Spring Term Courses

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Spring-Term Topics in Accounting

ACCT 297B - Evans, Daniel K. (Dan)

Intensive study of specific accounting issues in significant detail. Pedagogy depends on the specific topic but generally emphasizes discussion, research, fieldwork, projects, or case analysis rather than lecture. Specific course content changes from term to term, and is announced prior to preregistration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Anatomy of a Fraud

ACCT 304 - Hess, Megan F.

This course examines the phenomena of financial statement fraud and discusses some of the key forensic accounting concepts and skills used to address this problem. Drawing on historical cases of financial statement fraud as well as the first-hand experience of the instructor, we search for the answers to questions such as: What causes executives to "cook the books"? What factors contribute to fraud? What can be done to prevent and detect it? How have regulations changed the landscape of corporate misconduct? What role do auditors, lawyers, employees, the media, and other stakeholders play?

Casino Accounting, Auditing, and Financial Analysis

ACCT 370 - Boylan, Scott J.

This course provides an introduction to financial accounting and auditing in the gaming industry. Topics include the design and implementation of controls over cash, revenue recognition and measurement, accounting for the extension of casino credit , progressive jackpot liabilities, complimentary expenditures, and customer loyalty programs.

Chicana/o Art and Muralism: From the Street to the (Staniar) Gallery

ARTH 276 - Lepage, Andrea C.

This class examines the process by which Chicana/o artists have garnered public attention and respect, and have taken their artworks from the peripheries of the art world to more traditional museum and gallery spaces. Using the Great Wall of Los Angeles as a connecting thread, this class considers the broad theme of identity creation and transformation as expressed by Chicana/o artists from the 1970s to the present.

Forget Me Not: Visual Culture of Historic and Religious Memorials

ARTH 347 - Kerin, Melissa R.

This class analyzes the visual material of memorial sites that shape social identity. Whether simple or elaborate in their construction, these creations allow people the space to connect with and/or honor a person or event from the historic or even mythological past. This global and thematic examination of memorials considers three primary foci: the built environment of a memorial; the performative role of visitors; and the function of memory at these sites.

Seminar in Museum Studies

ARTH 398 - Hobbs, Patricia A.

An exploration of the history, philosophy and practical aspects of museums. Topics of discussion include governance and administration, collections, exhibitions and education. The course alternates weekly readings and class discussion with field trips to regional museums. Requires short papers and a major project.

Painted Light: Interpreting the Landscape

ARTS 219 - Stevens-Lubin, Laure A.

This course begins with the introduction of en plein air, a French expression which means "in the open air" and is used to describe the act of painting outdoors. We examine artists who have worked en plein air, past and present, study their work and methods, and then apply this knowledge to painting outdoors. Emphasis is on the way light and color define form and space. Students build on their knowledge of color theory through observation and implementation. Beginning with the concept of plein air, we quickly branch out to more interpretive and subjective uses of the landscape in painting, resulting in a cohesive body of work. Lab fee required.

Special Topics in Photography

ARTS 292 - Griffiths, Megan S. (Meg)

Advanced study in photography, with an emphasis on a specialized topic within the medium. Course may be taught by visiting artists or faculty. Lab fee required.

Spring 2017, ARTS 292-01: Special Topics in Photography: Artistic Collaboration and Community Engagement (4). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. This course is designed to promote community engagement through artistic collaboration with an emphasis in photography and visual media. The course builds upon skills which students are acquiring in their chosen areas of interest in liberal arts, but most especially in studio art and art history, as well as poverty and human capabilities. The application of those skills serve as a means for enriched interdisciplinary collaboration and support meaningful engagement with the community and non-profit local agencies, the culmination of which manifest in the creation of public-art pieces. (HA) Griffiths.

Environmental Biology: Endangered Plants of the Appalachians

BIOL 101 - Winder, Charles T.

Using case studies in plant endangerment as a focal point for understanding ecological and evolutionary processes and the impact of human activities on biodiversity, students gain fundamental insight into their relationship with the living world and the importance of preserving biological diversity through a combination of targeted readings, intensive discussions, and basic research in the field, Field activities take place in regional hotspots of plant endemism and give students experience in applied conservation research. Field sites and subject species vary from year to year.

CSI: W&L

BIOL 160 - Watson, Fiona L. / LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred)

This laboratory course is an introduction to the field of forensic science with a focus on the physical, chemical, and biological basis of crime scene evidence. A particular emphasis is on the analysis of trace physical (e.g., glass, soil, fiber, ballistics) and biological (e.g., hair, blood, DNA) evidence and forensic toxicology (e.g., drugs, alcohol, poisons). The laboratory portion of this course provides "hands-on" opportunities to analyze collected crime scene samples and to utilize some of the commonly used forensic laboratory techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, and spectroscopy. The course also introduces some of the legal aspects associated with collection and analysis of crime-scene evidence. Laboratory course.

Field Ornithology

BIOL 241 - Cabe, Paul R.

This course integrates studies of bird biology with field observation and identification of local bird species. Topics covered include anatomy, taxonomy, reproduction, vocalization, migration, ecology, and evolution. Field trips to a variety of areas throughout Virginia emphasize identification skills and basic field research techniques. No other course may be taken concurrently. Laboratory course.

Field Herpetology

BIOL 242 - Marsh, David M.

Field Herpetology is a research-based course on the ecology and behavior of amphibians and reptiles. Research projects vary from year-to-year and are designed to give students plenty of time on the field and exposure to a diverse assortment of amphibian and reptile species. Students should be prepared for hiking off-trail, wading in swamps, and catching live animals.

Ecological Modeling and Conservation Strategies

BIOL 325 - Humston, Robert

This course is an intensive introduction to foundational methods in ecological modeling and their application, with emphasis on the dynamics of exploited or threatened populations and developing strategies for effective conservation. Topics include managing harvested populations, population viability analysis, individual based models, and simulation modeling for systems analyses. Laboratory course.

Plant Functional Ecology

BIOL 332 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Information regarding the specific course topic and field trip schedule is made available in the fall. Through novel research projects in a variety of field settings (e.g., on-campus, Appalachian and Blue Ridge Mountains, The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem), this field-based laboratory course covers topics which investigate the vital roles that plants play in shaping Earth's ecosystems. Topics focus on the responses of native plants to environmental stresses, such as global climate change (elevated temperature and carbon dioxide and drought), herbivory, and invasive species. Field and laboratory exercises focus on testing hypotheses through experiments using a variety of species from intact plant communities. A review of the pertinent literature is used to develop and conduct a term research project. Laboratory course.

Experimental Neurophysiology

BIOL 360 - Blythe, Sarah N.

An in-depth exploration of the theory and techniques of cellular neurophysiology. Labs utilize extracellular and intracellular recording techniques to explore motor neuron and sensory receptor firing properties and to examine the ionic basis for resting and action potentials and synaptic transmission. Laboratory course.

Directed Individual Study

BIOL 401 - Humston, Robert

Reading in the primary research literature on a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 424 - Hamilton, Eugene W., III (Bill)

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Richmond Clinical Rotation Program

BIOL 464 - Wubah, Judith A.

This program is for students who have demonstrated an interest in a career in medicine. The Richmond Term Program combines an introductory experience in a medical practice with academic study of Immunology and infectious disease. It exposes the students to the process and problems of medicine through observations, seminars, and discussions. This is a faculty-supervised, off-campus experience with various physicians in Richmond, VA. This course does not meet major requirements.

FS: First-Year Seminar

BUS 180 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

Topics vary by subject and term.

Spring 2017, BUS 180: First-Year Seminar: International Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability (4). Prerequisite: FY standing and instructor consent. ACCT 201 recommended. Do corporations have an obligation to manage their social impact in addition to maximizing sales, profits and stock price? What happens when these objectives are in conflict with each other? This course seeks to explore the relative roles of businesses, not-for-profits, government and individual citizens in managing social and environmental impact. Significant time is spent exploring case studies and interacting with senior management of various companies. Recent examples include Carlsberg, Dr. Pepper-Snapple Group, Dunkin' Brands, Norden, Novo Nordisk, Pandora, Proctor & Gamble, Starbucks, and Unilever. The class culminates with two weeks in Copenhagen visiting numerous Danish companies and developing a group research project on a topic chosen by the students. The time abroad also includes cultural excursions to places such as Frederiksborg Castle and Tivoli, dinners with Danish families, a harbor/canal tour, and a closing dinner featuring New Nordic cuisine. Oliver and Straughan.

Seminar in Organizational Behavior

BUS 301 - Schatten, Jeffrey M.

