Course Offerings

Fall 2014

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Williams Investment Society

BUS 196 - Culpepper / Schwartz

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. This cocurricular educational student organization manages a portion of Washington and Lee's endowment. Students meet in formal and informal sessions conducted by faculty advisers and attend presentations made by outside speakers hosted by the Williams School. The experiential learning that occurs in this setting is grounded in fields such as accounting, economics, and finance, as well as the practice of investments and banking.

Washington and Lee Student Consulting

BUS 197 - Oliver / Straughan

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. This cocurricular student organization provides pro bono consulting services to businesses and not-for-profits. Experiential learning draws from business fields, such as marketing, finance, accounting, e-commerce, database management, business strategy, and human resources. In addition to working on various projects, students gain experience managing the organization.

Entrepreneurship Field Consulting Experience

BUS 198 - Shay

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. This co-curricular student organization provides pro bono consulting services to entrepreneurial businesses and entrepreneurial not-for-profits. Experiential learning draws from business fields, such as marketing, finance, accounting, e-commerce, database management, business strategy and human resources. Students gain real world experience through writing business plans, marketing plans, and strategic plans for real-world ventures.

Marketing Management

BUS 211 - Bower, Fox, Straughan (Multiple Sections)

An exploration of strategic marketing. The focus of the course is on the analysis of a firm's current marketing strengths and weaknesses and the development of a strategic plan to capitalize on key opportunities. Topics include environmental analysis, market segmentation, targeting and positioning, and management of the marketing mix. Throughout the course, significant attention is devoted to international issues, the interrelationships between marketing and other disciplines, and the role of ethically and socially responsible marketing.

Management and Organizational Behavior

BUS 217 - Dean, Herbert (Multiple Sections)

A study of management in modern organizations. This course examines the factors which influence individual, group, and firm behavior in the context of the workplace. Topics covered include individual differences, motivation, leadership, business ethics, group behavior, decision making, and organizational design and change.

Managerial Finance

BUS 221 - Hoover, Rosenberg (Multiple Sections)

A study of finance from a managerial perspective emphasizing the primary goal of the firm as stockholder wealth maximization. Emphasis is on decisions relating to the acquisition of assets and funds and internal management-financial analysis, planning and control, working capital management, capital budgeting, sources and forms of long-term financing, financial structure and the cost of capital, and valuation.

Seminar in Management

BUS 304 - Lind (Multiple Sections)

Topics vary by term.

Management Information Systems

BUS 310 - Pratt (Multiple Sections)

The objective is to build an understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operations, management decision making, and strategic advantage. Topics include basic systems concepts and major roles of information systems; computer, telecommunications, and database management concepts; and management issues in the implementation of information systems, including international, security, and ethical considerations.

Multimedia Design and Development

BUS 321 - Ballenger

This course is an introduction to the study and creation of multimedia content primarily used in business. Students explore the steps used to plan and create multimedia content that effectively targets and delivers business information. This is a hands-on, project-oriented course with emphasis on the design and creation of media elements such as interactive web, graphic, audio, and video content. The course focuses on using WordPress development using Headway Themes with emphasis on Cascading Style Sheets, Adobe Photoshop, Reaper, and Final Cut Pro X as the foundation for creating online multimedia content.

Global Human-Resource Management

BUS 330 - Dean

Human-resource management (HRM) is concerned with how to best attract, select, develop, and retain employees in organizations. This course examines HRM in the global context. Topics include employee selection, training, performance management, compensation, health, safety, and security, and termination. We focus on designing HRM practices in the context of the global social, legal, and technological environments.

Economic Globalization and Multinational Corporations

BUS 337 - Reiter (Multiple Sections)

This course focuses on the historical and present effects and issues of economic globalization, and the role of multinational corporations in a global economy. Topics covered may include: production, supply chain, technology, trade, finance, natural environment, labor, development, poverty and inequality, privatization of utilities, immigration, and state sovereignty. Emphasis is on understanding the costs and benefits of economic globalization and the role business plays in contributing to these outcomes.

Business Ethics

BUS 345 - Reiter

An examination of the moral and ethical issues associated with management policy and executive decisions. The course examines the basic approaches to moral reasoning, macro-moral issues concerning the justice of economic systems, and micro-moral issues, such as the following: conflict of interest, whistle blowing, discrimination in employment, product safety, environment, and advertising.

