Spring Term Courses

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Federal Tax Policy and Planning in Today's World

ACCT 256 - Bovay, John C. (Jack)

This course promotes thoughtful discussion and research of current topics in U.S. tax policy and planning. After an intensive introduction to basic federal tax concepts, each student writes a paper on a current federal tax topic.

History Through Accounting

ACCT 280 - Fafatas, Stephan A.

This class explores the development of accounting through the study of historical economic, business, and cultural issues. From Venetian merchants to recent scandals, this course seeks to learn how accounting has impacted society and vice versa. The course begins by reviewing early evidence of accounting methods as important tools for decision makers and then moves on to the development of financial reporting, with a large focus on the history of the railroad industry in the U.S. The class combines readings with site visits to libraries, historical societies, and businesses to dig into the forces that have helped shape accounting into the science it is today.

Anatomy of a Fraud

ACCT 304 - Hess, Megan F.

This course examines the phenomena of financial statement fraud and discusses some of the key forensic accounting concepts and skills used to address this problem. Drawing on historical cases of financial statement fraud as well as the first-hand experience of the instructor, we search for the answers to questions such as: What causes executives to "cook the books"? What factors contribute to fraud? What can be done to prevent and detect it? How have regulations changed the landscape of corporate misconduct? What role do auditors, lawyers, employees, the media, and other stakeholders play?

Casino Accounting, Auditing, and Financial Analysis

ACCT 370 - Boylan, Scott J.

This course provides an introduction to financial accounting and auditing in the gaming industry. Topics include the design and implementation of controls over cash, revenue recognition and measurement, accounting for the extension of casino credit , progressive jackpot liabilities, complimentary expenditures, and customer loyalty programs.

Chicana/o Art and Muralism: From the Street to the (Staniar) Gallery

ARTH 276 - Lepage, Andrea C.

This class examines the process by which Chicana/o artists have garnered public attention and respect, and have taken their artworks from the peripheries of the art world to more traditional museum and gallery spaces. Using the Great Wall of Los Angeles as a connecting thread, this class considers the broad theme of identity creation and transformation as expressed by Chicana/o artists from the 1970s to the present.

Digital Florence

ARTH 383 - Bent, George R. / Gustafson, Erik D.

This course invites students to participate in and contribute to the Digital Humanities project "Florence As It Was: The Digital Reconstruction of a Medieval City". We consider how the built environment of Florence influenced--and was in turn influenced by--the culture, society, art, and history of the city. Students learn to translate historical, scholarly analysis into visually accessible formats, and collaborate on the "Florence As It Was" project, contributing to the digital mapping, data visualization, and virtual-reality reconstruction of medieval Florence.

Seminar in Museum Studies

ARTH 398 - Hobbs, Patricia A.

An exploration of the history, philosophy and practical aspects of museums. Topics of discussion include governance and administration, collections, exhibitions and education. The course alternates weekly readings and class discussion with field trips to regional museums. Requires short papers and a major project.

Drawing Italy

ARTS 213 - Olson-Janjic, Kathleen

Living and drawing on site in Rome, Florence, Umbria, and Tuscany and with day trips to Pompeii, Assisi, and other important art sites in Italy. Students explore Italy's vast artistic heritage within its cultural context, then apply this experience to their own art while working in the distinctive Mediterranean light. Media include pen and ink, pastel and acrylic. Lab fee required.

Drawing in Place

ARTS 214 - Beavers, Leigh A.

This drawing course is intended for intermediate drawing students. The goals of this intensive course are to practice drawing skills, learn about the tradition of art of place, and to produce a series of drawings based on a specific place. The first two weeks is spent brushing up on the basics of drawing while reading and discussing writings about place and site-oriented art. Image presentations and group discussion support the readings.

Antique Photographic Processes

ARTS 221 - Bowden, Christa K.

An exploration of 19th-century photographic processes within the context of the history of photography. Individual processes are learned through studio demonstration and intensive hands-on lab sessions. Processes covered in this course include salt printing, cyanotype, Van Dyke, kallitype, and platinum and palladium printing and toning, as well as wet plate collodion processes such as tintypes and ambrotypes. Students learn how to make enlarged digital negatives for contact printing from photographs that originate in either film or digital formats. In addition to technique, students learn the historical background of each process, as well as contemporary trends and artists working with these methods.

Genetic Engineering and Society

BIOL 150 - Ayoub, Nadia A. / Friend, John K. (Kyle)

Humans have manipulated genes for thousands of years to make better crops and to domesticate animals. But in the last century the ability to transfer genes from one organism to another ("genetic engineering") has dramatically changed our understanding of biology and our lives. In this course, we explore the nuts and bolts of genetic engineering and a small sampling of its applications, including developing drugs and vaccinations, enhancing crops, testing for genetic diseases, and genetic testing in the courtroom. These applications introduce ethical considerations for us to debate. In addition, we use molecular-biology tools to carry out our own genetic engineering projects with spider silk genes, which have potential for multiple medical and industrial applications. Students culminate the term by making a sales pitch to biotech companies to buy their spider-silk genes. Laboratory course.

Field Ornithology

BIOL 241 - Cabe, Paul R.

This course integrates studies of bird biology with field observation and identification of local bird species. Topics covered include anatomy, taxonomy, reproduction, vocalization, migration, ecology, and evolution. Field trips to a variety of areas throughout Virginia emphasize identification skills and basic field research techniques. No other course may be taken concurrently. Laboratory course.

Field Herpetology

BIOL 242 - Marsh, David M.

Field Herpetology is a research-based course on the ecology and behavior of amphibians and reptiles. Research projects vary from year-to-year and are designed to give students plenty of time on the field and exposure to a diverse assortment of amphibian and reptile species. Students should be prepared for hiking off-trail, wading in swamps, and catching live animals.

Ecological Modeling and Conservation Strategies

BIOL 325 - Humston, Robert / Rowe, Barbara L.

This course is an intensive introduction to foundational methods in ecological modeling and their application, with emphasis on the dynamics of exploited or threatened populations and developing strategies for effective conservation. Topics include managing harvested populations, population viability analysis, individual based models, and simulation modeling for systems analyses. Laboratory course.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 423 - Blythe, Sarah N.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major. May be carried out during summer.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 424 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Amateurism and the NCAA: A For-Profit Enterprise in a Not-For-Profit Environment

BUS 135 - Cowins, Elicia P.

A discussion of the primary regulatory body of college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and its effectiveness as a governance mechanism. Over the course of the term, we examine the following: 1) history and structure of the NCAA; 2) interactions between Division I men's basketball and football, specifically, as revenue-generating sports and the non-profit institutions within which they operate; 3) present and past legal challenges that threaten to alter--or have altered--the relationship between the NCAA and member colleges; 4) externalities that manifest as a result of the influence of athletic departments on certain university campuses; and, 5) educational, physical/mental health, and financial prospects for athletes, regardless of their transition to the professional ranks.

International Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability

BUS 191 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

Do corporations have an obligation to manage their social impact in addition to maximizing sales, profits and stock price? What happens when these objectives are in conflict with each other? This course explores the relative roles of businesses, not-for-profits, government, and individual citizens in managing social and environmental impact. Student spend significant time exploring case studies and interacting with senior management of various companies. Recent examples include Carlsberg, Dr. Pepper-Snapple Group, Dunkin' Brands, Norden, Novo Nordisk, Pandora, Proctor & Gamble, Starbucks, and Unilever. The course culminates with two weeks in Copenhagen visiting numerous Danish companies and developing a group research project on a topic chosen by the students. The time abroad also includes cultural excursions to places such as Frederiksborg Castle and Tivoli, dinners with Danish families, a harbor/canal tour, and a closing dinner featuring New Nordic cuisine.

Seminar in Organizational Behavior

BUS 301 - Schatten, Jeffrey M.

Offered from time to time when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, BUS 301-01: Leading Teams (4). Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. This course is taught at the Augusta Correctional Center in Craigsville, VA. Ten W&L students and ten inmates take the course together. Students learn from the professor and from one another as they explore the interpersonal processes and psychological factors that affect the way in which individuals interact and engage with one another. Students learn to understand conflict and how to effectively manage conflict in group settings. This course is mostly comprised of team activities and cases, which is intended to give students the tools, insight, and experience to better understand and manage teams. (EXP) Schatten.

Data Science for Business

BUS 322 - Larson, Keri M.

No prior programming experience required. Meets the Information Systems requirement in the business administration major. Data Science is a hot new field, but data scientists are only as good as their ability to ask the right questions about the data they are investigating. This course covers the nuts and bolts of data science without programming, focusing on how organizations can make smarter decisions to address their business problems and create new business opportunities. Students use industry-standard tools to achieve a range of competencies from machine learning and statistics to data wrangling, data visualization, and data access. We emphasize best practices in coding, data handling, and adherence to the principles of reproducible research.

Framing a Franchise: The Business of Entertainment

BUS 360 - Lind, Stephen J.

Entertainment franchises are big business that pervade our consumer culture. This course challenges students to evaluate the various practices used to "frame" such creative entertainment franchise properties. Students study a variety of global franchises, such as Peanuts, Star Wars, or Disney lines, analyzing key issues involved in creative product development. These issues include framing, fidelity, and audience management, as well practical processes like the role of development gatekeepers and product licensing structures. The course includes a one-week trip to Los Angeles to meet with entertainment industry executives at studio and key franchise locations.