Offered from time to time when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, BUS 301-01: Seminar in Organizational Behavior: Leading Teams (4). Prerequisite: at least sophomore standing. Preference to BSADM majors during initial registration . This course is taught at Augusta Correctional Center, a medium-security prison in Craigsville, VA. Ten W&L students and ten soon-to-be-released inmates take the course together. Students learn from the professor and from one another as they explore the interpersonal processes and psychological factors that affect the way in which individuals interact and engage with one another. Students learn to understand conflict and how to effectively manage conflict in group settings. This course is mostly comprised of team activities and cases, which is intended to give students the tools, insight, and experience to better understand and manage teams. Schatten. Spring 2017 and alternate years

Seminar in Management

BUS 304 - Herbert, Richard H. (Rick)

Topics vary by term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, BUS 304-01: Money, Power, and Lies (4). Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. Preference to BSADM or JOURF(JMCB) majors during the first round of registration. How do we design and lead organizations that foster ethical behavior? This course integrates the disciplines of business ethics and organizational behavior to address this question. It examines the impact of organizational forces on the ability of individuals to act ethically in large, complex organizations, with special emphasis on the financial industry. Beginning with the era of the ENRON and Arthur Anderson scandals and continuing through the 2008 financial crisis, the issue of unethical behavior in large organizations has grown more disturbing. The major case study we address is the 2008 financial meltdown and its aftermath. Outside speakers interact with the class and add perspective. Past speakers have included financial executives and business journalists from Lehman Brothers, Goldman Sachs, and The Washington Post . Herbert .

Negotiation and Dispute Resolution in a Business Environment

BUS 349 - Youngman, Julia F. (Julie)

This course is designed to give students the abilities to negotiate successfully in a commercial environment and to create business solutions when a problem or dispute arises. Lectures, written materials, group projects, video, and role-play are utilized to explore the various theories of negotiation and types of dispute resolution, and to equip students with practical skills for forming and preserving business relationships and resolving business disputes as they occur.

Framing a Franchise: The Business of Entertainment

BUS 360 - Lind, Stephen J.

Entertainment franchises are big business that pervade our consumer culture. This course challenges students to evaluate the various practices used to "frame" such creative entertainment franchise properties. Students study a variety of global franchises, such as Peanuts, Star Wars, or Disney lines, analyzing key issues involved in creative product development. These issues include framing, fidelity, and audience management, as well practical processes like the role of development gatekeepers and product licensing structures. The course includes a one-week trip to Los Angeles to meet with entertainment industry executives at studio and key franchise locations.

Supervised Study Abroad

BUS 390 - Dean, Roger A.

These upper-level courses cover topics of current interest in business administration for which international travel provides a unique opportunity for enhancing understanding. Emphasis changes from year to year and is announced well in advance of registration.

Spring 2017, BUS 390-01: Supervised Study Abroad: Business in Ireland (4). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Twenty-five years ago, Ireland was regarded as the "poorest of the rich nations". Then it grew to one of the richest and strongest economies in the world. During these "Celtic Tiger" years, Ireland benefited from partnerships with government, business, and labor unions, and received significant direct foreign investments. However, at the end of 2008 Ireland encountered severe economic difficulties. This course, based in County Galway, has two primary objectives: 1. To immerse students into the culture (history, literature, theater, religion, social norms) of Ireland, via lectures and field trips to sites of historic and cultural significance, including a course-concoluding medieval banquet and traditional Irish entertainment at a historic castle; and 2. To study the economy, management practices, and business climate of modern Ireland including its role in the European Union via lectures, meetings with business leaders, and visits to national and international businesses. Dean.

Supervised Study Abroad

BUS 390 - Shay, Jeffrey P. (Jeff)

These upper-level courses cover topics of current interest in business administration for which international travel provides a unique opportunity for enhancing understanding. Emphasis changes from year to year and is announced well in advance of registration.

Spring 2017, BUS 390-02: Supervised Study Abroad: Leadership and Cross-Cultural Management (4). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. This course focuses on developing both leadership and cross-cultural management skills through immersing students in an intensive, leadership rich, and culturally diverse environment. Students and faculty live onboard a 50-foot bareboat yacht while travelling in the British Virgin Islands and the Leeward Islands. Living and learning on board a yacht for 21 days is quite a transformative experience. Students are required to adapt to new and unfamiliar surroundings, both in terms of the yacht and the cultures visited. Moreover, students are required to assume many roles and responsibilities on a daily basis, ranging from leading the crew as their skipper to utilizing newly developed navigational skills to plot the course to the next harbor and assure that the yacht arrives safely to preparing and serving meals for the crew. To enrich the onboard experience for participants, students complete readings and engage in discussions on leadership and cross-cultural management. At each location students engage with local businesses and business leaders. In addition, each student is required to maintain a daily analytical journal that applies the readings to their experience onboard. No prior sailing experience is required as students develop sailing, navigation, and yacht management proficiencies through living and learning onboard the yacht. Shay.

Corporate Social Responsibility Practicum

BUS 391 - Straughan, Robert D. (Rob) / Oliver, Elizabeth G.

The course provides students an opportunity to explore corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability challenges from within an organization. The course is taught in Denmark, regarded as one of the most progressive economies in terms of CSR implementation. Initial reading, discussion, and research in the winter term prepare students to be matched with a Danish organization grappling with a CSR issue. Students work in small groups (four students) in a consultative capacity with a sponsoring Danish organization's decision makers. Students also participate in larger group discussions of issues confronted during the practicum and reflect on their experiences in both a personal journal and group blog. Sponsoring organizations include both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations, and the nature of the issues varies from sponsor to sponsor. May be taken twice for degree credit if the topics are significantly different.

Layered Berlin: German Culture and the Social Market Economy

BUS 392 - Youngman, Paul A. / Hess, Andrew M. (Drew)

A four-week course taught abroad that offers students a true immersion in German language, culture, and business environment. In order to give students a complete understanding of contemporary Germany, we integrate a literary-historical analysis of the country's rich history from 1848 to the present day with an introduction to German social and economic system that focuses on stakeholder-centric business and sustainability principles. Through an exciting mix of literary fiction, historical readings and cases, film screenings, along with corporate and cultural site visits, students gain an understanding of the interdependence between "big C" Culture and business culture.

Disorder and Chaos

CHEM 106 - Abry, Andrea C. / Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve) / Rowe, Barbara L.

An interdisciplinary introduction to the concepts underlying nonlinear dynamics and fractal geometry emphasizing the theories of chaos and complexity. Students study mathematical and computer modeling of physical and social systems and interpret the results of these models using graphical methods and written descriptions. Methods and concepts from calculus are demonstrated but no mathematics beyond high-school algebra is assumed. The laboratory component consists of a series of projects from diverse areas of the natural sciences, including pendulum motion, oscillating chemical reactions, and natural growth patterns. Laboratory course.

Disorder and Chaos

CHEM 106 - Abry, Andrea C. / Desjardins, Steven G. (Steve)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the concepts underlying nonlinear dynamics and fractal geometry emphasizing the theories of chaos and complexity. Students study mathematical and computer modeling of physical and social systems and interpret the results of these models using graphical methods and written descriptions. Methods and concepts from calculus are demonstrated but no mathematics beyond high-school algebra is assumed. The laboratory component consists of a series of projects from diverse areas of the natural sciences, including pendulum motion, oscillating chemical reactions, and natural growth patterns. Laboratory course.

Science of Cooking

CHEM 155 - France, Marcia B.

The course will build upon the foundation developed in CHEM 154.  Lectures will focus on the biological structures of more complex food organisms such as meat, fruits, vegetables, and eggs, as well as the chemical reactivity involved in cooking and spoilage.  Lectures will also include more in-depth discussions of these chemical processes.  Instruction at an Italian cooking school and visits to local food production facilities will supplement the classroom work.  The course will take place on location in Siena, Italy for four weeks. CHEM 154 must be completed with a grade of S in order to fulfill FDR SL credit with CHEM 155 .

CSI: W&L

CHEM 160 - Watson, Fiona L. / LaRiviere, Frederick J. (Fred)

This laboratory course is an introduction to the field of forensic science with a focus on the physical, chemical, and biological basis of crime scene evidence. A particular emphasis is on the analysis of trace physical (e.g., glass, soil, fiber, ballistics) and biological (e.g., hair, blood, DNA) evidence and forensic toxicology (e.g., drugs, alcohol, poisons). The laboratory portion of this course provides "hands-on" opportunities to analyze collected crime scene samples and to utilize some of the commonly used forensic laboratory techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, and spectroscopy. The course also introduces some of the legal aspects associated with collection and analysis of crime-scene evidence. Laboratory course.

Spring-Term Special Topics in Chemistry

CHEM 299 - Friend, John K. (Kyle)

Studies of special topics. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Possible topics include medicinal chemistry, materials chemistry, or atmospheric chemistry and the environment.

