Women's and Gender Studies Minor Requirements

Women's and Gender Studies minor

A minor in women's and gender studies requires completion of 21 credits. In meeting the requirements of this interdisciplinary minor, a student may not use more than nine credits that are also used to meet the requirements of any other major or minor.

  1. Introduction: WGS 120, completed by the end of the sophomore year
  2. Distribution: 15 credits selected from the following, with at least one course from each of the two areas. Additional courses may be used when the topic is relevant and the Women's and Gender Studies Committee approves.
    1. Social and Natural Sciences: ANTH 275; BIOL 255; POL 251 (SOAN 251), 255; PSYC 215, 262, 269; SOAN 251 (POL 251), 280, SPAN 323, and WGS 296; and when appropriate, ANTH 290
    2. Humanities and other disciplines: ARTH 367; ENGL 261, 312, 313, 320, 358, 359; HIST 257, 258, 385; LIT 220; PHIL 215, 216, 219, 235, 259; REL 132, 215; THTR 250; and, when appropriate, ENGL 250, 380; FREN 331, 397; LATN 326; SPAN 397 and 398, and WGS 295
  3. Capstone experience (after the completion of all other requirements): WGS 396 or another relevant individual study, senior thesis, or honors thesis in the student's major approved by the program committee.
  1. Introduction:
    • WGS 120 - Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies and Feminist Theory

      FDR: HU
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      This course introduces students to the fields of feminist theory and women's and gender studies by focusing on key theoretical concepts and surveying a range of topics that have been central to the academic study of women and gender. Such topics are likely to include the family as a social institution, gender in the workplace, beauty norms, violence against women, the history of feminist activism, and/or women's achievements in traditionally male-dominated fields such as sports, art, science, or literature. Students learn to approach such topics using gender as an analytical tool that intersects in complex ways with other categories of social power, such as race, class, and sexuality. The course is interdisciplinary in approach and presents a plurality of feminist perspectives in order to offer a rich understanding of the development of feminist thought over the past several decades. Course assignments encourage students to use such thought to analyze their other academic pursuits, as well as the non-academic environments in which they live, including thinking critically about their own experiences as women and men in contemporary society.

    • completed by the end of the sophomore year
  2. Distribution:
  3. 15 credits selected from the following, with at least one course from each of the two areas. Additional courses may be used when the topic is relevant and the Women’s and Gender Studies Committee approves.

    • Social and Natural Sciences:
      • SOAN 275 - Feminist Anthropology

        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2014 and alternate years
        Credits: 3


        This course covers the complex and sometimes "awkward" relationship between feminism and anthropology. We explore topics such as the place of feminist theory and politics within the discipline of anthropology, the problems involved in being a feminist and an anthropologist, and the creation of feminist ethnography.

      • BIOL 255 - Reproductive Physiology

        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 113.

        An examination of sex as a biological phenomenon with consideration of the genetic (chromosomal), embryological, endocrine, and neurological bases of sexual development, differentiation, and identity.

      • POL 251 - Social Movements (SOAN 251)

        FDR: SS4
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisites: POL 100, 105 or 111 or instructor consent.

        A survey of American social movements, including an evaluation of competing theoretical approaches to the study of social movements and an examination of the strategies, successes, failures, and political and social consequences of the civil rights, labor, student, and women's movements. Close attention is given to factors contributing to the rise and decline of these

      • POL 255 - Gender and Politics

        FDR: SS2
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: POL 100, 105 or 111 or instructor consent.

        This course investigates the gendered terms under which women and men participate in political life. Attention is given to the causes of men's and women's different patterns of participation in politics, to processes that are likely to decrease the inequalities between men's and women's political power, and the processes by which society's gender expectations shape electoral and institutional politics. The different effects of gender on the practice of politics in different nations are compared, with a special emphasis placed on advanced industrial democracies.

      • PSYC 215 - Seminar in Evolutionary Psychology

        FDR: SS3
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Spring 2015 and alternate years
        Credits: 4


        Prerequisite: PSYC 111, 112, 113, or 114.