Creative Strategic Planning

BUS 371 - Bower, Amanda

Strategic planning (also called account or brand planning) is a philosophy of consumer research that fully incorporates the consumer in strategic developments. The course includes the types of qualitative techniques traditionally associated with social sciences (e.g., anthropology, sociology and psychology) in order to arrive at a brand (or other) strategy. The students must think creatively, independently, and interdependently as they apply the variety of research techniques, develop the strategic recommendations and present and defend both the research and recommendations. In addition to research techniques, students receive an orientation in relevant software (video editing, photo manipulation) and learn effective and persuasive presentation skills. The course is project-based, and the course culminates in the opportunity to present their work to the client (usually an advertising/marketing professional) for whom they've been working the course of the term.

Technology and Entrepreneurship

BUS 383 - Junkunc, Marc T.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of process through which technological inventions are transformed into innovations.  Key works from scholars in the field will guide class discussions on understanding why managing innovation is complex, cross-functional, and a historically-dependent endeavor.  By the end of the class, students will have an appreciation for the entrepreneurial mindset, key actors in the start-up process, and the means through which technology is commercialized.  In addition to these discussions, students will travel to Silicon Valley to not only meet individuals who are a part of the recent start-up/technology scene, but also visit key locations that capture the history and context of innovation in the San Francisco/Bay Area.

Corporate Social Responsibility Practicum

BUS 391 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

The course provides students an opportunity to explore corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability challenges from within an organization. The course is taught in Denmark, regarded as one of the most progressive economies in terms of CSR implementation. Initial reading, discussion, and research in the winter term prepare students to be matched with a Danish organization grappling with a CSR issue. Students work in small groups (four students) in a consultative capacity with a sponsoring Danish organization's decision makers. Students also participate in larger group discussions of issues confronted during the practicum and reflect on their experiences in both a personal journal and group blog. Sponsoring organizations include both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations, and the nature of the issues varies from sponsor to sponsor. May be taken twice for degree credit if the topics are significantly different.

Layered Berlin: German Culture and the Social Market Economy

BUS 392 - Hess, Andrew M. (Drew) / Youngman, Paul A.

A four-week course taught abroad that offers students a true immersion in German language, culture, and business environment. In order to give students a complete understanding of contemporary Germany, we integrate a literary-historical analysis of the country's rich history from 1848 to the present day with an introduction to German social and economic system that focuses on stakeholder-centric business and sustainability principles. Through an exciting mix of literary fiction, historical readings and cases, film screenings, along with corporate and cultural site visits, students gain an understanding of the interdependence between "big C" Culture and business culture.

Directed Individual Study

BUS 401 - Ballenger, Robert M. (Bob)

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest. Credits may not be used toward the major requirements in business administration.

Disorder and Chaos

CHEM 106 - Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve) / Abry, Andrea C.

An interdisciplinary introduction to the concepts underlying nonlinear dynamics and fractal geometry emphasizing the theories of chaos and complexity. Students study mathematical and computer modeling of physical and social systems and interpret the results of these models using graphical methods and written descriptions. Methods and concepts from calculus are demonstrated but no mathematics beyond high-school algebra is assumed. The laboratory component consists of a series of projects from diverse areas of the natural sciences, including pendulum motion, oscillating chemical reactions, and natural growth patterns. Laboratory course. Additional course fee.

Genetic Engineering and Society

CHEM 150 - Ayoub, Nadia A. / Friend, John K. (Kyle)

Humans have manipulated genes for thousands of years to make better crops and domesticate animals, but in the last century the ability to transfer genes from one organism to another (genetic engineering) has dramatically changed our understanding of biology and our lives. In this course. we explore the nuts and bolts of genetic engineering and a small sampling of its applications, including developing drugs and vaccinations, enhancing crops, testing for genetic diseases, and genetic testing in the courtroom. These applications introduce ethical considerations that we debate. In addition, we use molecular biology tools to carry out our own genetic engineering projects with spider silk genes, which have potential for multiple medical and industrial applications. The course culminates with students making a sales pitch to biotech companies to buy their spider silk genes. Laboratory course.

Supervised Study Abroad: Beginning Chinese

CHIN 103 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to introduce Chinese language and culture to students with little or no previous Chinese language background and prepare them for studying first-year Chinese. Combining language study with studies of other aspects of Chinese culture (literature, art. history, economy, etc.) provides students with first-hand experience of the development of contemporary China. Classes and discussions are held at the International College or Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. Students learn through personal experience about the emergence or modern China and its changing culture. The 2019 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,700 and for the 6-week course is $4,150.

Supervised Study Abroad: Beginning Chinese

CHIN 105 - Fu, Hongchu

 This course is designed to introduce Chinese language and culture to students with little or no previous Chinese language background and prepare them for studying first-year Chinese. Combining language study with studies of other aspects of Chinese culture (literature, art, history, economy, etc.) provides students with firsthand experience of the development of contemporary China. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. Students learn through personal experience about the emergence of modern China and its changing culture. The 2019 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,700 and for the 6-week course is $4,150.

Supervised Study Abroad: First-Year Chinese

CHIN 113 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to improve active oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for studying second-year Chinese. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students have opportunities to mingle with ordinary Chinese people, to engage in everyday conversation, and to have first-hand experience of the development of contemporary China. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. The 2019 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,700 and for the 6-week course is $4,150. .

Supervised Study Abroad: First-Year Chinese

CHIN 115 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to improve active oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for studying second-year Chinese. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students have opportunities to mingle with ordinary Chinese people, to engage in everyday conversation, and to have firsthand experience of the development of contemporary China. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. The 2019 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,700 and for the 6-week course is $4,150.

Supervised Study Abroad: Second-Year Chinese

CHIN 263 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to further improve student oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for studying third-year Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students discuss and debate with Chinese students about emerging social. economic, and policy issues. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. The 2019 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,700 and for the 6-week course is $4,150.

Supervised Study Abroad: Second-Year Chinese

CHIN 265 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to further improve student oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for studying third-year. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students discuss and debate with Chinese students about emerging social, economic, and policy issues. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. The 2019 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,700 and for the 6-week course is $4,150.

The Athenian Acropolis

CLAS 214 - Laughy, Michael H., Jr.

In this course. we study the art and architecture of the Acropolis, from the Neolithic period to today. with a particular focus on the Archaic and Classical periods. Our study is based upon a detailed and chronology survey of the buildings. dedications, and religious practices conducted on the Acropolis. We conclude the course with a discussion of the Acropolis in the post-Classical period, and the meaning of the Acropolis for Greeks today.

Introduction to Robotics

CSCI 250 - Khalifa, Moataz

This course combines readings from the contemporary robotics literature with hands-on lab experience building robots (equipment provided) and programming them to do various tasks. The lab experience culminates with a peer-judged competition of robot projects proposed and built during the second half of the term.

Software Engineering through Web Applications

CSCI 335 - Sprenkle, Sara E.

In this course, students learn to develop high-performance software for Web applications using advanced software engineering techniques. The concepts of client-server computing, theories of usable graphical user interfaces, models for Web-based information retrieval and processing, and iterative development are covered.

Innovations in Publishing

DCI 175 - Barry, Jeffrey S.

An intensive introduction to the publishing industry with a focus on digital innovations. A hands-on approach in a series of four laboratory sessions provides students with the ability to tackle a variety of technical scenarios for publishing. Students assemble an e-book from scratch and produce a print-on-demand book. Each class begins with news from the publishing industry and ends by examining job ads to understand the types of skills and experiences necessary for pursuing careers in this very broad field. This course focuses primarily on book publishing, particularly fiction.

Cool Japan: A Visual Journey through Anime, Manga, Robots, Language, and Culture

EALL 175 - Naito, Yumiko

Taught in English, this course examines a variety of visual artifacts such as manga, anime, and unique social phenomena, observable in current Japan through reading materials and discussions, to understand Japanese culture and society. Students learn the visually beautiful writing system of Japanese and onomatopoeia, which is used extensively in Japanese manga. Through hands-on experiences, students gain a deeper understanding and multicultural perspective of the culture and society of Japan

Caste at the Intersection of Economy, Religion, and Law

ECON 246 - Lubin, Timothy (Tim) / Silwal, Shikha B.

Social stratification touches every aspect of life, and South Asia's traditional caste structure is a special case: this highly complex, strictly-adhered-to system has been religiously legitimized and criticized over a 3,000-year history, and is nowadays seen as being at odds with the modern world. Yet it remains a crucial factor in social identity, economic roles, legal status, and religious practice. This course offers a 360-degree survey of caste both historically and in practice today in Nepal. The course addresses four themes, respectively providing for each a combination of historical background, social scientific analysis of the modern situation, and direct field experience for the students.

Economics of the Chesapeake Bay: Agriculture, Recreation, Fisheries and Urban Sprawl

ECON 257 - Kahn, James R. (Jim)

This course examines the causes of, consequences of, and solutions to the environmental problems of the Chesapeake Bay, using economic tools in an interdisciplinary context. The course will spend approximately four days in the Chesapeake Bay area. Students work as a group to develop a plan to recover the Chesapeake Bay to promote its ecological health and the ecological services that it provides for the watershed.

