Business Administration Major Requirements

2014 - 2015 Catalog

Business Administration major leading to a BS with Special Attainments in Commerce degree

A major in business administration leading to a Bachelor of Science with Special Attainments in Commerce requires at least 50 credits total, including at least 24 credits in business administration and 26 credits not in business administration, as follows:

  1. ACCT 201, 202; BUS 211, 217, 221; ECON 101, 102; INTR 201, 202
  2. BUS 345 or 346
  3. BUS 398 or 399
  4. Business Administration electives: at least nine additional credits, chosen from Business Administration courses numbered 300 or above, but excluding BUS 401 and 402.
  5. Non-Business Administration electives: nine credits chosen from the following:
    ACCT: all courses numbered above 202;
    ARTH 453
    ARTS 217, 218, 220, 224, 226, 227, 228, 231, 232
    CSCI 209, 211, 251
    DANC 220
    ECON: all courses numbered 200 and above
    ENGN 250
    ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 307, 308, 309
    ENV 250, 295, 381, 395, 397
    JOUR 225, 231, 242, 270, 371, 372, 377
    MATH 309, 310, 332, 333, 353
    MUS 361
    PHIL 240, 242, 346, 348, 354
    POL 215, 227, 232, 233, 245, 246, 247, 255, 280, 381
    POV 423
    PSYC 202, 252, 254, 262, 269
    SOAN 202, 212, 228, 245, 246, 251, 262, 280, 375
    THTR 220, 235, 238, 239, 251, 253, 361
  6. One course from each International Business and Information Systems. The 18 credits required in 4 and 5 above must include at least one course from each of the following areas:
    a. International Business: BUS 305, 330, 333, 335, 337, 357, 372, 390, 391; ECON 270, 271, 272, 274, 275, 280, 317, 356, 382
    b. Information Systems: ACCT 310; BUS 306, 310, 311, 312, 315, 317, 321, 325
  7. For students majoring in both business administration and psychology, completing both PSYC 120 and 250 may be substituted for INTR 202.
  1. Required courses:
    • ACCT 201 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      .

      This course covers the fundamental principles of financial accounting and provides an introduction to the process of accumulating, classifying, and presenting financial information. Primary emphasis is given to understanding the financial statements of a business enterprise.

    • ACCT 202 - Introduction to Managerial Accounting

      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: ACCT 201 and sophomore standing.

      This course covers the preparation and utilization of financial information for internal management purposes. Special emphasis is given to cost determination, cost control, and the development of information for planning and decisions.

    • BUS 211 - Marketing Management

      Faculty: Bower, Fox, Straughan
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102, ACCT 201, and INTR 201; and at least junior standing (sophomores allowed in winter term). Preference to BSADM, ACCB, PAAC, JMCB, or JOURF majors during the first round of registration.

      An exploration of strategic marketing. The focus of the course is on the analysis of a firm's current marketing strengths and weaknesses and the development of a strategic plan to capitalize on key opportunities. Topics include environmental analysis, market segmentation, targeting and positioning, and management of the marketing mix. Throughout the course, significant attention is devoted to international issues, the interrelationships between marketing and other disciplines, and the role of ethically and socially responsible marketing.

    • BUS 217 - Management and Organizational Behavior

      Faculty: Dean, Herbert
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: INTR 201; At least junior standing (sophomores allowed in winter term). Preference to BSADM, ACCB, PACC, JMCB, or JOURF majors during the first round of registration.

      A study of management in modern organizations. This course examines the factors which influence individual, group, and firm behavior in the context of the workplace. Topics covered include individual differences, motivation, leadership, business ethics, group behavior, decision making, and organizational design and change.

    • BUS 221 - Managerial Finance

      Faculty: Hoover, Kester, Schwartz
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102; ACCT 201 and 202; INTR 202 or equivalent; and at least junior standing (sophomores allowed in winter term). Preference to BSADM, ACCB, PACC, ECON, MATH, JMCB, or JOURF majors during the first round of registration.

      A study of finance from a managerial perspective emphasizing the primary goal of the firm as stockholder wealth maximization. Emphasis is on decisions relating to the acquisition of assets and funds and internal management-financial analysis, planning and control, working capital management, capital budgeting, sources and forms of long-term financing, financial structure and the cost of capital, and valuation.

    • ECON 101 - Principles of Microeconomics

      FDR: SS1
      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Survey of economic principles and problems with emphasis on analysis of consumer behavior, firm behavior, market outcomes, market structure, and microeconomic policy. The first half of a two-term survey of economics. Should be followed by ECON 102.

    • ECON 102 - Principles of Macroeconomics

      FDR: SS1
      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: ECON 101.

      Continuation of survey begun in ECON 101, with emphasis on performance of the aggregate economy. Analysis of unemployment, inflation, growth, and monetary and fiscal policies.

