Course Offerings

Fall 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Modern Descriptive Chemistry

CHEM 100 - Pleva, Michael A. (Mike) / Rowe, Barbara L.

An elementary study of the structure and reactions of molecules. Laboratory work illustrates some fundamental procedures in chemistry. Designed for non-science students fulfilling general education requirements or desiring a science elective. Laboratory course with fee.

General Chemistry

CHEM 110 - Tuchler, Matthew F. (Matt) / Abry, Andrea C.

This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course with fee.

General Chemistry

CHEM 110 - Uffelman, Erich S. / LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred) / Abry, Andrea C.

This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course with fee.

General Chemistry

CHEM 110 - Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve) / Friend, John K. (Kyle) / Abry, Andrea C.

This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course with fee.

Organic Chemistry I

CHEM 241 - Samonina-Kosicka, Jelena / Smith, Donna M.

A survey of the compounds of carbon including their structure, chemical and physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms, identification, and synthesis. Laboratory focuses on the development of skills in preparing, purifying, and identifying organic compounds using spectroscopic methods. Laboratory course with fee.

Organic Chemistry I

CHEM 241 - Samonina-Kosicka, Jelena / Smith, Donna M. / Alty, Lisa T.

A survey of the compounds of carbon including their structure, chemical and physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms, identification, and synthesis. Laboratory focuses on the development of skills in preparing, purifying, and identifying organic compounds using spectroscopic methods. Laboratory course with fee.

Organic Chemistry I

CHEM 241 - Alty, Lisa T. / Smith, Donna M.

A survey of the compounds of carbon including their structure, chemical and physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms, identification, and synthesis. Laboratory focuses on the development of skills in preparing, purifying, and identifying organic compounds using spectroscopic methods. Laboratory course with fee.

Organic Chemistry I at St. Andrews

CHEM 241S - France, Marcia B.

A survey of the compounds of carbon including their structure, chemical and physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms, identification, and synthesis. Laboratory focuses on the development of skills in preparing, purifying, and identifying organic compounds using spectroscopic methods. Taught at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland with final grade assigned by W&L faculty member. Laboratory course.

Spectroscopic Methods

CHEM 243 - Smith, Donna M.

This course covers theory and interpretation of more complex proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, including two-dimensional techniques, and qualitative mass spectrometry. Laboratory course with fee.

Physical Chemistry of Biological Systems

CHEM 260 - Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve)

An introduction to the application of physical chemistry to biological systems. Topics Include enzyme kinetics, the thermodynamics of metabolic cycles, the conformational energetics of biomolecules, especially protein folding, and an introduction to quantum mechanics.

Biochemistry I

CHEM 341 - Friend, John K. (Kyle)

A study of the structure, function, biosynthesis and breakdown of biomolecules, including amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. Enzymes, biological membranes and membrane transport, signal transduction, and regulation of metabolism are studied in greater detail.

Biochemistry I

CHEM 341 - LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred)

A study of the structure, function, biosynthesis and breakdown of biomolecules, including amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. Enzymes, biological membranes and membrane transport, signal transduction, and regulation of metabolism are studied in greater detail.

Biochemistry I Laboratory

CHEM 343 - Friend, John K. (Kyle)

Experiments demonstrate the techniques used to study proteins and lipids. Isolation and characterization of proteins and lipids using gel electrophoresis, UV-Vis spectroscopy, chromatographic techniques including GC-MS, and the proper reporting and analysis of experimental data are included. Laboratory course with fee.

Advanced Organic Chemistry

CHEM 347 - Samonina-Kosicka, Jelena

An introduction to the synthesis of complex organic molecules. Topics include control of stereochemistry, synthetic methodology, modern synthetic reactions, protecting groups, natural products synthesis, and combinatorial chemistry.

Directed Individual Research

CHEM 421 - Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve)

Literature search, conferences, tri-weekly reports and laboratory work on a project supervised by the instructor and designed by the student and instructor. A final written report on the project is required.

Directed Individual Research

CHEM 421 - Friend, John K. (Kyle)

Literature search, conferences, tri-weekly reports and laboratory work on a project supervised by the instructor and designed by the student and instructor. A final written report on the project is required.

Directed Individual Research

CHEM 421 - LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred)

Literature search, conferences, tri-weekly reports and laboratory work on a project supervised by the instructor and designed by the student and instructor. A final written report on the project is required.

Directed Individual Research

CHEM 421 - Uffelman, Erich S.