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 295 - Casey, James F. (Jim)

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Spring 2019, ECON 295-01: Introduction to Sustainable Development (3). Prerequisites: ECON 100 or 101. Preference to first-years and sophomores. In September 2015, many countries adopted a set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for 2015-2030 to replace the Millennium Development Goals when they expired in 2015. These SDGs set targets for the three pillars of sustainable development -- reducing poverty, protecting the environment, and increasing equality of opportunity for those who may have had less-than-equal opportunity in the past. This course provides an introduction to the concept, theories, and potential outcomes of sustainable development. Additionally, we take a case-study approach and look at policies and programs that have aimed to address each of the SDGs. Students are introduced to sustainability through policies addressing oceans, biodiversity, climate, energy, education, social investment, and health. Casey .

Special Topics in Economics

ECON 295 - Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

Course emphasis and prerequisites change from term to term and are announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. A maximum of nine credits chosen from all special topics in economics courses may be used, with permission of the department head, toward requirements for the economics major.

Spring 2019, ECON 295-02: Land in O'odham Culture Economics and History (4). A seminar on the cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of the O'odham Indians' ties to their lands as expressed in their pre- and post-reservation lifeways. Students address three major themes: 1) O'odham land and cosmology; 2) land and economy in O'odham history; and 3) contemporary cultural and economic issues among O'odham peoples. The class spends 8 days in the Sonoran Desert region of Southern Arizona to visit sites and meet with speakers in and around the Tohono O'odham Nation. Guse and Markowitz.

Health: A Social Science Exploration

ECON 376 - Blunch, Niels-Hugo (Hugo)

Much of the work done by consulting companies, banks, insurance companies, think tanks, non-governmental organizations, government agencies, etc., is based on applied statistical and econometric analysis. This course helps prepare students for careers in these environments using a hands-on approach and emphasizing the use of data and student-directed research in the specific context of health-related issues. Example of these issues include obesity, vaccinations, pre- and post-natal care, contraceptive use, or child mortality; possible determinants include poverty, education, or distance to the nearest health clinic or hospital. An interdisciplinary perspective is highlighted, as is the use and importance of quantitative analysis for public policy.

Educating Citizens for Democracy

EDUC 230 - Moffa, Eric D.

Students study the relationship between education and democracy by critically examining various theories of democracy, competing conceptions of citizenship, and its implications for formal education. Specifically, students investigate the actual and possible roles for citizens in a democracy and the function of education in reproducing, altering, or challenging these roles. Students analyze and evaluate historic and philosophical texts, educational research, and conduct a narrative inquiry project to help draw conclusions about the best practices and policies for educating citizens for democracy.

Topics in Creative Writing: Playwriting

ENGL 202 - Gavaler, Christopher P. (Chris)

A course in the practice of writing plays, involving workshops, literary study, critical writing, and performance.

Eco-Writing

ENGL 207 - Green, Leah N.

An expeditionary course in environmental creative writing. Readings include canonical writers such as Frost, Emerson, Auden, Rumi, and Muir, as well as contemporary writers such as W.S. Merwin, Mary Oliver, Janice Ray, Gary Snyder, Annie Dillard, Tich Nhat Hanh, Wendell Berry, and Robert Hass. We take weekly "expeditions" including creative writing hikes, a landscape painting exhibit, and a Buddhist monastery. "Expeditionary courses" sometimes involve moderate to challenging hiking. We research the science and social science of the ecosystems explored, as well as the language of those ecosystems. The course has two primary aspects: (1) reading and literary analysis of eco-literature (fiction, non-fiction, and poetry) and (2) developing skill and craft in creating eco-writing through the act of writing in these genres and through participation in weekly "writing workshop."

 

The Novel

ENGL 232 - Hill, Michael D.

An introductory study of the novel written in English. The course may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of modern narrative.

 

Individual Shakespeare Play: Othello

ENGL 242 - Pickett, Holly C.

A detailed study of a single Shakespearean play, including its sources, textual variants, performance history, film adaptations and literary and cultural legacy. The course includes both performance-based and analytical assignments.

Spring 2019, ENGL 242-01: Othello and Ourselves: Race, Religion, and Reconciliation in Shakespeare (3). Race, religion, sexualized violence: Othello is a play that poses timely and difficult questions for our own age. This course examines one of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies in detail, studying its sources, historical context, textual history, performance history, and film adaptations. Subsequently, special attention is given to the play's literary and cultural legacy to see ways the play has been both cited and revised to comment on our modern situation. We consider one of Shakespeare's late plays, The Winter's Tale , as one of the early "revisions" of Shakespeare's Othello and see the play at the American Shakespeare Center in Staunton. (HL) Pickett.

English Works: Careers for English Majors

ENGL 290 - Gertz, Genelle C. / Olan, Lorriann T. (Lorri)

A course for English majors and students considering the major to explore and prepare for careers. Students have the opportunity to assess their abilities and skills, learn about a variety of industries, develop professional documents as well as online profiles, participate in mock interviews, network with alumni, and apply for internships and jobs.

Topics in British Literature

ENGL 292 - Walle, Taylor F.

British literature, supported by attention to historical and cultural contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time or focus on a cultural phenomenon. Students develop their analytical writing skills through both short papers and a final multisource research paper. May be repeated for degree credit and for the major if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, ENGL 292-01: A Monstrous Creation: Frankenstein and Its Intertexts (3). Much like the creature who haunts its pages, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is itself an assemblage of parts. Drawing on numerous literary and philosophical precedents, Shelley's groundbreaking novel is at once deeply familiar and shockingly new. Placing Frankenstein at its center, this seminar begins with texts that Shelley invokes--including Paradise Lost, Prometheus , Rousseau , and Coleridge , among others--and ends with texts that she inspires. We consider the common mythology, questions, and concerns that all of these texts share, and also the nature of literary allusion, homage, and adaptation. Why does the Genesis story remain so central to the Western literary tradition? Why is Shelley's creature an especially compelling representation of humankind's fallen condition? Why does Shelley's novel continue to resonate with modern audiences, 200 years after its publication? How does the figure of the monster evolve from Milton's Satan to Dick's Android? Students cultivate critical thinking and close reading through class discussion, and then deploy these same skills in a series of analytical writing assignments. (HL) Walle.

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293 - Adams, Edward A.

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, ENGL 293-01: Topics in American Literature & Culture: Films of Alfred Hitchcock (3). Prerequisite: Completion of the FW requirement. Not open to students who have taken a similar course as ENGL 272 or 372. This course presents an intensive survey of the films of Alfred Hitchcock: it covers all of his major and many of his less well-known films. It supplements that central work by introducing students to several approaches to film analysis that are particularly appropriate for studying Hitchcock. These include biographical interpretation (Spoto's dark thesis), auteur and genre-based interpretation (Truffaut), psychological analyses (Zizek & Freud), and dominant form theory (hands-on study of novel to film adaptations). (HL) Adams.

Spring-Term Seminar in Literary Studies

ENGL 295 - Wilson, Ricardo A.

Students in this course study a group of works related by theme, by culture, by topic, by genre, or by the critical approach taken to the texts. Involves field trips, film screenings, service learning, and/or other special projects, as appropriate, in addition to 8-10 hours per week of class meetings. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, ENGL 295-01: Spring-Term Seminar in Literary Studies: Neo-Slave Narratives (3). Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement. How does an engagement with the genre of neo-slave narratives help to develop our thought about the institution of slavery across the Americas? Most importantly, how does this body of work force us to reexamine our cultural inheritance? This course addresses these questions via the thoughtful examination of a range of theoretical, fictional, and cinematic texts. This course involves a five-day residency at the Berry Hill Plantation in South Boston, Virginia. While exploring the plantation and surrounding communities, we visit slave cemeteries and some of the most well-preserved slave quarters in the nation. (HL) Wilson.

Spring-Term Seminar in Literary Studies

ENGL 295 - Millan, Diego A.

Students in this course study a group of works related by theme, by culture, by topic, by genre, or by the critical approach taken to the texts. Involves field trips, film screenings, service learning, and/or other special projects, as appropriate, in addition to 8-10 hours per week of class meetings. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, ENGL 295-02: Spring-Term Seminar in Literary Studies: Adapting the 19th Century (4). Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement. This course considers what it takes to adapt facets of the 19th century for 21st-century audiences. We read literary works ranging from "Rip Van Winkle" to "The Tell-Tale Heart" to Douglass' Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, as well as neo slave narratives, film, and artefact curation that either adapt these works or otherwise engage the difficult questions that emerge out of adapting the 19th century (slavery, empire, etc.). Students think about what makes something literature, what goes into adaptation, and what alternative versions of a given text can show us about their source material. The course includes visits to Monticello and the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Students eventually work towards adapting/curating an aspect of W&L's 19th-century history for modern audiences. (HL) Millan.

