Course Offerings

Fall 2016

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

American National Government

POL 100 - Bragaw, Stephen G.

A study of the constitutional origins and historical development of the national government with special attention to Congress, the presidency, the judiciary, and the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media in the policy process.

American National Government

POL 100 - Bragaw, Stephen G.

A study of the constitutional origins and historical development of the national government with special attention to Congress, the presidency, the judiciary, and the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media in the policy process.

Introduction to Global Politics

POL 105 - Dickovick, James T. (Tyler)

A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.

Introduction to Global Politics

POL 105 - Dickovick, James T. (Tyler)

A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.

Introduction to Global Politics

POL 105 - Williams, Thomas M.

A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.

Introduction to Global Politics

POL 105 - Williams, Thomas M.

A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.

Introduction to Global Politics

POL 105 - Le Blanc, Robin M.

A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.

Introduction to Political Philosophy

POL 111 - Gray, Stuart J., Jr. (Stu)

An introduction to some of the perennial themes of politics, such as the relationship between human nature and political institutions, individual freedom and community, private conscience and civic virtue, the claims of reason and faith, the nature of law, obligation, and rights, among others. Our inquiry is guided by selections from influential works in the history of political thought, ancient, modern and contemporary, as well as plays, dialogues, comedies, tragedies, novels, and films. Consult with instructor for specific reading assignments and course requirements.

Introduction to Political Philosophy

POL 111 - Morel, Lucas E.

An introduction to some of the perennial themes of politics, such as the relationship between human nature and political institutions, individual freedom and community, private conscience and civic virtue, the claims of reason and faith, the nature of law, obligation, and rights, among others. Our inquiry is guided by selections from influential works in the history of political thought, ancient, modern and contemporary, as well as plays, dialogues, comedies, tragedies, novels, and films. Consult with instructor for specific reading assignments and course requirements.

State and Local Government

POL 203 - Finch, Kevin D.

An introduction to the structures and functions of United States subnational governments, with particular emphasis on the policy-making process and on the relationships between policy makers and the public. Computer-assisted analysis of survey-research data is included.

European Politics and Society

POL 245 - Jasiewicz, Krzysztof

A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.

European Politics and Society

POL 245 - Jasiewicz, Krzysztof

A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.

Latin American Politics

POL 247 - Dickovick, James T. (Tyler)

This course focuses on Latin American politics during the 20th and 21st centuries. Major topics include: democracy and authoritarianism; representation and power; populism, corporatism, socialism, and communism; and questions of poverty, inequality, and economic growth. The course places particular emphasis on the Cuban and Mexican Revolutions, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Guatemala, and Peru. In addition, the course examines political and economic relations between the United States and Latin America.

Black American Politics

POL 250 - Morel, Lucas E.

A study of important black figures in American political thought. The course focuses on the intellectual history of black Americans but also considers contemporary social science and public policies dealing with race in America.

Modern Political Philosophy

POL 266 - Gray, Stuart J., Jr. (Stu)

An examination of some of the central questions and concerns of modern political philosophy. The course is not restricted to a historical period but extends to modern themes within contemporary culture. A mixture of plays, novels, epics, dialogues, treatises, and films are used. Authors, texts, and themes vary from year to year.

Special Topics in American Government: Washington and the Arts of Leadership

POL 291 - Fuchs, Ronald / Morel, Lucas E.

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2016: POL 291-01: Special Topics in American Government: Washington and the Arts of Leadership (1). This course examines how George Washington used architecture, portraiture, clothing, and furnishings to fashion his image as a leader. Through a hands-on study of objects, such as Charles Wilson Peale's portrait of Washington in his French and Indian War uniform, the architecture of Mount Vernon, and his Chinese export porcelain dinner service with the insignia of the Society of the Cincinnati, students learn how he used objects to create an image of power and authority in a democratic society. Readings explore the public and private life of George Washington to learn how his character, principles, and politics, linked with the art of visual display, shaped the American republic. Course includes a $100 student fee to cover a 2-day trip to Washington D.C. and Mt. Veronon during Fall Reading Days. Fuchs, Morel.