    • INTR 201 - Information Technology Literacy

      Faculty: Ballenger, Boylan (administrator)
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 1


      Prerequisite: First-year or sophomore standing

      Through the use of interactive online tutorials, students gain proficiency in and a working knowledge of five distinct areas of information technology literacy: Windows Operating System, spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel), word processing (Microsoft Word), presentation software (Microsoft PowerPoint), and basic networking (the Washington and Lee network, basic Web browsing, and Microsoft Outlook). Lessons, exercises, practice exams and exams mix online efforts and hands-on activities.

    • INTR 202 - Applied Statistics

      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: INTR 201.

      An examination of the principal applications of statistics in accounting, business, economics, and politics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.

  2. Take one course from:
    • BUS 345 - Business Ethics

      Faculty: Reiter
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: At least junior standing. Preference to BSADM, ACCB, PACC, or JOURF (JMCB) majors during the first round of registration.

      An examination of the moral and ethical issues associated with management policy and executive decisions. The course examines the basic approaches to moral reasoning, macro-moral issues concerning the justice of economic systems, and micro-moral issues, such as the following: conflict of interest, whistle blowing, discrimination in employment, product safety, environment, and advertising.

    • or
    • BUS 346 - Private Law in a Market Economy

      Faculty: Culpepper
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: At least junior standing. Preference to BSADM, ACCB, PACC, or JOURF (JMCB) majors during the first round of registration.

      This course studies the law governing the relations between individuals in day-to-day commerce. The emphasis is on how individuals and firms organize their voluntary agreements in markets, a process governed by the law of contracts. The course covers this process, ranging from the sale of goods, through the securing and payment of debt, to the creation of large corporations. Both the Common Law and the Uniform Commercial Code are analyzed. The course accents procedural and managerial techniques and stresses economic and ethical issues. Writing assignments apply legal theories to literary masterworks and hypothetical situations.

  3. Take one course from:
    • BUS 398 - Strategic Management

      Faculty: Garvis, Reiter, Touve
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: Senior standing. Limited to BSADM, ACCB, PACC, or JOURF (JMCB) majors.

      A capstone course designed to expose students to a strategic perspective on global issues that impact the firm. Integrative in that it draws on concepts from functional disciplines (e.g., finance, marketing, accounting) in the diagnosis, analysis, and resolution of complex business situations. Practical problem-solving skills are emphasized. Case analysis and/or computer simulation are used extensively in oral presentations and written cases.

    • or
    • BUS 399 - Entrepreneurship

      Faculty: Shay
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: BUS 211 and 221, and senior standing. Limited to BSADM, ACCB, PACC, or JOURF (JMCB) majors.

      A capstone course focused on developing the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to plan, finance, and launch a new business venture. To accomplish this, students utilize strategic management models, theories, and concepts to search the environment for entrepreneurial opportunities, analyze market potential, devise plans for operations, and assess the sources of capital required to convert the opportunity into a viable new business venture. This course uses lectures, case studies, guest speakers, class discussions, and experiential exercises in order to expose students to the challenges that entrepreneurs face. Students work in teams to develop a business plan and give a professional presentation for a high potential new business venture.

  4. Business Administration electives:
  5. at least nine additional credits, chosen from Business Administration courses numbered 300 or above, but excluding BUS 401 and 402.
     

  6. Non-Business Administration electives:
  7. nine credits chosen from the following:
     

    ACCT: all courses numbered above 202
    ECON: all courses numbered 200 or above
     

    • ARTH 453 - Internship in Arts Management

      Faculty: Archer
      Planned Offering: Winter 2015
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

      Supervised off-campus experience in an art gallery, art dealership, museum, or auction house approved by the Art Department. Requires a paper in addition to projects devised in advance by the instructor and student.

    • ARTS 217 - Painting I

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Olson-Janjic
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: ARTS 111 and instructor consent.

      Emphasis on color, design and spatial relationships. Work from observation and imagination in oil and acrylic. Lab fee required.

    • ARTS 218 - Painting II

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Olson-Janjic
      Planned Offering: Winter 2015
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: ARTS 217 and instructor consent.

      Continuation of ARTS 217. Lab fee required.

    • ARTS 220 - Photography II

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Bowden
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: ARTS 120 or instructor consent.

      A continuation of ARTS 120, with an emphasis on black-and-white craft and creative problem solving through both film and digital processes. Course includes a combination of demonstrations, studio instruction, and group critiques, as well as image presentations, readings, and discussions related to historical and contemporary movements in the medium. Lab fee required; cameras available for checkout from department.

    • ARTS 224 - Color Photography

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Bowden
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: ARTS 120 or instructor consent.

      An introduction to the visual and technical principles of color photography, as applied in the digital realm. Students learn the concepts of color photography through applied projects, as well as image presentations, readings, and discussions of methods and artists, historical and contemporary. Students photograph in digital format, and learn the craft of fine color printing in the digital darkroom. Lab fee required, cameras available for checkout from department.

    • ARTS 226 - Introduction to the Book Arts

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Merrill
      Planned Offering: Not offered in 2013-2014
      Credits: 3


      A creative exploration of the tradition of the handmade book. Students learn to make several styles of binding, including accordion books, pamphlets, and Japanese bindings, developing some skill in letterpress printing, paper decorating, and simple printmaking techniques to create original handmade books. Readings, discussions, and slide lectures introduce students to the ingenious history of books and printing. Besides constructing imaginative, individual book art projects, students create one collaborative project. Lab fee required.