        The purpose of this course is to examine evolutionary theory as a means of explaining human behavior. The main premise is that behaviors such as cooperation, aggression, mate selection, and intelligence exist because individuals exhibiting these behaviors were more likely to produce healthy offspring that perpetuated those behaviors (i.e., natural selection). We evaluate the validity of this argument in a number of areas of human behavior and also discuss how culture has shaped our genes. Evolutionary psychology is not an area of psychology, like social psychology or cognitive psychology, but is instead a lens through which all human behavior can be explained. Though it is tempting to engage in "arm chair" application of evolutionary theory to behavior, this is a science course; all arguments must be backed up with data.

      • PSYC 262 - Gender-Role Development

        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisites: PSYC 113, PSYC 250 or WGS 120.

        This course provides the student with an overview of gender-role development: How do children learn to be boys and girls? What role do biological factors play in different behaviors of boys and girls? Does society push boys and girls in different directions? We discuss children's evolving ideas about gender, and what can be done to change these ideas (or whether they need to be changed at all). Through the examination of these questions and issues, the course introduces students to the major theories of gender-role development, the research methods used to measure children's gender-role behaviors and attitudes, and the current research in the field.

      • PSYC 269 - Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination

        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisites: PSYC 114 and PSYC 250 (as co-req or pre-req) or instructor consent.

        This course examines cognitive and affective processes involved in stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Causes and social implications of prejudice involving various stigmatized groups (e.g., African-Americans, women, homosexuals, people of low socioeconomic status, overweight individuals) are examined. Participants focus on attitudes and behaviors of both perpetrators and targets of prejudice that likely contribute to and result from social inequality.

      • SOAN 251 - Social Movements (POL 251)

        FDR: SS4
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisites: POL 100, 105 or 111 or instructor consent.

        A survey of American social movements, including an evaluation of competing theoretical approaches to the study of social movements and an examination of the strategies, successes, failures, and political and social consequences of the civil rights, labor, student, and women's movements. Close attention is given to factors contributing to the rise and decline of these movements.

      • SOAN 280 - Gender and Sexuality

        FDR: SS4
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter
        Credits: 3


        An anthropological and sociological investigation of sex roles in preliterate and modern societies. Special consideration is given to the role of innate sexual differences, cultural variation, technology, and power in determining patterns of male dominance. Emphasis is placed on real and mythical female and male power in the context of changing relationships between men and women in American society.

      • WGS 296 - Social Science Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and faculty resources permit
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: Depending on the topic, WGS 120 or instructor consent.

        A topical seminar that focuses on an interdisciplinary examination of a singular theme and/or geographic region relevant to the overall understanding of Women's and Gender Studies, such as Men and Masculinities. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      • and when appropriate,
      • SOAN 291 - Special Topics in Anthropology

        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit
        Credits: 3


        A discussion of a series of topics of anthropological concern. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

    • Humanities and other disciplines:
      • ARTH 367 - Seminar on Women Artists

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Not offered in 2013-2014
        Credits: 4


        An intensive exploration of the roles women artists have played in the history of western art from the renaissance to the present. Special attention is given to the strategies women used for survival and success, and to contemporary theoretical approaches to the subject. Lectures, discussions, readings, papers, and a research project.

      • ENGL 261 - Reading Gender

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

        A course on using gender as a tool of literary analysis. We study the ways ideas about masculinity and femininity inform and are informed by poetry, short stories, novels, plays, films, and/or pop culture productions. Also includes readings in feminist theory about literary interpretation and about the ways gender intersects with other social categories, including race, ethnicity, sexuality, and class. Historical focus will vary according to professor's areas of interest and expertise. We study novels, poems, stories, and films that engage with what might be considered some major modern myths of gender: popular fairy tales. We focus at length upon the Cinderella and Red Riding Hood stories but also consider versions of several additional tales, always with the goal of analyzing the particular ideas about women and men, girls and boys, femininity and masculinity that both underlie and are produced by specific iterations of these familiar stories.