Special Topics in American Politics

POL 295A - Strong, Robert A. (Bob)

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2016, POL 295A-01: Special Topics in American Government: 2016 Elections (3). Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. This course follows the major events in the 2016 U.S. presidential election while providing context and content for critical analysis of the current election cycle.  Topics include: the history of presidential selection in the American political regime, the origins and evolution of the primary/caucus nomination system, the role of media in presidential politics, the lessons learned from the presidential election of 2012, the contested issues in 2016 and the future of presidential politics following the unusual events that have occurred in the current presidential selection process.  In addition to exams, a series of short paper are assigned throughout the term. Strong.

Spring 2016, POL 295-01: Special Topics in American Government: Business, Government, and the International Economy (4). Prerequisite: POL 100 or instructor consent. This course examines the evolution of the relationship between businesses, governments, and the international economy. Emphasis is on how technological innovation has disrupted established relationships, leading to new forms of regulation, law, and competition, as well as how constitutional and legal norms shape political economy policy making. Examples are drawn from financial crises, the politics of globalization, and trade and development, with a particular focus on the post-1980 economy. (SS2) Bragaw.

Seminar in American Political Thought

POL 370 - Bragaw, Stephen G.

An examination of classic themes and current issues in American political thought. Depending on the instructor, emphases may include the Federalists, Anti-Federalists, Alexis de Tocqueville, Abraham Lincoln, and voices from the Progressive and civil rights eras. Course readings stress primary sources including speeches, essays, and books by politicians and theorists. The course explores the effort to reconcile liberty and equality, individualism and community, liberalism and republicanism, politics and religion, among other themes. The course highlights the contemporary relevance of the enduring tensions between political principles and practice.

Global Politics Seminar

POL 380A - Rush, Mark E. / Hu, Margaret

Examination of selected topics dealing with international and comparative politics. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2016, POL 380A-01: Global Issues in Big Data, Cybersurveillance, and Privacy Law (3). Co-taught as LAW 335 (2). Prerequisite: At least three credits at the 200-level in politics or instructor consent. Open to majors and non-majors. Meets the global politics field requirement in the politics major. On Mondays, the course meets on the undergraduate campus, 2:30-4:00 pm; on Wednesdays, it will meet in Sydney Lewis Hall, 2:30-4:30 pm. Taught as a joint offering between the Politics Department and the Law School, we address the legal, ethical, and political implications of the impact of technology on privacy around the world. This course entails a study of the development of privacy law in North America and the European Union, analysis of the threats posed by technological growth to individual privacy rights, and the benefits such development brings in areas such as equality rights, medicine, and criminal law. Undergraduates will undertake research projects on a topic of their choice and present their findings and their seminar papers to the class. (SS2) Rush, Hu.

Global Politics Seminar

POL 380B - Williams, Thomas M.

Examination of selected topics dealing with international and comparative politics. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2016, POL 380B-01: Global Politics Seminar: Nuclear Weapons: Strategy and Politics (3). Prerequisite: POL 105 or instructor consent. Open to majors and non-majors of all classes. Meets the global politics field requirement in the politics major. Nuclear weapons, arms control, proliferation, and terrorism pose an important and ongoing challenge to international security. This course examines basics of nuclear weapons production and delivery systems, and overview the Cold War history of the nuclear arms race, before focusing on the present-day issues of nuclear politics. Nuclear weapons affect alliances, the usefulness of conventional force, the stability of rivalries, and the possibilities for accidents or terrorism. Required written work focuses on summarizing articles and applying insights to present day issues, and students propose and carry out a research project centered on the nuclear politics of a minor nuclear state or potential proliferator. (SS2) Williams.

Seminar in Asian Politics

POL 392 - Le Blanc, Robin M.

A topical seminar focusing on Chinese politics, other Asian countries, or selected subjects in Asian politics. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2016, POL 392-01: Seminar in Asian Politics: Youth Movements in Asia (3). Prerequisites: POL 100, 105, an East Asian Studies course, or instructor consent. This seminar considers the variety of ways activism by the young has shaped contemporary politics in Asian countries. Movements studied include the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, the democracy movement in 1980s South Korea, the recent "Umbrella Movement" in Hong Kong, and various forms of peace movements in Japan, including recent protests against revisions of national security laws. Consideration is given to how movements make use of particular national and regional histories and cultural frameworks and also to how movements speak to and from global discourses about democracy and human rights. (SS2). LeBlanc .

