Course Offerings

Winter 2018

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Ayoub, Nadia A.

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2018, BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Evolutionary Medicine (3) Corequisite: BIOL 113 . An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, ecology, physiology, population dynamics, and biochemistry. This course examines underlying principles of evolution and genetics as applied to human health and medicine. Specific topics include how clonal evolution gives rise to antibiotic resistance and cancer progression, how population genetics can explain exceptionally high rates of heritable diseases like cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia, and the possibility that the recent rise of asthma and type II diabetes may result from a mismatch between the environments experienced by humans for hundreds of generations versus the modern environment. Ayoub.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Cabe, Paul R.

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2018, Biology 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: My Own Personal Genome (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. All students will be required to submit samples to the personal genetic testing company 23andMe, which is done as a group during the first week of class. Cost of testing is covered by a course fee of $105. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. The explosive growth of genetics and genomics offers unprecedented possibilities for investigating and understanding our own genomes. In medicine and health, are we entering an age of "personal genomics"? What can we learn about our own characteristics and health risks? Students explore the basics of molecular genetics, and use this foundation to better understand personal genomic data. Students examine their own data during the term. Laboratory fee. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Cabe .

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Hurd, Lawrence E. (Larry)

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2018, BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Diversity of Life (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113 . An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Biologists use the word diversity, or biodiversity, to describe the variety of life forms in nature. This section is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? (3) what is its future? We cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hurd.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Toporikova, Natalia

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2018, BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Rhythms (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, ecology, physiology, population dynamics, and biochemistry. From cell division to bird migration, clocklike rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section, we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. Toporikova.

Biology Laboratory

BIOL 113 - Winder, Charles T.

A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.

Biology Laboratory

BIOL 113 - STAFF / Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.

Cell Biology

BIOL 211 - Watson, Fiona L.

This course will focus on understanding the components of a cell, the internal organization of a cell, how they move, how they function, how they respond to cues from their external environment, and the limits of our current knowledge. Lecture topics will include the internal organization of a cell, structure and function of DNA, RNA and proteins, membrane and cytoskeleton structure function, protein sorting, membrane transport, cell cycle and cell-cycle control, cell signaling and communication, and cell death. The lab component reinforces the lecture by emphasizing the experimental approaches to the study of cell biology. Laboratory course.

Biochemistry of the Cell

BIOL 215 - Whitworth, Gregg B.

A study of the molecular basis of cell structure and function. Topics include biomolecular structure and chemistry, enzyme kinetics and inhibition, bioenergetics, intermediary metabolism and its regulation, membrane structure and transport, membrane receptors and signal transduction, and the endomembrane system. The laboratory stresses techniques for use in current biochemical research. Laboratory course.

Virology

BIOL 223 - Simurda, Maryanne C.

A study of those obligate intracellular parasites known as viruses, that infect both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including viral structure, mode of infection and replication, regulation of viral life cycle. Discussions include viral diseases in humans.

Zoology

BIOL 240 - Hurd, Lawrence E. (Larry)

Form and function of animals with emphasis on evolution and ecology of major invertebrate and vertebrate groups. Laboratory course.

Vertebrate Endocrinology

BIOL 250 - Blythe, Sarah N.

This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of the endocrine system, including exploration of chemoregulatory mechanisms in vertebrates and examination of biochemical, cellular, and physiological aspects of hormone action. In-class exercises focus on developing written and verbal scientific communication skills, as well as in-depth analysis of primary literature.

Anatomy and Physiology

BIOL 260 - Blythe, Sarah N.

This course is an introduction to the structure, function, and homeostatic properties of the major organ systems of humans.  Laboratory exercises include basic histology, kinesthetic clay modeling of human musculature, and standard diagnostic medical tests such as urinalysis and spirometry. Laboratory course.

