Film Courses

Fall 2015

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

19th-Century European Art

ARTH 262 - Sytsma, Janine A. / Olson-Janjic, Kathleen

This course begins in the late 18th century and covers major European art movements and criticism up to c.1900. Topics include the art of the French Revolution as an instrument of propaganda; the rise of Romanticism; the advent and impact of early photography; and the aesthetic and ideological origins of Modern Art.

Drawing I

ARTS 111 - Olson-Janjic, Kathleen

Development of skills and visual awareness through the study of the basic elements of drawing. Variety of media, including pencil, charcoal, ink and crayon. Lab fee required.

Drawing I

ARTS 111 - STAFF / Olson-Janjic, Kathleen

Development of skills and visual awareness through the study of the basic elements of drawing. Variety of media, including pencil, charcoal, ink and crayon. Lab fee required.

Photography I

ARTS 120 - Bowden, Christa K.

An introduction to the methods and materials of black and white film photography, with an emphasis on composition, exposure, and darkroom technique. The course includes a combination of image presentations, technical demonstrations, studio instruction, and group critiques. Lab fee required; cameras are available for check-out.

Design I

ARTS 131 - Stene, Larry M.

An introduction to the elements and concepts of two-dimensional design within the context of current digital technology, with an emphasis on contemporary computer software programs.

Painting II

ARTS 218 - Olson-Janjic, Kathleen

Continuation of ARTS 217. Lab fee required.

Film

ENGL 233 - Lilly, Anthony W., II / Wheeler, Lesley M.

An introductory study of film in English. The course may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of film.

Topics in Film Studies

FILM 195 - Martinez, Joseph D.

Selected topic in film studies, focused on one or more of film history, theory, production, or screenwriting. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2015 topic:

FILM-195: Acting for the Camera (3). No prerequisites. A studio course designed to improve a student-actor's ability to communicate ideas and emotions in a public forum and in particular for a film and television viewing audience. Students explore the acting techniques unique to dramatic characterization in the non-linear processes of digital film production. (HA) Martinez. Fall 2015

Global Cinema

FILM 233 - McCormick, Stephen P.

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus upon texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. The course generally emphasizes one national film tradition and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of film.

Stage Acting I

THTR 141 - Levy, Jemma A.

An introduction to acting for the stage. In this hands-on class, students learn and develop physical and vocal techniques for text-based and improvisational performance, focusing on relationships, objectives, and actions. Work includes in-class scene presentations from modern scripts.

Playwriting

THTR 220 - Jew, Kimberly M.

An introductory workshop in creative writing for the theater that will focus on traditional forms of scene and script writing. Opportunities for collaborative writing and devised theater may be included. Weekly writing and reading assignments are required. Limited enrollment.

Introduction to Performance Design

THTR 251 - Collins, Owen

An introduction to the history, fundamentals and aesthetics of design for theater and dance with an emphasis on the collaborative nature of the design disciplines. Design projects are required. Lab fee required

Lighting Design

THTR 336 - Evans, Shawn Paul

A study of the practice of stage lighting, focusing on styles of production, historical methods and artistic theory. Culminates in a light design for a public theatrical production. Lab fee required.


Spring 2015

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Photography and the City

ARTS 223 - Bowden, Christa K.

Spring Term Abroad course. Several major cities, including Paris and New York, play an important role in the medium of photography. Students are introduced to the historical context of photography and photographers of a particular city, as well as contemporary artists and exhibitions. Field trips to museums, galleries, and relevant sites play an integral role in the course. The geometry of the city provides a sharp visual contrast to the bucolic landscape of rural Virginia. Each student undertakes a substantial photographic project based upon a particular visual element or conceptual idea of the city, shooting for their project every day of the first three weeks while in the one of these cities, with regular group critiques. The last week of the course is spent printing the project and curating an exhibition of the work.

Topics in Film and Literature

FILM 196 - Lambeth, John A.

Selected topics in film and literature. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2015 topic:

FILM 196: French New Wave Film (4). Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement. This course uses French language films as the basis for discussions, oral presentations and directed writing exercises. It is structured as an intensive workshop for students who would like to learn to analyze films. This course is conducted in English and all of the readings will be in English. The class will focus on French New Wave films of the 1950s and 60s and the filmmakers who revolutionized film style by experimenting with hand-held cameras, natural light and sound, and by playfully questioning accepted film techniques. Students will acquire the vocabulary to describe camera position, camera movement, and editing as the grammar and syntax of the 'mise-en-scène.' They will acquire a better understanding of how the composition and sequencing of images contributes to narrative development. These films are a window onto the baby boom culture of post World War II France and, as such, will provide a deeper understanding of contemporary French culture. All films are in French with English subtitles. (HL). Lambeth.