Private Law in a Market Economy

BUS 346 - Culpepper (Multiple Sections)

This course studies the law governing the relations between individuals in day-to-day commerce. The emphasis is on how individuals and firms organize their voluntary agreements in markets, a process governed by the law of contracts. The course covers this process, ranging from the sale of goods, through the securing and payment of debt, to the creation of large corporations. Both the Common Law and the Uniform Commercial Code are analyzed. The course accents procedural and managerial techniques and stresses economic and ethical issues. Writing assignments apply legal theories to literary masterworks and hypothetical situations.

Social Entrepreneurship

BUS 381 - Hess

Social entrepreneurship is an approach to creating system-level change though the application of entrepreneurial thinking and problem solving to social ventures, non-profit organizations, government institutions, and non-governmental organizations to create economic, environmental, and social value for multiple stakeholders. The purpose of this class is to (a) introduce students to the strategic thinking that forms the foundation of successful entrepreneurial ventures, (b) engage students in the application of these strategic tools and frameworks through case analyses and discussion, and (c) to encourage students to change the world in a meaningful way by thinking about a social venture of their own.

Strategic Management

BUS 398 - Garvis, Hess (Multiple Sections)

A capstone course designed to expose students to a strategic perspective on global issues that impact the firm. Integrative in that it draws on concepts from functional disciplines (e.g., finance, marketing, accounting) in the diagnosis, analysis, and resolution of complex business situations. Practical problem-solving skills are emphasized. Case analysis and/or computer simulation are used extensively in oral presentations and written cases.

Entrepreneurship

BUS 399 - Shay (Multiple Sections)

A capstone course focused on developing the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to plan, finance, and launch a new business venture. To accomplish this, students utilize strategic management models, theories, and concepts to search the environment for entrepreneurial opportunities, analyze market potential, devise plans for operations, and assess the sources of capital required to convert the opportunity into a viable new business venture. This course uses lectures, case studies, guest speakers, class discussions, and experiential exercises in order to expose students to the challenges that entrepreneurs face. Students work in teams to develop a business plan and give a professional presentation for a high potential new business venture.


Spring 2014

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

The Business of Contemporary Art

BUS 125 - King / Alexander

This course combines finance, tax policy, marketing, economics, and art history to provide a 'nuts-and-bolts' view of how the contemporary art world operates. Appropriate for business students with an interest in contemporary art as well as museum studies and art history majors who wish to gain an understanding of business concepts in the art world, the course serves as preparation for students who may anticipate acquiring art for personal or business investment/use, serving on a museum board, pursuing employment in the art world, or advising high wealth clients on business matters related to art. Each topic begins with an overview of general principles before reviewing applications to the art world. For example, discussion of charitable giving covers the general tax rules of charitable deductions before discussing the specific rules related to art and museums.

Seminar in Finance

BUS 302 - Davey

Offered from time to time when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit.

Spring 2014 topic:

BUS 302-01: Seminar in Finance: Commercial Real Estate Investments (4). Prerequisite: BUS 221. Commercial Real Estate is a major investment asset class globally. This course is designed to provide both academic theoretical foundations for the nvestment decisions made by sector participants, as well as practical applications of the theory. The first two weeks cover the theory that underpins the industry. The third week primarily serves as an immersion into the actual investment strategies and processes of industry participants, as the class travels to Washington DC to meet with industry professionals, tour properties, and evaluates a variety of investment opportunities. The fourth week crystallizes the theory and industry knowledge as students evaluate, underwrite, and present "live" investment opportunities in a manner typically performed in large institutional real estate investment firms. Davey. Spring 2014

Seminar in Management

BUS 304 - Herbert

Topics vary by term.

Spring 2014 topic:

BUS 304: Money, Power, and Lies (4). Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. Can we design and lead organizations that foster ethical behavior? This course integrates the disciplines of business ethics and organizational behavior to address this question. It examines the impact of psychological and social forces on the ability of individuals to act ethically in large organizations. The 2008 financial melt- down will be addressed as the major case study, although other cases will be studied. We will analyze examples of unethical organizational behavior, suggest causes, and recommend changes to the organizational environment that would decrease the chance of similar failures. We will also seek to understand and be prepared to deal with the pressures for unethical behavior workers may face in an organization. Herbert.

