals play in contemporary literature and engage in peer editing. (HL) Smith .

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293E - Brodie, Laura F.

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2017, ENGL 293E-01: Topics in American Literature: Pulitzer Prize-Winning Fiction (3). This course studies trends in contemporary American fiction, and the current publishing industry, by focusing on recent winners of the Pulitzer Prize. We begin with an overview of the prize's history and the judging process, before delving into novels, novellas, and story collections. Readings include Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies, Egan's A Visit from the Goon Squad , and the three nominees from 2012, when no winner was chosen: Johnson's Train Dreams , Russell's Swamplandia , and Wallace's Pale King (excerpts). Students also read and write about three Pulitzer nominees from a year of their choosing. The class explores book review venues—newspapers, blogs, podcasts—and considers the current literary market, from self-publishing through major commercial publishers. (HL) Brodie .

Seminar for Prospective Majors

ENGL 299 - Gertz, Genelle C.

A study of a topic in literature issuing in a research process and sustained critical writing. Some recent topics have been Detective Fiction; American Indian Literatures; Revenge; and David Thoreau and American Transcendentalism.

Winter 2017, ENGL 299-01: Seminar for Prospective Majors: Divinity and Desire in the English Renaissance (3). In this gateway seminar, we study portrayals of secular and divine love in the English Renaissance. We read love poets of Henry VIII's court—Wyatt and Surrey—along with accounts of the last English mystic, Elizabeth Barton, whose way of life ended with the dissolution of the monasteries. We trace discourses of divinity and love through the sonnets of Anne Locke, a Protestant exile in the reign of Mary, along with a host of secular writers in Elizabeth's court—Spenser, Shakespeare, Sidney—culminating with the holy eroticism of metaphysical poet John Donne. Drawing from readings on Tudor courts and discourses of love and romance, students practice the skills of research writing in stages, preparing for the essay requirements of upper-level English courses. (HL) Gertz .

Seminar for Prospective Majors

ENGL 299 - Wheeler, Lesley M.

A study of a topic in literature issuing in a research process and sustained critical writing. Some recent topics have been Detective Fiction; American Indian Literatures; Revenge; and David Thoreau and American Transcendentalism.

Winter 2017, ENGL 299-02: Seminar for Prospective Majors: Poetry's Otherworlds (3). "Speculative fiction" encompasses science fiction and fantasy, but can it include poetry, too? In this gateway seminar, we read recent poetry that departs from consensus reality and estranges the familiar. As students study verse by Anne Sexton, James Merrill, Tracy K. Smith, and Anne Carson in conjunction with theories of the fantastic, they also practice the skills of research writing in stages, preparing for the essay requirements of upper-level English courses. (HL) Wheeler .

Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

ENGL 308 - Gavaler, Christopher P. (Chris)

A workshop in writing fiction, requiring regular writing and outside reading.

The Tudors

ENGL 316 - Gertz, Genelle C.

Famous for his mistresses and marriages, his fickle treatment of courtiers, and his vaunting ambition, Henry VIII did more to change English society and religion than any other king. No one understood Henry's power more carefully than his daughter Elizabeth, who oversaw England's first spy network and jealously guarded her throne from rebel contenders. This course studies the writers who worked for the legendary Tudors, focusing on the love poetry of courtiers, trials, and persecution of religious dissidents, plays, and accounts of exploration to the new world. We trace how the ambitions of the monarch, along with religious revolution and colonial expansion, figure in the work of writers like Wyatt, Surrey, and Anne Askew; Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Southwell; and Thomas More and Walter Ralegh.

18th-Century Novels

ENGL 335 - Walle, Taylor F.

A study of prose fiction up to about 1800, focusing on the 18th-century literary and social developments that have been called "the rise of the novel." Authors likely include Behn, Haywood, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Burney, and/or Austen.