Spring 2017, CHEM 299-01: Mechanisms of Stem-Cell Growth and Differentiation (4). A practical guide to mammalian stem cell biology. Students explore the molecular underpinnings of stem-cell maintenance with a focus on cellular signaling pathways and stem-cell niche microenvironments, both in the embryo and the adult. We study the biochemistry of directed differentiation and lineage determination, and discuss the function of stem cells in adult-tissue homeostasis and recovery from injury. Within a laboratory setting, students culture and maintain embryonic stem cells, perform pluripotency assays, and direct embryonic stem cells to differentiate into neural progenitors and cardiac cells. Friend

Supervised Study Abroad: Beginning Chinese

CHIN 103 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to introduce Chinese language and culture to students with little or no previous Chinese language background and prepare them for studying first-year Chinese. Combining language study with studies of other aspects of Chinese culture (literature, art. history, economy, etc.) provides students with first-hand experience of the development of contemporary China. Classes and discussions are held at the International College or Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. Students learn through personal experience about the emergence or modern China and its changing culture. The 2017 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,600 and for the 6-week course is $3,950.

Supervised Study Abroad: Beginning Chinese

CHIN 105 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to introduce Chinese language and culture to students with little or no previous Chinese language background and prepare them for studying first-year Chinese. Combining language study with studies of other aspects of Chinese culture (literature, art, history, economy, etc.) provides students with firsthand experience of the development of contemporary China. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. Students learn through personal experience about the emergence of modern China and its changing culture.The 2017 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,600 and for the 6-week course is $3,950.

Supervised Study Abroad: First-Year Chinese

CHIN 113 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to improve active oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for studying second-year Chinese. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students have opportunities to mingle with ordinary Chinese people, to engage in everyday conversation, and to have first-hand experience of the development of contemporary China. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. The 2017 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,600 and for the 6-week course is $3,950.

Supervised Study Abroad: First-Year Chinese

CHIN 115 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to improve active oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for studying second-year Chinese. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students have opportunities to mingle with ordinary Chinese people, to engage in everyday conversation, and to have firsthand experience of the development of contemporary China. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. The 2017 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,600 and for the 6-week course is $3,950.

Supervised Study Abroad: Second-Year Chinese

CHIN 263 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to further improve student oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for studying third-year Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students discuss and debate with Chinese students about emerging social. economic, and policy issues. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. The 2017 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,600 and for the 6-week course is $3,950.

Supervised Study Abroad: Second-Year Chinese

CHIN 265 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to further improve student oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for studying third-year. Classes and discussions are held at the International College of Chinese Studies at East China Normal University in Shanghai. Students discuss and debate with Chinese students about emerging social, economic, and policy issues. The program includes field trips to points of historical interests and many cultural activities. The 2017 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,600 and for the 6-week course is $3,950.

Supervised Study Abroad: 3rd- or 4th-Year Chinese

CHIN 363 - Fu, Hongchu

This course is designed to further improve student oral proficiency in Chinese, to introduce various aspects of Chinese culture, and to prepare students for further study. The 2017 course fee for the 4-week course is $2,600 and for the 6-week course is $3,950.

Classical Mythology

CLAS 201 - Crotty, Kevin M.

An introduction to the study of Greek mythology, with an emphasis on the primary sources. The myths are presented in their historical, religious, and political contexts. The course also includes an introduction to several major theories of myth, and uses comparative materials drawn from contemporary society and media.

Topics in Classical Civilization

CLAS 295 - Hagen, Adrienne M.

Selected subject areas in classical civilization. The topic selected varies from year to year. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, CLAS 295-01: Nature and the Environment in Antiquity (4). How did people in the ancient world conceive of nature from a philosophical, religious, and scientific standpoint? What attitudes did they hold towards animals and other forms of life? How did they shape the world around them through practices such as agriculture, mining, water management, and deforestation? Did they share our modem concerns about the use and conservation of natural spaces? Students in this course investigate these questions using literature, art, and artifacts from the ancient Mediterranean world (primarily Greece and Rome but also Egypt, the Near East, and Britain) as well as works by contemporary scholars of ecocriticism and environmental thought (e.g., William Cronon and Wendell Berry). Readings are in English, with the opportunity to read portions of some texts in Greek or Latin if desired by students with prior knowledge of these languages. (HU). Hagen.

Introduction to Robotics

CSCI 250 - Levy, Simon D.

This course combines readings from the contemporary robotics literature with hands-on lab experience building robots (equipment provided) and programming them to do various tasks. The lab experience culminates with a peer-judged competition of robot projects proposed and built during the second half of the term.

Special Topics

DANC 390 - Davies, Jenefer M.

An advanced studio course for experienced dancers exploring various choreographic styles and methods and the intersections between technique, aesthetics and creative collaboration. This course permits the student to follow a program of specialized applied research in order to widen the scope of experience and to build upon concepts covered in other courses. The course culminates in a performance piece for presentation. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, DANC 390-01: Aerial Dance (4). Prerequisite: Instructor consent (especially if you have a physical ailments or a fear of heights). Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term. A technique course for dancers, athletes and anyone excited about pushing themselves to new heights (literally!). This class explores various choreographic styles and methods and the intersections between technique, aesthetics, and creative collaboration. The course  culminates in an outside performance with the dancers tethered to the roof of Wilson Hall and dancing on its walls. Davies.

Cool Japan: A Visual Journey through Anime, Manga, Robots, Language, and Culture

EALL 175 - Tashiro, Yumiko

Taught in English, this course examines a variety of visual artifacts such as manga, anime, and unique social phenomena, observable in current Japan through reading materials and discussions, to understand Japanese culture and society. Students learn the visually beautiful writing system of Japanese and onomatopoeia, which is used extensively in Japanese manga. Through hands-on experiences, students gain a deeper understanding and multicultural perspective of the culture and society of Japan

Current Public Policy Debates

ECON 222 - Diette, Timothy M. (Tim) / Shester, Katharine L.

The course is an applied public finance and policy course that focuses on current policy debates. While the topics are updated with each offering, students in this course examine options for replacing the Affordable Care Act, analyze whether the country should adopt a universal voucher program for K-12, discuss containing the cost of college, and explore options for securing the long-term financial stability of Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security. We use economic theory to frame the each of the policy questions. Students conduct additional research on each of the topics, debate topics, and author policy opinion papers.

The Auto Industry: Economics, Society, Culture

ECON 244 - Smitka, Michael J. (Mike)

This course investigates the automobile industry from an interdisciplinary perspective, including a visit to factories and R&D facilities in Detroit. Why did GM file bankruptcy? Why do we have 600-plus new passenger vehicles available in the US -- isn't such diversity wasteful? How and why has the automobile shifted the rhythm of daily life, including the growth of suburbs and decline of cities? What of safety and the environment -- electric vehicles? The course also considers cars themselves, the subject of two Tom Wolfe stories in The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Bab y.

Caste at the Intersection of Economy, Religion, and Law

ECON 246 - Silwal, Shikha B. / Lubin, Timothy (Tim)

Social stratification touches every aspect of life, and South Asia's traditional caste structure is a special case: this highly complex, strictly-adhered-to system has been religiously legitimized and criticized over a 3,000-year history, and is nowadays seen as being at odds with the modern world. Yet it remains a crucial factor in social identity, economic roles, legal status, and religious practice. This course offers a 360-degree survey of caste both historically and in practice today in Nepal. The course addresses four themes, respectively providing for each a combination of historical background, social scientific analysis of the modern situation, and direct field experience for the students.

Supervised Study Abroad: The Environment and Economic Development in Amazonas

ECON 259 - Kahn, James R. (Jim)

Spring Term Abroad course. Amazonas is a huge Brazilian state of 1.5 million sq. kilometers which retains 94 percent of its original forest cover. This course examines the importance of the forest for economic development in both the formal and informal sectors of the economy, and how policies can be develop to promote both environmental protection and an increase in the quality life in both the urban and rural areas of Amazonas. The learning objectives of this course integrate those of the economics and environmental studies majors. Students are asked to use economic tools in an interdisciplinary context to understand the relationships among economic behavior, ecosystems and policy choices. Writing assignments focus on these relationships and look towards the development of executive summary writing skills.

Urban Education and Poverty

EDUC 369 - Sigler, Haley W.

Not open to students with credit for ECON 234. In this course, students explore pedagogy, curriculum, and social issues related to urban education by working in schools in the Richmond area for three weeks. Students read about and discuss the broader social and economic forces, particularly poverty, that have shaped urban schools and the ramifications of those forces for school design. The Richmond schools provide the opportunity to observe critical components of teaching and learning in the urban classroom. Housing is provided with alumni during the week. Students return to Lexington for Friday seminars and for the fourth week of the term for seminars and discussion.

Topics in Creative Writing: Playwriting

ENGL 202 - Gavaler, Christopher P. (Chris)

A course in the practice of writing plays, involving workshops, literary study, critical writing, and performance.

Eco-Writing

ENGL 207 - Green, Leah N.