Fall 2013 topics:

BUS 304A-01: Seminar in Management: Social Entrepreneurship (3). Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. Social entrepreneurship is distinguished within the broad discipline of entrepreneurship by its focus upon complex societal challenges (e.g., hunger, education, healthcare) and explicit expectations for what is known as "social impact." The goals of this seminar are: (a) to introduce students to the structure, methods, and mindsets of the social venture community (e.g., key ventures, foundations, venture philanthropy, social return); (b) to engage students in the application of these methods and mindsets through case analyses and discussions, and the proposal of a new social venture; and (c) to encourage students to change the world in significant and positive ways. Hess. Fall 2013

BUS 304B-02 & -03: Seminar in Management: Modern Professional Communications (3). Prerequisite: INTR 201 and at least junior standing. This course offers students the theories, skills and strategies that help them to become effective communicators in professional settings. By the end of the course, students should be able to 1) think critically about how to create effective communications, 2) write effectively and persuasively, 3) design appropriate documents (either for written or oral communications), 4) develop and deliver effective presentations, 5) communicate effectively in digital formats e.g., social media, email), and 5) give and respond appropriately to constructive feedback. Lind.

Healthcare Information Systems: Technologies and New Ventures

BUS 311 - Pratt

This course begins the journey towards the electronic sharing of healthcare information and both the successes and pitfalls along the way. Students explore and understand quality of care, patient safety, and cost reduction methods from the perspective of business, technology, and medicine. This course introduces the business and technology needs of our healthcare systems. Students be introduced to regulatory requirements and healthcare organizational behavior, IT operations and processes, quality and assurance of data and information, and the frontiers of electronic health records. Students also learn the basics of hardware, software, and network technology. Laboratory fee

Negotiation and Dispute Resolution in a Business Environment

BUS 349 - Culpepper

This course is designed to give students the abilities to negotiate successfully in a commercial environment and to create business solutions when a problem or dispute arises. Lectures, written materials, group projects, video, and role-play are utilized to explore the various theories of negotiation and types of dispute resolution, and to equip students with practical skills for forming and preserving business relationships and resolving business disputes as they occur.

Corporate Mergers, Leveraged Buyouts, and Divestitures

BUS 358 - Kester

This course focuses upon company valuation, mergers, leveraged buyouts, and divestitures. The interactive course makes extensive use of the case method in developing an understanding of business valuation methodologies and corporate financing decisions. Advanced-level finance concepts, models, and techniques are applied by students in the development of situational problem formulation, analysis, evaluation, and decision-making skills necessary to solve the unstructured problems faced in the practice of financial and business management. Classroom participation and group presentations are emphasized.

Technology and Entrepreneurship

BUS 383 - Hess

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of process through which technological inventions are transformed into innovations.  Key works from scholars in the field will guide class discussions on understanding why managing innovation is complex, cross-functional, and a historically-dependent endeavor.  By the end of the class, students will have an appreciation for the entrepreneurial mindset, key actors in the start-up process, and the means through which technology is commercialized.  In addition to these discussions, students will travel to Silicon Valley to not only meet individuals who are a part of the recent start-up/technology scene, but also visit key locations that capture the history and context of innovation in the San Francisco/Bay Area.

Supervised Study Abroad

BUS 390 - Dean

These upper-level courses cover topics of current interest in business administration for which international travel provides a unique opportunity for enhancing understanding. Emphasis changes from year to year and is announced well in advance of registration.

Spring 2014 topic:

BUS 390: Supervised Study Abroad: Business in Ireland (4). Twenty-five years ago, Ireland was regarded as the "poorest of the rich nations". Then it grew to one of the richest and strongest economies in the world. During these "Celtic Tiger" years, Ireland benefited from partnerships with government, business, and labor unions, and received significant direct foreign investments. However, at the end of 2008 Ireland encountered severe economic difficulties. This course, based in County Galway, has two primary objectives: 1. To immerse students into the culture (history, literature, theater, religion, social norms) of Ireland, via lectures and field trips to sites of historic and cultural significance, including a course-concoluding medieval banquet and traditional Irish entertainment at a historic castle; and 2. To study the economy, management practices, and business climate of modern Ireland including its role in the European Union via lectures, meetings with business leaders, and visits to national and international businesses. Dean.

Corporate Social Responsibility Practicum

BUS 391 - Oliver / Straughan

The course provides students an opportunity to explore corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability challenges from within an organization. The course is taught in Denmark, regarded as one of the most progressive economies in terms of CSR implementation. Initial reading, discussion, and research in the winter term prepare students to be matched with a Danish organization grappling with a CSR issue. Students work in small groups (four students) in a consultative capacity with a sponsoring Danish organization's decision makers. Students also participate in larger group discussions of issues confronted during the practicum and reflect on their experiences in both a personal journal and group blog. Sponsoring organizations include both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations, and the nature of the issues varies from sponsor to sponsor.