Hotel Orient

ENGL 382 - Kao, Wan-Chuan

This seminar charts the historical encounters between East and West through the very spaces that facilitate cross-cultural transactions from the medieval to the postmodern. If modern hotel consciousness is marked by transience, ennui, eroticism, and isolation, we ask whether or not the same characteristics held true in premodern hotel practices, and if the space of the Orient makes a difference in hotel writing. Semantically, "Orient" means not only the geographic east. As a verb, to orient means to position and ascertain one's bearings. In this sense, to write about lodging in the East is to sort out one's cultural and geopolitical orientation.

Visions and Beliefs of the West of Ireland

ENGL 387 - Brown, Alexandra R. / Conner, Marc C.

This course immerses the student in the literature, religious traditions, history, and culture of Ireland. The primary focus of the course is on Irish literary expressions and religious beliefs and traditions, from the pre-historic period to the modem day, with a particular emphasis on the modem (early 20th-century) Irish world. Readings are coordinated with site visits, which range from prehistoric and Celtic sites to early and medieval Christian sites to modem Irish life. Major topics and authors include Yeats and Mysticism, St. Brendan's Pilgrimage, Folklore and Myth, Lady Gregory and Visions, Religion in Irish Art, the Blasket Island storytellers, the Mystic Island, and others.

Topics in Literature in English before 1700

ENGL 392 - Pickett, Holly C.

Enrollment limited. A seminar course on literature written in English before 1700 with special emphasis on research and discussion. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, ENGL 392-01: Topic: English Literature beforen 1700: Othello and Ourselves: Race, Religion, and Reconciliation in Shakespeare (4). Race, religion, sexualized violence: Othello is a play that poses timely and difficult questions for our own age. This course examines one of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies in detail, studying its sources, historical context, textual history, performance history, and film adaptations. Subsequently, special attention is given to the play's literary and cultural legacy to see ways the play has been both cited and revised to comment on our modern situation. We consider one of Shakespeare's late plays, The Winter's Tale , as one of the early "revisions" of Shakespeare's Othello and see the play at the American Shakespeare Center in Staunton. Students taking the course for 300-level credit complete a digital-humanities project on the textual variants between the two earliest editions of the play. (HL) Pickett.

Topics in Literature in English from 1700-1900

ENGL 393 - Walle, Taylor F.

Enrollment limited. A seminar course on literature written in English from 1700 to 1900 with special emphasis on research and discussion. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, ENGL 393-01: Topics in Literature from 1700-1900: Austen's Fan Cultures and Afterlives (3). In the 20th and 21st centuries, Jane Austen has attained a celebrity that far exceeds the recognition she enjoyed during her lifetime. The fan culture that now surrounds Austen, her spunky heroines, and her swoon-worthy heroes rivals that of Star Wars or Harry Potter. Austen enthusiasts meet for book club, wear Regency costumes, convene for tea, and throw balls with period-appropriate music and dance. All of this mooning over Mr. Darcy, however, could easily be the object of Austen's own satire. Mercilessly lampooning silliness and frivolity, "dear Jane" was more inveterate cynic than hopeless romantic. How, then, did Austen transform from biting social satirist to patron saint of chick lit? Beginning with three of Austen's novels, and then turning to the fan cultures surrounding Pride and Prejudice, this course examines the nature of fandom, especially its propensity to change and adapt the very thing it celebrates. What does it mean to be a fan? Is there such a thing as an "original" or authorial meaning of a text? What do Austen's fan cultures say about both the novels themselves and the society that appropriates them? This course meets 300-level departmental requirements by requiring 15-20 pages of writing. Walle .

Ecology of Place

ENV 250 - Hurd, Lawrence E. (Larry) / Cooper, Gregory J. (Greg)

Think globally, study locally. This course explores globally significant environmental issues such as biodiversity conservation, sustainable delivery of ecosystem goods and services, and environmental justice, as they are manifested on a local/regional scale. We examine interactions among ethical, ecological, and economic concerns that shape these issues. Students are fully engaged in the development of policy recommendations that could guide relevant decision makers. The course incorporates readings, field trips, films, and discussions with invited experts.

Seven-Minute Shakespeare

FILM 255 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

After intensive collective reading and discussion of four Shakespeare plays in the first week, students organize into four-person groups with the goal of producing a seven-minute video version of one of the plays by the end of the term, using only the actual text of the play. The project requires full engagement and commitment, and includes tasks such as editing and selecting from the text to produce the film script, creating storyboards, casting and recruiting actors, rehearsing, filming, editing, adding sound tracks and effects. We critique and learn from each other's efforts.

Earth Lab

GEOL 105 - Knapp, Elizabeth P.

Preference given to first-years and sophomores. The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside field work with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. The primary goal of this course is an in-depth introduction to a particular region or field of geological study for introductory level science students. Information about the course is made available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements. Lab fee required.

Spring 2019, GEOL 105-01: FS: Earth Lab: Hawaii (4). Prerequisite: First-year standing. Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term. An introductory study of earth science and the geology of the Hawaiian Islands. Its purpose is to provide an unparalleled opportunity to observe a wide variety of geologic processes in action. This course entails close interaction with the faculty and intensive study amongst the students during the term. (SL) Knapp.

Earth Lab

GEOL 105 - Jay Seymour, Cassidy N.

Preference given to first-years and sophomores. The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside field work with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. The primary goal of this course is an in-depth introduction to a particular region or field of geological study for introductory level science students. Information about the course is made available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements. Lab fee required.

Spring 2019, GEOL 105-02: Earth Lab: The Next Big One (4) . Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term. Preference given to first-years and sophomores. Some of humanity's biggest threats are a direct consequence of huge, powerful motions of water, air, and earth. In this course, we explore natural hazards through the lens of geology. What do we know about natural hazards? How do we know what we know? Do we know enough to keep people safe? We also think critically about natural hazards communication. How is information about natural hazards communicated to the public? Is the information accurate? Should we, as geologists, address misconceptions, and, if so, how? We focus on case studies of atmospheric, hydrologic, and tectonic natural hazards, and spend 5 days at Mount Saint Helens, observing the geologic and societal aftermath of the destructive 1980 eruption. (SL) Jay Seymour.

 

Environmental Field Methods

GEOL 231 - Hinkle, Margaret A.

An introduction to the study of standard methods, equipment and tools used in environmental field investigations. Special attention is given to methods used by geologists to measure, record, and report field observations associated with groundwater, surface water, soil and air. Focus is given to the validity of data obtained using various investigative strategies as well as data handling and presentation. The course has an intensive field component using the local watershed as a model environmental system.

Regional Geology

GEOL 373 - Harbor, David J.

The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside fieldwork with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. Information about the course is available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements

Spring 2019: GEOL 373-01: Regional Geology of Iceland (4). Where else do glaciers form on a hot spot at a mid-ocean spreading center? Explore the dynamics of Iceland where volcanism creates elevation that invites erosion under glacial icecaps. Discover myriad volcanic flows, rocks and landforms. Unravel a short but complicated volcanic and tectonic history. See glaciers and their deposits and then imagine the processes and forms of the late glacial maximum when Iceland was larger in area but completely covered in ice. Learn how Icelanders live with volcanic, climatic, and other hazards. Experience a culture that prides itself on sustainability but has difficult choices to make about increasingly intense land use, a struggle as old as the sagas. (SL) Harbor, Biemiller.

Layered Berlin: German Culture and the Social Market Economy

GERM 392 - Hess, Andrew M. (Drew) / Youngman, Paul A.

A four-week course taught abroad that offers students a true immersion in German language, culture, and business environment. In order to give students a complete understanding of contemporary Germany, we integrate a literary-historical analysis of the country's rich history from 1848 to the present day with an introduction to German social and economic system that focuses on stakeholder-centric business and sustainability principles. Through an exciting mix of literary fiction, historical readings and cases, film screenings, along with corporate and cultural site visits, students gain an understanding of the interdependence between "big C" Culture and business culture.

Scenes from Chinese History

HIST 105 - Bello, David A.

Film is one of the 20th century's most influential forms of mass communication and, consequently, has been one medium for the creation and maintenance of nation-states. In this sense, no film can be considered as mere entertainment entirely divorced from the social, political, economic and, ultimately, historical context in which it was produced. This is particularly true of modern nation-states "invented" during the 20th century like the People's Republic of China (PRC). This course is intended to explore how contemporary PRC cinema has interpreted Chinese history, as represented by some of that history's pre-PRC milestones of conflict in the Qin and Qing dynasties as well as the Republican period. Students evaluate the films critically as historical products of their own times as well as current historical narratives of the past by examining each event through a pair of films produced at different times in PRC history. Students also examine post-1949 changes in China and its interpretation of its pre-1949 history, and so, by seeing how a country interprets its history at a given time.

Muslims in the Movies

HIST 172 - Atanasova, Kameliya N.

An examination of the history of visual representation of Islam and Muslims in classical and modern cinema. We approach movies produced by both Muslims and non-Muslims over the last century as historical sources: visual monuments that have captured the specific cultural and political context in which they were produced. We examine a selection of these movies through the lens of critical theory and the study of religion in order to pay attention to how questions surrounding identity and representation, race and gender, Orientalism and perceptions of difference have historically influenced and continue to influence cinematic images of Islam.

Dante: Renaissance and Redemption

HIST 200 - Peterson, David S.

