East-Asian Languages & Literatures Major Requirements

2016 - 2017 Catalog

East Asian Languages and Literatures major leading to BA degree

A major in East Asian Languages and Literatures leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree requires completion of at least 33 credits, including an emphasis in either Chinese or Japanese as follows.

  1. Language core: At least four courses (12-14 credits), in either Chinese or Japanese, including CHIN 302 or JAPN 302, chosen from the following:
    CHIN 261, 262, 301, 302 311, 312
    JAPN 261, 262, 301, 302, 311, 312
  2. Literature and Culture Core: Two courses chosen from
    EALL 175, 215;
    LIT 218, 220, 221, 223, 225, 235, and 295 (when appropriate)
  3. At least 6 additional credits chosen from the following:
    CHIN 311, 312, 315, 401, 402, 403
    JAPN 311, 312, 401, 402, 403
    LIT 395 (when appropriate)
  4. General courses: At least 6 additional credits taken from the following, or from additional courses approved in advance by the department head.
    ARTH 140, 240, 241
    CHIN 103,113, 263, 305, 315, 363 (maximum of 4 credits from this group)
    ECON 272, 274
    HIST 103, 104
    JAPN 100, 115, 265, 365 (4 credits total from this group)
    PHIL 130
    POL 227
    REL 103, 131
  5. Capstone Experience: EALL 399 (1), and optionally, EALL 493-493 (6)

Students with background in the core language may substitute courses with the advance approval of the East Asian Languages and Literatures department head. Native speakers in either Chinese or Japanese will be required to study the other language to fulfill the requirements.

The East Asian Languages and Literatures major may not be combined with the interdisciplinary minor in East Asian Studies.

  1. Language core:
  2. At least 4 courses (12-14 credits), including CHIN 302 or JAPN 302, chosen from the following:

    • CHIN 261 - Second-Year Chinese I

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall

      A continuation of first-year Chinese with intensive drill in spoken Chinese closely coordinated with acquiring Chinese characters and reinforcing sentence patterns. Audiovisual materials are used extensively.


    • CHIN 262 - Second-Year Chinese II

      FDR: FL
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Winter

      A continuation of CHIN 261 with intensive drill in spoken Chinese closely coordinated with acquiring Chinese characters and reinforcing sentence patterns.


    • CHIN 301 - Third-Year Chinese I

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall

      This course is focused upon reinforcement of Chinese structural patterns and extensive acquisition of Chinese characters, as well as topical conversational practice and the introduction of much cultural information essential to communication in Chinese.


    • CHIN 302 - Third-Year Chinese II

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter

      A continuation of CHIN 301 with added emphasis on writing.


    • CHIN 311 - Advanced Chinese I

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall

      Advanced readings with discussion in Chinese. This course reinforces Chinese structural patterns and extensive acquisition of Chinese characters and enhances students' ability to speak and to write. Topics involving current Chinese culture are introduced and discussed.


    • CHIN 312 - Advanced Chinese II

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter

      This course focuses on advanced readings in Chinese literature with intensive practice in speaking and writing. The texts analyzed are authentic modern literary works from both China and Taiwan .


    • JAPN 261 - Second-Year Japanese I

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall

      A continuation of JAPN 112 with emphasis on the spoken language and written texts using audiovisual materials.


    • JAPN 262 - Second-Year Japanese II

      FDR: FL
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Winter

      A continuation of JAPN 261 with intensive drills in spoken Japanese and the close reading of texts.


    • JAPN 301 - Third-Year Japanese I

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall

      A continuation of JAPN 262 designed to further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Advanced classroom drills, reading texts, and taped materials provide systematic practice in increasingly complex discourses and acquaint students with key aspects of Japanese customs, culture, and society.


    • JAPN 302 - Third-Year Japanese II

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter

      A continuation of JAPN 301.


    • JAPN 311 - Advanced Japanese I

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall

      Advanced readings, discussion in Japanese and written responses to a variety of literary materials, including relevant journal and newspaper articles. Whenever available, video materials will supplement readings.


