Classics Course Offerings

Fall 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Classical Mythology

CLAS 201 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.

Plato

CLAS 221 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An in-depth examination of the philosophy of Plato.  We look at Plato's epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, ethics, and political philosophy through a careful analysis of several dialogues, including some or all of the following:  Euthyphro, Laches, Apology, Gorgias, Meno, Phaedo, Symposium, Phaedrus , and Republic .  In addition, we consider certain challenges posed by Plato's use of the dialogue form, such as whether we are justified in assuming that Socrates is a mouthpiece for Plato's own views, and how we should interpret Plato's frequent appeal to myths and other literary devices within his dialogues.

Ancient Greek History

CLAS 225 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

This course is an introduction to ancient Greek history from the Bronze Age to Alexander the Great, with emphasis on the remarkable and often brutal world of the Archaic and Classical Greeks. During this time, warfare is a constant, but the legacy of the Greeks also contains radical experiments in egalitarian political life, philosophy, art, literature and science that emerge from their dynamic history. Most of our readings are from the ancient sources themselves, including Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Aristotle, and Plutarch. Apart from learning the history, therefore, we also ask such questions as how to interpret primary sources and how to resolve conflicts among them.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Benefiel, Rebecca R.

Honors Thesis.

Spring 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Classical Mythology

CLAS 201 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.

Topics in Classical Civilization

CLAS 295 - Hagen, Adrienne M.

Selected subject areas in classical civilization. The topic selected varies from year to year. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, CLAS 295-01: Nature and the Environment in Antiquity (4). How did people in the ancient world conceive of nature from a philosophical, religious, and scientific standpoint? What attitudes did they hold towards animals and other forms of life? How did they shape the world around them through practices such as agriculture, mining, water management, and deforestation? Did they share our modem concerns about the use and conservation of natural spaces? Students in this course investigate these questions using literature, art, and artifacts from the ancient Mediterranean world (primarily Greece and Rome but also Egypt, the Near East, and Britain) as well as works by contemporary scholars of ecocriticism and environmental thought (e.g., William Cronon and Wendell Berry). Readings are in English, with the opportunity to read portions of some texts in Greek or Latin if desired by students with prior knowledge of these languages. (HU). Hagen.

Winter 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

FS: First-Year Seminar

CLAS 180 - Dance, Caleb M.

Topic varies by term.

Winter 2017, CLAS 180-01: Blasts from the Classical Past: Considering the Ancient Canon (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing. This seminar is about traditions--those of the literary and philosophical cultures with which much of Western society has identified and continues to identify, as well as those of communities that are un(der)represented in the historical canon. Through close-reading, discussion, analysis, and writing, we examine the theatrical, literary, historical, and philosophical traditions represented in the readings and consider our relationship to these traditions as individuals and as members of various modem communities. We also explore the ways in which the works respond to one another as literary and cultural artifacts. Our ultimate goals are to refine our skills as critical readers/thinkers/writers and to enjoy and enrich ourselves and one another in the process. (HL) Dance. Winter 2017 and every third year

Greek Art & Archaeology

CLAS 200 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

An introduction to ancient Greek art and archaeology. We encounter some of the greatest works of art in human history, as we survey the development of painting, sculpture, architecture, and town planning of the ancient Greeks. We encounter the history of the people behind the objects that they left behind, from the material remains of the Bronze Age palaces and Classical Athenian Acropolis to the world created in the wake of Alexander the Great's conquests. We also consider how we experience the ancient Greek world today through archaeological practice, cultural heritage, and the antiquities trade.

Topics in Classical Civilization

CLAS 295A - Hagen, Adrienne M.

Selected subject areas in classical civilization. The topic selected varies from year to year. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2017, CLAS 295A-01: Survey of Roman History (3). This course provides a survey of Roman history from the founding of the city to the fall of the Western Empire. We discuss the major political, military, and social developments of a civilization that has fundamentally shaped our own culture. Students learn about Rome's major political and military players, get an idea of what it was like to live in the Roman Empire, read foundational Roman authors, and explore the empire's most significant moments. Throughout the course, we critically assess the sources of our knowledge about Roman history. HU

Directed Individual Study

CLAS 403 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Honors Thesis

CLAS 493 - Dance, Caleb M.

Honors Thesis.