A survey of the culture, society, and politics of early Renaissance Italy using the life of the Florentine poet Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) and his Divine Comedy . This period witnessed revolutions in Florence and Rome and the emergence of new artistic forms aimed at reconciling Christian beliefs with classical thought, notably that of the Greek philosopher Aristotle and the Roman poet Virgil. It also generated conflicts between popes, kings, and emperors that issued ultimately in modern European states. First, we survey Dante's historical setting using a chronicle by one of his contemporaries, Dino Compagni. We then follow Dante on his poetic pilgrimage of personal and collective redemption through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven as he synthesized the artistic, religious, philosophical and political challenges of his age.

From Weimar to Hitler: Modernism and Anti-Modernism in German Culture after the First World War

HIST 215 - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

Germany adopted an admirably democratic constitution after the First World War, and the Weimar Republic became a center of bold experimentation in literature, the arts, theater, cinema, and scholarship, but it also became a hotbed of radical nationalism and xenophobia. This course analyzes the relationship between art and politics through case studies in the debates provoked by anti-war films and poetry, the Bauhaus "international style" of architecture, the plays of Bertolt Brecht, expressionist art, and films and paintings to celebrate the advent of the "New Woman." Why did modernism inspire so much anxiety in Germany in the 1920s? To what extent did cultural experimentation contribute to the popularity of Adolf Hitler? What lessons did Weimar intellectuals in exile learn from the Nazi seizure of power?

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, HIST 269-01: Washington and Lee Traditions and Transformations in the 20th Century. (3). This discussion-based seminar focuses on significant mileposts in the history of W&L, focusing on racial desegregation and coeducation. It is reading- and writing-intensive. . (HU). DeLaney.

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295 - Rupke, Nicolaas A.

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, HIST 295-01: Place and Race: Euro-Exceptionalism in Late-Modern Science (3). The notion of Euro-exceptionalism has been critically discussed ever since the decades following WW II when decolonization, post-colonialism, and anti-racism began to attract widespread scholarly attention. Much of the critical literature has focused on the economics and politics of European imperialism. Little attention has been paid to the fact that Eurocentricity and Caucasian-supremacist thought received significant scientific input during the period 1750-1950. In this course, the involvement of science in the construction of Euro-exceptionalism are comprehensively explored, in particular the role played by Humboldtian geographical science and Darwinian evolution theory. (HU) Rupke.

HIST 295A-01: Seminar: Science and Religion (3). The encounter of science and Christian belief in the Western tradition. This encounter is not interpreted as warfare but in terms of several parallel discourses, only one of which is to be understood as conflict. A number of thematic topics are to pass the revue, ranging from early-modern physico-theology to current controversies over Darwinian evolution vs. Intelligent Design. (HU) Rupke.

Research Preparation in the Sciences

INTR 200 - Toporikova, Natalia

This course is composed of seminar and workshop modules on such topics as: critical reading of research papers; use of relevant primary literature in experimental design; integrative approaches to research questions; use of quantitative methods and modeling; data acquisition, record-keeping, and analysis; research ethics; introduction to specific lab techniques used in research; scientific writing and data presentation. In addition, students develop and present a research plan for their research project that is discussed and critiqued by the whole group. Laboratory course.

Study Abroad Reflections and Assessment

INTR 298 - Rush, Mark E. / Dittman, D Scott (Scott) / Irby, Cynthia G. (Cindy)

Before the end of the final term in which the student is on approved study abroad, students submit to the Director of International Education a reflective essay, to be designed and assigned for each term abroad by the faculty's Global Liaisons. The liaisons review student reflections, assess them with regard to Washington and Lee's learning outcomes for study abroad, and issue a brief report at the end of each academic year.

Spring Option

INTR 995 - Dittman, D Scott (Scott)

The Spring Option allows students to use the spring term of their sophomore, junior and/or senior years to engage in an internship, service program, employment, travel or educational program that will broaden and enhance their collegiate education. The faculty offer this opportunity to encourage students to seek creative outlets not provided in the normal academic setting. Spring option policies and requirements can be found under Academic Regulations .

Spring Option

INTR 995 - Dittman, D Scott (Scott) / Rush, Mark E. / Irby, Cynthia G. (Cindy)

The Spring Option allows students to use the spring term of their sophomore, junior and/or senior years to engage in an internship, service program, employment, travel or educational program that will broaden and enhance their collegiate education. The faculty offer this opportunity to encourage students to seek creative outlets not provided in the normal academic setting. Spring option policies and requirements can be found under Academic Regulations .

INTR 998 - Dittman, D Scott (Scott) / Rush, Mark E. / Irby, Cynthia G. (Cindy)

Media Bias: Beyond Right and Left

JOUR 204 - Coddington, Mark A.

Many of our conversations and opinions on the news media come back to bias, but we rarely take the time to interrogate our own perspectives about it. In this course, students delve into the history and sociology of journalism and the psychology of our own news consumption to go beyond popular conservative and liberal theories of bias and find out how the news media really work. Students talk with prominent journalists and scholars, and they cover a story they care about in order to experience and evaluate firsthand the decisions and influences that go into news media production.

Topics in Journalism and Mass Communications

JOUR 295 - Abah, Adedayo O. (Dayo)

Study of a selected topic in journalism or mass communications. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Appropriate for non-majors.

Spring 2019, JOUR 295-01: Say What? Landmark First Amendment Cases and their Implications for Speech in the 21st Century (3). This course helps students to understand the First Amendment in context and the different forms of expressions that have shaped its jurisprudence. The U.S. Supreme Court's interpretations of expression have implications for all aspects of American political life and often involve protection of minority, often unpopular, viewpoints from being overpowered by the majority, or by the government. Abah.

In-depth Reporting

JOUR 356 - Locy, Toni R. / Finch, Kevin D.

The principles and techniques of developing and creating enterprising, heavily researched journalistic work for the mass media. Students produce in-depth work that they showcase on a website. Extensive group work is required.

Media Management & Entrepreneurship

JOUR 377 - Swasy, Alecia

A seminar examining trends and challenges in media management, including a close examination of industry economics, changing reader and viewer habits, revenue and profit pressures, and labor and management issues unique to the news profession.

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Crockett, Roger A.

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, LIT 295-01: Literary Reflections on National Socialism (3). Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement. The literature of post World War II Germany that reflects on and attempts to come to terms with the atrocities of the Nazi regime. Readings, discussion, and writing in English. (HL). Crockett.

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Abdelmonem, Hala A.

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Kamara, Mohamed

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, LIT 295-03: Topic: The African Child-Soldier (3). Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement. Who is a child? Who is a child-soldier? Did the child have a childhood in a home and family before becoming a soldier? What is childhood? How does the definition of childhood (legal or otherwise) jibe with the child's own perception or understanding of his/her place in society? Does s/he return home, and to a family after combat? Are home and family still the same? This course engages these and other questions as they relate to the representation of the child-soldier in African literary texts and in film. In so doing, we interrogate the larger question of agency, victimhood, and the human capacity to transcend adversity, focusing specifically on how the child (or child-soldier) negotiates the meandering road upon which s/he has been thrusted by people and circumstances, with no properly functioning compass. (HL) Kamara.

FS: First-Year Seminar

MATH 180 - Humke, Paul D.

First-year seminar.

Spring 2019, Math 180-01: FS:A Brief Voyage to the 4th Dimension (4). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-Year class standing and MATH 102 or equivalent. A beginning look at the geometry of 4-dimensional Euclidean space, including learning some tools for studying 4-dimensional objects, and beginning to understand the difficulties in "seeing" such objects. Students also begin measuring in this 4-dimensional setting. The last week of the course is devoted to group projects and presentations. (SC) Humke.

Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics

MATH 301 - Denne, Elizabeth J.

Basic analytical tools and principles useful in mathematical investigations, from their beginning stages, in which experimentation and pattern analysis are likely to play a role, to their final stages, in which mathematical discoveries are formally proved to be correct. Strongly recommended for all prospective mathematics majors.

Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics

MATH 301 - Dresden, Gregory P.

Basic analytical tools and principles useful in mathematical investigations, from their beginning stages, in which experimentation and pattern analysis are likely to play a role, to their final stages, in which mathematical discoveries are formally proved to be correct. Strongly recommended for all prospective mathematics majors.

Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics

MATH 301 - Hardy, Stephen R.

Basic analytical tools and principles useful in mathematical investigations, from their beginning stages, in which experimentation and pattern analysis are likely to play a role, to their final stages, in which mathematical discoveries are formally proved to be correct. Strongly recommended for all prospective mathematics majors.

Opera Workshop

MUS 111 - Williamson, Scott M. / Parker, Gregory B. (Greg)

This course focuses on the preparation of scenes from operas or of complete operas. Students audition for and are cast in roles in the production of the opera or the scenes. Rehearsals are scheduled subject to the availability of the cast and instructor. While some cast members may rehearse during weekdays, most should expect evening and weekend rehearsals.

Chamber Ensembles

MUS 112 - McArdle, Jaime H.

This course may be repeated. Small chamber groups consisting of vocalists and instrumentalists are created to perform music. 

Bluegrass Ensemble offers students the opportunity to study and perform the traditional music of Appalachia in which improvisation is encouraged.

Brass Ensemble  offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for brass instruments in various combinations.

String Ensemble  offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for violin, viola, cello, and double bass in various combinations.