      • ENGL 312 - Gender, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2014 and alternate years
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

        A study of the complex nexus of gender, love, and marriage in medieval legal, theological, political, and cultural discourses. Reading an eclectic range of texts--such as romance, hagiography, fabliau, (auto)biography, conduct literature, and drama--we consider questions of desire, masculinity, femininity, and agency, as well as the production and maintenance of gender roles and of emotional bonds within medieval conjugality. Authors include Chaucer, Chretien de Troyes, Heldris of Cornwall, Andreas Cappellanus, Margery Kempe, and Christine de Pisan. Readings in Middle English or in translation. No prior knowledge of medieval languages necessary.

      • ENGL 313 - Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2014 and alternate years
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

        This course considers the primary work on which Chaucer's reputation rests: The Canterbury Tales. We pay sustained attention to Chaucer's Middle English at the beginning of the semester to ease the reading process. Then we travel alongside the Canterbury pilgrims as they tell their tales under the guise of a friendly competition. The Canterbury Tales is frequently read as a commentary on the social divisions in late medieval England, such as the traditional estates, religious professionals and laity, and gender hierarchies. But despite the Tales' professed inclusiveness of the whole of English society, Chaucer nonetheless focuses inordinately on those individuals from the emerging middle classes. Our aim is to approach the Tales from the practices of historicization and theorization; that is, we both examine Chaucer's cultural and historical contexts and consider issues of religion, gender, sexuality, marriage, conduct, class, chivalry, courtly love, community, geography, history, power, spirituality, secularism, traditional authority, and individual experience. Of particular importance are questions of voicing and writing, authorship and readership. Lastly, we think through Chaucer's famous Retraction at the "end" of The Canterbury Tales, as well as Donald R. Howard's trenchant observation that the Tale is "unfinished but complete." What does it mean for the father of literary "Englishness" to end his life's work on the poetic principle of unfulfilled closure and on the image of a society on the move?

      • ENGL 320 - Shakespearean Genres

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall in alternate years
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

        In a given term, this course focuses on one or two of the major genres explored by Shakespeare (e.g., histories, tragedies, comedies, tragicomedies/romances, lyric and narrative poetry), in light of Renaissance literary conventions and recent theoretical approaches. Students consider the ways in which Shakespeare's generic experiments are variably inflected by gender, by political considerations, by habitat, and by history.

      • ENGL 358 - Literature by Women Before 1800

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

        A study of poetry, narrative, and drama written in English by women before 1800. Texts, topics, and historical emphasis may vary, but the course addresses the relation of gender to authorship; considers particular constraints and liberties encountered by women writers; and examines how women's literary productions reflect and participate in constructing their material and social circumstances.

      • ENGL 359 - Literature by Women of Color

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

        This course focuses on the intersection of race and gender as they meet in the lives and identities of contemporary women of color via literature: African-Americans, Native Americans, Chicanas, Asian-Americans, and mixed bloods, or 'mestizas.' Our readings, discussions and writings focus on the work that "coming to voice" does for women of color, and for our larger society and world. Students read a variety of poetry, fiction, and autobiography in order to explore some of the issues most important to and about women of color: identity, histories, diversity, resistance and celebration. Literary analyses-i.e., close readings, explications and interpretations-are key strategies for understanding these readings.

      • HIST 257 - History of Women in America, 1609-1870

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2015 and alternate years
        Credits: 3


        An examination of women's social, political, cultural and economic positions in America through the immediate post-Civil War. Changes in women's education, legal status, position in the family, and participation in the work force with emphasis on the diversity of women's experience, especially the manner in which class and race influenced women's lives. The growth of organized women's rights.

      • HIST 258 - History of Women in America, 1870 to the Present

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2014 and alternate years
        Credits: 3


        A survey of some of the major topics and themes in American women's lives from the mid-19th century to the present, including domestic and family roles, economic contributions, reproductive experience, education, suffrage, and the emergence of the contemporary feminist movement. The influence on women's roles, behavior, and consciousness by the social and economic changes accompanying industrialization and urbanization and by variations in women's experience caused by differences in race, class, and region.

