Film Courses

Fall 2014

We do not offer any courses this term.


Spring 2014

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Topics in Film and Literature

FILM 196 - Bini

Selected topics in film and literature. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 topics: FILM 196B: French New Wave Film (4). Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement. This course uses French language films as the basis for discussions, oral presentations and directed writing exercises. It is structured as an intensive workshop for students who would like to learn to analyze films. This course is conducted in English and all of the readings are in English. The class focuses on French New Wave films of the 1960s and '70s and the filmmakers who revolutionized film style by experimenting with hand-held cameras, natural light and sound, and by playfully questioning accepted film techniques. Students acquire the vocabulary to describe camera position, camera movement, and editing as the grammar and syntax of the 'mise-en-scène.' They also acquire a better understanding of how the composition and sequencing of images contributes to narrative development. These films are a window onto the baby boom culture of post World War II France and, as such, provide a deeper understanding of contemporary French culture. All films are in French with English subtitles. (HL). Lambeth.

FILM 196: Visions of Italian Landscapes: Rome in Film (4). Study Abroad. May be used for the minor in film and visual culture. This course examines the representation of Rome and the Italian cinematic city, a crucial element to fully understanding Italian cinema and society, from 1945 to present time. Readings, discussions and excursions provide an understanding of the contrast between ancient and modern that characterizes Italian postwar urbanization. The course investigates aspects of contemporary Italian society and life, the massive modernization first brought by the economic miracle and then by tourism and globalization. While the course is taught in English, special attention is devoted to some key expressions in Italian, dialects, body language as well as other aspects of Italian culture. (HL) Bini. Spring 2014

Topics in Film and Literature

FILM 196B - Lambeth

Selected topics in film and literature. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 topics: FILM 196B: French New Wave Film (4). Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement. This course uses French language films as the basis for discussions, oral presentations and directed writing exercises. It is structured as an intensive workshop for students who would like to learn to analyze films. This course is conducted in English and all of the readings are in English. The class focuses on French New Wave films of the 1960s and '70s and the filmmakers who revolutionized film style by experimenting with hand-held cameras, natural light and sound, and by playfully questioning accepted film techniques. Students acquire the vocabulary to describe camera position, camera movement, and editing as the grammar and syntax of the 'mise-en-scène.' They also acquire a better understanding of how the composition and sequencing of images contributes to narrative development. These films are a window onto the baby boom culture of post World War II France and, as such, provide a deeper understanding of contemporary French culture. All films are in French with English subtitles. (HL). Lambeth.

FILM 196: Visions of Italian Landscapes: Rome in Film (4). Study Abroad. May be used for the minor in film and visual culture. This course examines the representation of Rome and the Italian cinematic city, a crucial element to fully understanding Italian cinema and society, from 1945 to present time. Readings, discussions and excursions provide an understanding of the contrast between ancient and modern that characterizes Italian postwar urbanization. The course investigates aspects of contemporary Italian society and life, the massive modernization first brought by the economic miracle and then by tourism and globalization. While the course is taught in English, special attention is devoted to some key expressions in Italian, dialects, body language as well as other aspects of Italian culture. (HL) Bini. Spring 2014

Seven-Minute Shakespeare

FILM 255 - Dobin

After intensive collective reading and discussion of four Shakespeare plays in the first week, students organize into four-person groups with the goal of producing a seven-minute video version of one of the plays by the end of the term, using only the actual text of the play. The project requires full engagement and commitment, and includes tasks such as editing and selecting from the text to produce the film script, creating storyboards, casting and recruiting actors, rehearsing, filming, editing, adding sound tracks and effects. We critique and learn from each other's efforts.

Music in the Films of Stanley Kubrick

FILM 285 - Gaylard

How does music add power and meaning to a film? What are the connections between the flow of music and the flow of a dramatic narrative? How does music enhance visual images? The course will focus on the pre-existent classical compositions chosen by Stanley Kubrick for his movies 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), A Clockwork Orange (1971), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980). The ability to read music is not a requirement for this course.


Winter 2014

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Topics in Film Studies

FILM 195 - Martinez

Selected topic in film studies, focused on one or more of film history, theory, production, or screenwriting. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.