Woodwind Ensemble offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for woodwind instruments in various combinations.

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141J - Artwick, Thomas B. (Tom)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141O - McCorkle, William F., Jr. (Bill)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141P - Watanabe Petty, Shuko

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141P - Petty, Byron W.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141P - Gaylard, Timothy R. (Tim)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - Harper, Jesse J.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - Goudimova, Julia

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - McArdle, Jaime H.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - Matheson, Bryan E.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141V - Parker, Lori M. / Lynch, Shane M.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141W - Perry, David T.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141W - Murphy, Erin J.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141W - Dobbins, Heather F.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Recital Attendance

MUS 200 - Parker, Gregory B. (Greg)

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. A course focused on the development of listening and performance skills through attendance at Department of Music concerts and recitals. Students attend at least 75 percent of the afternoon and evening events sponsored by the Department of Music. Students must also attend the music convocation that takes place one Friday afternoon each month during the fall and winter terms. Music majors must complete the course each term in residence after declaring the major. Music minors must complete two terms.

A Year in Jazz

MUS 222 - Vosbein, Terry

An in-depth view of a one-year span in the history of America's only native art form. Students become absorbed in the era through the study of seminal recordings, historic videos, and readings. Research projects complete the term.

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241P - Watanabe Petty, Shuko

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241P - McCorkle, William F., Jr. (Bill)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241P - Petty, Byron W.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241P - Gaylard, Timothy R. (Tim)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - Harper, Jesse J.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - Goudimova, Julia

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - McArdle, Jaime H.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - Matheson, Bryan E.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241V - Parker, Lori M. / Lynch, Shane M.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241W - Perry, David T.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241W - Murphy, Erin J.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241W - Dobbins, Heather F.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Third Year

MUS 341W - Artwick, Thomas B. (Tom)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Fourth Year

MUS 441V - Parker, Lori M.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Directed Individual Research

NEUR 422 - Watson, Fiona L.

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a neuroscience faculty member by prior mutual agreement. Consult with individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be carried out during the summer. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits may apply towards the major.

Honors Thesis Proposal

NEUR 442 - Watson, Fiona L.

Writing a proposal for honors thesis research, including a clear statement of the problem being studied, a literature review, and a feasible, detailed plan for the research. Taken no later than the winter term of the junior year.

Therapeutic Exercise

PE 102 - Williamson, Joshua D.

A specialized course employing physical rehabilitation techniques. Students with an acute physical impairment are assigned through consultation with the University physician in lieu of other physical education courses. May be repeated once for degree credit.

Aerobic Swimming

PE 111 - Gardner, Kateri A. (Kami) / LaBerge, Logan E.

A course designed to improve stroke technique and endurance.  Not to be taken after completing PE 205 or 213. May be taken once.

Aerobic Swimming

PE 111 - Ellis, Paul M.

A course designed to improve stroke technique and endurance.  Not to be taken after completing PE 205 or 213. May be taken once.

Golf

PE 151 - Gyscek, Peter J. / Carralero, Kelsie A.

Offered 1st six-weeks in fall, 2nd six-weeks in winter, and spring. Golf. Not to be taken after completing PE 209. Course fee: $100 and must provide own transportation. (If you need financial assistance to take this course, please contact the Office of Financial Aid at financialaid@wlu.edu .)

Aerobic Running

PE 154 - Freeman, Dana L.

Aerobic running. Not to be taken after completing PE 200 or 212.

Aerobic Running

PE 154 - Dager, Michael J. (Mike)

Aerobic running. Not to be taken after completing PE 200 or 212.

Weight Training

PE 155 - Colliton, James G. (Gavin) / Koch, Eric M.

Weight Training

Weight Training

PE 155 - White, Theodore W. (Ted) / Franklin, Eric N.

Weight Training

Team Sports

PE 157 - Spalding, Brandon P.

This course involves basketball, volleyball, and soccer which will take up three quarters of the course. The fourth component will be any combination of team games/sports from the following: Team Handball, Softball, Ultimate Frisbee, kickball, and other games. Students will learn the fundamentals of each sport, including how to play and officiate.

Team Sports

PE 157 - Clancy, Christine K.

This course involves basketball, volleyball, and soccer which will take up three quarters of the course. The fourth component will be any combination of team games/sports from the following: Team Handball, Softball, Ultimate Frisbee, kickball, and other games. Students will learn the fundamentals of each sport, including how to play and officiate.

Tennis

PE 158B - Detwiler, David A.

Offered 1st six-weeks in fall and spring. Beginning and intermediate tennis. Students may take this course only once regardless of level. Not to be taken after completing PE 211.

Tennis

PE 158I - Ness, Erin G.

Offered 1st six-weeks in fall and spring. Beginning and intermediate tennis. Students may take this course only once regardless of level. Not to be taken after completing PE 211.

Badminton

PE 159 - LeRose, Garrett M.

Badminton

Badminton

PE 159 - Shearer, Nathan W.

Badminton

Mountain Biking

PE 176 - Dick, James

Mountain Biking. (Additional fee required. If you need financial assistance to take this course, please contact the Office of Financial Aid at financialaid@wlu.edu .)

Scuba

PE 185 - Dick, James

An introduction to the underwater world of SCUBA Diving, including classroom, pool-session, and open-water components. Students learn about dive equipment, the science of diving, responsible diving practices, and the environment. Practice time enhances students' safety and comfort and training is completed with a minimum of five open-water dives. Successful completion results in lifetime open-water diver certification from NAUI, www.naui.com. Diving instruction is provided by Nags Head Diving of Manteo, North Carolina. (Additional fee required. If you need financial assistance to take this course, please contact the Office of Financial Aid at financialaid@wlu.edu .)

Sports Psychology

PE 306 - Singleton, Michael J. (Mike)

An examination of both theory and application of sport psychology. Students gain an understanding of the psychological principles and theories that apply to sport and learn how to use this knowledge in an applied setting when working with teams or athletes. Major areas of focus include personality theory, attribution theory, group cohesion, imagery, goal orientation and motivation, goal setting, and imagery.

PE Graduation Requirement Complete

PE XXX - Dittman, D Scott (Scott)

Administrative designation of the completion of the Physical Education requirement for graduation. Credit is awarded by the University Registrar with a composite grade upon completion of all required 100- or 200-level PE skills courses.

Philosophy and Science Fiction

PHIL 272 - Goldberg, Nathaniel J.

Discussion of one or more major works in science fiction and in philosophy that explore related themes.

Seminar in Ethics and Value Theory

PHIL 296 - McGonigal, Andrew J.

A consideration of selected issues in philosophy. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, PHIL 296-01: Seminar in Ethics and Value Theory: Film, Philosophy, and Nature (4). An examination of a range of issues in philosophy of film, and their relationships to the natural world. What is film? What does it mean to appreciate film landscapes as nature? In what ways do motion pictures stand in a distinctive relationship to the emotions? To ethics? What does it mean to claim that something is part of nature? For example, do claims about ethics, religion, possibility or consciousness describe elements of the natural world, or are they true in virtue of special non-natural properties? What implications do movies have for environmental aesthetics? How should we understand the art(s) of film? Can fiction films communicate important or distinctive forms of knowledge about environmental threats such as global warming? Can popular movies be sublime? What is the distinctive nature of documentary film? Why is it valuable? How do film narratives differ from other narrative forms? We discuss these and related questions in the context of film texts that originate from different national cultures and historical periods. (HU) McGonigal.

Black Mirror

POL 271 - Gray, Stuart J., Jr. (Stu)

Through a critical engagement with the television series "Black Mirror", this course is intended to help students understand and think critically about how various technologies are actively shaping what it means - and what it might mean in the future - to be human, live a good life, and act as a socio-political agent. We examine some of the central questions and themes presented in each episode through supplementary readings drawn from various fields, including political philosophy, literature, science fiction, and journalism. Topics include technology's impact on romantic and family relationships, social surveillance and punishment, and political leadership, among others.

The Maghreb: History, Culture, and Politics

POL 287 - Cantey, Joseph M., Jr. (Seth)

This course examines the history, culture, and politics of the Maghreb, and especially the Kingdom of Morocco. After a few days in Lexington, most of the course is based in the old cities of Rabat and Fez, the latter a UNESCO world-heritage site and home to the oldest continually operating university in the world. We take field trips to the blue city of Chefchouen, the Roman ruins of Volubilis, and Africa's largest mosque in Casablanca. Throughout the course, students explore the region's political history, including the influence of imperialism and Islam on politics, gender relations in North Africa, Morocco's relationship with the United States, and more.

Seminar in Politics, Literature and the Arts

POL 290 - Connelly, William F., Jr. (Bill)

In this course, we study how literature, film, and other media are used to examine political themes and how they are used to achieve political ends. We address how politics shapes the arts and how the arts shape politics. The topic is announced at registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Only one such seminar may be counted towards the politics major.

Spring 2019, POL 290-01: Politics and Culture: Seminar in Politics, Literature, and the Arts (3). Prerequisite: POL 100. In this American politics course, we study how literature, film, and other media are used to examine political themes and how they are used to achieve political ends. We explore the interplay between politics and culture from William Shakespeare's King Lear to Mark Twain's Tom Sawyer to Lin Manuel Miranda's Hamilton, with a particular focus on the role of political humor in reflecting and molding political mores and opinions. Movies include Casablanca and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. We address how politics shapes the arts and how the arts shape politics. Political science texts supplement the artistic sources assigned. (SS2) Connelly.