An expeditionary course in environmental creative writing. Readings include canonical writers such as Frost, Emerson, Auden, Rumi, and Muir, as well as contemporary writers such as W.S. Merwin, Mary Oliver, Janice Ray, Gary Snyder, Annie Dillard, Tich Nhat Hanh, Wendell Berry, and Robert Hass. We take weekly "expeditions" including creative writing hikes, a landscape painting exhibit, and a Buddhist monastery. "Expeditionary courses" sometimes involve moderate to challenging hiking. We research the science and social science of the ecosystems explored, as well as the language of those ecosystems. The course has two primary aspects: (1) reading and literary analysis of eco-literature (fiction, non-fiction, and poetry) and (2) developing skill and craft in creating eco-writing through the act of writing in these genres and through participation in weekly "writing workshop."

Children's Literature

ENGL 234 - Bufkin, Sydney M.

A study of works written in English for children. The course treats major writers, thematic and generic groupings of texts, and children's literature in historical context. Readings may include poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction, and illustrated books, including picture books that dispense with text.

Children's Literature

ENGL 234 - Harrington, Jane F.

A study of works written in English for children. The course treats major writers, thematic and generic groupings of texts, and children's literature in historical context. Readings may include poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction, and illustrated books, including picture books that dispense with text.

The Bible as Literature: Exile and Return

ENGL 237 - Gertz, Genelle C.

Students may not take for degree credit both this course and ENGL 236.  Stories of leaving, and one day returning, are found in nearly every book of the Bible.  Leaving Eden, Ur, or Israel; being sold from one's homeland into slavery; losing the messiah—all of these exiles are critical to any study of the Bible, as well as later literature based on the Bible.  As the poet John Milton well understood, exile, by its nature, includes longing for a return—either to Paradise, to one's homeland, or to the deity's presence on earth; it can also include desire for a new settlement, and a new historical era.  Themes of exile and return connect the Bible to the genre of epic, another ancient literary form, where homecoming and settlement sometimes hail the beginning of a new people, nation, or age.  In this class we explore themes of exile and return in Genesis and Exodus, I and II Kings, Ezekiel, the Gospels of Matthew and John, and the books of Acts and Revelation.  Exile and return feature not just as recurrent themes in separate books, but as narrative forms themselves (such as epic, or even the law, which exiles narrative), as metaphors, spiritual states, and central tropes of Biblical literature.  In addition to focused literary study, we engage with Biblical forms through the history of the book and in local religious contexts.  We study rare Bibles available in special collections and facsimile, becoming familiar with how the bible was experienced in earlier historical periods.  Finally, students engage in fieldwork involving attendance and observance of how local religious communities (outside of one's own faith tradition) read scripture today.

Topics in British Literature

ENGL 292 - Keen, Suzanne P.

Studies in British literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, ENGL 292-01: Topic in British Literature: Utopian or Dystopian? (4). Prerequisite: Completion of the FW requirement. Over a decade ago, celebrated contemporary British science fiction and fantasy writer Gwyneth Jones's Bold as Love sequence anticipated both devolution and "Brexit" in an award-winning series published between 2001-2006. With titles drawn from Jimi Hendrix tunes and allusions to Arthurian legend, Shakespeare's history plays, English folk-tales, American westerns, and Chinese opera, the Bold as Love novels defy generic categories. Theories explored and tested include intertextuality and intermediality, sources and influences, and generic hybrids. (HL) Keen. Spring 2017 only

Topics in British Literature

ENGL 292 - Adams, Edward A.

Studies in British literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, ENGL 292-02:  Middlemarch & Devoted Readers (4). Not open to students who have taken ENGL 299. Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement. This seminar begins with and centers upon George Eliot's Middlemarch, a novel often regarded as one of the greatest and most ambitious produced in the era of the novel's securest cultural dominance and famously described by Virginia Woolf as one of the "few English novels written for grown-up people." It then problematizes this encounter by setting it in light of Rebecca's Mead's critically-acclaimed My Life in Middlemarch, a memoir of her devoted lifelong reading and reading of it, not just for pleasure but for its profound wisdom and insight. The question of such intense admiration verging on fandom is one that has received increasing scholarly attention, particularly in relation to the so-called Janeite phenomenon, that is, the love of Jane Austen fans for her novels, but extends to numerous other novelists, poets, playwrights, fun-makers, and their fans. Students supplement this focus of the course by researching and presenting their own exemplary case studies of such readerly devotion, obsession, or fandom. (HL) Adams.

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293 - Smout, Kary

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, ENGL 293-01: Topics in American Literature: Business in American Literature (4). In his 1776 book The Wealth of Nations , Adam Smith tells a powerful story of the free market as a way to organize our political and economic lives, a story that has governed much of the world ever since. This course studies that story, considers alternate stories of human economic organization, such as those of American Indian tribes, and sees how these stories have been acted out in American business and society. We study novels, films, short stories, non-fiction essays, autobiographies, advertisements, websites, some big corporations, and some local businesses in the Lexington area. Our goal is not to attack American business but to understand its characteristic strengths and weaknesses so we can make the best choices about how to live and work happily in a free market society. (HL) Smout.

Topics in American Literature

ENGL 293 - Oliver, Bill

Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, ENGL 293-02: Topics in American Literature: The American Short Story (4). Prerequisite: Completion of the FW requirement. Initially limited to First-Years. This course is a study of the evolution of the short story in America from its roots, both domestic and international, tracing the main branches of its development in the 20th century. We also explore more recent permutations of the genre, such as magical realism, new realism, and minimalism. Having gained an appreciation for the history and variety of this distinctly modern genre, we focus our attention on the work of two American masters of the form, contemporaries and erstwhile friends who frequently read and commented on each other's work--Hemingway and Fitzgerald. We examine how they were influenced by their predecessors and by each other and how each helped to shape the genre. (HL) Oliver .

Fresh/Local/Wild: The Poetics of Food

ENGL 307 - Miranda, Deborah A.

This class visits fresh/local/wild food venues each week, where sensory explorations focus on all aspects of foraging, creating, adapting and eating food. Coursework includes guided writing exercises based on the landscape/geography of food both in the field and classroom, with in-depth readings that help us turn topics like food politics, food insecurity, sustainable agriculture and genetically modified foods into poetry. Individual handmade chapbooks of the term's poems serve as the final product. A service learning component is also included in the course through Campus Kitchen.

Middlemarch and Devoted Readers

ENGL 349 - Adams, Edward A.

This seminar begins with and centers upon George Eliot's Middlemarch , a novel often regarded as one of the greatest and most ambitious produced in the era of the novel's securest cultural dominance and famously described by Virginia Woolf as one of the "few English novels written for grown-up people." It then problematizes this encounter by setting it in light of Rebecca's Mead's critically-acclaimed My Life in Middlemarch , a memoir of her devoted lifelong reading and reading of it, not just for pleasure but for its profound wisdom and insight. The question of such intense admiration verging on fandom is one that has received increasing scholarly attention, particularly in relation to the so-called Janeite phenomenon, that is, the love of Jane Austen fans for her novels, but extends to numerous other novelists, poets, playwrights, fun-makers, and their fans. Students supplement this focus of the course by researching and presenting their own exemplary case studies of such readerly devotion, obsession, or fandom.

Visions and Beliefs of the West of Ireland

ENGL 387 - Brown, Alexandra R. (Alex) / Conner, Marc C.

This course immerses the student in the literature, religious traditions, history, and culture of Ireland. The primary focus of the course is on Irish literary expressions and religious beliefs and traditions, from the pre-historic period to the modem day, with a particular emphasis on the modem (early 20th-century) Irish world. Readings are coordinated with site visits, which range from prehistoric and Celtic sites to early and medieval Christian sites to modem Irish life. Major topics and authors include Yeats and Mysticism, St. Brendan's Pilgrimage, Folklore and Myth, Lady Gregory and Visions, Religion in Irish Art, the Blasket Island storytellers, the Mystic Island, and others.

Topics in Literature in English since 1900

ENGL 394 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

Enrollment limited. A seminar course on literature written in English since 1900 with special emphasis on research and discussion. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, ENGL 394-01: Advanced Seminar: Celluloid Shakespeare (4). Prerequisite: ENGL 299. The films adapted from or inspired by William Shakespeare's plays are a genre unto themselves. We study a selection of films, not focused on their faithfulness to the original playscript, but on the creative choices and meanings of the distinct medium of film. We see how the modern era has transmuted the plays through the lens of contemporary sensibility, politics, and culture—and through this new visual mode of storytelling. This course is very much an exploration of how to interpret and appreciate film broadly, as we learn the concepts and lexicon of film with Shakespeare as our case study. Our methods vary: sometimes we study the play in detail and compare several film versions, or we see a film fresh—without having read the play—to approach it as a work of art on its own terms. We hear reports from students about additional films to expand the repertoire of films we study and enjoy. The films we view range from multiple versions of Hamlet, Macbeth , and A Midsummer Night's Dream , to adaptations of As You Like It, Titus Andronicus , and Henry V , to original Shakespeare-inspired films such as Forbidden Planet, A Thousand Acres , and My Own Private Idaho . (HL) Dobin.