Seven-Minute Shakespeare

FILM 255 - Dobin, Howard N. (Hank)

After intensive collective reading and discussion of Shakespeare plays in the first week, students organize into four-person groups with the goal of producing a seven-minute video version of one of the plays by the end of the term, using only the actual text of the play. The project requires full engagement and commitment, and includes tasks such as editing and selecting from the text to produce the film script, creating storyboards, casting and recruiting actors, rehearsing, filming, editing, adding sound tracks and effects. This spring's plays may include The Tempest, The Comedy of Errors, and Measure for Measure. To see last year's films of Macbeth and The Taming of the Shrew, click on this link.

Cross-Cultural Documentary Filmmaking

JOUR 266 - Finch, Kevin D.

The United States is a melting pot of nationalities and cultures. As people move to the U. S. from other countries they go through cross-cultural adaptation, and identity becomes an issue for everyone. Students in this course work in three-person teams to produce five-minute documentaries on cross-cultural adaptation by an ethnic community in our region or by selected international students at Washington and Lee. Students are expected to immerse themselves in learning about the home countries and current communities of their subjects. The course includes instruction in the techniques of documentary film-making, allowing student to develop their writing, storytelling, shooting and editing skills.

Digital Media and Society

JOUR 270 - Artwick, Claudette G.

Facebook, YouTube, and iPhones are popular, if not essential elements in college students' busy lives. Being born into the digital age, students have grown up with profound and rapidly-changing media and communication technologies, yet likely take them for granted. This course takes an in-depth look at digital media, exploring the relationship between technology and social change. The concept of technological determinism guides our examination of social networking, online news/information, digital entertainment, and health online.

Topics in Politics and Film

POL 292 - Le Blanc, Robin M.

This course examines how film and television present political issues and themes. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2015 topic:

POL 292: Politics and Film: The Politics of Race and Gender in Mad Men (4). This class uses episodes of the Emmy Award-winning television series Mad Men--famous for its depiction of shifting understandings of gender and race relations in the United States in the 1960s--as a basis for exploring the culture of race and gender shared/challenged by the show's 21st-century audience. Supplementary reading and films offer a framework for critique. Students create their own short screenplays to further explore how entertainment can work as social criticism. Le Blanc. Spring 2015

Topics in Latin American Culture and Literature

SPAN 290A - Botta, Monica B.

This course offers students the opportunity to further their knowledge of the culture and literature of a specific Latin American country, and their awareness of Latin America in general, through the study of special cultural and literary topics. Readings, discussions, and assignments occur primarily in Spanish. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2015 topic:

SPAN 290A: Topics in Latin American Culture and Literature: Instrospección, Reflexión y Activismo Social en el Cine Documental Contemporáneo (4). Documentary filmmaking has a strong tradition in Latin America going back to the 1930s and becoming a remarkable form of denunciation in the 1960s and 1970s. Since its origins, and in most cases, a commitment to socio-political causes has motivated the nonfiction productions in the region. In the past two decades, though, there has been a tendency to use documentaries as a means of connecting and understanding personal and historical realities, as well as a mode of advancing social causes through the participation of the social actors in the filmmaking process. This course introduces students to nonfiction films with specific attention given to the documentary practices that emerged in Latin America in the past two decades. Botta. Spring 2015

SPAN 290B: Latin America through Film (4). This spring term abroad course offers an overview of key aspects of Latin American culture, with a special focus on Argentina, as seen through film, with supporting material drawn from music, poetry, and news articles. Students view, discuss, and analyze movies from Latin American countries such as Argentina, México, Cuba, and Peru, in order to develop an understanding of Latin American cultures, and of issues that have shaped their societies today, including: the foundation of national identities in the period immediately following independence; the political struggles and dictatorships of the 20th century; women and society; and immigration and globalization. Students develop tools to analyze movies in their thematic content and cinematic aspects, write movie reviews, and enact selected scenes from the movies discussed. Readings and guided field trips enhance students' understanding, along with a daily Spanish language class emphasizing listening, speaking, reading, and writing. (HU) Pinto-Bailey. Spring 2015


Winter 2015

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Baroque and Rococo Art

ARTH 258 - Lepage, Andrea C.

A survey of the art and architecture of Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries. The course focuses on the stylistic and ideological issues shaping western art during the age of Religious Wars. This course considers the stylistic innovations of Caravaggio, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt, Velasquez, Poussin, Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, and Tiepolo, as well as the function of- and interest in-artistic production within the context of 17th- and 18th-century society.

History of Photography

ARTH 261 - Ramirez, Jennifer O. (Jenny)

An introduction to the technical, aesthetic, and social history of photography within a cultural context in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as contemporary movements in the medium. Course includes weekly lectures, readings, films, and discussions, as well as gallery and museum visits throughout the term.

20th-Century European Art

ARTH 263 - King, Elliott H.

Sculpture and painting in Europe from 1900 to 1950.

Surrealism

ARTH 363 - King, Elliott H.