    • JAPN 312 - Advanced Japanese II

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter

      A continuation of JAPN 311 with an emphasis on reading and discussing literary works. Advanced readings in Japanese modern prose, poetry, and drama and discussion in Japanese of literature and literary criticism.


  3. Literature and Culture Core:
  4. Two courses chosen from:

    • EALL 175 - Cool Japan: A Visual Journey through Anime, Manga, Robots, Language, and Culture

      FDR: HU
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring 2018 and alternate years

      Taught in English, this course examines a variety of visual artifacts such as manga, anime, and unique social phenomena, observable in current Japan through reading materials and discussions, to understand Japanese culture and society. Students learn the visually beautiful writing system of Japanese and onomatopoeia, which is used extensively in Japanese manga. Through hands-on experiences, students gain a deeper understanding and multicultural perspective of the culture and society of Japan


    • EALL 215 - East Asian Cinema

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring 2013 and alternate years

      This course provides an introduction to and overview of contemporary East Asian cinema, including the Chinese-language cinemas of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, and those of Japan and Korea. It focuses on the flourishing cinema of East Asia since the 1980s and provides a solid foundation in the successes and dominant tendencies of contemporary East Asian cinema and culture. Among the aims of the course are examining ways in which the contemporary East Asian cinemas and cultures are in dialogue with one another and looking at specific conditions and cultural forces at work in each unique case. The course also explores how the cinemas of East Asia reflect the changing cultural, economic, historical, political and social conditions of each country and how these cinemas and cultures are part of a larger redefinition of the idea of a national culture. Screenings and readings consist of exemplary works from each East Asian culture, organized around specific motifs, such as history, memory, identity, communication, love, and death.


    • LIT 218 - Pre-Modern Chinese Literature in Translation

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall

      A survey of Chinese literature from the earliest period to the founding of the Republic in 1912. Taught in English, the course presupposes no previous knowledge of China or Chinese culture. The literature is presented in the context of its intellectual, philosophical and cultural background. Texts used may vary from year to year and include a wide selection of fiction, poetry, historical documents, Chinese drama (opera) and prose works. Audiovisual materials are used when appropriate and available.


    • LIT 220 - Modern Chinese Literature in Translation

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter

      This is a survey course to introduce students to the literature of 20th-century China. Through close reading of key literary texts from the 1910s to the present, students explore the social, historical and literary background that gave rise to the texts studied and the ways in which these texts address various issues that China faced at the time. Taught in English, the course presupposes no previous knowledge of China or Chinese culture. In addition to the selected literary texts, the course introduces several feature films that are cinematic adaptations of modern Chinese fiction and explore the complex and dynamic interchange between literary and cinematic language.


    • LIT 221 - Japanese Literature in Translation

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter

      An introduction to Japanese literature in its historical and cultural contexts from premodern to modern times. The course materials draw upon selections from the earliest prose works to contemporary fiction of representative modern writers.


    • LIT 223 - Seminar in Japanese Literature in Translation

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall

      Selected topics in Japanese literature, varying from year to year. Possible topics include the development of poetic forms, Heian court literature and art, diaries, epics, Buddhist literature, the culture of food and tea, and Noh drama.

      Fall 2016, LIT 223-01: Seminar in Japanese Lit in Trans: Food and Tea in Japan (3). No prerequisite. Corequisite: LIT 223L.  This seminar explores the distinct theme of food and tea in Japanese culture and literature. We examine three broad categories throughout the term; kaiseki, bento, and common fare. In addition to three hours of lecture, this unique course requires a "cultural lab" where students master the rudimentary procedure of the tea ceremony in the Japanese tea room in Watson Pavilion. (HL) Ikeda.


    • LIT 225 - Poetry and Drama of Japan in Translation

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall

      This course is designed to introduce students to the poetry and theater of Japan's premodern era. We examine classical themes and poetic art forms, and read from the vast canon of Japanese poetry. Readings cover major poets such as Hitomaro, Komachi, Teika, Saigyo, Sogi and Basho. The second part of the course offers a close study of the four traditional dramatic art forms of Japan: Noh, Kyogen or Comic Theater, Puppet Theater, and Kabuki. Students experience the performative aspect of the Noh theater by learning dance movements and song/chant from the play Yuya . The final part of the course demonstrates how classical theater has influenced modern playwrights and novelists.