Topics in Politics and Film

POL 292 - LeBlanc, Robin M.

This course examines how film and television present political issues and themes. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, POL 292-02: Politics and Film: The Politics of Race and Gender in Mad Men (4). Prerequisite: Instructor consent . This class uses episodes of the Emmy Award-winning television series Mad Men -- famous for its depiction of shifting understandings of gender and race relations in the United States in the 1960s -- as a basis for exploring the culture of race and gender shared/challenged by the show's 21st century audience. Supplementary reading and films will offer a framework for critique. Students create their own short screenplays to further explore how entertainment can work as social criticism. (SS2) LeBlanc.

Spring-Term Topics in Public Policy

POL 294 - Harris, Rebecca C.

This course is designed to give students additional expertise and awareness of discrete policy challenges in the United States. Students learn to explain current policy systems, including political institutions and political behavior by political actors. Students also formulate policy evaluations acknowledging the strengths and the weaknesses in the policy system. 

 

Special Topics in American Politics

POL 295 - Bragaw, Stephen G.

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2018, POL 295-01: In it to Win It: Planning and Financing Successful Political Campaigns (4). Prerequisite: Preference given to Strategic Communication and Politics majors; instructor consent required. Cycle after cycle, the price tag for competitive races for elective office continues to grow. Tens of millions are committed on both sides of the partisan divide with the hopes of persuading a diminishing group of uncommitted voters. As the influence of big dollar donors and the outside groups they fund are playing a greater role, competition for their attention is fierce among political candidates. In this course, students will learn about the pursuit of financing by being divided into teams tasked with developing a comprehensive campaign strategy to be presented to a panel of "influencers" who will decide which candidate to support financially. (SS2) Allen.

Special Topics in American Politics

POL 295 - Rush, Mark E. / Kuettner, Paul R. (Dick)

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, POL 295-02: Special Topic: Minority Rights and Gerrymandering (4). An introduction to the history of voting-rights discrimination in the United States with a particular focus on gerrymandering. The course begins with a study of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and how it has evolved through congressional amendments and Supreme Court decisions. We then investigate theories of minority representation and democracy. To place the theoretical aspects of the course into practical perspective, the course includes a lab component in which students learn to use redistricting software (ArcMap). We use Virginia elections and census data to produce alternative election maps of Virginia to demonstrate how we can make elections fairer and more competitive and create more opportunities for minority representation. (SS2) Rush, Kuettner.

Special Topics in American Politics

POL 295 - Zito, Salena

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, POL 295-03: Special Topic: Campaign Journalism in the Age of High-Tech Populism (3). Experiential Learning. An examination of how to cover the men and women who run for President of the United States, beyond the outside-the-Beltway method of "parachute journalism". Topics include "pack journalism" and its impact on how Americans view the candidates and the issues; the role of national and political parties and whether they have any meaningful impact on the voters; how local issues shape votes; and the influence of the national media on voter's sentiments. The instructor, an active journalist, leads the students in their real-time fieldwork, with each student assigned to research and prepare a remote story in a primary-election or general-election state, one to be published in the Washington Examiner. The student's work receives the same full edit, fact-checking, and follow-through as any other print story. (SS2) Zito .

Special Topics in Global Politics

POL 296 - O'Dell, Wesley B. (Wes)

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, POL 296-01: Special Topics in Global Politics: International Crises and National Security (4) . Prerequisite: POL 105 and instructor consent. This course examines international crisis behavior through a combination of classroom instruction and participatory National Security Council simulation scenarios. Students study theories of international crisis alongside historical case studies such as the July Crisis of 1914, the Suez Crisis, and the Cuban Missile Crisis, among others, with students assuming a role on a model National Security Council. Using crisis scenarios derived from the Council on Foreign Relations Model Diplomacy series, students research past and present policymakers on the NSC, adopt a policy persona, and work toward the resolution of crises guided by the instructor and guest participants from the policy community. The combination of readings and enactment encourages critical examination of both theories of national security and the vicissitudes of its practice. Multiple outside-of-class meetings are required. (SS2) O'Dell.

Washington Term Program

POL 466 - Alexander, Brian N.

The Washington Term Program aims to enlarge students' understanding of national politics and governance. Combining academic study with practical experience in the setting of a government office, think tank, or other organization in Washington, it affords deeper insight into the processes and problems of government at the national level. A member of the politics faculty is the resident director, supervising students enrolled in this program while they are in Washington, D.C.

Poverty and Human Capability: An Interdisciplinary Introduction and Fieldwork

POV 103 - Charley, Marisa S.

Students may not take for degree credit both this course and POV 101 and 102. An exploration of the nature, scope, causes, effects, and possible remedies for poverty as a social, moral, political and policy, economic, legal, psychological, religious, and biological problem. The course focuses on domestic poverty in the United States but also considers poverty as a global problem. This spring term version of the course integrates service fieldwork into the introductory course taught in the fall and winter and offers the same credit as POV 101 and 102 combined.

Special Topics in Poverty Studies

POV 296 - Pickett, Howard Y.

An intensive, in-depth examination of particular thinkers, approaches, policies or debates in the field of poverty and human capability studies.

Spring 2018, POV 296-01: Special Topics in Poverty Studies: Martin Luther King Jr.: Justice, Love, and Forgiveness (4). Prerequisite: POV 101. This interdisciplinary, community-based seminar takes place at Augusta Correctional Center in Craigsville, VA (approx. 35 miles from campus). a level 3 (out of 6) medium-security state prison. W&L undergraduates attend class with inmates who are pursuing higher education. Participants read and discuss together the writings of Martin Luther King Jr, a great social-justice thinker and practitioner. We ask: What is justice and what does it require from us, individually and collectively? What does love have to do with justice? Does love require forgiveness? Is forgiveness sometimes unjust? What role should non-violence and religion play in the pursuit of justice and love within a pluralistic society? How might one's view of human dignity and community inform that pursuit? Are love and justice ever In conflict? If so, how then should we live? (HU) Pickett.

Psychology Mythbusters

PSYC 118 - Johnson, Dan R.

In this course, students learn how to test psychological myths and to determine a status: confirmed, plausible, or busted. We explore a variety of myths, including the existence of the unconscious mind, relationship myths, brain myths, psychology and law myths, social myths, personality myths, and mental-illness myths. Students critically evaluate psychology myths by 1) gathering and writing about empirical evidence; 2) designing, running, and analyzing an experiment on a particular psychology myth; and 3) making class presentations.

Health Neuroscience

PSYC 216 - Schreiber, William B.

This seminar provides an introduction to the scientific study of physical and mental health using research methods in neuroscience. We examine the effects of exercise on the brain (from the cellular/molecular to systems-level perspective), how neuroplasticity contributes to both the etiology and treatment of neurological and psychological conditions. and extensively discuss the effects of stress on the brain. The course features comprehensive readings of popular psychology/neuroscience books, as well as empirical reports and reviews published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. A background in neuroscience is recommended. as well as  additional experience with psychology and/or biology prior to enrollment.

Current Advances in Psychological Science

PSYC 295 - Brindle, Ryan C.

Seminar topics and specific prerequisites vary with instructor and term. These seminars are designed to introduce students to an area of current interest in the field of psychology. Students receive an overview of the experimental research and/or applied practices that have advanced an area of psychological science. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, PSYC 295-01: Current Advances in Psychological Science: Sleep, Health and Society: An Underappreciated Health Emergency (3). No prerequisite.  Sleep (or the lack thereof) is increasingly becoming recognized as a major health concern at the societal level leading to poor physical and mental health. This course examines the basic functions of sleep and how deficiencies in sleep lead to poor health at the population level. Students participate in discussion groups, perform a self-study of sleep, and design a sleep improvement campaign. (SC) Brindle.

Spring-Term Topics in Psychology

PSYC 296 - Stewart, Robert E. (Bob)

Topics and prerequisites vary with instructor and term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, PSYC 296-01: Special Topics: The Marijuana Question (4). This course explores a.) how the basic and clinical pharmacology of cannabis and cannabis products interconnects with policy and practice in the realms of public health, legislation, and law enforcement; b.) how these interconnections have informed shifting public attitudes toward the use of cannabis in medical and recreational contexts; and c.) how incomplete understanding of cannabis effects in key knowledge domains demands coordinated initiatives in basic, clinical, and public health research to foster formulation of coherent and effective public policy going forward. (SS3) Stewart.

Muslims in the Movies

REL 172 - Atanasova, Kameliya N.

An examination of the history of visual representation of Islam and Muslims in classical and modern cinema. We approach movies produced by both Muslims and non-Muslims over the last century as historical sources: visual monuments that have captured the specific cultural and political context in which they were produced. We examine a selection of these movies through the lens of critical theory and the study of religion in order to pay attention to how questions surrounding identity and representation, race and gender, Orientalism and perceptions of difference have historically influenced and continue to influence cinematic images of Islam.

Caste at the Intersection of Economy, Religion, and Law

REL 246 - Lubin, Timothy (Tim) / Silwal, Shikha B.

