DCI Minor Requirements

2018 - 2019 Catalog

Digital Culture and Information

A minor in digital culture and information requires completion of 18 credits, as follows. In meeting the requirements of this interdisciplinary minor, a student may not use more than nine credits (including capstone) that are also used to meet the requirements of other majors or minors.

  1. DCI 102, 108
  2. At least six credits chosen from DCI 110, 175,190,393,403; HIST 211; JOUR 341
  3. At least three credits chosen from BUS 321, 306, 310, 315, 317; CLAS 343; any CSCI course; DCI 180; ENGL 453; GERM 347, 349; SOAN 265, 266; and, when approved in advance, DCI-designated courses
  4. Capstone project. Three credits chosen from DCI 393, 403 (not used above), or a capstone or honors thesis in the major field of study, of sustained intellectual engagement using digital tools or methods and approved one term in advance of beginning by the core faculty of the minor
  5. Portfolio: at least three projects or assignments, in addition to the capstone, from courses in the minor which demonstrate attention to design, used experience, awareness of audience, and professional or academic context, and including both reflection on and analysis of each work in the portfolio.
  1. Required courses:
    • DCI 102 - Data in the Humanities
      FDRSC
      Credits3
      FacultyBrooks

      This course Introduces students to the creation and visualization of data in humanities research. The course is predicated on the fact that the digital turn of the last several decades has drastically changed the nature of knowledge production and distribution. The community and set of practices that is digital humanities (DH) encourages fluency in media beyond the printed word such as text mining, digital curation, data visualization, and spatial analysis. Readings and discussions of theory complement hands-on application of digital methods and computational thinking. While the objects of our study come primarily from the humanities, the methods of analysis are widely applicable to the social and natural sciences. Three unit-long collaborative projects explore the creation, structure, and visualization of humanities data. This course meets in two-hour blocks to accommodate a lab component.


    • DCI 108 - Communication Through the Web
      Credits3
      FacultyMickel

      Although the World Wide Web is nearly 30 years old, the medium is in its relative infancy. and we are still learning how to use it to communicate effectively. This course takes a liberal arts approach to Web design and development by clearly defining the message that is being sent; determining the audience to whom the message should reach; shaping the message for the medium; designing a website with suitable coherent structure, text, and multimedia content; planning to allow access to the site for those other than fully capable visitors; use of HTML and CSS; and soliciting feedback for making changes and improvements.


  2. At least six credits chosen from:
    • DCI 110 - Web Programming for Non-Programmers
      FDRSC
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteNo prior programming experience is needed, but a desire to learn and to be challenged is a must
      FacultyMickel

      Computer science and IT graduates are no longer the only people expected to have some knowledge of how to program. Humanities and social science majors can greatly increase their job prospects by understanding the fundamentals of writing computer code, not only through the ability itself but also being better able to communicate with programming professionals and comprehending the software development and design process as a whole. The most centralized and simple platform for learning is the Web. This course starts with a brief introduction to/review of HTML and CSS and then focuses on using JavaScript to write basic code and implement preexisting libraries to analyze and visualize data. Students become familiar with building a complete Web page that showcases all three languages.


    • DCI 175 - Innovations in Publishing
      Credits4

      An intensive introduction to the publishing industry with a focus on digital innovations. A hands-on approach in a series of four laboratory sessions provides students with the ability to tackle a variety of technical scenarios for publishing. Students assemble an e-book from scratch and produce a print-on-demand book. Each class begins with news from the publishing industry and ends by examining job ads to understand the types of skills and experiences necessary for pursuing careers in this very broad field. This course focuses primarily on book publishing, particularly fiction.


    • DCI 190 - Digital Humanities Studio
      Credits1

      This course examines the research questions that guide digital humanities methodology, reviews exemplary scholarly projects on the topic at hand, and offers significant hands-on experience exploring relevant tools. May be repeated for up to three degree credits if the topics are different.