    • LIT 235 - Tragedies East and West

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: When departmental resources are available

      This course is designed to introduce students to the topic of tragedy in both China and the West from its origin in Greece and the Chinese Yuan dynasty up to modern times. It examines the concept of tragedy as a literary genre in the West, its evolution in history, and the aptness of its application to Chinese drama. Primary texts from Western and Chinese classical drama as well as from the modern period are selected as a basis for comparison, with a view to helping students form a comparative perspective in their appreciation of both Chinese and Western drama. Course activities include frequent discussions, writing assignments and projects of student performance, video screenings and a possible trip to either Washington DC or New York City to view a Chinese or Western play in performance.


    • LIT 295 - Special Topics in Literature in Translation (when appropriate)

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

      A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      Fall 2016, LIT 295A-01: Germanic Heroes and Arthurian Legends (3). Prerequisite: Completion of the FDR FW requirement. The German Middle ages gave us beautiful courtly love poetry, a blossoming of Arthurian legends, and the larger than life Nibelungen heroes. Readings include the amorous, playful and sometimes naughty Minnesang, Wolfram's epic of the Grail Parzival, Gottfried's tragic love story Tristan and Isolde and the German national epic Song of the Nibelungen. We also trace the late Medieval origins of the Faust legend and view the early years of the Reformation through the lens of Martin Luther and of the shoemaker-poet Hans Sachs. (HL) Crockett.

      Spring 2016, LIT 295-01: Tang Xianzu Meets William Shakespeare: Classical Theater of China and the Encounter between Two Cultures (4). Prerequisite: Completion of the FDR FW requirement. This course introduces the classical theater of China and its intercultural attempts with regard to Shakespeare in contemporary times. We examine various aspects of classical Chinese theater, its musical construction, stage presentation, the virtuosity of the actor, role types, costume and make up, and so forth. We read classic works of Chinese opera authors and explore the cross-cultural issues that arise when Shakespeare's plays meet and mix with various forms of classical Chinese theater. In addition, students learn the basics of Chinese theater by participating in a full-immersion theater workshop session with professional actors. (HL) Xie.

      Spring 2016, LIT 295-02: The Arab World through Film (4). Prerequisite: Completion of the FDR FW requirement. The geopolitical importance of the Arab world and the legacy of Orientalism reduce "the Arab" and the region to stereotypes and misrepresentations. In order to challenge these depictions, we start by asking how Arab cinema represents contemporary Arab society'. This course introduces the student to the vibrant societies and dynamic cultures of the Arab world through the medium of film. This course analyzes, upholds, and challenges issues of social and cultural significance in the region. (HL) Edwards.

      Spring 2016, LIT 295-03: The Human Rights Question in African Literature (4). Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement. May be used as an elective toward any major in the Romance languages. From the days of African empires, through the slave trade, colonization, the cold war, civil wars, to the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and today's persistent debates over the benefits and deficits of immigration and globalization, human rights have always been present, even in their absence, at the core of Africa's relations with herself and with others. No mode of expression in Africa has interrogated this issue more than the continent's literature. What are human rights? How are notions of human rights in Africa different from those derived from western (Enlightenment) traditions? Or, are they different? What does the 13th-century French declaration of individual and collective rights, "La Charte du Mandé," occasioned by Emperor Sundjata Keita's 1235 victories, have in common with the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, among others? Are human rights the same as natural rights, the same as peoples' rights, individual rights? How do women's and children's rights, for example, fit into the universal and universalizing concept of the 'droits de l'homme' or the 'rights of man'? These vexing questions and others are explored through discussions of mostly literary texts and films. (HL) Kamara.