Literature search, conferences, tri-weekly reports and laboratory work on a project supervised by the instructor and designed by the student and instructor. A final written report on the project is required.

Directed Individual Research

CHEM 422 - I'Anson, Helen

Literature search, conferences, tri-weekly reports and laboratory work on a project supervised by the instructor and designed by the student and instructor. A final written report on the project is required.

Senior Thesis

CHEM 471 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

Literature search, conferences, reports and laboratory. Maximum of six credits. Laboratory course.

Spring 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Disorder and Chaos

CHEM 106 - Abry, Andrea C. / Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve) / Rowe, Barbara L.

An interdisciplinary introduction to the concepts underlying nonlinear dynamics and fractal geometry emphasizing the theories of chaos and complexity. Students study mathematical and computer modeling of physical and social systems and interpret the results of these models using graphical methods and written descriptions. Methods and concepts from calculus are demonstrated but no mathematics beyond high-school algebra is assumed. The laboratory component consists of a series of projects from diverse areas of the natural sciences, including pendulum motion, oscillating chemical reactions, and natural growth patterns. Laboratory course.

Disorder and Chaos

CHEM 106 - Abry, Andrea C. / Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the concepts underlying nonlinear dynamics and fractal geometry emphasizing the theories of chaos and complexity. Students study mathematical and computer modeling of physical and social systems and interpret the results of these models using graphical methods and written descriptions. Methods and concepts from calculus are demonstrated but no mathematics beyond high-school algebra is assumed. The laboratory component consists of a series of projects from diverse areas of the natural sciences, including pendulum motion, oscillating chemical reactions, and natural growth patterns. Laboratory course.

Science of Cooking

CHEM 155 - France, Marcia B.

The course will build upon the foundation developed in CHEM 154.  Lectures will focus on the biological structures of more complex food organisms such as meat, fruits, vegetables, and eggs, as well as the chemical reactivity involved in cooking and spoilage.  Lectures will also include more in-depth discussions of these chemical processes.  Instruction at an Italian cooking school and visits to local food production facilities will supplement the classroom work.  The course will take place on location in Siena, Italy for four weeks. CHEM 154 must be completed with a grade of S in order to fulfill FDR SL credit with CHEM 155 .

CSI: W&L

CHEM 160 - Watson, Fiona L. / LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred)

This laboratory course is an introduction to the field of forensic science with a focus on the physical, chemical, and biological basis of crime scene evidence. A particular emphasis is on the analysis of trace physical (e.g., glass, soil, fiber, ballistics) and biological (e.g., hair, blood, DNA) evidence and forensic toxicology (e.g., drugs, alcohol, poisons). The laboratory portion of this course provides "hands-on" opportunities to analyze collected crime scene samples and to utilize some of the commonly used forensic laboratory techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, and spectroscopy. The course also introduces some of the legal aspects associated with collection and analysis of crime-scene evidence. Laboratory course.

Spring-Term Special Topics in Chemistry

CHEM 299 - Friend, John K. (Kyle)

Studies of special topics. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Possible topics include medicinal chemistry, materials chemistry, or atmospheric chemistry and the environment.

Spring 2017, CHEM 299-01: Mechanisms of Stem-Cell Growth and Differentiation (4). A practical guide to mammalian stem cell biology. Students explore the molecular underpinnings of stem-cell maintenance with a focus on cellular signaling pathways and stem-cell niche microenvironments, both in the embryo and the adult. We study the biochemistry of directed differentiation and lineage determination, and discuss the function of stem cells in adult-tissue homeostasis and recovery from injury. Within a laboratory setting, students culture and maintain embryonic stem cells, perform pluripotency assays, and direct embryonic stem cells to differentiate into neural progenitors and cardiac cells. Friend

Winter 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

General Chemistry

CHEM 110 - Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve) / Abry, Andrea C. / Pleva, Michael A. (Mike)

This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course with fee.

General Chemistry

CHEM 110 - Uffelman, Erich S. / Abry, Andrea C. / Pleva, Michael A. (Mike)

This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course with fee.

General Chemistry

CHEM 110 - Tuchler, Matthew F. (Matt) / Abry, Andrea C.

This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course with fee.

Introduction to the Science of Cooking, with Laboratory

CHEM 154 - France, Marcia B.