    • ARTS 227 - Printmaking I

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Beavers
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: ARTS 111 or instructor consent.

      A survey of fine art printmaking media, with emphasis on beginning techniques and the artistic potential of the print. Media include a selection of techniques from intaglio, relief, and planographic printmaking.

    • ARTS 228 - Printmaking II

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Beavers
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: ARTS 227 and instructor consent.

      Continuation of Printmaking I, with emphasis on one of the major media of printmaking (intaglio, relief, lithography). Students gain experience both with technique and the creative ability to solve visual problems and present compelling images in two dimensions.

    • ARTS 231 - Sculpture I

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Stene
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3 in winter; 4 in spring


      Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

      An introduction to sculpture techniques, tools and materials. Studio problems develop skills in working with wood, stone, clay, and metal. Lab fee required.

    • ARTS 232 - Sculpture II

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Stene
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: ARTS 231 and instructor consent.

      Studio problems concentrate on one medium, e.g., stone, wood, clay, or metal. Contemporary concerns in sculpture are explored through readings and presentations by students. Lab fee required.

    • CSCI 209 - Software Development

      Faculty: Sprenkle
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: CSCI 112.

      An examination of the theories and design techniques used in software development. Topics include the software life cycle, design patterns, the Unified Modeling Language, unit testing, refactoring, rapid prototyping, and program documentation.

    • CSCI 211 - Algorithm Design and Analysis

      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: CSCI 112 and MATH 121 or MATH 301.

      Methods for designing efficient algorithms, including divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and greedy algorithms. Analysis of algorithms for correctness and estimating running time and space requirements. Topics include advanced data structures, graph theory, network flow, and computational intractability.

    • CSCI 251 - iPhone Application Programming

      FDR: SC
      Faculty: Lambert
      Planned Offering: Spring 2014 and alternate years
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: CSCI 209 or equivalent programming background approved by the instructor.

      In this course, students learn how to develop programs for the iPhone / iPad / iPod Touch, the most popular smart-phone platform in use today. Classroom lectures on the Objective-C language and CocoaTouch development environment are supplemented by extensive hands-on programming assignments, leading to an independent application project of the student's devising. Williams School faculty guest lecture on the issues surrounding the iPhone App Store's novel business model. The course culminates with a presentation of each student's application, and an optional upload to the iPhone App Store to see how well the application sells.

    • DANC 220 - Dance Composition

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: DANC 120.

      A studio course exploring the craft and art of creating dance performances in a variety of styles and contexts. Images, text, music, improvisation and the elements of time, space and energy are examined as sources for dance material leading to group choreography. This course focuses on creating a finished performance piece for presentation.

    • ENGN 250 - Introduction to Engineering Design

      Faculty: D'Alessandro, Kuehner
      Planned Offering: Spring
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: PHYS 112.

      This course introduces students to the principles of engineering design through first-hand experience with a design project that culminates in a design competition. In this project-based course, the students gain an understanding of computer-aided drafting, machining techniques, construction methods, design criteria, progress- and final-report writing, and group presentations. Students are engaged using various methods, including traditional lectures, seminars, apprenticing, group work, and peer critiquing in order to achieve the learning objectives for the class.

    • ENGL 202 - Topics in Creative Writing: Playwriting

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Spring
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement.

      A course in the practice of writing plays, involving workshops, literary study, critical writing, and performance.

    • ENGL 203 - Topics in Creative Writing: Fiction

      FDR: HA
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter, Spring
      Credits: 3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring


      Prerequisites: Completion of FW requirement. Limited enrollment.

      A course in the practice of writing short fiction, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.

      Winter 2015 topic:

      ENGL 203: Topics in Creative Writing: Fiction (3). The practice of writing short fiction, with an emphasis on the short-short and flash-fiction subgenres. The course involves workshops, literary study of the short short's history and practice and critical writing about both published and student work, culminating in a portfolio or revised stories and an essay about the modes and strategies of the short short. (HL) Smith.

    • ENGL 204 - Topics in Creative Writing: Poetry

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: Completion of FW requirement. Limited enrollment.

      A course in the practice of writing poetry, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.

    • ENGL 205 - Poetic Forms

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Wheeler
      Planned Offering: Spring 2017 and alternate years
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisites: Completion of FW requirement.

      A course in the practice of writing poetry, with attention to a range of forms and poetic modes. Includes workshops, literary study, community outreach, and performance. A service-learning course. This course blends three activities: exercises for generating poems; workshops devoted to student writing; and literary analysis of verse forms and modes, from terza rima to performance poetry. Local field trips and special events augment regular class meetings. For each class, students complete readings, generate a new poem draft, and undertake other short assignments. Students establish a daily writing practice and participate in a service-learning project.