Seminar in American Government

POL 397 - Strong, Robert A. (Bob)

Examination of selected topics in American political institutions, ideas, and processes. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2016, POL 397-01: Seminar: 2016 Elections (3). Prerequisite: POL 100. This seminar follows the major events in the 2016 U.S. presidential election while providing context and content for critical analysis of the current election cycle.  Topics include: the history of presidential selection in the American political regime, the origins and evolution of the primary/caucus nomination system, the role of media in presidential politics, the lessons learned from the presidential election of 2012, the contested issues in 2016, and the future of presidential politics following the unusual events that have occurred in the current presidential selection process.  A major research paper is required. Strong.

Honors Thesis

POL 493 - Morel, Lucas E.

Honors Thesis.

Honors Thesis

POL 493 - Gray, Stuart J., Jr. (Stu)

Honors Thesis.

Spring 2016

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Separation of Powers in the U.S. Constitution

POL 230 - Murchison, Brian C.

This course probes the origins, development, advantages, and disadvantages of the tripartite structure of the federal government, beginning with an examination of the background and text of Articles I, II, and III of the U.S. Constitution. We analyze structural explanations provided in the Federalist Papers, along with Classical and Enlightenment sources addressing the nature of political power, the problem of faction, the role of checks and balances, and the purpose of separated functions. In-depth analyses of leading U.S. Supreme Court decisions trace evolving conceptions of legislative. executive. and judicial powers along with attention to the relevance of war and economic crisis to the authority and function of each branch. In discussions of landmark decisions, students compare the legal thought of a number of Justices--John Marshall, William Howard Taft, Robert Jackson, William Brennan, Sandra Day O'Connor, Anthony Kennedy, and Antonin Scalia. We trace the creation of the so-called "fourth branch" of government--the administrative state-- and examine whether this "branch" can be reconciled with ideas of representative democracy and constitutional text. Students prepare and deliver two oral arguments based on assigned cases and write an appellate brief on a separation-of-powers topic.

Spring-Term Topics in Public Policy

POL 294 - Harris, Rebecca C.

This course is designed to give students additional expertise and awareness of discrete policy challenges in the United States. Students learn to explain current policy systems, including political institutions and political behavior by political actors. Students also formulate policy evaluations acknowledging the strengths and the weaknesses in the policy system.

Spring 2016, POL 294-01: Spring-Term Topics in Public Policy: Food Policy (4). Prerequisite: POL 100 or instructor consent. Majors in politics, economics, business, environmental studies, public health, or poverty are encouraged to take the course. This course introduces students to the institutions and politics of U.S. food-and-farm policy. Major considerations include farm-and-food policy history, tools of governance, and political issues. Specific topics include the farm bill (economics and conservation), poverty & nutrition programs, food industry regulation, and food safety. Spring term engagement includes investigative projects and policy analysis (SS2) Harris.

Special Topics in American Politics

POL 295 - Bragaw, Stephen G.

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2016, POL 295-01: Special Topics in American Government: Business, Government, and the International Economy (4). Prerequisite: POL 100 or instructor consent. This course examines the evolution of the relationship between businesses, governments, and the international economy. Emphasis is on how technological innovation has disrupted established relationships, leading to new forms of regulation, law, and competition, as well as how constitutional and legal norms shape political economy policy making. Examples are drawn from financial crises, the politics of globalization, and trade and development, with a particular focus on the post-1980 economy. (SS2) Bragaw.

Special Topics in Global Politics

POL 296 - Strong, Robert A. (Bob) / Settle, Frank A., Jr.

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2016, POL 296-01: Special Topics in Global Politics: Avoiding Armageddon: The Politics and Science of Nonproliferation (4). Prerequisite: POL 105 or instructor consent. This course, team-taught by a political scientist and a chemist, introduces students to complex technical and political issues connected to the proliferation of chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons and the possibilities that such weapons could be used by rogue nations or terrorist groups. Students are expected to design a realistic terrorist attack involving weapons of mass destruction (WMD), engage in the debate over whether nuclear proliferation might make the world safer, and propose a specific policy proposal for enhancing global security in the age of WMD proliferation. (SS2) Strong, Settle.