    • DCI 393 - Creating Digital Scholarship Seminar
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteEither junior or senior standing and one course chosen from DCI 102, 108, 110 or instructor consent
      FacultyBrooks, Bufkin

      This seminar provides students with the skills, theoretical background, and methodological support to transform a work of traditional scholarship within an academic discipline into a public-facing work of digital scholarship. Students decide on a digital project in consultation with classmates and the instructor. Students survey and analyze examples of digital scholarship to determine what form each student's project should take.


    • DCI 403 - Directed Individual Study
      PrerequisiteEither junior or senior standing and one course chosen from DCI 102, 108, 110 or instructor consent. Applications must be approved by the department and accepted by the student's proposed director
      FacultyStaff

      A course designed for students who wish to undertake a digital scholarship project of their own conception and execution. In consultation with a director, students plan an independent course of study which culminates in the production of a work of public-facing digital scholarship. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.


    • HIST 211 - Scandal, Crime, and Spectacle in the 19th Century
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      FacultyHorowitz, Walsh

      This course examines the intersection between scandal, crime, and spectacle in 19th-century France and Britain. We discuss the nature of scandals, the connection between scandals and political change, and how scandals and ideas about crime were used to articulate new ideas about class, gender, and sexuality. In addition, this class covers the rise of new theories of criminality in the 19th century and the popular fascination with crime and violence. Crime and scandal also became interwoven into the fabric of the city as sources of urban spectacle. Students are introduced to text analysis and data mining for the humanities.


    • JOUR 341 - Multimedia Storytelling Design
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least junior class standing
      FacultyBarry, Locy

      Have you ever wondered how news organizations put together their Pulitzer Prize-winning interactive stories? This course introduces students to tools that help them imagine, design, and create powerful interactive features with audio, video, graphics, and words on the cutting edge of journalism and mass communications. Students learn web design and programming skills using HTML CSS and JavaScript. This course is for students with little or no coding experience but who want to know, "How they did that."


  3. At least three credits chosen from:
  4. any CSCI course, and, when approved in advance, DCI-designated courses

    • BUS 306 - Seminar in Management Information Systems
      Credits3 in fall, winter; 4 in spring
      PrerequisiteMay vary with topics. Preference to BSADM or JMCB majors during the first round of registration

      Topics vary by term and instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      Fall 2018, BUS 306A-01: MIS Seminar: Data Management and Analytics for Business (3). Prerequisite: INTR 202 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during the first round of registration. No previous programming experience is required. Analysis of data is becoming a vital component of business decision-making. In this seminar, students examine the data challenges that businesses confront. How data management and analytics are used to help make sound management decisions. In the first module, students learn how to communicate and present data in business reports and presentations. The second module covers querying and extracting data from relational databases and preparing it for analysis using MySQL and Structured Query Language (SQL). The third module is data analytics, the process of discovery, interpretation, and communication of meaningful insights and patterns in data, using robust data-analysis software. We use R, the software language and environment for statistical computing and graphics, to conduct our data analysis, along with several of its introductory data analysis packages. Ballenger.

      Fall 2018, BUS 306A-02: MIS Seminar: Data Management and Analytics for Business (3). Prerequisite: INTR 202 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during the first round of registration. No previous programming experience is required. Analysis of data is becoming a vital component of business decision-making. In this seminar, students examine the data challenges that businesses confront. How data management and analytics are used to help make sound management decisions. In the first module, students learn how to communicate and present data in business reports and presentations. The second module covers querying and extracting data from relational databases and preparing it for analysis using MySQL and Structured Query Language (SQL). The third module is data analytics, the process of discovery, interpretation, and communication of meaningful insights and patterns in data, using robust data-analysis software. We use R, the software language and environment for statistical computing and graphics, to conduct our data analysis, along with several of its introductory data analysis packages. Ballenger.


    • BUS 310 - Management Information Systems
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteINTR-201 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during first round of registration
      FacultyLarson

      The objective is to build an understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operations, management decision making, and strategic advantage. Topics include basic systems concepts and major roles of information systems; computer, telecommunications, and database management concepts; and management issues in the implementation of information systems, including international, security, and ethical considerations.