    • ENGL 307 - Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Miranda
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring


      Prerequisites: Three credits in 200-level English and instructor consent. Students must submit writing samples to qualify for admission. ENGL 203 and/or 204 recommended. Limited enrollment.

      A workshop in writing poems, requiring regular writing and outside reading. Students who have successfully completed either ENGL 204 or 205 should inform Mrs. O'Connell, who will grant them permission to enroll. All others should email a short sample of their poetry to Professor Miranda at mirandad@wlu.edu.

    • ENGL 308 - Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

      FDR: HA
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring


      Prerequisites: Three credits in 200-level English and instructor consent. Students must submit writing samples to qualify for admission. ENGL 203 and/or 204 recommended.

      A workshop in writing fiction, requiring regular writing and outside reading.

      Winter 2015 topic:

      ENGL 308: Advanced Creative Writing: Literary Genre Fiction (3). Reflecting literary trends of the last decade, students explore the intersections between traditional pulp genres and narrative realism. They draft and revise stories that use elements from a range of possible genres--science fiction, fantasy, horror, detective, romance--while also developing complex characters grounded in psychological realism. (HL) Gavaler.

    • ENGL 309 - Advanced Creative Writing: Memoir

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Miranda
      Planned Offering: Winter in alternate years
      Credits: 3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring


      Prerequisite: Three credits in 200-level English and instructor consent.

      Flannery O'Connor once said that any writer who could survive childhood had enough material to write about for a lifetime. Memoir is a mosaic form, utilizing bits and pieces from autobiography, fiction, essay and poetry in ways that allow the author to muse (speculate, imagine, remember, and question) on their own life experiences. Modern literary memoir requires tremendous work from the author, as she moves both backward and forward in time, re-creates believable dialogue, switches back and forth between scene and summary, and controls the pace and tension of the story with lyricism or brute imagery. In short, the memoirist keeps her reader engaged by being an adept and agile storyteller. This is not straight autobiography. Memoir is more about what can be gleaned from a section of one's life than about chronicling an entire life. Like a mosaic, memoir is about the individual pieces as much as the eventual whole. Work focuses on reading established memoirists, free writing, and workshopping in and out of class.

    • ENV 250 - Ecology of Place

      Faculty: Cooper, Hurd
      Planned Offering: Spring 2013 and alternate years
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

      Think globally, study locally. This course explores globally significant environmental issues such as biodiversity conservation, sustainable delivery of ecosystem goods and services, and environmental justice, as they are manifested on a local/regional scale. We examine interactions among ethical, ecological, and economic concerns that shape these issues. Students are fully engaged in the development of policy recommendations that could guide relevant decision makers. The course incorporates readings, field trips, films, and discussions with invited experts.

    • ENV 295 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies

      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: ENV 110 or BIOL 111.

      This courses examines special topics in environmental studies, such as ecotourism, the environment and development, local environmental issues, values and the environment, global fisheries, global climate change, tropical deforestation and similar topics of importance, which could change from year to year. This is a research-intensive course where the student would be expected to write a significant paper, either individually or as part of a group, of sufficient quality to be made useful to the scholarly and policy communities. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

    • ENV 381 - Global Environmental Governance: Law, Policy, and Economics

      Faculty: Kahn, Drumbl
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      This seminar examines challenges to the integrity and well-being of the global environment. Its approach is interdisciplinary, drawing from economics, law, political science, and ecology. Through a series of case studies, this seminar examines the tragedy of the commons, open-access resources, the place of markets, intergenerational equality, distributive ethics, environmental racism, and the role of "law" in promoting sustainable economic regimes. The case studies are introduced on a modular basis and include, but are not limited to, climate change; trade and globalization; biodiversity and intellectual property; deforestation and poverty; marine resources; and transboundary movement of hazardous substances. Throughout, an attempt is made to understand the economic and ecological effects of extant international legal regimes and to explore how these can be improved.

    • ENV 395 - Special Topics in Environmental Ethics

      Planned Offering: Winter, Spring
      Credits: 3


      This course explores areas of topical concern within the field of environmental ethics. The issues explored may vary from year to year. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

    • ENV 397 - Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies

      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: ENV 110 and completion of any two of the three remaining areas for the Program in Environmental Studies, and instructor consent.

      An interdisciplinary capstone course intended for students in the environmental studies program. Students analyze a particular environmental issue and attempt to integrate scientific inquiry, political and economic analysis and ethical implications. The particular issue changes each year.

    • JOUR 225 - Crisis Communications

      Faculty: Abah
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: JOUR 273 or instructor consent; at least junior standing.

      A case-study approach to current methods of forecasting problems and responding effectively to crises and consequences in the public and private sectors. Topics include identifying and communicating effectively with stakeholders during crises, effective media-relations strategies during emergencies, building an effective crisis-response plan, regaining public credibility following a crisis, and avoiding public relations mistakes during litigation.

    • JOUR 231 - Communication Theory

      Faculty: Artwick
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: JOUR 101 or instructor consent; at least sophomore standing.