Washington Term Program

POL 466 - Connelly, William F., Jr. (Bill)

The Washington Term Program aims to enlarge students' understanding of national politics and governance. Combining the practical experience of a Washington internship with academic study, it affords deeper insight into the processes and problems of government at the national level. A member of the politics faculty is the resident director, supervising students enrolled in this program while they are in Washington, D.C.

Winter 2016

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

American National Government

POL 100 - Bragaw, Stephen G.

A study of the constitutional origins and historical development of the national government with special attention to Congress, the presidency, the judiciary, and the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media in the policy process.

American National Government

POL 100 - Connelly, William F., Jr. (Bill)

A study of the constitutional origins and historical development of the national government with special attention to Congress, the presidency, the judiciary, and the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media in the policy process.

American National Government

POL 100 - Bragaw, Stephen G.

A study of the constitutional origins and historical development of the national government with special attention to Congress, the presidency, the judiciary, and the role of political parties, interest groups, and the media in the policy process.

Introduction to Global Politics

POL 105 - Strong, Robert A. (Bob)

A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.

Introduction to Global Politics

POL 105 - Strong, Robert A. (Bob)

A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.

Introduction to Global Politics

POL 105 - Williams, Thomas M.

A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.

Introduction to Global Politics

POL 105 - Williams, Thomas M.

A survey of the comparative study of national and international politics and the interaction between the two. Topics may include power relations among and within states, changes in the conduct of international affairs and conflict resolution, contrasting ideas about democracy, economic development, justice, globalization, terrorism, causes and alternatives to war, social movements and the role of the nation-state.

Introduction to Political Philosophy

POL 111 - Gray, Stuart J., Jr. (Stu)

An introduction to some of the perennial themes of politics, such as the relationship between human nature and political institutions, individual freedom and community, private conscience and civic virtue, the claims of reason and faith, the nature of law, obligation, and rights, among others. Our inquiry is guided by selections from influential works in the history of political thought, ancient, modern and contemporary, as well as plays, dialogues, comedies, tragedies, novels, and films. Consult with instructor for specific reading assignments and course requirements.

Introduction to Political Philosophy

POL 111 - Gray, Stuart J., Jr. (Stu)

An introduction to some of the perennial themes of politics, such as the relationship between human nature and political institutions, individual freedom and community, private conscience and civic virtue, the claims of reason and faith, the nature of law, obligation, and rights, among others. Our inquiry is guided by selections from influential works in the history of political thought, ancient, modern and contemporary, as well as plays, dialogues, comedies, tragedies, novels, and films. Consult with instructor for specific reading assignments and course requirements.

Introduction to Political Philosophy

POL 111 - Le Blanc, Robin M.

An introduction to some of the perennial themes of politics, such as the relationship between human nature and political institutions, individual freedom and community, private conscience and civic virtue, the claims of reason and faith, the nature of law, obligation, and rights, among others. Our inquiry is guided by selections from influential works in the history of political thought, ancient, modern and contemporary, as well as plays, dialogues, comedies, tragedies, novels, and films. Consult with instructor for specific reading assignments and course requirements.

Public Policy

POL 232 - Harris, Rebecca C.

Introduction to public policy formation and implementation, decision making in government, the concepts and techniques of policy analysis, and ethical analysis of policy. Policy issues such as education, the environment, and public health are used as illustrations.

Environmental Policy and Law

POL 233 - Harris, Rebecca C.

A study of major environmental laws and the history of their enactment and implementation. Discusses different theoretical approaches from law, ethics, politics, and economics. Reviews significant case law and the legal context. Emphasis is on domestic policy with some attention to international law and treaties.

Congress and the Legislative Process

POL 234 - Connelly, William F., Jr. (Bill)

A review of the constitutional origins and historical development of Congress as a representative and deliberative institution. Course focus includes the relation between the President and Congress, bicameralism, congressional elections, congressional reform, legislative rules and procedures, and the policy process. The course follows the current Congress using C-SPAN and Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report.

Gender and Politics

POL 255 - Le Blanc, Robin M.