    • BUS 315 - Database Management for Business
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteINTR-201 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during the first round of registration
      FacultyLarson

      An introduction to the theories, concepts, features, and capabilities of database management systems in a business environment. This course provides a greater understanding of how to design, develop and access database-driven business applications and emphasizes the use of database-management systems in real-world business settings and how this technology can be applied effectively to solve business problems. In this project-oriented course, students acquire the skills to document, design, create, test, and access a fully functional Oracle business database application. No prior programming or application development experience is assumed.


    • BUS 317 - Data Mining for Sales, Marketing and Customer Relationship Management
      Credits4
      PrerequisiteINTR 201, INTR 202 or equivalent, and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM or JMCB majors during initial registration
      FacultyBallenger

      This course provides an introduction and overview to data mining as a means to understanding customers (existing and potential) in a broad sense, rather than focusing on underlying theory. Many organizations have a wealth of data residing in their databases. Business data mining is the process of collecting and turning this resource into business value. Basic data-mining methods have broad applications: market-basket analysis of scanner data, customer relationship management, churn analysis, direct marketing, fraud detection, click-stream web mining, personalization and recommendation systems, risk management, and credit scoring. The course provides hands-on experience in applying these techniques to practical real-world business problems using commercial data-mining software.


    • BUS 321 - Multimedia Design and Development
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteINTR 201 and at least junior standing. Preference to BSADM majors during initial registration
      FacultyBallenger

      This course is an introduction to the study and creation of multimedia content primarily used in business. Students explore the steps used to plan and create multimedia content that effectively targets and delivers business information. This is a hands-on, project-oriented course with emphasis on the design and creation of media elements such as interactive web, graphic, audio, and video content. The course focuses on using WordPress development using Headway Themes with emphasis on Cascading Style Sheets, Adobe Photoshop, Reaper, and Final Cut Pro X as the foundation for creating online multimedia content.


    • CLAS 343 - Classics in a Digital Age
      FDRHU
      Credits4
      FacultyBenefiel

      An exploration of the art, architecture, monuments, and space of the ancient world by analyzing and assessing the innovative scholarly resources that are currently available to students and scholars of the classical world. Each week a new discipline within Classics (e.g., philology, epigraphy, numismatics) is presented, followed by an introduction to several scholarly tools and resources that can be used to query or conduct research in that field. Each of the five groups within the class examines a particular time period and applies a series of scholarly tools to evaluate how Roman society, politics, and the expression of power shifted over the centuries of empire.


    • DCI 180 - FS: First-Year Seminar
      FDRHU
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteFirst-year seminar. Prerequisite: First-Year class standing

      A seminar for first-year students.

      Winter 2019, DCI 180-01: FS: Black Mirrors and Digital Culture (3). First-year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. How do various web tools and platforms dictate how we interact with each other? Why do we use some platforms for personal reasons, others for coursework, and some for professional purposes? Is there one correct way to use the web? In this seminar, we critically examine social media platforms, information repositories, apps, and other tools to create personal understandings of how a tool or company's motive influences our personal use of information and how we interact with our community. Themes include online identity, privacy, democracy, and the academic web. We explore these topics through the lenses of inclusiveness, information bias, "Big Data", and social networks. The course culminates in a multimedia narrative, giving students hands-on experience with various web publishing and content management technologies. (HU) Abdoney

      Winter 2019, DCI 180-02: FS: Black Mirrors and Digital Culture (3). First-year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. How do various web tools and platforms dictate how we interact with each other? Why do we use some platforms for personal reasons, others for coursework, and some for professional purposes? Is there one correct way to use the web? In this seminar, we critically examine social media platforms, information repositories, apps, and other tools to create personal understandings of how a tool or company's motive influences our personal use of information and how we interact with our community. Themes include online identity, privacy, democracy, and the academic web. We explore these topics through the lenses of inclusiveness, information bias, "Big Data", and social networks. The course culminates in a multimedia narrative, giving students hands-on experience with various web publishing and content management technologies. (HU) Teaff.