      A critical overview of leading theoretical traditions in communication studies. Examination of the concepts of general and thematic theories in use, describing the similarities and differences among the concepts and applying them in practical situations. Some attention is paid to epistemological foundations, the structure of communication theory as a field, and examining the relationship between communication theory and sociocultural practice.

    • JOUR 242 - Media Ownership and Control

      FDR: SS5
      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: At least junior standing or instructor consent.

      This course explores the relationship between what the media do and how they are owned and run. It examines the influence of market pressures and state regulation, and asks how commercial objectives affect the media's ability to meet their traditional responsibilities within a democratic society, as a forum for discourse, an organ of accountability and a means by which popular culture is sustained. Although the chief focus is on news media, the course also looks at the entertainment industries and the Internet as increasingly integrated parts of a consolidated media system and as interpreters of social and political realities.

    • JOUR 270 - Digital Media and Society

      Faculty: Artwick
      Planned Offering: Spring
      Credits: 4


      Facebook, YouTube, and iPhones are popular, if not essential elements in college students' busy lives. Being born into the digital age, students have grown up with profound and rapidly-changing media and communication technologies, yet likely take them for granted. This course takes an in-depth look at digital media, exploring the relationship between technology and social change. The concept of technological determinism guides our examination of social networking, online news/information, digital entertainment, and health online.

    • JOUR 319 - Mass Media and Society

      Faculty: Richardson
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: At least junior standing. Appropriate for nonmajors.

      A review of the current research into and theories of how people use the mass media, emphasizing the impact of the mass media on public knowledge, attitudes, and discourse. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of mass media to other cultural institutions.

    • JOUR 371 - Reporting on Business

      Faculty: Luecke
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: At least junior standing.

      Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of business, focusing especially on companies and their employees and customers. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business majors.

    • JOUR 372 - Reporting on the Economy

      Faculty: Luecke
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: At least junior standing.

      Reporting and writing techniques used by journalists who cover the world of economics and business, focusing especially on the economy and financial markets. Students develop competence in framing, researching, and writing articles in these areas. A part of the business journalism sequence; also appropriate as an elective for other journalism majors and for business and economics majors.

    • JOUR 377 - Media Management & Entrepreneurship

      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall, Spring
      Credits: 3-4


      Prerequisite: At least junior standing. Appropriate for nonmajors.

      A seminar examining trends and challenges in media management, including a close examination of industry economics, changing reader and viewer habits, revenue and profit pressures, and labor and management issues unique to the news profession.

    • MATH 309 - Mathematical Statistics I

      Planned Offering: Fall 2015 and alternate years
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: The equivalent of MATH 221 with C grade or better.

      Probability, probability density and distribution functions, mathematical expectation, discrete and continuous random variables, and moment generating functions.

    • MATH 310 - Mathematical Statistics II

      Planned Offering: Winter 2016 and alternate years
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: MATH 309.

      Sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, testing hypotheses, regression and correlation, and analysis of variance.

    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations

      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: MATH 221 with C grade or better.

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.

    • MATH 333 - Partial Differential Equations

      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: MATH 332.

      An introduction to the study of boundary value problems and partial differential equations. Topics include modeling heat and wave phenomena, Fourier series, separation of variables, and Bessel functions. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.

    • MATH 353 - Numerical Analysis

      Faculty: Siehler
      Planned Offering: Spring 2015 and alternate years
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisites: MATH 221 and 222.

      Analysis, implementation, and applications of algorithms for solving equations, fitting curves, and numerical differentiation and integration. Theorems and proofs are complemented by hands-on programming exercises fostering a concrete understanding of accuracy, efficiency and stability, as well as an awareness of potential pitfalls in machine arithmetic. No previous programming experience is required.

    • MUS 361 - Advanced Composition I

      Faculty: Vosbein
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: MUS 260.

      This course is the first step in the preparation for the senior composition recital. Original compositions are created and then performed during applied music recitals. Individual instruction is combined with a weekly seminar.

    • PHIL 240 - Contemporary Ethics

      FDR: HU
      Faculty: Mahon
      Planned Offering: Yearly
      Credits: 3


      An examination of different normative ethical theories, including consequentialism (utilitarianism), Kantian deontology, moral intuitionism, and virtue ethics, followed by an application of these normative theories to a selection of ethical problems, including famine and world hunger, abortion, infanticide, euthanasia, suicide, and self-defense. Philosophers include W.D. Ross, J. J. C. Smart, Bernard Williams, Susan Wolf, Peter Singer, Michael Tooley, Judith Jarvis Thomson, and Shelly Kagan.

    • PHIL 242 - Social Inequality and Fair Opportunity

      FDR: HU
      Faculty: Bell
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      An exploration of the different range of opportunities available to various social groups, including racial, ethnic and sexual minorities, women, and the poor. Topics include how to define fair equality of opportunity; the social mechanisms that play a role in expanding and limiting opportunity; legal and group-initiated strategies aimed at effecting fair equality of opportunity and the theoretical foundations of these strategies; as well as an analysis of the concepts of equality, merit and citizenship, and their value to individuals and society.