      Spring 2016, LIT 295-04: The Medieval Epic from Beowulf to Game of Thrones (3). The medieval epic celebrates warrior culture and the values that enhance clan loyalty, group cohesion, the defeat of enemies, the expansion and defense of territory, and the prosperity of families and kingdoms. Modern versions of the medieval epic retain some of these values, discard others and introduce new concerns. To understand this transformative process, this course studies Beowulf, Song of Roland, and Poem of the Cid in modern English and compares them to their film versions as well as to popular epic cycles such as Game of Thrones, Lord of the Rings, and Star Wars.  (HL) Bailey.

      Spring 2016, LIT 295-05: Brecht: Drama, Prose, Theory (4). Prerequisite: Completion of the FW FDR requirement. An in-depth investigation of the dramas, prose  fiction, poetry and theatrical practice of Bertolt Brecht, a leading playwright and drama theorist of the early 20th century. Readings include The Threepenny Opera; masterworks The Life of Galilei, Mother Courage, and The Caucasian Chalk Circle; representative narratives and poems; and theoretical writings on acting and set design. (HL) Crockett.


  5. At least 6 additional credits chosen from the following:
    • CHIN 311 - Advanced Chinese I

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall

      Advanced readings with discussion in Chinese. This course reinforces Chinese structural patterns and extensive acquisition of Chinese characters and enhances students' ability to speak and to write. Topics involving current Chinese culture are introduced and discussed.


    • CHIN 312 - Advanced Chinese II

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter

      This course focuses on advanced readings in Chinese literature with intensive practice in speaking and writing. The texts analyzed are authentic modern literary works from both China and Taiwan .


    • CHIN 315 - Introduction to Classical Chinese

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter, when departmental resources permit

      This course is an introduction to the basic grammar and syntax of classical Chinese, the standard written language in China for over two millennia until the early 20th century (and for many centuries the first written language in Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, as well). Literary, historical, philosophical, or political texts from the premodern Chinese era are selected for oral discussion and for written exercise. The aim of the course is to help students gain reading knowledge of and be able to appreciate the treasure house of the ancient Chinese culture.


    • CHIN 401 - Directed Individual Study

      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

      Advanced study in Chinese. The nature and content of the course will be determined by the students' needs and by an evaluation of their previous work.


    • CHIN 402 - Directed Individual Study

      Credits: 2
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

      Advanced study in Chinese. The nature and content of the course will be determined by the students' needs and by an evaluation of their previous work.


    • CHIN 403 - Directed Individual Study

      FDR: HL: only when the subject is literary
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

      Advanced study in Chinese. The nature and content of the course will be determined by the students' needs and by an evaluation of their previous work.


    • JAPN 311 - Advanced Japanese I

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall

      Advanced readings, discussion in Japanese and written responses to a variety of literary materials, including relevant journal and newspaper articles. Whenever available, video materials will supplement readings.


    • JAPN 312 - Advanced Japanese II

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter

      A continuation of JAPN 311 with an emphasis on reading and discussing literary works. Advanced readings in Japanese modern prose, poetry, and drama and discussion in Japanese of literature and literary criticism.


    • JAPN 401 - Directed Individual Study

      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

      A course that allows students to follow a program of directed reading with a more intensive exposure to written texts than is possible in courses oriented toward grammar and conversation. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • JAPN 402 - Directed Individual Study

      Credits: 2
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

      A course that allows students to follow a program of directed reading with a more intensive exposure to written texts than is possible in courses oriented toward grammar and conversation. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • JAPN 403 - Directed Individual Study

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit

      A course that allows students to follow a program of directed reading with a more intensive exposure to written texts than is possible in courses oriented toward grammar and conversation. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


  6. General courses:
  7. At least 6 additional credits taken from the following or from additional courses approved in advance by the department head.

    • ARTH 140 - Asian Art

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2017 and alternate years

      A survey of artistic traditions from South (including the Himalayan region), East, and Southeast Asia from roughly the 1st to the 18th centuries CE. The course focuses on a wide range of media - including architecture, sculpture, painting, textiles, and book arts - that serve a spectrum of religious and secular functions. The broad temporal, geographic, and topical scope of this course is meant to provide students with a basic understanding of not only the greatest artistic achievements and movements in Asia, but also the historical and political contexts that gave rise to these extraordinary pieces of art.