Social stratification touches every aspect of life, and South Asia's traditional caste structure is a special case: this highly complex, strictly-adhered-to system has been religiously legitimized and criticized over a 3,000-year history, and is nowadays seen as being at odds with the modern world. Yet it remains a crucial factor in social identity, economic roles, legal status, and religious practice. This course offers a 360-degree survey of caste both historically and in practice today in Nepal. The course addresses four themes, respectively providing for each a combination of historical background, social scientific analysis of the modern situation, and direct field experience for the students. 

Special Topics in Religion

REL 295 - Sonia, Kerry M.

A course offered from time to time in a selected problem or topic in religion. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, REL 295-01: Special Topics in Religion: Who Owns the Bible? (3). Where does the Bible come from? How did different texts come together to form the biblical canon? Who oversaw these processes? What is at stake—politically and theologically—in these processes? This course considers such questions and examines the composition and transmission of the Bible, as we know it today. In particular, the course focuses on the materiality of the Bible, including the surviving manuscripts and artifacts that help us reconstruct the ways in which biblical texts circulated from ancient times to the present day. We analyze the problems posed by the discovery of such objects, either through archaeological excavation or purchase on the antiquities market, and why such factors matter. The course culminates in a critical analysis of the recently opened Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C., which, since its inception, has been plagued by controversies, including the illegal smuggling of ancient artifacts into the United States and the display of fake Dead Sea Scroll manuscripts. Ultimately, the course uses this case study to consider the relationship between canon, commerce, and religious authority in American culture. The course includes a field trip to the Museum of the Bible. (HU) Sonia.

Visions and Beliefs in the West of Ireland

REL 387 - Brown, Alexandra R. / Conner, Marc C.

This course immerses the student in the literature, religious traditions, history, and culture of Ireland. The primary focus of the course is on Irish literary expressions and religious beliefs and traditions, from the pre-historic period to the modem day, with a particular emphasis on the modem (early 20th-century) Irish world. Readings are coordinated with site visits, which range from prehistoric and Celtic sites to early and medieval Christian sites to modem Irish life. Major topics and authors include Yeats and Mysticism, St. Brendan's Pilgrimage, Folklore and Myth, Lady Gregory and Visions, Religion in Irish Art, the Blasket Island storytellers, the Mystic Island, and others.

Field Methods in Archaeology

SOAN 210 - Gaylord, Donald A.

Additional special fees may apply. If necessary, some financial aid may be available through departmental funds. This course introduces students to archaeological field methods through hands-on experience, readings, and fieldtrips. Students study the cultural and natural processes that lead to the patterns we see in the archaeological record. Using the scientific method and current theoretical motivations in anthropological archaeology, students learn how to develop a research design and to implement it with actual field excavation. We visit several field excavation sites in order to experience, first hand, the range of archaeological field methods and research interests currently undertaken by leading archaeologists. Students use the archaeological data to test hypotheses about the sites under consideration and produce a report of their research, which may take the form of a standard archaeological report, an academic poster, or a conference-style presented paper.

Peoples of Central Europe Through Literature and Film

SOAN 225 - Jasiewicz, Krzysztof

This course provides basic information about the citizens of Central European nations of Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary. Beliefs, attitudes, and value systems of the people of Central Europe are examined against the backdrop of major historical events of the 20th century.  Core textbook readings are supplemented by feature films, video materials, novels, short stories, plays, and poetry.  Class discussions focus on interpreting these works of art in the context of comparative historical-sociological analysis of the Polish, Czech, and Hungarian cultures and societies.

Adolescence Under the Microscope

SOAN 281 - Novack, David R. / Novack, Lesley L.

This course focuses on adolescence through the lens of social psychology. Insights from sociology, anthropology, and psychology are employed to explicate the adolescent experience in the United States in contrast to other societies. Topics include: the impact of liminality on adolescent identity in cross-cultural perspective; adolescence as objective reality or cultural fiction; adolescence and peer relations, gender and suicide; and new technologies and virtual adolescence. Each student engages in a research project focusing on adolescence and identity through either interviews or observational techniques. The final project is a group analysis of adolescence as reflected in Facebook.

Special Topics in Sociology

SOAN 290 - Chin, Lynn G. (Lynny)

A discussion of a series of topics of sociological concern. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, SOAN 290-01: Special Topic: Belonging in College (4). This seminar explores the questions of what does it mean to belong" in college and how does academic institutional structure shape who gets to "fit in" and who "belongs". All college students face the problem of belonging. College is a transformative but nerve-wracking transition. The traditional student experience involves entering a new environment without the comfort and protection of former social ties. On the one hand, severing old ties provides students freedom to explore new identities and perhaps even reinvent themselves. On the other hand, this state of detachment is stressful as students compare themselves to their peers and ask: "How do I measure up?", "Do I fit in?", and "do I belong"? We explore the structural, interactional, and emotional barriers that all students face, and we examine the additional barriers for inclusion for "nontraditional" students. Understanding the struggles "traditional" and "non-traditional" students have in feeling like they belong is of utmost importance for developing successful inclusion interventions on campuses. Chin.

Special Topics in Anthropology

SOAN 291 - Goluboff, Sascha

A discussion of a series of topics of anthropological concern. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, SOAN 291-01: Cults (3). An exploration of the phenomenon of cults (also known as new religious movements [NRMs]). We examine the development of cults, how they operate, and the experiences of those who participate in them. Topics of discussion include brainwashing, gender, violence, sexuality, child rearing, and the possibility of objectivity on the part of the researcher. We structure the term around a visit from Marsha Goluboff Low (Professor Goluboff's aunt), who will talk about the 18 years she spent in Ánanda Márga. Goluboff.

Special Topics in Anthropology

SOAN 291 - Markowitz, Harvey J. / Guse, Aaron J. (Joseph)

A discussion of a series of topics of anthropological concern. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, SOAN 291-02: Land in O'odham Culture Economics and History (4). A seminar on the cultural, economic, and historical dimensions of the O'odham Indians' ties to their lands as expressed in their pre- and post-reservation lifeways. Students address three major themes: 1) O'odham land and cosmology; 2) land and economy in O'odham history; and 3) contemporary cultural and economic issues among O'odham peoples. The class spends 8 days in the Sonoran Desert region of Southern Arizona to visit sites and meet with speakers in and around the Tohono O'odham Nation. Markowitz and Guse.

Seville and the Foundations of Spanish Civilization

SPAN 213 - Bailey, Matthew J.

This course takes place in Seville, Spain, and uses this privileged location to study the cultures of Foundational Spain. Primary focus is on the medieval and Renaissance periods, from the troubled co-existence of Muslims, Jews, and Christians to the Christian reconquest and subsequent Empire. Significant cultural currents are examined through texts (literary, historical, and religious), direct contact with art and architecture through site visits, and with hands-on exposure to early and contemporary cuisine. Students live in homestays, attend daily classes, participate in site visits, and engage with the local culture independently and through planned activities.

Topics in Hispanic Culture and Expression

SPAN 296 - Spragins, Elizabeth L. (Liz)

This course offers students the opportunity to further their understanding of Hispanic cultures and their expression by focusing on a relevant cultural, linguistic or literary topic, on an historical period, or on a region of Spain, Latin America or the U.S. Readings, discussions, and assignments are primarily in Spanish. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2019, SPAN 296-01: Topics in Hispanic Culture and Expression: Comparative Critical Race Theory and the Early-Modern Creation of Race (3). Prerequisite: One 200-level Spanish course. Have you ever wondered why you should bother to read 16th- and 17th-century literature? What does Bartolome´ de las Casas have to do with Thomas Jefferson? How can Francisco de Vitoria help us to better understand the United States or, even more locally, the Virginia of 2019? This course comprises a survey of theorizations of race and ethnicity in Hispanophone literary and cultural studies, performance studies, visual studies, and philosophy. The course engages with the body of critical literature that examines the construction of race in a variety of different social, political, legal, and economic settings in the West, from the15th century Western Mediterranean to early-modern Spanish-American colonies to the United States of the 20th and 21st centuries. Accordingly, students gain the tools with which to examine their own beliefs and attitudes surrounding race, and with which to engage with the many, diverse people whom they encounter in the complex world of 21st century America. We seek to historicize the context of race and to understand the ways in which people have constructed and made use of race for particular purposes. Spragins.

Supervised Study Abroad

THTR 202 - Collins, Owen

A Spring Term Abroad course. An intensive exposure to English theater and the current season in London. In addition to a full schedule of theater attendance, the course includes a study of theater training, production techniques and representative styles and periods of English drama.

Study Abroad in Swedish Theater

THTR 204 - Evans, Shawn Paul

This course provides a broad impact on student's cross-cultural skills and global understanding, enhancing their worldview. Students have the opportunity to acquire critical intercultural knowledge, appreciation of cultural and social differentness, and exposure to perspectives critical for global leadership. The course focuses on examining cultural differences between Sweden and United States through the exploration of the arts; however, because of the size of the class students are encouraged to examine Swedish culture from their own disciplinary interest.

Total Theater

THTR 239 - Mish, Robert W.

A practical study of design, directing, production and acting problems in a specific style of dramatic literature, culminating in a public theatrical production.