Current Courses

The Classics Department offers courses in Greek, Latin, and classical civilization. See everything that Classics has to offer in the Course Catalog.

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Classics Courses 

Fall 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Roman History

CLAS 111 - Easton, Jeffrey A.

The course covers a long chronological span, from the period of the city's prehistoric foundations to the final years of the western Empire in the fifth century CE. The aim of the course is not only to treat the major political and social events of Roman history according to the annalistic tradition, but also to give special attention to various cultural norms and practices, the structure of Roman society and its institutions, and the interactions between different social groups in each period. Central to our study of these themes will be a consideration of the wide range of primary evidence available to ancient historians and an understanding of the methodological problems encountered in reconstructing the history of any society.

Classical Mythology

CLAS 201 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.

Ancient Greek Religion

CLAS 223 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

In this course, we examine the strange and wonderful world of ancient Greek religion, beginning with stories of the gods that all Greeks knew: Homer and Hesiod. We then study religion on the ground, examining how religion functioned at a number of sanctuaries and shrines in Greece. Topics covered in this course include ancient conceptions of the cosmos; the nature of Greek deities and heroes; the distinction between myth and religion; the art and architecture of sanctuaries; ritual performances and festivals; ritual sacrifice; sacred games; oracles; the underworld; sacred mysteries; women and religion; and the socio-political role of Greek ritual practice.

Topics in Classical Civilization

CLAS 295A - Easton, Jeffrey A.

Selected subject areas in classical civilization. The topic selected varies from year to year. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2019, CLAS 295A-01: The Roman Empire and Its Peoples (3). Meets requirements in the History major. The ranks of Roman society below the elite were occupied by numerous social groups which we might identify as marginal. Although often overlooked in our literary sources, the behaviors and experiences of ordinary men and women, slaves and ex-slaves, and freeborn foreigners from the provinces are essential for understanding the inner workings of Roman social hierarchies and the economy. This course examines how such groups made their way in the Roman world by operating within existing institutions or by forging new avenues for civic engagement and upward social mobility. In order to access their voices, we must look to their depictions in the world of Roman comedy and novels, the art and material culture they produced, and the most important body of evidence available to grasp the lives of ancient Romans, their personal inscriptions. (HU) Easton.

Spring 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

The Athenian Acropolis

CLAS 214 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

In this course. we study the art and architecture of the Acropolis, from the Neolithic period to today. with a particular focus on the Archaic and Classical periods. Our study is based upon a detailed and chronology survey of the buildings. dedications, and religious practices conducted on the Acropolis. We conclude the course with a discussion of the Acropolis in the post-Classical period, and the meaning of the Acropolis for Greeks today.

Winter 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Classical Mythology

CLAS 201 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.

Sex, Gender and Power in Ancient Literature

CLAS 210 - Dance, Caleb M.

What does it mean to be a woman or a man and what power dynamic exists between the two genders? Definitions of gender and gender roles are not a modern phenomenon but have their origins in antiquity. Both literary and visual sources reveal to us the constant puzzling over issues of gender that preoccupied the ancient Greeks and Romans. In this course, we examine sources from various genres and media for example, philosophy, epic, drama, poetry, history, painting, and sculpture in an attempt to understand the various ways the Greeks and Romans conceived of gender. Readings include primary sources from antiquity (e.g., Homer, Aeschylus, Euripides, Plato, Terence, Cicero, Livy), as well as secondary sources from modern scholarship on gender in antiquity.

Directed Individual Study

CLAS 403 - Crotty, Kevin M.

May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Senior Thesis

CLAS 473 - Dance, Caleb M.

The student researches and writes a senior thesis under the direction of a faculty member.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Dance, Caleb M.

Honors Thesis.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

Honors Thesis.

Latin Courses

Fall 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Latin

LATN 101 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

An introduction to Latin language and Roman culture. Students will learn about the structure of language, and will focus on the acquisition of Latin vocabulary and grammar. 

Intermediate Latin

LATN 201 - Dance, Caleb M.

Reading selections from some or all of the following: Cato, Nepos, Cicero, Caesar, Sallust, and Varro. Emphasis on style and syntax, along with the political and social background of the later Republican period.

Advanced Latin Readings

LATN 301 - Crotty, Kevin M.

Selections from among Cicero, Sallust, Livy, Seneca, and Quintilian.

Latin Epigraphy

LATN 350 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Study of the monuments of the Roman Empire and the importance of text in Roman culture. From religious offerings to building dedications, from wax tablets to statue bases listing an individual's career, inscriptions were a central part of Roman culture from the time of the emperor Augustus through the fourth century. Laws, catacombs, dedications to the emperor, and other topics provide a view into Roman culture and civilization.

Spring 2019

We do not offer any courses this term.


Winter 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Latin

LATN 102 - Dance, Caleb M.

A continuation of the materials and methods in LATN 101 with emphasis on syntax.

Practicum: Latin in the Schools

LATN 200 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

A service-learning course in which W&L students design a curriculum and teach beginning Latin in the local elementary school.

Introduction to Verse

LATN 202 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Introduction to the language, meter, and style of Latin verse with readings from Horace, Ovid, Virgil, and Propertius.

Introduction to Verse

LATN 202 - Crotty, Kevin M.

Introduction to the language, meter, and style of Latin verse with readings from Horace, Ovid, Virgil, and Propertius.

The Poetry of Ovid

LATN 326 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Readings from the masterpieces of Ovid's poetry, including one or more of the following: The Metamorphoses (a grand mythological epic), The Fasti (festivals and the Roman calendar), The Heroides (fictional letters written by mythological heroines, Ars Amatoria and Amores (love poetry) and Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto (his poetry from exile). Topic varies by term but course may be taken only once.

Directed Individual Study

LATN 401 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Greek Courses

Fall 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Ancient Greek

GR 101 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

An introduction to the ancient Greeks through a study of their language and material culture. This course focuses upon the essentials of grammar and vocabulary of Classical and Koine (Biblical) Greek. Language lessons are complemented with an introduction to Classical archaeology, with a focus on ancient Athens. This course is a prerequisite to GR 102, which focuses upon the language and ancient history of the Greeks. Note: GR 202, taking in the second year of language study, satisfies the FL FDR.

Intermediate Ancient Greek

GR 201 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

Readings in Greek prose.

The Greek Historians

GR 306 - Crotty, Kevin M.

Herodotus and Thucydides through Greek texts and English translations; Greek historiography and its relationship to tragic, epic and philosophical literature.

Directed Individual Study

GR 403 - Crotty, Kevin M.

May be repeated for degree credit with permission of the instructor and if the topics are different.

Spring 2019

We do not offer any courses this term.


Winter 2019

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Ancient Greek

GR 102 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

A continuation of GR 101. Further work on grammar and vocabulary and an introduction to some simple Greek prose.

Homer

GR 202 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the language of Homer and to the Greek oral and written tradition; a reading of the Iliad or the Odyssey in Greek and in translation.

Directed Individual Study

GR 401 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

May be repeated for degree credit with permission of the instructor and if the topics are different.