    • ARTH 240 - Arts of China

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2016

      This broad-based investigation of Chinese art from the Neolithic period to the present examines a wide spectrum of media: painting, illustrated scrolls, architecture, ceramics, and sculpture. This general survey will be paired with single-focused analyses of materials, issues, and genres particular to Chines art, such as the use of jade, development of ceramics, lore of calligraphy, and tradition of landscape painting. To this end, we use objects from the W&L Special Collections.


    • ARTH 241 - The Arts of Japan

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years

      This survey of Japanese art, which includes material from protohistoric times to the 20th century, is structured chronologically with lectures addressing seminal artistic developments and movements throughout Japan's history. Central to this course is an investigation of the ways in which Japan's dynamic socio-political contexts shaped its religious and political artistic developments.


    • CHIN 103 - Supervised Study Abroad: Beginning Chinese

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring

      This course is designed to introduce Chinese language and culture to students with little or no previous Chinese language background and prepare them for studying first-year Chinese. Combining language study with studies of other aspects of Chinese culture (literature, art. history, economy, etc.) provides students with first-hand experience of the development of contemporary China. Classes and discussions are held at the International College or Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. Students learn through personal experience about the emergence or modern China and its changing culture.


    • CHIN 113 - Supervised Study Abroad: First-Year Chinese

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring

      This course is designed to improve active oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for studying second-year Chinese. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students have opportunities to mingle with ordinary Chinese people, to engage in everyday conversation, and to have first-hand experience of the development of contemporary China. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities.


    • CHIN 263 - Supervised Study Abroad: Second-Year Chinese

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring

      This course is designed to further improve student oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for studying third-year Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students discuss and debate with Chinese students about emerging social. economic, and policy issues. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities.


    • CHIN 305 - Introduction to Business and Legal Chinese

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2013 and when departmental resources permit

      This course provides basic knowledge of the Chinese language necessary for doing business and for handling legal issues. Topics are selected that represent typical business and legal use of the language, and discussion of the grammar. Certain language features and their use and context are provided. Extensive drills and practices of the sentence patterns and specialized vocabulary, both in and out of class, further help students use the business and legal Chinese appropriately.


    • CHIN 315 - Introduction to Classical Chinese

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter, when departmental resources permit

      This course is an introduction to the basic grammar and syntax of classical Chinese, the standard written language in China for over two millennia until the early 20th century (and for many centuries the first written language in Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, as well). Literary, historical, philosophical, or political texts from the premodern Chinese era are selected for oral discussion and for written exercise. The aim of the course is to help students gain reading knowledge of and be able to appreciate the treasure house of the ancient Chinese culture.


    • CHIN 363 - Supervised Study Abroad: 3rd- or 4th-Year Chinese

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring

      This course is designed to further improve student oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for further study.


    • (maximum of 4 credits from this group of CHIN courses)
    • ECON 272 - Japan's Modern Economy

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall or Winter

      Analysis of the contemporary Japanese economy, including the comparative structure of its economy; the macroeconomics of the late 1980s "bubble economy" and subsequent growth; the changing role of women and its impact on fertility; and the future of an economy facing population decline and the fiscal burden of a rapidly aging population. Texts include works by sociologists and political scientists to emphasize the need to integrate the impact of policy and social structures on economic behavior.


    • ECON 274 - China's Modern Economy

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall or Winter

      Economic analysis of the Chinese economy in the 20th century. Comparisons of pre- and post-revolutionary periods. Performance and policies of Taiwan and mainland China. Issues include the population problem, industrialization, provision of public health and education, alleviation of poverty and inequality. Microeconomic emphasis.


    • HIST 103 - China: Origins to 20th-Century Reforms

      FDR: HU
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall

      China's history embodies the full range of experience -as domain of imperial dynasties, target of imperial aggression, dissident member of the cold war Communist bloc, and current regional superpower in East Asia. This course tracks these transitions in political and social organization that, among other things, terminated history's longest lasting monarchical system, ignited two of its largest revolutions, began World War II and produced the most populous nation on earth. A wide range of cultural, political and intellectual stereotypes of China are challenged in the process of exploring its particular historical experience.