Bioengineering and Bioinspired Design

BIOL 267 - Erickson, Jonathan C. (Jon)

Interdisciplinary study of the physical principles of animal navigation and sensory mechanisms. This course integrates biology, physics, engineering, and quantitative methods to study how an animal's physiology is optimized to perform a critical function, as well as how these biological systems inspire new technologies. Topics include: long-distance navigation; locomotion; optical, thermal, and auditory sensing; bioelectricity; biomaterials; and swarm synchronicity. Some examples of questions addressed are: How does a loggerhead turtle navigate during a 9,000 mile open-ocean swim to return to the beach where it was born? How does a blowfly hover and outmaneuver an F-16? How is the mantis shrimp eye guiding the next revolution in DVD technology? This course is intended for students interested in working on problems at the boundary of biology and physics/engineering, and is appropriate for those who have more experience in one field than the other. Lectures, reading and discussion of research literature, and hands-on investigation/field-work, where appropriate.

Problem Solving in Biological Systems: A Modeling Approach

BIOL 282 - Toporikova, Natalia

Biological systems are incredibly complex and include multiple interactions, which makes them hard to understand and to predict the outcomes. In this course, students learn how to solve complex problems inspired by biological systems
using a modeling approach. Students learn to identify most essential elements of biological systems, construct the
verbal and graphical models, translate them to a computational software, and make predictions that are relevant for
health policy, conservation efforts, or experimental outcomes. The topics include spread of infectious diseases,
population dynamics, physiology, and neuroscience. Laboratory course.

Seminar in Biology

BIOL 295 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

Seminar topics vary with instructor and term. Sample topics include: genetics, molecular genetics, virology, evolutionary biology, history of medicine, biology of aging, ecology, cancer, reproductive strategies, neuroendocrinology, microbiology and immunology. These are in-depth studies of restricted topics within the broad areas indicated by the titles, involving critical review of literature, discussion and oral and/or written presentation. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, BIOL 295-01: Topics in Biology: Yellowstone Ecology (1). Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 113, junior standing, and instructor consent. This course examines the interactions of microbes, plants and animals in the world's oldest national park. Through weekly readings, discussions, presentations, and written works, we cover toipcs including soil microbes, grazing, fire, predators, and ecosystem function. This course is a prerequiste for BIOL 332: Plant Functional Ecology which goes to Yellowstone in Spring term and priority is given to students plannig to enroll in BIOL 332. Hamilton .

Seminar in Biology

BIOL 295A - Wubah, Daniel A.

Seminar topics vary with instructor and term. Sample topics include: genetics, molecular genetics, virology, evolutionary biology, history of medicine, biology of aging, ecology, cancer, reproductive strategies, neuroendocrinology, microbiology and immunology. These are in-depth studies of restricted topics within the broad areas indicated by the titles, involving critical review of literature, discussion and oral and/or written presentation. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2018, BIOL 295A-01: Topics in Biology: Case Studies in Medical Microbiology (1) . Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 113 and at least junior standing.  The purpose of this course is to expose students to contemporary issues in infectious diseases in the context of prevention and treatment. The topics cover emerging as well as established diseases. We discuss the molecular basis, symptoms and therapeutic protocols for the diseases. Using case studies from primary literature, students improve their knowledge base, communication skills, collaboration abilities, and critical thinking. Wubah.

Microbiology

BIOL 310 - Simurda, Maryanne C.

A broadly based course in the study of microorganisms, specifically: prokaryotic cells, microbial diversity, and the effects of microbes in the world, in society and in the bodies of animals and plants. It concerns the central role of microbiology as a basic biological science that enhances our understanding of the biology of higher organisms. Laboratory course.

Experimental Botany: Global Climate Change

BIOL 330 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

Lectures focus on the major impacts of global climate change (elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and elevated temperatures) on plant function (photosynthesis and respiration) and plant communities. Additional topics include global carbon budgets, plant carbon sequestration, and agricultural impacts. Participants review the pertinent primary literature and conduct a term-long laboratory research project. Laboratory course.

Evolution

BIOL 340 - Ayoub, Nadia A.

An examination of the evidence for evolution and the mechanisms by which evolution occurs.

Animal Physiology

BIOL 362 - I'Anson, Helen

A comparative study of functional processes of animals, primarily vertebrates, and their environmental interactions. Laboratory emphasis is on functional adaptations and the use of physiological instrumentation in measuring functional processes. Laboratory course.