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. This course serves as the foundation for CHEM 155, providing an introduction to the structure of molecules as well as their inter- and intramolecular interactions, with an emphasis on those species of importance to food and cooking. Chemical reactivity as it relates to cooking, food preservation, and spoilage is also discussed as are methods of heat transfer. Each meeting consists of a one-hour lecture and a three-hour laboratory. The lecture is devoted to gaining a thorough working knowledge of the basic concepts of structure and bonding, particularly as these relate to the important food molecules. Chemical reactivity and methods of cooking are also discussed. The laboratory consists of demonstrating chemical principles using food- and cooking-related experiments. Students who receive an Unsatisfactory grade may not continue to CHEM 155, but they remain liable for their committed course costs. Laboratory course with fee.

Analytical Chemistry

CHEM 211 - Tuchler, Matthew F. (Matt) / Abry, Andrea C. / Trimmer, Philip C. (Phil)

Emphasis on inorganic systems exhibiting aqueous solution equilibria. Topics covered include acid/base reactions, redox reactions, complexation, precipitation reactions, and solution equilibrium. Laboratory work emphasizes basic wet-chemical as well as more sophisticated instrumental techniques of chemical quantitative analysis with appropriate statistical methods of data handling. Laboratory course with fee.

Organic Chemistry II

CHEM 242 - Samonina-Kosicka, Jelena / Smith, Donna M. / Friend, John K. (Kyle) / Uffelman, Erich S.

A continuation of CHEM 241.  Laboratory course with fee.

Organic Chemistry II

CHEM 242 - Samonina-Kosicka, Jelena / Smith, Donna M.

A continuation of CHEM 241.  Laboratory course with fee.

Organic Chemistry II

CHEM 242 - Smith, Donna M. / Uffelman, Erich S.

A continuation of CHEM 241.  Laboratory course with fee.

Organic Chemistry II

CHEM 242 - Smith, Donna M.

A continuation of CHEM 241.  Laboratory course with fee.

Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry

CHEM 250 - Uffelman, Erich S.

A survey of main group and transition metal chemistry, as well as fundamentals of point group symmetry and of the major metalloproteins, metalloenzymes, and medicinal inorganic compounds. Main group chemistry is discussed from the perspective of the "classic" compounds from the alkali metals, the alkaline earths, the boron family, the carbon family, the pnicogens, the chalcogens, the halogens, and the noble gases. Transition metal chemistry will be examined from the standpoint of characteristic coordination geometries, kinetics and mechanism, electron transfer (inner and outer sphere), and catalysis.

Physical Chemistry: Quantum & Computational Chemistry

CHEM 261 - Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve)

An introduction to quantum mechanics as it applies to atomic and molecular systems. The emphasis is placed on spectroscopic methods and the modern picture of chemical bonding and molecular structure. The accompanying lab focuses on computational methods to illustrate course topics. Laboratory course.

Biochemistry II

CHEM 342 - LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred)

A continuation of CHEM 341 with an emphasis on the structure, function, and metabolism of nucleic acids. Topics covered in detail include gene expression and regulation, DNA replication and repair, RNA transcription and processing, and protein synthesis and degradation.

Biochemistry II Laboratory

CHEM 344 - Friend, John K. (Kyle)

A laboratory course designed to demonstrate the fundamental techniques used to study nucleic acids. Methods to isolate and characterize DNA and RNA include PCR, gel electrophoresis, hybridization techniques, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Laboratory course with fee.

Directed Individual Study

CHEM 401 - Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve)

Advanced work and reading in topics selected by the instructor and meeting the special needs of advanced students, in accordance with departmental guidelines (available from chemistry faculty). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Directed Individual Research

CHEM 421 - Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve)

Literature search, conferences, tri-weekly reports and laboratory work on a project supervised by the instructor and designed by the student and instructor. A final written report on the project is required.

Directed Individual Research

CHEM 421 - Friend, John K. (Kyle)

Literature search, conferences, tri-weekly reports and laboratory work on a project supervised by the instructor and designed by the student and instructor. A final written report on the project is required.

Directed Individual Research

CHEM 421 - LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred)

Literature search, conferences, tri-weekly reports and laboratory work on a project supervised by the instructor and designed by the student and instructor. A final written report on the project is required.

Directed Individual Research

CHEM 421 - Uffelman, Erich S.

Literature search, conferences, tri-weekly reports and laboratory work on a project supervised by the instructor and designed by the student and instructor. A final written report on the project is required.

Senior Thesis

CHEM 472 - Friend, John K. (Kyle)

Literature search, conferences, reports and laboratory. Maximum of six credits. Laboratory course.

Senior Thesis

CHEM 473 - LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred)

Literature search, conferences, reports and laboratory. Maximum of six credits. Laboratory course.