Literature in Translation Courses

Winter 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

FS: First-Year Seminar

LIT 180 - STAFF / Youngman, Paul A.

First-year seminar.

Winter 2018, LIT 180-01: FS: Jinn and Ghosts: Poetry, Madness, and Memory in Modern Arabic Literature (3). First-year seminar. Prerequisite: First-year standing. Completion of FDR writing requirement (FW). This course traces the trope of the jinn in Arabic literature: from the place of jinn in the Qur'an and Islamic tradition, through their entanglement with poetic inspiration, to their reincarnation in modern works of literature. More specifically, we ask why do modern authors call up demons and resurrect ghosts, and what political and cultural work these beings, which are neither human nor divine, not quite living and not quite dead, are required to do. Consequently, we explore the manner jinn are latched onto modern debates on personal and collective trauma, memory, madness, relations between East and West (or North and South), political violence, gender difference, and virtual realities. (HL) Alon.

Greek Literature from Homer to the Early Hellenistic Period

LIT 203 - Crotty, Kevin M.

Readings in translation from Homer, Hesiod, the tragedians, the comedians, and the lyric and pastoral poets, including selections from Herodotus and Thucydides, and from Plato's and Aristotle's reflections on literature. The course includes readings from modern critical writings. We read some of the most famous stories of the Western world--from the Iliad and the Odyssey , to Milton's Paradise Lost and Joyce's Ulysses , via Virgil's Aeneid and Lucan's Civil War . All of these works are epic narratives, each presenting a different concept of the hero, and yet, at the same time, participating in a coherent, on-going and unfinished tradition. We consider such questions as the role of violence in literature; the concept of the heroic as it reflects evolving ideas of the individual and society; and the idea of a literary tradition.

20th-Century Russian Literature in Translation

LIT 215 - Brodsky, Anna

Selected Russian literary masterpieces (short stories, plays and novels). Authors include Olesha, Babel, Nabokov, and Solzhenitsyn.

Pre-Modern Chinese Literature in Translation

LIT 218 - Fu, Hongchu

A survey of Chinese literature from the earliest period to the founding of the Republic in 1912. Taught in English, the course presupposes no previous knowledge of China or Chinese culture. The literature is presented in the context of its intellectual, philosophical and cultural background. Texts used may vary from year to year and include a wide selection of fiction, poetry, historical documents, Chinese drama (opera) and prose works. Audiovisual materials are used when appropriate and available.

Modern Jewish Literature in Translation

LIT 273 - Marks, Richard G.

Readings in the works of 20th-century Jewish authors, studied as literary responses to the historical and religious crises of modern Jewish life in Europe, the United States, and Israel.

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - STAFF / Youngman, Paul A.

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, LIT 295-01: Hidden Figures: Arab Women Writers, Genres and Forms (3). Prerequisite: Completion of the FDR writing requirement (FW). This course examines literary works of women writers in the Arabic literary tradition. In the Western world, Arab women's fiction is often read in order to gain insight into the social and political questions facing women in various Arab societies - the metaphorical drawing of the veil from the face of the Arab woman. We follow this mode of inquiry to some extent, and we also consider our eagerness to draw back this veil in the first place. While paying attention to literary themes, poetics, rhetoric, and literary forms, we examine the roles women came to fulfill in Arabic literary culture, the narrative and poetic forms they have adopted in their writing in different periods, and the way these reflect on gender dynamics in the Middle East. (HL). Alon.

Representations of Women, Gender and Sexuality in World Literature

LIT 310 - Radulescu, Domnica V.

This course examines a plethora of literary texts chosen from across historical periods from antiquity, through early modern times, to the modern and postmodern era and across several national traditions and cultural landscapes.  Its main intellectual objective is to sensitize students to the ways in which women and gender have been represented in literary texts of various genres and to help them develop specific analytic skills in order to discover and evaluate the interconnections between the treatment of women in society and their artistic reflections in works of literature.

Fall 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Modern Chinese Literature in Translation

LIT 220 - Zhu, Yanhong

This is a survey course to introduce students to the literature of 20th-century China. Through close reading of key literary texts from the 1910s to the present, students explore the social, historical and literary background that gave rise to the texts studied and the ways in which these texts address various issues that China faced at the time. Taught in English, the course presupposes no previous knowledge of China or Chinese culture. In addition to the selected literary texts, the course introduces several feature films that are cinematic adaptations of modern Chinese fiction and explore the complex and dynamic interchange between literary and cinematic language.

19th-Century Russian Literature in Translation

LIT 263 - Brodsky, Anna

A study of major works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov.

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295A - Youngman, Paul A.

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Crockett, Roger A.

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.