Winter 2017, ENGL 335-01: 18th-Century Novels: Jane Austen: Radical Jane: The Politics of Class, Gender, and Race in Austen's "Polite" Fiction (3). Among 21st-century audiences, Jane Austen's novels are often considered romantic comedies—celebrations of love, companionate marriage, and happy endings. Austen, however, is much more socially-aware and historically-engaged than that reputation allows, and her work contends with a wide range of late 18th- and early 19th-century issues, including the shifting British class structure, women's rights, and slavery. By situating Austen within her historical and literary context, this class seeks to reclaim Austen from the realm of romantic comedy. Over the course of the term, students read Austen's novels in combination with works by late 18th-century authors, such as Burney, Equiano, Radcliffe, Sterne, and Wollstonecraft. Through these pairings students not only encounter a variety of novelistic forms (including the sentimental, the gothic, the novel of manners, and the slave narrative), but also engage with the discourses of class, gender, and race that simmer beneath the glossy surface of Austen's popular novels. (HL) Walle .

Studies in Contemporary Poetry

ENGL 365 - Wheeler, Lesley M.

Focused study of poetry in English from 1980 to the present. Topics vary but can include the role of place in contemporary writing or 21st-century poetry and performance. Depending on interest and department needs, readings may involve mainly U.S. authors or English-language poetry from other regions such as Ireland or the Pacific.

Winter 2017, ENGL 365-01: Studies in Contemporary Poetry: Here, Nowhere (3). Place has become an increasingly urgent subject for poets, as environmental and political crises reshape how human beings interact with the nonhuman world. Students in this class read contemporary poetry in English from North America, Ireland, Britain, and the Pacific, with special attention to transnational works about endangered, damaged, or imaginary locations. Through recent books by Avia, Meehan, Vuong, and others, we consider what difference gender, race, sexuality, and immigration make to how poets navigate the world. (HL) Wheeler .

Literary Theory

ENGL 375 - Warren, James P. (Jim)

An introduction to literary theory, focusing on classic texts in literary criticism and on contemporary developments such as Formalism, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Marxism, New Historicism and Cultural Studies, Feminism and Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism.

Topics in Literature in English since 1900

ENGL 394A - Smout, Kary

Enrollment limited. A seminar course on literature written in English since 1900 with special emphasis on research and discussion. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2017, ENGL 394A-01: Advanced Seminar: Cormac McCarthy (3). Prerequisite: ENGL 299. A study of selected works by one of America's most renowned post-modern authors, who treats shocking subjects in an inimitable style. McCarthy has developed gradually over the last 60 years from a struggling writer and auto parts worker too poor to buy toothpaste to a number one box office draw, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, eager candidate for the Nobel Prize, and novelist behind a major motion picture. Our key question: Why is McCarthy so famous now? How does he do it? What do his works say to us that we are drawn to hear? (HL) Smout.

Topics in Literature in English since 1900

ENGL 394B - Miranda, Deborah A.

Enrollment limited. A seminar course on literature written in English since 1900 with special emphasis on research and discussion. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2017, ENGL 394B-01: Advanced Seminar: "Mother of All Women": Gender in Chicana and Native American Women's Literature (3). Prerequisite: ENGL 299. This course focuses on the intersection of race and gender as they meet in the lives and identities of Chicana and Native American women through readings of poetry, fiction, memoir and drama that give us materials with which to explore some of the interlocking issues: mother-daughter relationships, cultural/ethnic identity, sexual identity, alternative histories, political activism, gendered violence, economic position, and celebrations of survival. Authors include Linda Hogan, Sandra Cisneros, Gloria Anzaldua, Leslie Marmon Silko, Natalie Diaz, Ire'ne Lara Silva, Ernestine Hayes. (HL) Miranda .

Directed Individual Study

ENGL 403 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

A course designed for special students who wish to continue a line of study begun in an earlier advanced course. Their applications approved by the department and accepted by their proposed directors, the students may embark upon directed independent study which must culminate in acceptable papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Directed Individual Study

ENGL 403 - Gertz, Genelle C.

