Residential Life Program

The residential life staff is comprised of sophomore, junior and senior student leaders who are selected through a competitive process during fall term for the next academic year. Resident assistants (RA's) work with upper-division students in Woods Creek Apartments and University theme houses. Resident advisers for First-Year students (RA-FY's) work with First-Year students in the First-Year residence halls: Graham Lees, Davis, Gilliam and Gaines. Training for residence life staff occurs throughout the academic year and during a week-long intensive program one week before Orientation in the fall of each year. Residential Life staff provide regular programming planned for and with residents throughout the academic year.

Resident Advisers for First-Year Students

RA's for First-Years are sophomores, juniors, and seniors who live in the first-year residence halls and assist students with the academic and social transition to college. Approximately 12-20 students live on each hall with their assigned RA. The selection process to serve as an RA is rigorous; these upper-division students are knowledgeable about Washington and Lee and are available to answer questions and discuss problems. They also are entrusted with enforcing the residence halls policies of the University. RA's provide a broad range of social and educational programs ranging from informational programs about the student culture at Washington and Lee to social programs including bowling and hall dinners at local restaurants. Residents are encouraged to take an active role in assisting with planning in the residence halls.

First-Year students should always feel free to call upon their RA for advice and information.

Resident Advisers for Upper-Division Students

Resident Advisers are sophomores, juniors, and seniors who live in the upper-division residence halls and assist their peers with issues of on-campus life. Approximately 20-25 students live on each hall with their assigned resident adviser. The selection process to serve as resident adviser is rigorous; therefore, these upper-division students are knowledgeable about Washington and Lee and are available to answer questions and discuss problems. They also are entrusted with enforcing the residence hall policies of the University. RA's provide programming opportunities that speak to the issues more pertinent to older students at Washington and Lee such as sessions with staff from the Career Development Center.