    • HIST 104 - Japan: Origins to Atomic Aftermath

      FDR: HU
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter

      This course traces the span of Japan's historical development from its origins through the Cold War, with a special, but not exclusive, emphasis on an environmental perspective. The first half of the course covers the emergence of indigenous Japanese society and its adaptation to cultural and political influences from mainland East Asia, including Buddhism, Confucianism, and Chinese concepts of empire. The second half covers Japan's successful transition from a declining Tokugawa Shogunate to a modern imperial nation to a reluctant U.S. Cold War ally from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries.


    • JAPN 100 - Supervised Study Abroad: Beginning Japanese

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring 2016 and alternate years

      Spring Term Abroad course. This course is designed to introduce the Japanese language and culture to students with little or no previous language background. Classes are held at the Ishikawa Foundation for International Exchange, a prestigious Japanese institution in Kanazawa. Students live with a host family and can experience typical Japanese daily life. The program includes field trips to points of historical interest and many cultural activities.


    • JAPN 115 - Supervised Study Abroad: First-Year Japanese

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring 2016 and alternate years

      Spring Term Abroad course. This course is designed to improve active oral proficiency in Japanese, to introduce the culture and society of Japan, and to prepare students for second-year Japanese study. Classes are held at the Ishikawa Foundation for International Exchange, a prestigious Japanese institution in Kanazawa. Students live with a host family and can experience typical Japanese daily life. The program includes field trips to points of historical interest and many cultural activities.


    • JAPN 265 - Supervised Study Abroad: Second-Year Japanese

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring 2016 and alternate years

      Spring Term Abroad course. This course is designed to introduce the Japanese language and culture to students, to introduce the culture and society of Japan, and to prepare students for third-year Japanese study. Classes are held at the Ishikawa Foundation for International Exchange, a prestigious Japanese institution in Kanazawa. Students live with a host family and can experience typical Japanese daily life. The program includes field trips to points of historical interest and many cultural activities.


    • JAPN 365 - Supervised Study Abroad: Third-Year Japanese

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring 2016 and alternate years

      Spring Term Abroad course. This course is designed to introduce the Japanese language and culture to students, to introduce the culture and society of Japan, and to prepare students for fourth-year Japanese study. Classes are held at the Ishikawa Foundation for International Exchange, a prestigious Japanese institution in Kanazawa. Students live with a host family and can experience typical Japanese daily life. The program includes field trips to points of historical interest and many cultural activities.


    • (4 credits total from this group of JAPN courses)
    • PHIL 130 - Chinese Philosophy

      FDR: HU
      Credits: 3

      An introductory course focusing on classical (Zhou period) Confucian and Taoist philosophers. No background in Chinese studies is presupposed.


    • POL 227 - East Asian Politics

      FDR: SS2
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2013 and alternate years

      An investigation of East Asian political systems and the global, historical, and cultural contexts in which their political institutions have developed. Students consider the connections between political structure and the rapid social and economic changes in East Asia since World War II, as well as the effectiveness of varied political processes in addressing contemporary problems. Emphasis is given to China, Korea, and Japan.


    • REL 103 - Introduction to Asian Religions

      FDR: HU
      Credits: 3

      A survey of the teachings, practices, and historical significance of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto.


    • REL 131 - Buddhism

      FDR: HU
      Credits: 3

      A survey of the historical development of the doctrines and practices of Buddhism. After a discussion of the Hindu origins of Buddhism, the course focuses on the development of the Theravada, Vajrayana and Mahayana traditions. A class trip to at least one Buddhist center is included.


  8. Capstone Experience
  9. Capstone Experience:

    • EALL 399 - Capstone Project

      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter

      Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. A translation project required of all EALL majors typically done during their senior year, preferably while taking Chinese 312/Japanese 312. The appropriate faculty member assigns a literary piece to be translated (not poetry), written in the modern language. The project results in a final translation of at least 2,500 words.


    • and, optionally,
    • EALL 493 - Honors Thesis (3-3)

      Credits: 3-3
      Planned Offering: Fall-Winter

      Honors Thesis.