Courses

The wide scope of Classics and its emphasis on study, analysis, and critical thinking makes the field an excellent preparation for a wide range of professions. Recent graduates are pursuing a variety of careers including academia, law, medicine, journalism, consulting, teaching, and public service.  Here is what the Princeton Review had to say about the study of Classics:

"Classics majors (and math majors) have the highest success rates of any majors in law school. Believe it or not: political science, economics, and pre-law majors lag fairly far behind. Even furthermore, Classics majors consistently have some of the highest scores on GREs of all under-graduates... Ultimately, though, Classics majors get on well in life because they develop intellectual rigor, communication skills, analytical skills, the ability to handle complex information, and, above all, a breadth of view which few other disciplines can provide." - PRINCETON REVIEW

The Classics Department offers a Major in either Greek or Latin, or both ancient languages together, as well as courses of interest to all students.

Classics Courses   Jump to Latin Courses   Jump to Greek Courses  

Classics Courses 

Winter 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Greek Literature from Homer to the Early Hellenistic Period

CLAS 203 - Crotty, Kevin M.

Readings in translation from Homer, Hesiod, the tragedians, the comedians, and the lyric and pastoral poets, including selections from Herodotus and Thucydides, and from Plato's and Aristotle's reflections on literature. The course includes readings from modern critical writings. We read some of the most famous stories of the Western world--from the Iliad and the Odyssey , to Milton's Paradise Lost and Joyce's Ulysses , via Virgil's Aeneid and Lucan's Civil War . All of these works are epic narratives, each presenting a different concept of the hero, and yet, at the same time, participating in a coherent, on-going and unfinished tradition. We consider such questions as the role of violence in literature; the concept of the heroic as it reflects evolving ideas of the individual and society; and the idea of a literary tradition.

The Trojan War

CLAS 326 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

The Trojan War ranks among the greatest tales ever told. But is the story real? In this course, we begin with the literary evidence, including the epics of Homer, as well as contemporary accounts from the Bronze Age Greeks, Hittites, and Egyptians. We then follow the archaeological evidence, from the palaces of mainland Greece to the presumed site of Troy itself. Our search leads not just to the truth that lies behind the destruction of Troy, but reveals a long-lost international community of world superpowers whose cities were nearly all destroyed at the same time that Troy fell, an international cataclysm on a scale never before seen in ancient history.

Pompeii

CLAS 338 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

The site of ancient Pompeii presents a thriving Roman town of the first century AD, virtually frozen in time by the devastating eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. In this course, we examine Pompeii's archaeological remains-public buildings, domestic architecture, painting, artifacts, inscriptions, and graffiti-in order to reconstruct the life of the town. We also consider religion, games and entertainment, politics, and the structure of Roman society.

Directed Individual Study

CLAS 401 - Hagen, Adrienne M.

May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Honors Thesis.

Fall 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Classical Mythology

CLAS 201 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.

Plato

CLAS 221 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An in-depth examination of the philosophy of Plato.  We look at Plato's epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, ethics, and political philosophy through a careful analysis of several dialogues, including some or all of the following:  Euthyphro, Laches, Apology, Gorgias, Meno, Phaedo, Symposium, Phaedrus , and Republic .  In addition, we consider certain challenges posed by Plato's use of the dialogue form, such as whether we are justified in assuming that Socrates is a mouthpiece for Plato's own views, and how we should interpret Plato's frequent appeal to myths and other literary devices within his dialogues.

Ancient Greek History

CLAS 225 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

This course is an introduction to ancient Greek history from the Bronze Age to Alexander the Great, with emphasis on the remarkable and often brutal world of the Archaic and Classical Greeks. During this time, warfare is a constant, but the legacy of the Greeks also contains radical experiments in egalitarian political life, philosophy, art, literature and science that emerge from their dynamic history. Most of our readings are from the ancient sources themselves, including Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Aristotle, and Plutarch. Apart from learning the history, therefore, we also ask such questions as how to interpret primary sources and how to resolve conflicts among them.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Honors Thesis.

Spring 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Classical Mythology

CLAS 201 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.

Topics in Classical Civilization

CLAS 295 - Hagen, Adrienne M.

Selected subject areas in classical civilization. The topic selected varies from year to year. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, CLAS 295-01: Nature and the Environment in Antiquity (4). How did people in the ancient world conceive of nature from a philosophical, religious, and scientific standpoint? What attitudes did they hold towards animals and other forms of life? How did they shape the world around them through practices such as agriculture, mining, water management, and deforestation? Did they share our modem concerns about the use and conservation of natural spaces? Students in this course investigate these questions using literature, art, and artifacts from the ancient Mediterranean world (primarily Greece and Rome but also Egypt, the Near East, and Britain) as well as works by contemporary scholars of ecocriticism and environmental thought (e.g., William Cronon and Wendell Berry). Readings are in English, with the opportunity to read portions of some texts in Greek or Latin if desired by students with prior knowledge of these languages. (HU). Hagen.

Latin Courses

Winter 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Latin

LATN 102 - Hagen, Adrienne M.

A continuation of the materials and methods in LATN 101 with emphasis on syntax.

Introduction to Verse

LATN 202 - Hagen, Adrienne M.

Introduction to the language, meter, and style of Latin verse with readings from Horace, Ovid, Virgil, and Propertius.

Introduction to Verse

LATN 202 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Introduction to the language, meter, and style of Latin verse with readings from Horace, Ovid, Virgil, and Propertius.

Early Roman Comedy and Literature

LATN 331 - Crotty, Kevin M.

This course explores the literature of early Rome, most importantly Roman comedy.

Fall 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Latin

LATN 101 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Study of Latin declensional patterns and sentence formation.

Republican Prose

LATN 201 - Hagen, Adrienne M.

Reading selections from some or all of the following: Cato, Nepos, Cicero, Caesar, Sallust, and Varro. Emphasis on style and syntax, along with the political and social background of the later Republican period.

Advanced Prose

LATN 301 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Selections from among Cicero, Sallust, Livy, Seneca, and Quintilian.

Spring 2017

We do not offer any courses this term.


Greek Courses

Winter 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Ancient Greek

GR 102 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

A continuation of GR 101. Further work on grammar and vocabulary and an introduction to some simple Greek prose.

Homer

GR 202 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

An introduction to the language of Homer and to the Greek oral and written tradition; a reading of the Iliad or the Odyssey in Greek and in translation.

Old and Middle Comedy

GR 303 - Crotty, Kevin M.

A study of the comic tradition in general and of Greek comedy in particular. Readings in Greek and English from Aristophanes and from the corpus of ancient and modern comic plays.

Fall 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Elementary Ancient Greek

GR 101 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

An introduction to ancient Greek. The course focuses on the essentials of Greek grammar and vocabulary and offers an overview of some aspects of Greek culture.

Intermediate Ancient Greek

GR 201 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

Readings in Greek prose.

Tragedy

GR 301 - Crotty, Kevin M.

A study of the Greek dramatists through close textual analysis; readings from ancient and modern theatrical writers and theories.

Spring 2017

We do not offer any courses this term.