    • PHIL 342 - Metaethics

      FDR: HU
      Faculty: Smith
      Planned Offering: Alternate years
      Credits: 3


      This course focuses on contemporary issues in metaethics. For example, we address questions such as the following: Do moral judgments express truths that are independent of our feelings and conventions? Are "goodness" and "wrongness" real properties of things, or do we simply use these terms to express our subjective preferences toward states of affairs? Can we reason about morality? Do moral considerations provide practical reasons for all rational agents, or does the normative force of these considerations depend upon an agent's subjective desires? We also consider some meta-theoretical questions about the aims, methods, and authority of moral theory.

    • PHIL 346 - Medical Ethics

      FDR: HU
      Faculty: Burstein
      Planned Offering: Yearly
      Credits: 3


      An examination of the issues arising out of the human impact of modern biomedical research and practice. Specific issues are selected from among the following: abortion, contraception, death and dying, experimentation/research, genetics, in vitro fertilization, intellectual and developmental disabilities, public health/community medicine, science/technology, transplantation and patients' rights.

    • PHIL 354 - Distributive Justice

      FDR: HU
      Faculty: Bell
      Planned Offering: Alternate years
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor consent.

      How should the product of social cooperation be distributed in a just society? Is wealth redistribution through taxes fair? Is it a fair distribution of wealth that a just society depends on, or is distributive justice more complicated than that? Should we have welfare programs, and, if so, what should they be like? Our studies may include John Rawls' political liberalism, Robert Nozick's libertarianism, Ronald Dworkin's equality of resources, Amartya Sen's capabilities approach, Stuart White's justice as fair reciprocity, and criticisms of the distributive paradigm.

    • POL 215 - International Development

      FDR: SS2
      Faculty: Dickovick
      Planned Offering: Fall or Winter
      Credits: 3


      A study of international development and human capability, with a focus on Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The course analyzes theories to explain development successes and failures, with a focus on the structures, institutions, and actors that shape human societies and social change. Key questions include measuring economic growth and poverty, discussing the roles of states and markets in development, and examining the role of industrialized countries in reducing global poverty. The course explores links between politics and other social sciences and humanities.

    • POL 227 - East Asian Politics

      FDR: SS2
      Faculty: LeBlanc
      Planned Offering: Fall 2013 and alternate years
      Credits: 3


      An investigation of East Asian political systems and the global, historical, and cultural contexts in which their political institutions have developed. Students consider the connections between political structure and the rapid social and economic changes in East Asia since World War II, as well as the effectiveness of varied political processes in addressing contemporary problems. Emphasis is given to China, Korea, and Japan.

    • POL 232 - Public Policy

      FDR: SS2
      Faculty: Harris
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: POL 100.

      Introduction to public policy formation and implementation, decision making in government, the concepts and techniques of policy analysis, and ethical analysis of policy. Policy issues such as education, the environment, and public health are used as illustrations.

    • POL 233 - Environmental Policy and Law

      FDR: SS2
      Faculty: Harris
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: ECON 101 or POL 100.

      A study of major environmental laws and the history of their enactment and implementation. Discusses different theoretical approaches from law, ethics, politics, and economics. Reviews significant case law and the legal context. Emphasis is on domestic policy with some attention to international law and treaties.

    • POL 245 - European Politics and Society

      FDR: SS4
      Faculty: Jasiewicz
      Planned Offering: Fall 2015 and alternate years
      Credits: 3


      A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.

    • POL 246 - Post-Communism and New Democracies

      FDR: SS4 as sociology only
      Faculty: Jasiewicz
      Planned Offering: Fall 2014 and alternate years
      Credits: 3


      A comparative analysis of transition from Communism in the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Cases of successful and unsuccessful transitions to civil society, pluralist democracy, and market economy are examined. The comparative framework includes analysis of transition from non-Communist authoritarianism and democratic consolidation in selected countries of Latin America, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and South Africa.

    • POL 247 - Latin American Politics

      FDR: SS2
      Faculty: Dickovick
      Planned Offering: Fall 2013 and alternate years
      Credits: 3


      This course focuses on Latin American politics during the 20th and 21st centuries. Major topics include: democracy and authoritarianism; representation and power; populism, corporatism, socialism, and communism; and questions of poverty, inequality, and economic growth. The course places particular emphasis on the Cuban and Mexican Revolutions, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Guatemala, and Peru. In addition, the course examines political and economic relations between the United States and Latin America.

    • POL 255 - Gender and Politics

      FDR: SS2
      Faculty: LeBlanc
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: POL 100, 105 or 111 or instructor consent.

      This course investigates the gendered terms under which women and men participate in political life. Attention is given to the causes of men's and women's different patterns of participation in politics, to processes that are likely to decrease the inequalities between men's and women's political power, and the processes by which society's gender expectations shape electoral and institutional politics. The different effects of gender on the practice of politics in different nations are compared, with a special emphasis placed on advanced industrial democracies.