Directed Individual Study

BIOL 401 - I'Anson, Helen

Reading in the primary research literature on a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Study

BIOL 401 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

Reading in the primary research literature on a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Study

BIOL 402 - Simurda, Maryanne C.

Reading in the primary research literature on a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Toporikova, Natalia

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Humston, Robert

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Cabe, Paul R.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - I'Anson, Helen

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Toporikova, Natalia

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 423 - Watson, Fiona L.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Fall 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Introduction to Behavioral Ecology

BIOL 105 - Marsh, David M.

How do animals experience the world? What are animal social systems like? How do animals choose mates, find places to live, decide when to help others? This course for non-majors focuses on both the mechanisms of animal behavior (genes, hormones, sensory systems) and the adaptive value of behavior for survival and reproduction in nature. The laboratory includes field experiments and lab observations that test hypotheses using animals such as salamanders, cows, birds, and humans. Credit does not apply toward the biology major. Laboratory course.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Blythe, Sarah N.

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Fall 2017, BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Addiction & Drugs of Abuse (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as ecology, physiology, population dynamics, and biochemistry. This course utilizes addiction as a model for understanding the basic principles of cell biology, anatomy, physiology, neuroscience, pharmacology, and genetics. Students gain an appreciation for the biological basis of addiction, as well as the complexity of the body-drug interactions. Students also learn to search and read primary literature, understand the fundamentals of experimental design, and discuss topics related to addiction and drugs. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Blythe.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Fall 2017, BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Yellowstone Ecology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as ecology, physiology, population dynamics, and biochemistry. From cells to satellite data and bacteria and bears, this course investigates multiple biological levels of organization using the world's first national park as a case study. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hamilton.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Hurd, Lawrence E. (Larry)

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Fall 2017, BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Diversity of Life (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113 . An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Biologists use the word diversity, or biodiversity, to describe the variety of life forms in nature. This section is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? (3) what is its future? We cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hurd.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Simurda, Maryanne C.

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Fall 2017, BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

Biology Laboratory

BIOL 113 - Winder, Charles T.

A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.

Biology Laboratory

BIOL 113 - Lanier, Leah S.

A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.

Data Science: Visualizing and Exploring Big Data

BIOL 185 - Whitworth, Gregg B.

No prior programming experience required. We live in the era of Big Data. Major discoveries in science and medicine are being made by exploring large datasets in novel ways using computational tools. The challenge in the biomedical sciences is the same as in Silicon Valley: knowing what computational tools are right for a project and where to get started when exploring large data sets. In this course, students learn to use R, a popular open-source programming language and data analysis environment, to interactively explore data. Case studies are drawn from across the sciences and medicine. Topics include data visualization, machine learning, image analysis, geospatial analysis, and statistical inference on large data sets. We also emphasize best practices in coding, data handling, and adherence to the principles of reproducible research. Fulfills the computer science requirement for biology and neuroscience majors.

Statistics for Biology and Medicine

BIOL 201 - Toporikova, Natalia

This course examines the principles of statistics and experimental design for biological and medical research. The focus is on the practical and conceptual aspects of statistics, rather than mathematical derivations. Students completing this class will be able to read and understand research papers, to design realistic experiments, and to carry out their own statistical analyses using computer packages.

Human Parasitology

BIOL 210 - Simurda, Maryanne C.

A survey of the phenomenon of animal parasitism, including discussion of the chief distinguishing structures, life cycles, and functions of major pathogenic parasites infecting humans and other animals.

Cell Biology at St. Andrews

BIOL 211S - I'Anson, Helen

Lecture and lab work are intermingled in this course that introduces the structure and function of the cell and sub-cellular organelles. as well as prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The diversity and development of different cell types within multicellular organisms is also discussed. Taught at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland with final grade assigned by W&L biology faculty.

Molecular Biology at St. Andrews

BIOL 212S - I'Anson, Helen

Molecular biology is an essential tool within modern biology, widely used in biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, ecology, and evolution. This course provides an introduction to modem molecular biology. Lecture and laboratory exercises are intermingled to provide an understanding of fundamental biological processes that are central to molecular biology. In addition, genomics and bioinformatics concepts and tools are introduced. Taught at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland with final grade assigned by W&L biology faculty.

