Literature in Translation Courses

Fall 2016

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Modern Chinese Literature in Translation

LIT 220 - Zhu, Yanhong

This is a survey course to introduce students to the literature of 20th-century China. Through close reading of key literary texts from the 1910s to the present, students explore the social, historical and literary background that gave rise to the texts studied and the ways in which these texts address various issues that China faced at the time. Taught in English, the course presupposes no previous knowledge of China or Chinese culture. In addition to the selected literary texts, the course introduces several feature films that are cinematic adaptations of modern Chinese fiction and explore the complex and dynamic interchange between literary and cinematic language.

Seminar in Japanese Literature in Translation

LIT 223 - Ikeda Yuba, Janet

Selected topics in Japanese literature, varying from year to year. Possible topics include the development of poetic forms, Heian court literature and art, diaries, epics, Buddhist literature, the culture of food and tea, and Noh drama.

Fall 2016, LIT 223-01: Seminar in Japanese Lit in Trans: Food and Tea in Japan (3). No prerequisite. Corequisite: LIT 223L.   This seminar explores the distinct theme of food and tea in Japanese culture and literature. We examine three broad categories throughout the term; kaiseki, bento, and common fare. In addition to three hours of lecture, this unique course requires a "cultural lab" where students master the rudimentary procedure of the tea ceremony in the Japanese tea room in Watson Pavilion. (HL) Ikeda.

Seminar in Japanese Literature in Translation

LIT 223L - Ikeda Yuba, Janet

Selected topics in Japanese literature, varying from year to year. Possible topics include the development of poetic forms, Heian court literature and art, diaries, epics, Buddhist literature, the culture of food and tea, and Noh drama.

Spring 2016

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Xie, Fang (Laura)

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2016, LIT 295-01: Tang Xianzu Meets William Shakespeare: Classical Theater of China and the Encounter between Two Cultures (4). Prerequisite: Completion of the FDR FW requirement. This course introduces the classical theater of China and its intercultural attempts with regard to Shakespeare in contemporary times. We examine various aspects of classical Chinese theater, its musical construction, stage presentation, the virtuosity of the actor, role types, costume and make up, and so forth. We read classic works of Chinese opera authors and explore the cross-cultural issues that arise when Shakespeare's plays meet and mix with various forms of classical Chinese theater. In addition, students learn the basics of Chinese theater by participating in a full-immersion theater workshop session with professional actors. (HL) Xie .

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Edwards, Anthony (Antoine)

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2016, LIT 295-02: The Arab World through Film (4). Prerequisite: Completion of the FDR FW requirement. The geopolitical importance of the Arab world and the legacy of Orientalism reduce "the Arab" and the region to stereotypes and misrepresentations. In order to challenge these depictions, we start by asking how Arab cinema represents contemporary Arab society'. This course introduces the student to the vibrant societies and dynamic cultures of the Arab world through the medium of film. This course analyzes, upholds, and challenges issues of social and cultural significance in the region. (HL) Edwards.

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Kamara, Mohamed

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2016, LIT 295-03: The Human Rights Question in African Literature (4). Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement. May be used as an elective toward any major in the Romance languages. From the days of African empires, through the slave trade, colonization, the cold war, civil wars, to the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and today's persistent debates over the benefits and deficits of immigration and globalization, human rights have always been present, even in their absence, at the core of Africa's relations with herself and with others. No mode of expression in Africa has interrogated this issue more than the continent's literature. What are human rights? How are notions of human rights in Africa different from those derived from western (Enlightenment) traditions? Or, are they different? What does the 13th-century French declaration of individual and collective rights, "La Charte du Mandé, " occasioned by Emperor Sundjata Keita's 1235 victories, have in common with the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights , among others? Are human rights the same as natural rights, the same as peoples' rights, individual rights? How do women's and children's rights, for example, fit into the universal and universalizing concept of the 'droits de l'homme' or the 'rights of man'? These vexing questions and others are explored through discussions of mostly literary texts and films. (HL) Kamara .

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Bailey, Matthew J.

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2016, LIT 295-04: The Medieval Epic from Beowulf to Game of Thrones (3) . The medieval epic celebrates warrior culture and the values that enhance clan loyalty, group cohesion, the defeat of enemies, the expansion and defense of territory, and the prosperity of families and kingdoms. Modern versions of the medieval epic retain some of these values, discard others and introduce new concerns. To understand this transformative process, this course studies Beowulf, Song of Roland , and Poem of the Cid in modern English and compares them to their film versions as well as to popular epic cycles such as Game of Thrones, Lord of the Rings , and Star Wars .  (HL) Bailey .

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Crockett, Roger A.

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2016, LIT 295-05: Brecht: Drama, Prose, Theory (4). Prerequisite: Completion of the FW FDR requirement. An in-depth investigation of the dramas, prose  fiction, poetry and theatrical practice of Bertolt Brecht, a leading playwright and drama theorist of the early 20th century. Readings include The Threepenny Opera; masterworks The Life of Galilei, Mother Courage, and The Caucasian Chalk Circle; representative narratives and poems; and theoretical writings on acting and set design. (HL) Crockett.

Winter 2016

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

20th-Century Russian Literature in Translation

LIT 215 - Brodsky, Anna

Selected Russian literary masterpieces (short stories, plays and novels). Authors include Olesha, Babel, Nabokov, and Solzhenitsyn.

Pre-Modern Chinese Literature in Translation

LIT 218 - Xie, Fang (Laura)

A survey of Chinese literature from the earliest period to the founding of the Republic in 1912. Taught in English, the course presupposes no previous knowledge of China or Chinese culture. The literature is presented in the context of its intellectual, philosophical and cultural background. Texts used may vary from year to year and include a wide selection of fiction, poetry, historical documents, Chinese drama (opera) and prose works. Audiovisual materials are used when appropriate and available.

Japanese Literature in Translation

LIT 221 - Ikeda Yuba, Janet

An introduction to Japanese literature in its historical and cultural contexts from premodern to modern times. The course materials draw upon selections from the earliest prose works to contemporary fiction of representative modern writers.