Winter 2014

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Williams Investment Society

BUS 196 - Culpepper / Schwartz

Graded Pass/Fail through Fall, 2014. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory beginning Winter, 2014. This cocurricular educational student organization manages a portion of Washington and Lee's endowment. Students meet in formal and informal sessions conducted by faculty advisers and attend presentations made by outside speakers hosted by the Williams School. The experiential learning that occurs in this setting is grounded in fields such as accounting, economics, and finance, as well as the practice of investments and banking.

Washington and Lee Student Consulting

BUS 197 - Straughan / Oliver

Graded Pass/Fail through Fall, 2014. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory beginning Winter, 2014. This cocurricular student organization provides pro bono consulting services to businesses and not-for-profits. Experiential learning draws from business fields, such as marketing, finance, accounting, e-commerce, database management, business strategy, and human resources. In addition to working on various projects, students gain experience managing the organization.

Entrepreneurship Field Consulting Experience

BUS 198 - Shay

Graded Pass/Fail through Fall, 2014. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory beginning Winter, 2014. This co-curricular student organization provides pro bono consulting services to entrepreneurial businesses and entrepreneurial not-for-profits. Experiential learning draws from business fields, such as marketing, finance, accounting, e-commerce, database management, business strategy and human resources. Students gain real world experience through writing business plans, marketing plans, and strategic plans for real-world ventures.

Marketing Management

BUS 211 - Bower, Simmons (Multiple Sections)

An exploration of strategic marketing. The focus of the course is on the analysis of a firm's current marketing strengths and weaknesses and the development of a strategic plan to capitalize on key opportunities. Topics include environmental analysis, market segmentation, targeting and positioning, and management of the marketing mix. Throughout the course, significant attention is devoted to international issues, the interrelationships between marketing and other disciplines, and the role of ethically and socially responsible marketing.

Management and Organizational Behavior

BUS 217 - Dean, Herbert (Multiple Sections)

A study of management in modern organizations. This course examines the factors which influence individual, group, and firm behavior in the context of the workplace. Topics covered include individual differences, motivation, leadership, business ethics, group behavior, decision making, and organizational design and change.

Managerial Finance

BUS 221 - Hoover, Kester (Multiple Sections)

A study of finance from a managerial perspective emphasizing the primary goal of the firm as stockholder wealth maximization. Emphasis is on decisions relating to the acquisition of assets and funds and internal management-financial analysis, planning and control, working capital management, capital budgeting, sources and forms of long-term financing, financial structure and the cost of capital, and valuation.

Seminar in Management

BUS 304A - Lind (Multiple Sections)

Topics vary by term.

Spring 2014 topic:

BUS 304: Money, Power, and Lies (4). Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. Can we design and lead organizations that foster ethical behavior? This course integrates the disciplines of business ethics and organizational behavior to address this question. It examines the impact of psychological and social forces on the ability of individuals to act ethically in large organizations. The 2008 financial melt- down will be addressed as the major case study, although other cases will be studied. We will analyze examples of unethical organizational behavior, suggest causes, and recommend changes to the organizational environment that would decrease the chance of similar failures. We will also seek to understand and be prepared to deal with the pressures for unethical behavior workers may face in an organization. Herbert.

Fall 2013 topics:

BUS 304A-01: Seminar in Management: Social Entrepreneurship (3). Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. Social entrepreneurship is distinguished within the broad discipline of entrepreneurship by its focus upon complex societal challenges (e.g., hunger, education, healthcare) and explicit expectations for what is known as "social impact." The goals of this seminar are: (a) to introduce students to the structure, methods, and mindsets of the social venture community (e.g., key ventures, foundations, venture philanthropy, social return); (b) to engage students in the application of these methods and mindsets through case analyses and discussions, and the proposal of a new social venture; and (c) to encourage students to change the world in significant and positive ways. Hess. Fall 2013

BUS 304B-02 & -03: Seminar in Management: Modern Professional Communications (3). Prerequisite: INTR 201 and at least junior standing. This course offers students the theories, skills and strategies that help them to become effective communicators in professional settings. By the end of the course, students should be able to 1) think critically about how to create effective communications, 2) write effectively and persuasively, 3) design appropriate documents (either for written or oral communications), 4) develop and deliver effective presentations, 5) communicate effectively in digital formats e.g., social media, email), and 5) give and respond appropriately to constructive feedback. Lind.