      • ENGL 385 - Preparatory Reading for Study Abroad

        Credits: 1
        Planned Offering: Winter
        Credits: 1


        Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

        Seminar in reading preliminary to study abroad.

      • LIT 220 - Modern Chinese Literature in Translation

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: Completion of FW FDR requirement.

        This is a survey course to introduce students to the literature of 20th-century China. Through close reading of key literary texts from the 1910s to the present, students explore the social, historical and literary background that gave rise to the texts studied and the ways in which these texts address various issues that China faced at the time. Taught in English, the course presupposes no previous knowledge of China or Chinese culture. In addition to the selected literary texts, the course introduces several feature films that are cinematic adaptations of modern Chinese fiction and explore the complex and dynamic interchange between literary and cinematic language.

      • PHIL 235 - Beauvoir and The Second Sex

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 4
        Planned Offering: Spring 2014 and alternate years
        Credits: 4


        The Second Sex (1949) is Simone de Beauvoir's most well-known work in philosophy. It is a deep and urgent meditation on a true hope that is still elusive for many of us: to become, in every sense. one's own. It weaves together philosophy, history, social studies, economics, and biology to analyze the notion of "woman" and to explore the making and the power of gender and sexuality. Newly translated, The Second Sex is an important philosophical and political document about inequality and enforced otherness. In this course, we read this text together with recent work in the field and discuss it both as an important historical document and as a still relevant work on our gendered being in the world.

      • PHIL 242 - Social Inequality and Fair Opportunity

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter
        Credits: 3


        An exploration of the different range of opportunities available to various social groups, including racial, ethnic and sexual minorities, women, and the poor. Topics include how to define fair equality of opportunity; the social mechanisms that play a role in expanding and limiting opportunity; legal and group-initiated strategies aimed at effecting fair equality of opportunity and the theoretical foundations of these strategies; as well as an analysis of the concepts of equality, merit and citizenship, and their value to individuals and society.

      • PHIL 244 - Feminist Social and Political Philosophy

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2012 and alternate years
        Credits: 3


        This course critically examines the gender norms that pervade our identities, govern our everyday behavior, and organize our social life. Questions addressed may include: What is gender? In what ways does it affect the quality of women's and men's lives? Is gender difference natural? Is it valuable? Can it contribute to, or interfere with, human flourishing? Can a gendered society be just? What can any of us do to promote good relations among women and men?

      • PHIL 246 - Philosophy of Sex

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall
        Credits: 3


        This course explores questions related to contemporary conceptions of sexuality and its proper role in our lives. Questions addressed include: What is the purpose of sex? Are sexual practices subject to normative evaluation on grounds of morality, aesthetics, and/or capacity to promote a flourishing human life? We consider the relation between sex and both intimacy and pleasure, viewed from the perspective of heterosexual women and men, and gay men and lesbians. What are our sexual practices and attitudes toward sex? What should they be like?

      • PHIL 254 - Philosophy of the Family

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2015 and alternate years
        Credits: 3


        This course considers philosophical issues raised by family as a social institution and as a legal institution. Topics addressed include the social and personal purposes served by the institution of family, the nature of relationships between family members, the various forms that family can take, the scope of family privacy or autonomy, and how family obligations, mutual support, and interdependency affect individual members of families.

      • REL 132 - God and Goddess in Hinduism

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2016 and alternate years
        Credits: 3


        This course explores the many ways in which Hindus visualize and talk about the divine and its manifestations in the world through mythic stories, use of images in worship, explanations of the nature of the soul and body in relation to the divine, and the belief in human embodiments of the divine in Hindu holy men and women. Topics include: the religious meanings of masculine and feminine in the divine and human contexts; the idea of local, family, and "chosen" divinities; and differing forms of Hindu devotion for men and women.

      • REL 215 - Female and Male in Western Religious Traditions

        FDR: HU
        Credits: 3
        Credits: 3


        An investigation of views about the body, human sexuality, and gender in Western religious traditions, especially Judaism and Christianity, and of the influences of these views both on the religious traditions themselves and on the societies in which they develop. The course focuses on religion and society in antiquity and the Middle Ages, but also considers the continuing influence of religious constructions of the body and sexuality on succeeding generations to the present.