This course investigates the gendered terms under which women and men participate in political life. Attention is given to the causes of men's and women's different patterns of participation in politics, to processes that are likely to decrease the inequalities between men's and women's political power, and the processes by which society's gender expectations shape electoral and institutional politics. The different effects of gender on the practice of politics in different nations are compared, with a special emphasis placed on advanced industrial democracies.

Special Topics in Global Politics

POL 296 - Williams, Thomas M.

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2016, POL 296-01: Special Topics in Global Politics: Geopolitics: Geography, Technology, and Power (3) . Prerequisite: POL 105 or instructor consent. Geopolitics is the study of the natural world and the constraints it places on human societies in their development, political organization, conflict, and sustainability. Food, energy, transportation, communication, resources, and warfare are all fundamentally tied to the physical environment and the technology harnessed by humans to overcome the limitations they face. This course surveys international history to trace the interaction between human societies and the forces of geography, how this interaction continues to shape our world today, and whether modern technology has fundamentally altered the balance between society and geography. (SS2) T. Williams.

Special Topics in Political Philosophy

POL 297 - Kemerli, Pinar

A seminar in political science for students at the introductory or intermediate level. Topic, hour, and instructor are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2016, POL 297-01: Special Topics in Political Philosophy: Resistance and the State (3). Prerequisite: POL 111 or instructor consent. States claim to benefit the people they represent. But the relationship between the modern state and the people is not always a happy one, nor devoid of conflict and violence. In this course, we examine the grounds and reach of state power, and diverse forms of resistance to it. What makes state power legitimate? What happens when the state itself is involved in the oppression of the people it claims to represent? When are the people justified in resisting the state and disobeying the law? What forms such disobedience may justifiably take? We explore these questions through reading a wide range of literature on state and resistance from Sophocles' Antigone to Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail . Examples of resistance around the world are considered including revolution, anticolonial resistance, hunger strikes, conscientious objection to military draft, and the civil rights movement in the US. We also question the role of contemporary global powers -- "empires" -- and the resistance to them. Thinkers considered include Hobbes, Foucault, Fanon, Gandhi, Frederick Douglas, and Malcolm X. (SS2) Kemerli .

Seminar: Lincoln's Statesmanship

POL 360 - Morel, Lucas E.

This seminar examines the political thought and practice of Abraham Lincoln. Emphasis is on his speeches and writings, supplemented by scholarly commentary on his life and career.

Seminar on Middle Eastern Politics

POL 384 - Cantey, Joseph M., Jr. (Seth)

This course examines contemporary politics in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Topics include the role of colonial legacies in state formation, the region's democratic deficit, nationalism, sectarianism, and the influence of religion in politics. We explore inter- and intrastate conflict, including the use of terrorism, economic development and underdevelopment, and the recent Arab uprisings (commonly referred to as the Arab Spring). Throughout, we consider why the Middle East attracts as much attention from policymakers and scholars as it does, how analysts have studied the region across time and space, and why understanding different cultural perspectives is critical to understanding the region.

Seminar in Political Philosophy

POL 396 - Gray, Stuart J., Jr. (Stu)

An examination of selected questions and problems in political philosophy and/or political theory. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2016, POL 396-01: Seminar in Political Philosophy: Freedom (3). Prerequisite: POL 111 or instructor consent. It is no exaggeration to say that the maximization of individual freedom is one of the central goals of modern and contemporary politics. But, what does freedom mean, and what should we be doing with it? Is freedom just the absence of restraint, or are there special purposes toward which freedom ought to be dedicated? What role does politics play in the articulation and pursuit of freedom? This seminar explores the concept and meaning of freedom as it develops in modern and contemporary political thought. We examine contending conceptions of public (civic republican) and private (liberal) freedom, robust subjectivism, constraints of disciplinary power, and anarchism. Throughout the course, we track these various conceptions of freedom in contemporary American life by reading Jonathan Franzen's novel, Freedom. We also consider other thinkers including Rousseau, J.S. Mill, Nietzsche, Foucault, and Goldman. (SS2) Gray .

Directed Individual Study

POL 403 - Connelly, William F., Jr. (Bill)

This course permits a student to follow a program of directed reading, library research, or data collection and analysis in some area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Directed Individual Study

POL 403 - Cantey, Joseph M., Jr. (Seth)

This course permits a student to follow a program of directed reading, library research, or data collection and analysis in some area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.