Management Information Systems

BUS 310 - Pratt

The objective is to build an understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operations, management decision making, and strategic advantage. Topics include basic systems concepts and major roles of information systems; computer, telecommunications, and database management concepts; and management issues in the implementation of information systems, including international, security, and ethical considerations.

Multimedia Design and Development

BUS 321 - Ballenger

This course is an introduction to the study and creation of multimedia content primarily used in business. Students explore the steps used to plan and create multimedia content that effectively targets and delivers business information. This is a hands-on, project-oriented course with emphasis on the design and creation of media elements such as interactive web, graphic, audio, and video content. The course focuses on using Adobe Dreamweaver with emphasis on Cascading Style Sheets, Adobe Photoshop, Reaper, and Final Cut Express as the foundation for creating online multimedia content.

E-Commerce Development

BUS 325 - Pratt (Multiple Sections)

An introduction to the benefits, capabilities and related information technologies, which comprise the current state and emerging technologies of e-commerce. This course provides an understanding of how to design, develop and implement e-commerce order processing websites using industry leading e-commerce shopping cart software. In this project-oriented course, students acquire the skills to design, create, and administer a fully functional Web-based e-commerce solution. Students learn how to leverage features of the e-commerce software to attract consumers, increase conversion rates, and maximize the return on their ecommerce investment. No prior e-commerce or Web development experience is assumed. Laboratory fee.

Business Ethics

BUS 345 - Hess

An examination of the moral and ethical issues associated with management policy and executive decisions. The course examines the basic approaches to moral reasoning, macro-moral issues concerning the justice of economic systems, and micro-moral issues, such as the following: conflict of interest, whistle blowing, discrimination in employment, product safety, environment, and advertising.

Private Law in a Market Economy

BUS 346 - Culpepper (Multiple Sections)

This course studies the law governing the relations between individuals in day-to-day commerce. The emphasis is on how individuals and firms organize their voluntary agreements in markets, a process governed by the law of contracts. The course covers this process, ranging from the sale of goods, through the securing and payment of debt, to the creation of large corporations. Both the Common Law and the Uniform Commercial Code are analyzed. The course accents procedural and managerial techniques and stresses economic and ethical issues. Writing assignments apply legal theories to literary masterworks and hypothetical situations.

Cases in Corporate Finance

BUS 355 - Kester

Through use of the case method of learning, this course focuses on applied corporate finance strategy, including financial forecasting, financing sales growth, short-term versus long-term financing, commercial bank borrowing, leasing, and capital structure policy. Classroom participation is emphasized.

Financial Risk Management

BUS 356 - Schwartz

This course provides an introduction to financial derivatives and risk management and is intended to help upper-class students planning a career in finance or actuarial science. The course considers options and futures from a practical and theoretical perspective. Topics explored include: derivative markets, the Black-Scholes option pricing model, binomial option pricing, Monte-Carlo simulation, future pricing, parity relationships, and hedging with derivatives. Text, projects, participation, and problem-solving.

Integrated Marketing Communications

BUS 370 - Bower

Nature and contributions of the elements of marketing communications (e.g., advertising, sales promotions, the Web) in creating brand equity and stimulating demand. A project-oriented course with an emphasis on the strategic application of concepts resulting in an integrated communication plan for products and/or services. Course has a complementary lab component to teach technical skills and reinforce concepts via practicum.

Strategic Management

BUS 398 - Garvis, Hess (Multiple Sections)

A capstone course designed to expose students to a strategic perspective on global issues that impact the firm. Integrative in that it draws on concepts from functional disciplines (e.g., finance, marketing, accounting) in the diagnosis, analysis, and resolution of complex business situations. Practical problem-solving skills are emphasized. Case analysis and/or computer simulation are used extensively in oral presentations and written cases.

Directed Individual Study

BUS 401 - Ballenger, Bower, Dean, Pratt, Shay (Multiple Sections)

The objective is to permit students to follow a course of directed study in some field of management not presented in other courses or to emphasize a particular field of interest. Credits may not be used toward the major requirements in business administration.

Winter 2014 topic:

BUS 401: Directed Study: Buessinees Ethics & CSR (1). A study of the link between business ethics and corporate social responsibility: Are they synonymous or different issues? Dean.