      • SPAN 323 - Golden Age Spanish Women Writers

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall 2017 and every third year
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: SPAN 220 and SPAN 275.

        A study of the comedia and the novela corta and the manner in which the secular women writers inscribe themselves within and beyond these genres. Close reading and discussion of representative works that may include the short stories and plays by María de Zayas, Ana Caro, Leonor de Meneses, Mariana de Carvajal, and Angela de Azevedo.

      • THTR 250 - Women in Contemporary Theater

        FDR: HA
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2013 and alternate years
        Credits: 3


        This course explores the contemporary theater scene, investigating its plays, playwrights, directors and actors. The representation of women in theatrical art, as well as the unique contributions of contemporary women as artists, theorists and audiences, provides the principal focus of study. Traditional critical and historical approaches to the material are complemented by play reading, play attendance, oral presentations, writing assignments, journal writing and the creation of individual performance pieces.

      • and when appropriate:
      • ENGL 250 - Medieval and Early Modern British Literature

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2014 and alternate years
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

        This course is a survey of English literature from the Early Middle Ages to the Early Modern period. We read works in various genres--verse, drama, and prose--and understand their specific cultural and historical contexts. We also examine select modern film adaptations of canonical works as part of the evolving history of critical reception.

      • ENGL 380 - Advanced Seminar

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3 in fall or winter, 4 in spring
        Planned Offering: Fall, Winter, Spring
        Credits: 3 in fall or winter, 4 in spring


        Prerequisite: ENGL 299. Enrollment limited.

        A seminar course on a topic, genre, figure, or school (e.g. African-American women's literature, epic film, Leslie Marmon Silko, feminist literary theory) with special emphasis on research and discussion. The topic will be limited in scope to permit study in depth. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

        Fall 2014 topics:

        ENGL 380-01: Advanced Seminar: Cormac McCarthy (3). A study of selected works by one of America's most renowned post-modern authors, who treats shocking subjects in an inimitable style. McCarthy has developed gradually over the last 50 years from a struggling writer and auto parts worker too poor to buy toothpaste to a number one box office draw, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, eager candidate for the Nobel Prize, and author of a major motion picture. Our key questions: Why is McCarthy so famous now? How does he do it? What do his works say to us that we are drawn to hear? (HL) Smout. Fall 2014

        ENGL 380-02: Advanced Seminar: Celluloid Shakespeare (3). The films adapted from or inspired by William Shakespeare's plays are a genre unto themselves. We study a selection of films, not focused on their faithfulness to the original playscript, but on the creative choices and meanings of the distinct medium of film. We see how the modern era has transmuted the plays through the lens of contemporary sensibility, politics, and culture--and through this new visual mode of storytelling. This course is very much an exploration of how to interpret and appreciate film broadly, as we learn the concepts and lexicon of film with Shakespeare as our case study. Our methods vary: sometimes we study the play in detail and compare several film versions; or we see a film fresh--without having read the play--to approach it as a work of art on its own terms; or we hear individual reports from students about additional films to expand the repertoire of films we study and enjoy. The films we view range from multiple versions of Hamlet, Macbeth, and A Midsummer Night's Dream, to adaptations of As You Like It and Henry V, to original Shakespeare-inspired films such as Forbidden Planet, A Thousand Acres, and My Own Private Idaho. (HL) Dobin. Fall 2014

        ENGL 380-04: Thrilling Tales: New North American Fiction (3). A study of 21st-century novels and short stories by North American authors. We examine the recent movement of literary fiction into genres traditionally limited to pulp writing. Texts may include: McSweeney's Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales edited by Michael Chabon; Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake; Isabel Allende's Zorro; Sherman Alexie's Flight; Octavia Butler's Fledgling; Cormac McCarthy's The Road; Junot Diaz's The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Colson Whitehead's Zone One, and Austin Grossman's Soon I Will Be Invincible. (HL) Gavaler. Fall 2014

      • FREN 331 - Etudes thématiques

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: Three courses at the 200 level.