Engineering Marvels

ENGN 125 - D'Alessandro, Kacie C.

A Spring Term Abroad course. Engineering has evolved over the years as technology and society has advanced. This course investigates technical engineering concepts, the evolution of engineering, and the historical and cultural significance of engineering through the study of ancient and modern engineering marvels around the world. A framework of basic engineering analysis and historical context are explored for the marvels before travel. Site visits and tours take place abroad to explore these marvels firsthand. Specific topics vary depending on location.

Topics in Film and Literature

FILM 196 - Lambeth, John A.

Selected topics in film and literature. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Screenwriting

FILM 220 - Sandberg, Stephanie L.

In this course, students learn about the art and business of screenwriting, studying story and narrative structures, and what makes a story interesting to us. We begin by looking at the human need for story and how we can both access and feed this basic principle of human existence. In addition, you learn how to write your own stories into a screenplay. With creative discipline, you practice writing believable characters and scenes that will draw audiences in through the art of crafting great dialogue. You begin with the spark of your idea at the beginning of the term, turn it into a treatment, and eventually a full screenplay that you then have an opportunity to pitch to a producer for feedback. From your first draft, you learn the art of refining your screenplay, focusing on how to give it great tonality and form, building your skills as a writer, a creative thinker, and following through a whole artistic process.

Atelier avancé de langue, littérature et culture

FREN 295 - Radulescu, Domnica V.

A third-year topics or advanced grammar workshop. Recent offerings include: Les dossiers de la presse; Regards sur la ville. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, FREN 295-01: Atelier Avancé: Traduction et Improvisation (4). Prerequisites: FREN 162, FREN 164, or equivalent. This course focuses on developing translation skills from French into English and from English into French as well as skills for simultaneous translation and bilingual improvisation. It relies on literary texts as well as texts from other areas of knowledge such as philosophy or from pop culture and journalism. It is informed by various theories of translation as well as techniques of improvisation used in theater and performance. Radulescu .

Earth Lab

GEOL 105 - Leonard-Pingel, Jill S.

The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside field work with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. The primary goal of this course is an in-depth introduction to a particular region or field of geological study for introductory level science students. Information about the course is made available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements. Lab fee required.

Spring 2017, GEOL 105-01: Earth Lab: Dinosaurs (4). Prerequisite: First-Year or sophomore standing only. Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term. A multidisciplinary investigation into the morphology, classification, and ecology of the dinosaurs and their close relatives; the environmental, climatic, and geographic conditions on earth during the time of the dinosaurs and how geologists make those paleo-environmental interpretations; and the biological principles involved in understanding the origin, evolution, and extinction of the dinosaurs. In addition, students discuss how scientific investigations proceed, how science is conveyed to a larger audience, and why dinosaurs in the media are often portrayed with so many scientific errors. (SL) Leonard-Pingel .

Earth Lab

GEOL 105 - Axler, Jennifer A. (Jen)

The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside field work with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. The primary goal of this course is an in-depth introduction to a particular region or field of geological study for introductory level science students. Information about the course is made available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements. Lab fee required.

Spring 2017, GEOL 105-02: Earth Lab: Energy, Resources, and the Environment (4). Prerequisite: First-Year, sophomore, or junior standing only. Additional course fee required, for which the student is responsible after Friday of the 7th week of winter term. Energy from natural resources is used in many aspects of daily life, powering homes, schools, farms, businesses, and vehicles. In this modern industrial society, affordable energy is integral to sustaining our economic, social, and political standings. Most of our energy comes from the use of fossil fuels which come with a significant environmental impact. This course surveys the production and efficiency of a wide range of energy resources (including oil, gas, coal, solar, and wind), and studies the environmental impacts of obtaining energy and natural resources via each of these systems. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each energy resource and how we might improve our current energy system. (SL) Axler.

Environmental Field Methods

GEOL 231 - Smith, Stephen G.

An introduction to the study of standard methods, equipment and tools used in environmental field investigations. Special attention is given to methods used by geologists to measure, record, and report field observations associated with groundwater, surface water, soil and air. Focus is given to the validity of data obtained using various investigative strategies as well as data handling and presentation. The course has an intensive field component using the local watershed as a model environmental system.

Regional Geology

GEOL 373 - Harbor, David J.

The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Most course activity involves outside fieldwork with a series of multi-day to multi-week field trips. Information about the course is available prior to the end of the fall term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements.

Spring 2017, GEOL 373-01: Regional Geology: Iceland (4). Prerequisites: Instructor consent and two geology courses numbered 200 or above. Learn and discover the volcanic and glacial geology of Iceland, and explore sustainability practices. Most of the course is taught in the field in Iceland. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different but only four credits may be used toward major requirements. Harbor .

Layered Berlin: German Culture and the Social Market Economy

GERM 392 - Youngman, Paul A. / Hess, Andrew M. (Drew)

A four-week course taught abroad that offers students a true immersion in German language, culture, and business environment. In order to give students a complete understanding of contemporary Germany, we integrate a literary-historical analysis of the country's rich history from 1848 to the present day with an introduction to German social and economic system that focuses on stakeholder-centric business and sustainability principles. Through an exciting mix of literary fiction, historical readings and cases, film screenings, along with corporate and cultural site visits, students gain an understanding of the interdependence between "big C" Culture and business culture.

Dante: Renaissance and Redemption

HIST 200 - Peterson, David S.

A survey of the culture, society, and politics of early Renaissance Italy using the life of the Florentine poet Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) and his Divine Comedy . This period witnessed revolutions in Florence and Rome and the emergence of new artistic forms aimed at reconciling Christian beliefs with classical thought, notably that of the Greek philosopher Aristotle and the Roman poet Virgil. It also generated conflicts between popes, kings, and emperors that issued ultimately in modern European states. First, we survey Dante's historical setting using a chronicle by one of his contemporaries, Dino Compagni. We then follow Dante on his poetic pilgrimage of personal and collective redemption through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven as he synthesized the artistic, religious, philosophical and political challenges of his age.

From Weimar to Hitler: Modernism and Anti-Modernism in German Culture after the First World War

HIST 215 - Patch, William L., Jr. (Bill)

Germany adopted an admirably democratic constitution after the First World War, and the Weimar Republic became a center of bold experimentation in literature, the arts, theater, cinema, and scholarship, but it also became a hotbed of radical nationalism and xenophobia. This course analyzes the relationship between art and politics through case studies in the debates provoked by anti-war films and poetry, the Bauhaus "international style" of architecture, the plays of Bertolt Brecht, expressionist art, and films and paintings to celebrate the advent of the "New Woman." Why did modernism inspire so much anxiety in Germany in the 1920s? To what extent did cultural experimentation contribute to the popularity of Adolf Hitler? What lessons did Weimar intellectuals in exile learn from the Nazi seizure of power?

The Art of Command during the American Civil War

HIST 244 - Myers, Barton A.

This seminar examines the role of military decision-making, the factors that shape it and determine its successes and failures, by focusing on four Civil War battles: Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Wilderness. Extensive reading and writing. Battlefield tours.

Morning in America? Society, Culture and Politics in The Age of Reagan

HIST 264 - Michelmore, Mary (Molly)

This course provides students with an in-depth analysis of the United States during the Reagan presidency. While the bulk of the course focuses on the 1980s, it also provides an overview of the 1960s and 1970s as well as the legacy of the decade for contemporary America. Rather than studying a single theme across a long period of time, this class provides students with a variety of thematic approaches within a more confined time-period. Accordingly, while the focus is on national politics, we explore the impact of the decade on economic, social, cultural, diplomatic, and political history.

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295 - DeLaney, Theodore C., Jr. (Ted)

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, HIST 295-01: Acquiring Louisiana 1785-1804 (4). This course examines the Mississippi River Valley and the vast territory commonly called the "Louisiana Purchase".  Students learn about the international struggle for that territory as well as the explorations into that area by Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, and earlier explorers. This course also focuses on the indigenous people who lived in these regions.  It is research-oriented and is reading- and writing-intensive, with students examining primary literature and building research papers. (HU) DeLaney.

Research Preparation in the Sciences

INTR 200 - I'Anson, Helen

This course is composed of seminar and workshop modules on such topics as: critical reading of research papers; use of relevant primary literature in experimental design; integrative approaches to research questions; use of quantitative methods and modeling; data acquisition, record-keeping, and analysis; research ethics; introduction to specific lab techniques used in research; scientific writing and data presentation. In addition, students develop and present a research plan for their research project that is discussed and critiqued by the whole group. Laboratory course.

Study Abroad Reflections and Assessment

INTR 298 - Rush, Mark E.