A course designed for special students who wish to continue a line of study begun in an earlier advanced course. Their applications approved by the department and accepted by their proposed directors, the students may embark upon directed independent study which must culminate in acceptable papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Directed Individual Study

ENGL 403 - Oliver, Bill

A course designed for special students who wish to continue a line of study begun in an earlier advanced course. Their applications approved by the department and accepted by their proposed directors, the students may embark upon directed independent study which must culminate in acceptable papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Directed Individual Study

ENGL 403 - Miranda, Deborah A.

A course designed for special students who wish to continue a line of study begun in an earlier advanced course. Their applications approved by the department and accepted by their proposed directors, the students may embark upon directed independent study which must culminate in acceptable papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Senior Research and Writing

ENGL 413 - Bufkin, Sydney M.

A collaborative group research and writing project for senior majors, conducted in supervising faculty members' areas of expertise, with directed independent study culminating in a substantial final project. Possible topics include ecocriticism, literature and psychology, material conditions of authorship, and documentary poetics.

Winter 2017, ENGL 413-01: Senior Research and Writing: Dystopian Narratives (3). This course considers critical approaches to dystopian narratives, their cultural and historical contexts, and their commercial popularity. We read dystopian novels from recent years (possibilities include Paulo Bacigalupi, The Water Knife ; Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake ; William Gibson, The Peripheral ; Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven ; Chang-rae Lee, On Such a Full Sea ) alongside early 20th-century dystopias (Jack London, The Iron Heel ; Sinclair Lewis, It Can't Happen Her e), and examine a few utopian narratives for comparison (Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward; Star Trek ). We also read theoretical work from narrative theory, science fiction studies, and reception/reader response study and evaluate the suitability of different critical and theoretical approaches to dystopian fiction. In the second half of the course, students identify an individual project relating to one of the questions or concerns raised in the course and pursue an extended research paper of their own design. (HL) Bufkin.

Senior Research and Writing

ENGL 413 - Warren, James P. (Jim)

A collaborative group research and writing project for senior majors, conducted in supervising faculty members' areas of expertise, with directed independent study culminating in a substantial final project. Possible topics include ecocriticism, literature and psychology, material conditions of authorship, and documentary poetics.

Winter 2017, ENGL 413-02: Senior Research and Writing: Environmental Literature and Ecocriticism (3). In this course, we investigate the relationship between nature and culture through a focus on environmental literature and the literary theory called ecocriticism. Readings in the history of literary theory lead to discussions of themes such as textual recovery, literary history, genre, cultural geography, material culture, ecofeminism, and environmental justice. We also read a selection of primary texts in environmental literature. These could include works by Henry David Thoreau, Mary Austin, Barry Lopez, Robert Macfarlane, or others. The possibilities for research projects are numberless, and I try to guide students toward projects that join theoretical concerns with literary texts. We work together as a study group, but each student produces a research paper on a topic of individual interest. (HL) Warren .

Senior Research and Writing

ENGL 413 - Gertz, Genelle C.

A collaborative group research and writing project for senior majors, conducted in supervising faculty members' areas of expertise, with directed independent study culminating in a substantial final project. Possible topics include ecocriticism, literature and psychology, material conditions of authorship, and documentary poetics.

Internship in Literary Editing with Shenandoah

ENGL 453 - Smith, Rodney T.

An apprenticeship in editing for one or more students each 12-week term with the editor of Shenandoah , Washington and Lee's literary magazine. Students are instructed in and assist in these facets of the editor's work: evaluation of manuscripts, proofreading/copyediting, the arrangement of work within an issue, selection of cover art, composing contributor's notes, responding to queries, and issuing news releases. Interns also work toward an understanding of the role of journals in contemporary literature. May be applied once to the English major or Creative Writing Minor and repeated for a maximum of six additional elective credits, as long as the specific projects undertaken are different.

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Gertz, Genelle C.

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Keen, Suzanne P.

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Miranda, Deborah A.

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).

Honors Thesis

ENGL 493 - Smith, Rodney T.

A summary of prerequisites and requirements may be obtained at the English Department website (english.wlu.edu ).