Aquatic Ecology

BIOL 217 - Humston, Robert

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the ecology of freshwater systems, with laboratory emphasis on streams and rivers in the local area. It includes a review of the physical and biological properties of freshwater ecosystems as well as current issues relating to their conservation. Laboratory activities focus around monitoring the impacts of current stream restoration efforts in local watersheds.

Genetics

BIOL 220 - Ayoub, Nadia A.

A study of the three main branches of modern genetics: 1) Mendelian genetics, the study of the transmission of traits from one generation to the next; 2) molecular genetics, a study of the chemical structure of genes and how they operate at the molecular level; and 3) population genetics, the study of the variation of genes between and within populations. This course is a prerequisite to most 300-level courses in biology.

Genetics

BIOL 220 - Cabe, Paul R.

A study of the three main branches of modern genetics: 1) Mendelian genetics, the study of the transmission of traits from one generation to the next; 2) molecular genetics, a study of the chemical structure of genes and how they operate at the molecular level; and 3) population genetics, the study of the variation of genes between and within populations. This course is a prerequisite to most 300-level courses in biology.

Genetics Laboratory

BIOL 221 - Cabe, Paul R.

Techniques in modern molecular genetics.

Genetics Laboratory

BIOL 221 - Ayoub, Nadia A.

Techniques in modern molecular genetics.

Microanatomy

BIOL 355 - I'Anson, Helen

A study of the normal microscopic structure of the mammalian body with emphasis placed on structural and functional correlations. Laboratory work includes the study of prepared tissue and the preparation of tissues for microscopy. Laboratory course.

Developmental Biology

BIOL 365 - Watson, Fiona L.

An examination of the goals, practices, and accomplishments of contemporary developmental biology. Topics include gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, organogenesis, genetic control of cell differentiation, transgenic procedures, cloning, embryo manipulation, and stem cells. Lectures, discussions of the developmental literature, and electronic media are utilized. Laboratory sessions focus on experimental manipulations of early invertebrate and vertebrate embryos and emphasize student-designed research projects. Laboratory course.

Molecular Mechanics of Life

BIOL 385 - Whitworth, Gregg B.

How do we study complex networks of interactions between molecules in cells? How do we discover what roles different molecular machines play in the development and behavior of cells and animals? How can we identify the ways in which medical illness is caused by the misregulation of biological complexes because of a pathogenic infection or genetic disease? Our approach to answering these questions reflects the same interdisciplinary strategy being used at the forefront of current biomedical research. We consider the ways in which traditional approaches in biochemistry, genetics and cell biology can be merged with new systems-level approaches such as genomics and proteomics, to allow us to probe the underlying molecular mechanics of life. In the classroom, we examine different molecular networks, while readings include selections from the primary literature. The laboratory is based on an investigation of a novel research question, designed and addressed by student participants. Laboratory course

Selected Topics in Ecology and Evolution

BIOL 398 - Hurd, Lawrence E. (Larry)

Topics include ecology, behavior, evolution, and natural history of selected taxonomic groups. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2017, BIOL 398-01: Topic: Ecology and Conservation (3). Prerequisites: BIOL 220 and permission of the instructor.   What is biodiversity, how did it come about, and what is its future?  How do ecological systems work, and how (and why) can we conserve biodiversity in the Anthropocene? The recognition that global biological diversity is threatened with a precipitous decline of a magnitude similar to the past five mass extinctions, by human activities, has stimulated much ecological research.  We explore major ecological concepts and how they relate to biodiversity by reading and analyzing the primary research literature.  Following a lecture portion of the course to introduce major concepts, students will prepare oral presentations of research based in the primary literature, both assigned and of their choice. Hurd.

Directed Individual Study

BIOL 401 - Simurda, Maryanne C.