Before the end of the final term in which the student is on approved study abroad, students submit to the Director of International Education a reflective essay, to be designed and assigned for each term abroad by the faculty's Global Liaisons. The liaisons review student reflections, assess them with regard to Washington and Lee's learning outcomes for study abroad, and issue a brief report at the end of each academic year.

Spring Option

INTR 995 - Dittman, D. Scott (Scott)

The Spring Option allows students to use the spring term of their sophomore, junior and/or senior years to engage in an internship, service program, employment, travel or educational program that will broaden and enhance their collegiate education. The faculty offer this opportunity to encourage students to seek creative outlets not provided in the normal academic setting. Spring option policies and requirements can be found under Academic Regulations .

INTR 998 - Dittman, D. Scott (Scott)

Media Bias: Beyond Right and Left

JOUR 204 - Coddington, Mark A.

Many of our conversations and opinions on the news media come back to bias, but we rarely take the time to interrogate our own perspectives about it. In this course, students delve into the history and sociology of journalism and the psychology of our own news consumption to go beyond popular conservative and liberal theories of bias and find out how the news media really works. Students talk with prominent journalists and scholars and conduct their own media content analyses to test their own ideas about how the media covers issues they care about.

Cross-Cultural Documentary Filmmaking

JOUR 266 - Finch, Kevin D.

The United States is a melting pot of nationalities and cultures. As people move to the U. S. from other countries they go through cross-cultural adaptation, and identity becomes an issue for everyone. Students in this course work in three-person teams to produce five-minute documentaries on cross-cultural adaptation by an ethnic community in our region or by selected international students at Washington and Lee. Students are expected to immerse themselves in learning about the home countries and current communities of their subjects. The course includes instruction in the techniques of documentary film-making, allowing student to develop their writing, storytelling, shooting and editing skills.

Digital Media and Society

JOUR 270 - Artwick, Claudette G.

Facebook, YouTube, and iPhones are popular, if not essential elements in college students' busy lives. Being born into the digital age, students have grown up with profound and rapidly-changing media and communication technologies, yet likely take them for granted. This course takes an in-depth look at digital media, exploring the relationship between technology and social change. The concept of technological determinism guides our examination of social networking, online news/information, digital entertainment, and health online.

Topics in Journalism and Mass Communications

JOUR 295 - Colon, Aly A.

Study of a selected topic in journalism or mass communications. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. Appropriate for non-majors.

Spring 2017, JOUR 295-01: News Media and Religion: Faith, Facts, or Fiction? (4). Prerequisite: Sophomore class standing or higher. Open to non-majors. This class explores how the news media cover religion and whether this coverage helps or hinders understanding. Where do reporters turn for facts about religions? Do journalists reflect accurately and authentically religious lives? How do the news media depict people with extreme beliefs? Students examine these and other questions through readings, discussion, and interviews with experts and people of faith. Field trips allow personal exposure to places of worship. Colón.

In-depth Reporting

JOUR 356 - Locy, Toni R.

The principles and techniques of developing and creating enterprising, heavily researched journalistic work for the mass media. Students produce in-depth work for newspapers, magazines, radio, television and the World Wide Web. Extensive group work is required.

Media Management & Entrepreneurship

JOUR 377 - Swasy, Alecia

A seminar examining trends and challenges in media management, including a close examination of industry economics, changing reader and viewer habits, revenue and profit pressures, and labor and management issues unique to the news profession.

The Legal Profession

LEGL 220 - Osborne, Caroline L. / Miller, Stephanie C.

In recent decades, the percentage of civil and criminal suits in the U.S. which actually go to trial has dropped to about two percent. Yet most popular conceptions of the legal profession remain fixated on the drama of trials, as portrayed in films, on television, and in novels. What is legal practice actually like, for most attorneys, most of the time? This intensive seminar is designed for those who are curious about the legal profession and wish to know more about its inner workings, perhaps before committing themselves to post-graduate legal education. It introduces students to the fundamentals of legal reasoning and analysis, legal research, and legal writing, as well as contemporary issues and concerns facing the profession in a time of profound transition. Students engage in a series of practical exercises designed to mimic the tasks assigned to first-year associates at a law firm, and the seminar culminates with students' oral arguments on a motion hearing for which they have researched and drafted legal briefs.

Mass Atrocity, Human Rights, and International Law

LEGL 345 - Drumbl, Mark A.

This course is designed to benefit students with an interest in law school and/or international relations and also those with no plans to pursue law school or international relations work but who are keen to catch a view of both of these areas. This interdisciplinary course reflects upon the place of law and justice in societies that have endured or inflicted systemic human-rights violations. Among the examples we study are Germany, the former Yugoslavia, Japan, Czech Republic, Poland, Rwanda, Sudan, Iraq, Uganda, Cambodia, Syria, South Africa, Congo, ISIS, Sierra Leone, and the United States. A related aim is to consider what sorts of legal responses are suitable to deal with perpetrators of mass atrocity. Individuals commit the acts that cumulatively lead to mass atrocity, but the connived nature of the violence implicates questions of collective responsibility. While our instinct may be to prosecute guilty individuals, are other responses more appropriate? What do victims and their families want?

Special Topics in Literature in Translation

LIT 295 - Crockett, Roger A.

A selected topic focusing on a particular author, genre, motif or period in translation. The specific topic is determined by the interests of the individual instructor. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

FS: First-Year Seminar

MATH 180 - Humke, Paul D.

First-year seminar.

Spring 2017, Math 180-01: FS:A Brief Voyage to the 4th Dimension (4). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-Year class standing and MATH 102 or equivalent. A beginning look at the geometry of 4-dimensional Euclidean space, including learning some tools for studying 4-dimensional objects, and beginning to understand the difficulties in "seeing" such objects. Students also begin measuring in this 4-dimensional setting. The last week of the course is devoted to group projects and presentations. (SC) Humke.

Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics

MATH 301 - Denne, Elizabeth J.

Basic analytical tools and principles useful in mathematical investigations, from their beginning stages, in which experimentation and pattern analysis are likely to play a role, to their final stages, in which mathematical discoveries are formally proved to be correct. Strongly recommended for all prospective mathematics majors.

Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics

MATH 301 - Keller, Mitchel T. (Mitch)

Basic analytical tools and principles useful in mathematical investigations, from their beginning stages, in which experimentation and pattern analysis are likely to play a role, to their final stages, in which mathematical discoveries are formally proved to be correct. Strongly recommended for all prospective mathematics majors.

Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics

MATH 301 - Dresden, Gregory P.

Basic analytical tools and principles useful in mathematical investigations, from their beginning stages, in which experimentation and pattern analysis are likely to play a role, to their final stages, in which mathematical discoveries are formally proved to be correct. Strongly recommended for all prospective mathematics majors.

Seminar

MATH 383 - Pommersheim, James E.

Readings and conferences for a student or students on topics agreed upon with the directing staff. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, MATH 383-01: Seminar: Quantum Algorithms (4). Prerequisite: MATH 301. An introduction to the theory of quantum computation with a focus on quantum algorithms. The class begins with a basic abstract mathematical formulation of quantum computation. Algorithms covered include the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm, the Bemstein-Vazirani algorithm, Grover's search algorithm, and the Quantum Fourier Transform, leading up to Peter Shor's quantum factoring algorithm. Other topics may include quantum cryptography, quantum random walks, and the EPR paradox. Pommersheim

Chamber Ensembles

MUS 112 - Dobbins, Christopher L. (Chris)

This course may be repeated. Small chamber groups consisting of vocalists and instrumentalists are created to perform music. 

Bluegrass Ensemble offers students the opportunity to study and perform the traditional music of Appalachia in which improvisation is encouraged.

Brass Ensemble  offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for brass instruments in various combinations.

String Ensemble  offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for violin, viola, cello, and double bass in various combinations.

Woodwind Ensemble offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for woodwind instruments in various combinations.

Chamber Ensembles

MUS 112 - McArdle, Jaime H.

This course may be repeated. Small chamber groups consisting of vocalists and instrumentalists are created to perform music. 

Bluegrass Ensemble offers students the opportunity to study and perform the traditional music of Appalachia in which improvisation is encouraged.

Brass Ensemble  offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for brass instruments in various combinations.

String Ensemble  offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for violin, viola, cello, and double bass in various combinations.

Woodwind Ensemble offers students the opportunity to study and perform literature for woodwind instruments in various combinations.

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141B - Ahlhorn, Charles R. (Ross)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141J - Artwick, Thomas B. (Tom)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141P - Gaylard, Timothy R. (Tim)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141P - McCorkle, William F., Jr. (Bill)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - McArdle, Jaime H.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - Goudimova, Julia

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141S - Overfield-Zook, Kathleen L. (Katie)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141V - Cofield, Amy

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141W - Nicholas, Leslie K. (Les)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: First Year

MUS 141W - Dobbins, Heather F.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

A Year in Jazz

MUS 222 - Vosbein, Terry

An in-depth view of a one-year span in the history of America's only native art form. Students become absorbed in the era through the study of seminal recordings, historic videos, and readings. Research projects complete the term.