    • POL 280 - Biopolicy: Policymaking on the Frontiers of Science

      FDR: SS2
      Faculty: Harris
      Planned Offering: Spring
      Credits: 4


      This course is open to all students, is of particular interest to science and social science students, and is geared toward pre-law and pre-med students at any level. Counts towards the field requirement in American politics. A survey of policy problems arising from advances in microbiology and genetics, particularly including human cloning, reproductive technologies, genetically modified organisms, forensic DNA, behavioral genetics, patenting genetic material, genetic medicine, and genetic counseling.

    • POL 381 - Seminar in International Political Economy

      FDR: SS2
      Faculty: Dickovick
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: ECON 102 or POL 105, or instructor consent. Meets the global politics field requirement in the politics major.

      This course provides an intermediate-level introduction to the major actors, questions, and theories in the field of international political economy (IPE). Course participants discuss political and economic interactions in the areas of international trade, fiscal and monetary policy, and exchange rates; discuss globalization in historical and contemporary perspectives; and examine the international politics of the major intergovernmental organizations, multinational corporations, states, and other institutional actors in the global economy.

    • POV 423 - Poverty and Human Capability: A Research Seminar

      Faculty: Pickett, Staff
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: At least junior standing, POV 101 or POV 103, POV 453, or instructor consent.

      An inquiry into principal factors or agents responsible for the causes, effects, and remedies of poverty. This examination is conducted through reading appropriate in-depth studies from various disciplines and perspectives, and it culminates with an independent research project into specific aspects of poverty drawing on students' internships and respective areas of study and looking forward to their professional work and civic engagement. This seminar serves as a capstone for undergraduate poverty studies and includes second- and third-year law students in Law 391.

    • PSYC 202 - Theories of Personality

      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: Three credits in psychology and at least junior standing.

      This course addresses the theoretical foundations of the study of personality development and organization. Psychoanalytic, trait, learning, cognitive, humanistic, and positive psychology schools of thought are discussed.

    • PSYC 252 - Sensation Measurement and Perception

      Faculty: Lorig
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: NEUR 120 or PSYC 111, and PSYC 250 (as corequisite with instructor consent).

      Problems associated with sensory encoding, scaling, contextual and social determinants of perception are considered. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the senses in daily life.

    • PSYC 254 - Attention

      Faculty: Whiting
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: PSYC 111, PSYC 112, or NEUR 120; and at least junior standing.

      An examination of the theories and mechanisms associated with attentional processes. Topics include: selective attention, divided attention, inhibition, working memory, and the application of these processes in human/machine interfaces. The functioning of the above processes in abnormal patient populations is also examined.

    • PSYC 262 - Gender-Role Development

      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: PSYC 113, PSYC 250 or WGS 120.

      This course provides the student with an overview of gender-role development: How do children learn to be boys and girls? What role do biological factors play in different behaviors of boys and girls? Does society push boys and girls in different directions? We discuss children's evolving ideas about gender, and what can be done to change these ideas (or whether they need to be changed at all). Through the examination of these questions and issues, the course introduces students to the major theories of gender-role development, the research methods used to measure children's gender-role behaviors and attitudes, and the current research in the field.

    • PSYC 269 - Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination

      Faculty: Woodzicka
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: PSYC 114 and PSYC 250 (as co-req or pre-req) or instructor consent.

      This course examines cognitive and affective processes involved in stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Causes and social implications of prejudice involving various stigmatized groups (e.g., African-Americans, women, homosexuals, people of low socioeconomic status, overweight individuals) are examined. Participants focus on attitudes and behaviors of both perpetrators and targets of prejudice that likely contribute to and result from social inequality.

    • SOAN 202 - Contemporary Social Problems

      FDR: SS4
      Faculty: Eastwood
      Planned Offering: Winter 2014 and alternate years
      Credits: 3


      A study of the relationship of social problems to the cultural life and social structure of American society. An analysis of the causes, consequences, and possible solutions to selected social problems in American society.

    • SOAN 212 - Theories of Social Psychology

      Faculty: Chin
      Planned Offering: Winter 2013 and alternate years
      Credits: 3


      An introduction to three major paradigms present in the sociological tradition of social psychology. The course examines social structure and personality, structural social psychology and symbolic interactionist framework. The three paradigmatic approaches are used to understand how macro-level processes influence micro-level social interaction and vice versa.

    • SOAN 228 - Race and Ethnic Relations

      FDR: SS4
      Faculty: Novack
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: At least junior standing. Instructor consent required.

      An analysis of minority groups in America. Theories of ethnicity are examined focusing on the relationship between class and ethnicity, and on the possible social and biological significance of racial differences. Attention is also given to prejudice and discrimination, as well as to consideration of minority strategies to bring about change.

    • SOAN 245 - European Politics and Society

      FDR: SS4
      Faculty: Jasiewicz
      Planned Offering: Fall 2013 and alternate years
      Credits: 3


      A comparative analysis of European political systems and social institutions. The course covers the established democracies of western and northern Europe, the new democracies of southern and east-central Europe, and the post-Communist regimes in eastern and southeastern Europe. Mechanisms of European integration are also discussed with attention focused on institutions such as European Union, NATO, OSCE, and Council of Europe.