        This course gives students a general knowledge of the evolution of French literature and ideas over the centuries through the study of one main theme. Recent offerings include: L'Exil; Regards sur la ville; Le dépaysement; Le voyage dans la literature française; L'esprit critique au XVIIIe siècle. May be repeated for degree credit if the theme is different.

      • FREN 397 - Séminaire avancé

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: Three courses at the 200 level.

        The in-depth study of a topic in French literature and/or civilization. Recent offerings include: La Littérature francophone du Maghreb; La littérature Beure; La France sous l'occupation; Les femmes et l'écriture au XVIIe siècle; Les écrivains du XXe siècle et la diversité culturelle; L'affaire Dreyfus. Students are encouraged to use this course for the development of a personal project. May be repeated for degree credit when the topics are different.

        Fall 2014 topic:

        FREN 397: Séminaire avancé: La France sous l'occupation (3). Prerequisite: Three courses at the 200 level or instructor consent. A study of the German occupation of France (1939-44). This multidisciplinary, multimedia course focuses on the choices, be they military, political, economic, ethical, or a mere matter of survival, that faced the French during this bleak period, and the traces it left in memory, institutions and the arts. (HL) Frégnac-Clave

      • LATN 326 - The Poetry of Ovid

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Winter 2015
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: LATN 202 or instructor consent.

        Readings from the masterpieces of Ovid's poetry, including one or more of the following: The Metamorphoses (a grand mythological epic), The Fasti (festivals and the Roman calendar), The Heroides (fictional letters written by mythological heroines, Ars Amatoria and Amores (love poetry) and Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto (his poetry from exile). Topic varies by term but course may be taken only once.

      • SPAN 397 - Peninsular Seminar

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisites: SPAN 220 and SPAN 275.

        A seminar focusing on a single period, genre, motif, or writer. The specific topic will be determined jointly according to student interest and departmental approval. Recent topics have included "The Female Voice in Hispanic Literature," "19th- and 20th-Century Spanish drama," "Women Writers of the Golden Age," and "Romanticism and the Generation of '98." May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

        Fall 2014 topic:

        SPAN 397: Peninsular Seminar: Medieval Spanish Literature. (3): Prerequisites: SPAN 220 and SPAN 275. This course surveys the major works of Medieval Spanish literature, taking into account the widest possible sampling of literary forms and authors, from the first literary text in Castilian Spanish, Cantar de mio Cid (c. 1207), Galician-Portuguese lyric poetry, Marian miracle stories, wisdom literature, satirical verse, pre-Renaissance love lyric, and the parody of courtly-love drama La Celestina (1499). The texts are read in their original language, with translations to English and vocabulary aids to assist in comprehension as needed. (HL) Bailey.

      • SPAN 398 - Spanish-American Seminar

        FDR: HL
        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisites:SPAN 240 and SPAN 275.

        A seminar focusing on a single period, genre, motif, or writer. Recent topics have included "Spanish American Women Writers: From America into the 21st Century," "20th Century Latin America Theater," and "Past, Memory, and Identity in Contemporary Argentina's Cultural Products." May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      • WGS 295 - Humanities Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

        Credits: 3
        Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and faculty resources permit
        Credits: 3


        Prerequisite: Depending on the topic, WGS 120 or instructor consent.

        A topical seminar that focuses on an interdisciplinary examination of a singular theme and/or geographic region relevant to the overall understanding of Women's and Gender Studies, such as Hispanic Feminisms. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

  4. Capstone experience (after the completion of all other requirements):
    • WGS 396 - Advanced Seminar in Women's and Gender Studies

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and faculty re-sources permit
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: WGS 120, junior or senior standing, or instructor consent.

      This course provides an opportunity for advanced students to explore in detail some aspect of women's studies. Specific topics may vary and may be determined, in part, by student interest. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

    • or another relevant individual study, senior thesis, or honors thesis in the student’s major approved by the program committee.