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241J - Artwick, Thomas B. (Tom)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241P - Gaylard, Timothy R. (Tim)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241P - McCorkle, William F., Jr. (Bill)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - McArdle, Jaime H.

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - Goudimova, Julia

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241S - Overfield-Zook, Kathleen L. (Katie)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241V - Cofield, Amy

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Applied Music: Second Year

MUS 241W - Nicholas, Leslie K. (Les)

One credit is earned for ten 45-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours practice a week during fall and winter terms; eight 55-minute private lessons and a minimum of five hours of practice a week are required during the spring term. ($360 lesson fee)

Directed Individual Study

NEUR 401 - Kreiss, Deborah S. (Deb)

This seminar involves independent reading and/or research. Students are expected to prepare a detailed research proposal based on their independent work. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Therapeutic Exercise

PE 102 - Williamson, Joshua D.

A specialized course employing physical rehabilitation techniques. Students with an acute physical impairment are assigned through consultation with the University physician in lieu of other physical education courses. May be repeated once for degree credit.

Aerobic Swimming

PE 111 - Gardner, Kateri A. (Kami) / LaBerge, Logan E.

A course designed to improve stroke technique and endurance. May be taken once.

Golf

PE 151 - Gyscek, Peter J. / Carralero, Kelsie A.

(Additional special fees and must provide own transportation.)

Aerobic Running

PE 154 - Freeman, Dana L.

Aerobic Running

Aerobic Running

PE 154 - Dager, Michael J. (Mike)

Aerobic Running

Weight Training

PE 155 - Colliton, James G. (Gavin)

Weight Training

Weight Training

PE 155 - Berlin, Jonathan S. (Jon)

Weight Training

Team Sports

PE 157 - Clancy, Christine K. / Cale, Kylie M.

This course involves basketball, volleyball, and soccer which will take up three quarters of the course. The fourth component will be any combination of team games/sports from the following: Team Handball, Softball, Ultimate Frisbee, kickball, and other games. Students will learn the fundamentals of each sport, including how to play and officiate.

Tennis

PE 158B - Detwiler, David A. / Friedman, Jay

Beginning and intermediate tennis.

Tennis

PE 158I - Ness, Erin G. / Churchill, Samuel R. (Sam)

Beginning and intermediate tennis.

Badminton

PE 159 - Phillips, Steven A.

Badminton

Badminton

PE 159 - Shearer, Nathan W.

Badminton

Racquetball

PE 162 - Jones, Lucas E.

Racquetball

Racquetball

PE 162 - O'Brien, Brendan W.

Racquetball

Squash

PE 166 - Spalding, Brandon P.

Squash

Squash

PE 166 - LeRose, Garrett M.

Squash

Mountain Biking

PE 176 - Piranian, Rolf G.

Mountain Biking. Special fees apply .

Scuba

PE 185 - Dick, James

Special fees apply . An introduction to the underwater world of SCUBA Diving, including classroom, pool-session, and open-water components. Students learn about dive equipment, the science of diving, responsible diving practices, and the environment. Practice time enhances students' safety and comfort and training is completed with a minimum of five open-water dives. Successful completion results in lifetime open-water diver certification from NAUI, www.naui.com . Diving instruction is provided by Nags Head Diving of Manteo, North Carolina.

Sports Psychology

PE 306 - Singleton, Michael J. (Mike)

An examination of both theory and application of sport psychology. Students gain an understanding of the psychological principles and theories that apply to sport and learn how to use this knowledge in an applied setting when working with teams or athletes. Major areas of focus include personality theory, attribution theory, group cohesion, imagery, goal orientation and motivation, goal setting, and imagery.

Women's Health: Food, Fitness, and Fertility

PE 325 - Orrison, Wendy C.

This course focuses on women's health and alternative ways health can be achieved. Students gain the knowledge and tools necessary to prepare them for a lifetime of health and wellness, including examinations of political, social, and medical pressures which may influence a woman's ability to "be well." Students examine a wellness wheel and establish fitness, emotional, spiritual and social goals that they develop and implement through the course of the term. Literature and research are examined to explore the typical American diet. Food pyramids, nutrition labels, supplements and cooking classes are provided and examined in an effort to make healthy food choices. Students fully explore topics of women's fertility and sexual health, including but not limited to infertility, home birth, birth control, sexually transmitted infections, and sexual and nonsexual relationships. Guest lecturers, yoga, and field trips to local farms and vendors enhance our reading and discussions.

PE Graduation Requirement Complete

PE XXX - Dittman, D. Scott (Scott)

Administrative designation of the completion of the Physical Education requirement for graduation. Credit is awarded by the University Registrar with a composite grade upon completion of all required 100- or 200-level PE skills courses.

Ethics of War

PHIL 248 - Smith, Angela M. (Angie)

An investigation of important ethical issues concerning the justification, conduct, and consequences of war. The course concentrates, in particular, on traditional just war theory and on recent challenges that have been raised to the central tenets of this theory in light of the rise of terrorism and "asymmetric conflict" (i.e., conflicts waged between state and non-state parties), on the one hand, and reflection upon the moral responsibility of individuals who choose to support or participate in unjust wars, on the other. We address questions such as the following: Should we regard all combatants in war as having the same moral status, regardless of whether they are fighting for a "just cause"? Is it ever morally permissible to attack non-combatants? Is terrorism ever morally justified? Is torture ever morally justified? Is there a moral obligation to engage in humanitarian intervention to stop genocide? Can the conditions of war constitute an excusing condition for acts of moral atrocity?

Philosophy and Science Fiction

PHIL 272 - Goldberg, Nathaniel J.

Discussion of one or more major works in science fiction and in philosophy that explore related themes.

Stellar Evolution and Cosmology

PHYS 151 - Sukow, David W.

An introduction to the physics and astronomy of stellar systems and the universe. Topics include the formation and lifecycle of stars, stellar systems, galaxies, and the universe as a whole according to "Big Bang" cosmology. Observational aspects of astronomy are also emphasized, including optics and telescopes, star maps, and knowledge of constellations. Geometry, trigonometry algebra and logarithms are used in the course. Laboratory course.

Intelligence in Practice

POL 276 - Cantey, Joseph M., Jr. (Seth)

This course examines the responsibilities of, and challenges faced by, today's intelligence community (IC). Drawing on current literature and case studies, topics include intelligence collection and analysis, ethical and moral issues, oversight and accountability, covert action, and the increasing role of "cyber" in espionage. Through an intelligence lens, we explore the rise of al Qaeda and the global jihadist movement, the run-up to 9/11, intelligence failures (and successes) associated with the Iraq war and the Arab Spring, and the role of the IC in future scenario planning. One week is spent in and around Washington, DC, where we tour the National Spy Museum, meet with intelligence officials, and visit other intelligence-related sites.

Topics in Politics and Film

POL 292 - LeBlanc, Robin M.

This course examines how film and television present political issues and themes. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Special Topics in American Politics

POL 295 - Bragaw, Stephen G.

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Special Topics in Global Politics

POL 296 - O'Dell, Wesley B. (Wes)

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, POL 296-01: Special Topic in Global Politics: The Final Frontier: The Politics of Space Exploration and Colonization (4). Prerequisite: POL 105 or instructor consent. This course introduces students to the practical and theoretical politics of space exploration. Topics range from the global political importance of the historical space race to the public policy challenges of contemporary space flight to the speculative political forms that will shape human colonization efforts. Conceptually, students consider the place of contemporary institutions and ideas such as democracy, the United Nations, and the balance of power in a global politics that extends beyond Earth. Scholarly readings from political science and history are supplemented by works of science fiction as well as material from the field of futures studies. (SS2) O'Dell .

Seminar in Political Philosophy

POL 396 - Gray, Stuart J., Jr. (Stu)

An examination of selected questions and problems in political philosophy and/or political theory. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Washington Term Program

POL 466 - Connelly, William F., Jr. (Bill)

The Washington Term Program aims to enlarge students' understanding of national politics and governance. Combining the practical experience of a Washington internship with academic study, it affords deeper insight into the processes and problems of government at the national level. A member of the politics faculty is the resident director, supervising students enrolled in this program while they are in Washington, D.C.

Special Topics in Poverty Studies

POV 296 - Brotzman, Kelly L.

An intensive, in-depth examination of particular thinkers, approaches, policies or debates in the field of poverty and human capability studies.

Spring 2017, POV 296-01: Special Topics in Poverty Studies: Profit and Punishment (4). Prerequisite: Instructor consent. This course is taught in a classroom at Augusta Correctional Center in Craigsville, VA. Students attend class together with prisoners who are pursuing higher education while in custody at the center. The punishment sector is large and profitable. This includes not just private prisons but also accessory services such as telephone and commissary services in prisons and jails, contracts for correctional medicine and transportation, and private bail and probation companies. Students in this course examine how the carceral apparatus, which impoverishes so many, simultaneously generates substantial market benefits. We analyze individual companies (Global Tel Link, Corizon, Securus, Geo, etc.) ethically and economically and consider related business-ethics topics such as prison labor and lethal-injection drug manufacturing. We consider whether and how market incentives can or should be removed from the punishment industry. (SS5) Brotzman .