    • SOAN 246 - Post-Communism and New Democracies

      FDR: SS4
      Faculty: Jasiewicz
      Planned Offering: Fall 2014 and alternate years
      Credits: 3


      A comparative analysis of transition from Communism in the countries of the former Soviet bloc. Cases of successful and unsuccessful transitions to civil society, pluralist democracy, and market economy are examined. The comparative framework includes analysis of transition from non-Communist authoritarianism and democratic consolidation in selected countries of Latin America, the Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and South Africa.

    • SOAN 251 - Social Movements

      FDR: SS4
      Faculty: LeBlanc, Eastwood
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: POL 100, 105 or 111 or instructor consent.

      A survey of American social movements, including an evaluation of competing theoretical approaches to the study of social movements and an examination of the strategies, successes, failures, and political and social consequences of the civil rights, labor, student, and women's movements. Close attention is given to factors contributing to the rise and decline of these movements.

    • SOAN 262 - The Sociology of Culture

      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Not offered in 2013-2014
      Credits: 3


      This course introduces research and theory in the sociology of culture. Explores such questions as: What is culture? What is the relationship between culture and society? How and why does culture change? In addition to these questions, topics covered include an examination of the various theoretical approaches to culture; the relationship between high and popular culture and the debate over cultural boundaries; the production, distribution and consumption of culture; national culture and national identity; globalization; and the intersections between culture and class, gender, ethnicity and race. Special attention will be paid to examining key cultural forms, such as television, fashion, music, advertising, museums, art, and literature.

    • SOAN 280 - Gender and Sexuality

      FDR: SS4
      Faculty: Novack
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      An anthropological and sociological investigation of sex roles in preliterate and modern societies. Special consideration is given to the role of innate sexual differences, cultural variation, technology, and power in determining patterns of male dominance. Emphasis is placed on real and mythical female and male power in the context of changing relationships between men and women in American society.

    • SOAN 375 - Methods of Social Inquiry

      Faculty: Chin
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: SOAN 101 (ANTH 101) or SOAN 102 (SOC 102), and at least junior standing.

      The rationale and utility of research and its relationship to social and political theory. The two major aspects of social inquiry-measurement and interpretation-are examined focusing on the structuring of inquiry, modes of observation (experiments, surveys, field research, unobtrusive research, etc.), and analysis of data. The course includes lectures, discussions and field exercises.

    • THTR 220 - Playwriting

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Offered in fall or winter when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

      An introductory workshop in scene writing, culminating in the composition and staged reading of a short, one-act play. Weekly writing and reading assignments are required. Limited enrollment.

    • THTR 235 - Design and Performance

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Collins
      Planned Offering: Spring 2014 and alternate years
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: Three credits in theater or dance.

      This course is an in-depth exploration of the crafted artifacts of the theater, specifically relate to the properties of puppets and masks. Through videos and demonstrations, students experiment with various puppet and mask construction techniques and performance methods.

    • THTR 238 - 3D Printing & Desktop Manufacturing for the Theater

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Collins
      Planned Offering: Fall 2014 and alternate years
      Credits: 3


      Desktop manufacturing has revolutionized the design and prototyping of objects. This course is an introduction to the use of desktop manufacturing technologies. Students learn how to create digital designs, publish them electronically and create physical versions of those digital ideas. The course concentrates on how these technologies can be used in theater design and technology.

    • THTR 239 - Total Theater

      FDR: HA
      Planned Offering: Spring
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: Three credits in theater or dance and instructor consent.

      A practical study of design, directing, production and acting problems in a specific style of dramatic literature, culminating in a public theatrical production.

    • THTR 251 - Introduction to Performance Design

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Collins, Evans
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      An introduction to the history, fundamentals and aesthetics of design for theater and dance with an emphasis on the collaborative nature of the design disciplines. Design projects are required. Lab fee required

    • THTR 253 - Digital Production

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Evans
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Digital technologies and multimedia interaction are increasingly utilized to produce, enhance, and innovate theatrical production. Students examine and experiment with various digital technologies as they relate to theater and dance performance. Students create digital audio, video, design rendering, and animation projects for theatrical performances.

    • THTR 361 - Stage Directing

      FDR: HA
      Faculty: Martinez
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: Junior standing and THTR 141 or instructor consent.

      A studio course exploring the director's approach to play production, stressing the methods by which style, meaning, emotional values, and plot may be clearly expressed for an audience, culminating in a public presentation.

  8. One course from each International Business and Information Systems
  9. The 18 credits required in 4 and 5 above must include at least one course from each of the following areas:
     

    a. International Business: BUS 305, 330, 333, 335, 337, 357, 372, 390; ECON 270, 271, 272, 274, 275, 280, 317, 356, 382
    b. Information Systems: ACCT 310; BUS 306, 310, 311, 312, 315, 317, 321, 325

     

  10. Business Adm and Psychology majors:
  11. For students majoring in both business administration and psychology, completing both PSYC 120 and 250 may be substituted for INTR 202.”