A study of the development of surrealist art and thought. For its practitioners, surrealism was--and remains--foremost a revolution, striving to "transform the world" (Marx) and "change life" (Rimbaud). We examine writings and ideas underlying key works by artists such as Dali, Magritte, and Max Ernst; watch surrealist films; and play surrealist "games of chance".

Photography I

ARTS 120 - Bowden, Christa K.

An introduction to the technical and creative principles of black-and-white photography as a fine art medium, with an emphasis on composition, exposure, and darkroom technique. Course includes a combination of image presentations, technical demonstrations, studio instruction, and group critiques. Lab fee required; cameras available for checkout from department.

Design I

ARTS 131 - Stene, Larry M.

An introduction to the elements and concepts of two-dimensional design within the context of current digital technology, with an emphasis on contemporary computer software programs.

Design I

ARTS 131 - Stene, Larry M.

An introduction to the elements and concepts of two-dimensional design within the context of current digital technology, with an emphasis on contemporary computer software programs.

Film

ENGL 233 - Keiser, Jess C.

An introductory study of film in English. The course may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of film.

Film

ENGL 233 - Keiser, Jess C.

An introductory study of film in English. The course may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of film.

Topics in Film Studies

FILM 195 - Renault-Steele, Summer E.

Selected topic in film studies, focused on one or more of film history, theory, production, or screenwriting. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2015 topics:

FILM 195-01: Film: Medium of a Disintegrating World: Visual Culture and Modernity in the Weimar Republic (3). Prerequisite: Completion of FW FDR requirement. Before the advent of modern fascism, a group of prescient German Jewish intellectuals began to take film and popular culture seriously. Known as "The Frankfurt School," they theorized possible connections between their own visual landscape and the social, political, and economic conditions of the Weimar Republic. This course revisits key writings about film from The Frankfurt School in their historical specificity and seeks to reopen the potential of their thought more generally. In a time of swiftly evolving digital media, what theoretical tools, flickers of insight, or provocation can these early scholars of popular culture offer us today? (HA)   FILM 195-02: Acting for the Camera (3). Prerequisite: Completion of FW FDR requirement. A studio course designed to improve a student-actor's ability to communicate ideas and emotions in a public forum and, in particular, for a film- and television-viewing audience. Students explore the acting techniques unique to dramatic characterization in the non-linear processes of digital film production. (HA)

Topics in Film Studies

FILM 195B - Martinez, Joseph D.

Selected topic in film studies, focused on one or more of film history, theory, production, or screenwriting. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2015 topics:

FILM 195-01: Film: Medium of a Disintegrating World: Visual Culture and Modernity in the Weimar Republic (3). Prerequisite: Completion of FW FDR requirement. Before the advent of modern fascism, a group of prescient German Jewish intellectuals began to take film and popular culture seriously. Known as "The Frankfurt School," they theorized possible connections between their own visual landscape and the social, political, and economic conditions of the Weimar Republic. This course revisits key writings about film from The Frankfurt School in their historical specificity and seeks to reopen the potential of their thought more generally. In a time of swiftly evolving digital media, what theoretical tools, flickers of insight, or provocation can these early scholars of popular culture offer us today? (HA)   FILM 195-02: Acting for the Camera (3). Prerequisite: Completion of FW FDR requirement. A studio course designed to improve a student-actor's ability to communicate ideas and emotions in a public forum and, in particular, for a film- and television-viewing audience. Students explore the acting techniques unique to dramatic characterization in the non-linear processes of digital film production. (HA)

Global Cinema

FILM 233 - McCormick, Stephen P.

An introductory study of film taught in English and with a topical focus upon texts from a variety of global film-making traditions. The course generally emphasizes one national film tradition and, within it, may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of film.

Research and Writing

FILM 413 - Collins, Owen

A collaborative group research, writing, and/or production project for junior or senior minors, conducted in supervising faculty members' areas of expertise, with directed independent study culminating in a substantial final project. Possible topics include global and national film, focused treatments of auteur-directors or genres, film and psychology, film and technological change, film and painting, original film production.

Research and Writing

FILM 413 - Finch, Kevin D.

A collaborative group research, writing, and/or production project for junior or senior minors, conducted in supervising faculty members' areas of expertise, with directed independent study culminating in a substantial final project. Possible topics include global and national film, focused treatments of auteur-directors or genres, film and psychology, film and technological change, film and painting, original film production.

The Documentary

JOUR 338 - Finch, Kevin D.

A critical study of the documentary in film and television, with analysis of prominent directors and genres.

Introduction to Text and Performance

THTR 121 - Ristau, Todd W.

This course explores the intersection between dramatic script and performance.  Students are guided through a method of critical strategies for assessing and interpreting dramatic literature, as well as a series of formal writing exercises designed to develop their critical and creative abilities. The course  culminates in the creation and presentation of student-written and performed scenes.

Stage Acting I

THTR 141 - Mish, Robert W.

An introduction to the art of acting. A studio course with special attention given to the actor's analysis of dramatic literature. Memorization and the presentation of scenes from plays are required.