Health Neuroscience

PSYC 216 - Schreiber, William B.

This seminar provides an introduction to the scientific study of physical and mental health using research methods in neuroscience. We examine the effects of exercise on the brain (from the cellular/molecular to systems-level perspective), how neuroplasticity contributes to both the etiology and treatment of neurological and psychological conditions. and extensively discuss the effects of stress on the brain. The course features comprehensive readings of popular psychology/neuroscience books, as well as empirical reports and reviews published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. A background in neuroscience is recommended. as well as  additional experience with psychology and/or biology prior to enrollment.

Science and Policy

PSYC 280 - Lorig, Tyler S.

Students in this course adopt the role of consultants for a hypothetical legislator who must make a decision on a matter of public policy. A clear understanding of the scientific background and consequences of the policy must inform the legislator's decision. Each student works as a part of the consulting team and creates a document on a narrow aspect of the science related to the public policy. The policy being evaluated changes each term. Examples include: funding for mental health care, enactment or suspension of motorcycle helmet laws, establishing or abolishing court awards for mental suffering, and similar topics. Topic for Spring 2017: Mental Health and Gun Violence. Students examine and offer advice on issues related to gun violence and mental health. This is a controversial and complex issue currently receiving attention in Congress. After their own explorations and discussions of this issue and hearing from several experts on this topic, students prepare a white paper with their recommendations for public policy. Lorig.

Spring-Term Topics in Psychology

PSYC 296 - Kreiss, Deborah S. (Deb)

Topics and prerequisites vary with instructor and term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, PSYC 296-01: Spring Term Topics in Psychology: Psychopharmacology (4). Prerequisite: One course chosen from PSYC 110, PSYC 111, PSYC 150, and NEUR 120. This course explores the major neurotransmitter systems in the brain and the mechanisms by which the chemical systems can be manipulated through use of pharmacological agents (i.e., drugs). We address the effects of drugs at the molecular, cellular, and circuit levels, and examine the influence of drugs upon the behavior of those with and without psychological disorders, including the influences of socio-cultural norms, the media, and the legal system upon use of drugs in our society. Students collaborate in conducting a novel research experiment concerning the behavior of rats in an animal model of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. The course features readings from empirical reports and reviews published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, as well as material from lay sources such as popular books and films. (SS3) Kreiss.

Spring-Term Topics in Psychology

PSYC 296 - Scherschel, Heather M.

Topics and prerequisites vary with instructor and term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, PSYC 296-02: Spring Term Topics in Psychology: Psychology of Self-Control (4). This seminar focuses on understanding different theoretical approaches to self-control, critically analyzing the research applying these self-control models to different behavioral domains, and evaluating the effectiveness of self-control interventions based on their theoretical assumptions. Students evaluate and apply the theories through empirical reports and reviews published in peer-reviewed scientific journals and popular-press articles. Students also apply what they are learning in class to themselves through a self-directed behavior change program and to the world around them through application assignments. (SS3). Scherschel .

Caste at the Intersection of Economy, Religion, and Law

REL 246 - Silwal, Shikha B. / Lubin, Timothy (Tim)

Social stratification touches every aspect of life, and South Asia's traditional caste structure is a special case: this highly complex, strictly-adhered-to system has been religiously legitimized and criticized over a 3,000-year history, and is nowadays seen as being at odds with the modern world. Yet it remains a crucial factor in social identity, economic roles, legal status, and religious practice. This course offers a 360-degree survey of caste both historically and in practice today in Nepal. The course addresses four themes, respectively providing for each a combination of historical background, social scientific analysis of the modern situation, and direct field experience for the students.

Visions and Beliefs in the West of Ireland

REL 387 - Brown, Alexandra R. (Alex) / Conner, Marc C.

This course immerses the student in the literature, religious traditions, history, and culture of Ireland. The primary focus of the course is on Irish literary expressions and religious beliefs and traditions, from the pre-historic period to the modem day, with a particular emphasis on the modem (early 20th-century) Irish world. Readings are coordinated with site visits, which range from prehistoric and Celtic sites to early and medieval Christian sites to modem Irish life. Major topics and authors include Yeats and Mysticism, St. Brendan's Pilgrimage, Folklore and Myth, Lady Gregory and Visions, Religion in Irish Art, the Blasket Island storytellers, the Mystic Island, and others.

Field Methods in Archaeology

SOAN 210 - Gaylord, Donald A.

Fieldwork in archaeology. The student participates in all phases of ongoing archaeological projects. With the supervision of the instructor, students may take SOAN 210 more than once. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Peoples of Central Europe Through Literature and Film

SOAN 225 - Jasiewicz, Krzysztof

This course provides basic information about the citizens of the Central European nations of Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary. The beliefs, attitudes, and value systems of the people of Central Europe are studied using core textbook readings supplemented by feature films, video materials, novels, short stories, plays, and poetry. Class discussions focus on interpreting these works of art in the context of comparative, historical-sociological analysis of the Polish, Czech, and Hungarian cultures and societies.

Special Topics in Sociology

SOAN 290 - Chin, Lynn G. (Lynny)

A discussion of a series of topics of sociological concern. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, SOAN 290-01: Health and Inequality: An Introduction to Medical Sociology (4). No prerequisite, but SOAN 102 is recommended. An introduction to sociological perspectives of health and illness, with an underlying premise that social factors, not just biological ones, influence health outcomes. We examine diverse topics such as the social organization of medicine, inequalities in health, and health care reform. In each topic, we always consider health, medicine/medical care, and illness as social phenomena. We focus on how the structure of our everyday environments can affect our health-both through macro-level institutions, such as how we shape our health care system impacts the delivery of care, to micro-level interactions, such as how doctor-patient interactions may vary with socioeconomic status, gender, race/ethnicity, and nationality. In doing so, we consider the social organization of health, illness and medicine that go beyond differential access to medical care. Some of the questions we address include: How is the medical profession changing? What are the pros and cons of market-driven medicine? Does class have an enduring impact on health outcomes? Is it true that we are what our friends eat? Can unconscious racial biases affect the quality of care for people of different ethnicities? Chin.

Special Topics in Anthropology

SOAN 291 - Bell, Alison K.

A discussion of a series of topics of anthropological concern. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2017, SOAN 291-02: Domains of The Dead: Anthropologies of Cemeteries (4). This course teaches students how to think anthropologically about cemeteries, querying them in theory-grounded, systematic, testable ways for information about past and current people's social relations, cultural dispositions, values, beliefs, and aspirations. Assigned readings expose students to key theoretical texts from the anthropology of death and mourning as well as to historical surveys of cemeteries as they vary throughout the United States. Of special interest in the course is the recently documented proliferation of idiosyncratic forms of commemoration diverging considerably from previous centuries of more somber practice. Examples of this florescence and of its more restrained predecessors abound in the Valley of Virginia, and students investigate first-hand a range of cemeteries in Rockbridge, Augusta, and Rockingham Counties. Students record decorative motifs and epitaphs on gravestones as well as objects left on gravesites and work to read them as evidence of cultural expression and change. (SS4) Bell.

Medieval Spanish Cultures in Context

SPAN 312 - Bailey, Matthew J.

Spring Term Abroad course . Muslims, Jews, and Christians co-existed for eight-hundred years on the Iberian Peninsula. This course examines these diverse cultures through the texts (literary, historical, religious, and philosophical), the art, and the architecture from the period prior to the arrival of the Arabs in 711, up to and beyond the expulsion of the Jews in 1492. The objective of the course is to glean from the remnants of the experience of their co-existence insights into their distinctive characteristics and how they understood and influenced each other.

Workshop in Literary Translation

SPAN 393 - Barnett, Jeffrey C. (Jeff)

An intensive workshop devoted to the practical application, methods, and theories of literary translation. Students collaborate to produce artistic renderings of literary texts into the target language in a workshop-style setting. Preliminary attention is given to English-to-Spanish narrative as well as Spanish-to-English poetry. The primary activity involves the collaborative production of an original translation of a previously non-translated Spanish short story into English.

Special Effects for Theater

THTR 236 - Collins, Owen

In this hands-on, project-based course, students apply the process of iterative design and use critical thinking to provide creative solutions to solve the artistic effects required to tell stories in theater. Starting with textual analysis of given scripts, students develop the parameters required for various effects, figure out a process to create those effects, and make them.

University Theater III

THTR 309 - Evans, Shawn Paul

Participation in a university theater production for a minimum of 50 hours. A journal recording the production process is required.