Reading in the primary research literature on a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Study

BIOL 403 - I'Anson, Helen / Ober, William C., MD

Reading in the primary research literature on a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - I'Anson, Helen

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Toporikova, Natalia

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Marsh, David M.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Ayoub, Nadia A.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Humston, Robert

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Winder, Charles T.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Whitworth, Gregg B.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - I'Anson, Helen

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Ayoub, Nadia A.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Toporikova, Natalia

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Cabe, Paul R.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Humston, Robert

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Marsh, David M.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Blythe, Sarah N.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Whitworth, Gregg B.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Winder, Charles T.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Spring 2017

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Environmental Biology: Endangered Plants of the Appalachians

BIOL 101 - Winder, Charles T.

Using case studies in plant endangerment as a focal point for understanding ecological and evolutionary processes and the impact of human activities on biodiversity, students gain fundamental insight into their relationship with the living world and the importance of preserving biological diversity through a combination of targeted readings, intensive discussions, and basic research in the field, Field activities take place in regional hotspots of plant endemism and give students experience in applied conservation research. Field sites and subject species vary from year to year.

CSI: W&L

BIOL 160 - Watson, Fiona L. / LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred)

This laboratory course is an introduction to the field of forensic science with a focus on the physical, chemical, and biological basis of crime scene evidence. A particular emphasis is on the analysis of trace physical (e.g., glass, soil, fiber, ballistics) and biological (e.g., hair, blood, DNA) evidence and forensic toxicology (e.g., drugs, alcohol, poisons). The laboratory portion of this course provides "hands-on" opportunities to analyze collected crime scene samples and to utilize some of the commonly used forensic laboratory techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, and spectroscopy. The course also introduces some of the legal aspects associated with collection and analysis of crime-scene evidence. Laboratory course.

Field Ornithology

BIOL 241 - Cabe, Paul R.

This course integrates studies of bird biology with field observation and identification of local bird species. Topics covered include anatomy, taxonomy, reproduction, vocalization, migration, ecology, and evolution. Field trips to a variety of areas throughout Virginia emphasize identification skills and basic field research techniques. No other course may be taken concurrently. Laboratory course.

Field Herpetology

BIOL 242 - Marsh, David M.

Field Herpetology is a research-based course on the ecology and behavior of amphibians and reptiles. Research projects vary from year-to-year and are designed to give students plenty of time on the field and exposure to a diverse assortment of amphibian and reptile species. Students should be prepared for hiking off-trail, wading in swamps, and catching live animals.

Ecological Modeling and Conservation Strategies

BIOL 325 - Humston, Robert

This course is an intensive introduction to foundational methods in ecological modeling and their application, with emphasis on the dynamics of exploited or threatened populations and developing strategies for effective conservation. Topics include managing harvested populations, population viability analysis, individual based models, and simulation modeling for systems analyses. Laboratory course.

Plant Functional Ecology

BIOL 332 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Information regarding the specific course topic and field trip schedule is made available in the fall. Through novel research projects in a variety of field settings (e.g., on-campus, Appalachian and Blue Ridge Mountains, The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem), this field-based laboratory course covers topics which investigate the vital roles that plants play in shaping Earth's ecosystems. Topics focus on the responses of native plants to environmental stresses, such as global climate change (elevated temperature and carbon dioxide and drought), herbivory, and invasive species. Field and laboratory exercises focus on testing hypotheses through experiments using a variety of species from intact plant communities. A review of the pertinent literature is used to develop and conduct a term research project. Laboratory course.

Experimental Neurophysiology

BIOL 360 - Blythe, Sarah N.

An in-depth exploration of the theory and techniques of cellular neurophysiology. Labs utilize extracellular and intracellular recording techniques to explore motor neuron and sensory receptor firing properties and to examine the ionic basis for resting and action potentials and synaptic transmission. Laboratory course.

Directed Individual Study

BIOL 401 - Humston, Robert

Reading in the primary research literature on a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 424 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Richmond Clinical Rotation Program

BIOL 464 - Wubah, Judith A.

This program is for students who have demonstrated an interest in a career in medicine. The Richmond Term Program combines an introductory experience in a medical practice with academic study of Immunology and infectious disease. It exposes the students to the process and problems of medicine through observations, seminars, and discussions. This is a faculty-supervised, off-campus experience with various physicians in Richmond, VA. This course does not meet major requirements.