      Fall 2018, DCI 180-01: FS: Black Mirrors and Digital Culture (3). First-year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. How do various web tools and platforms dictate how we interact with each other? Why do we use some platforms for personal reasons, others for coursework, and some for professional purposes? Is there one correct way to use the web? In this seminar, we critically examine social media platforms, information repositories, apps, and other tools to create personal understandings of how a tool or company's motive influences our personal use of information and how we interact with our community. Themes include online identity, privacy, democracy, and the academic web. We explore these topics through the lenses of inclusiveness, information bias, "Big Data", and social networks. The course culminates in a multimedia narrative, giving students hands-on experience with various web publishing and content management technologies. (HU) Abdoney, Teaff.


    • ENGL 453 - Internship in Literary Editing with Shenandoah
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteAt least one course in creative writing, sophomore standing and instructor consent. Interested students should email Professor Staples (bstaples@wlu.edu) with information about their previous coursework and interests in editing, publishing, and contemporary literature
      FacultyStaples

      An apprenticeship in editing with the editor of Shenandoah, Washington and Lee's literary magazine. Students are instructed in and assist in these facets of the editor's work: evaluation of manuscripts of fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, comics, and translations; substantive editing of manuscripts, copyediting; communicating with writers; social media; website maintenance; the design of promotional material. May be applied once to the English major or Creative Writing minor and repeated for a maximum of six additional elective credits, as long as the specific projects undertaken are different.


    • GERM 347 - The Age of Goethe: Sentimentalism to Sturm und Drang
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGERM 311 and 312 or equivalent
      FacultyYoungman

      A study of dramatic, expository, narrative, and poetic works by the young Goethe, Schiller, and their contemporaries. While emphasizing the historical and sociopolitical context of this aesthetically revolutionary period, this course examines Germany's turn toward Sentimentalism that culminates in the Sturm und Drang movement. Regular expository writing in German and performing in debates or scenes are required. Conducted in German.


    • GERM 349 - The Age of Goethe: German Classicism
      FDRHL
      Credits3
      PrerequisiteGERM 311 and 312 or equivalent
      FacultyYoungman

      A course that examines the influence of Greece on German theoretical, dramatic, and poetic works by the mature Goethe, Schiller, and their contemporaries, especially Hölderlin and Kleist. By investigating the extent to which German writers embraced or rejected Winckelmann's stoic vision of Greek art and culture, this course aims to refine our understanding of German Classicism. Regular expository writing in German and performing in debates or scenes are required. Conducted in German.


    • SOAN 265 - Exploring Social Networks
      FDRSS4
      Credits3
      FacultyEastwood

      This course is an introduction to network analysis. Students learn some of the major network analysis literature in sociology and related fields and develop their skills as network analysts in laboratory sessions. Social science, humanities, business, and public health applications are emphasized.


    • SOAN 266 - Neighborhoods, Culture, and Poverty
      FDRSS3
      Credits3
      FacultyEastwood

      This course examines social-scientific research on the determinants of poverty, crime, and ill health by focusing on neighborhoods as the sites where many of the mechanisms impacting these outcomes operate. In addition to engaging with key readings and participating in seminar discussions, students conduct their own exploratory analyses of neighborhood level processes using a variety of spatial data analysis tools in R.


  5. Capstone project.
  6. Three credits chosen from DCI 393, 403 (not used above), or a capstone or honors thesis in the major field of study, of sustained intellectual engagement using digital tools or methods and approved one term in advance of beginning by the core faculty of the minor

  7. Portfolio.
  8. at least three projects or assignments, in addition to the capstone, from courses in the minor which demonstrate attention to design, used experience, awareness of audience, and professional or academic context, and including both reflection on and analysis of each work in the portfolio.