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Sociology and Anthropology Degree Requirements

Sociology and Anthropology major leading to BA degree

A major in sociology and anthropology leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree consists of at least 36 credits as follows:

  1. ANTH 101, SOC 102, 375
  2. One course chosen from INTR 202; MATH 118; PSYC 250 and SOC 118
  3. Completion of one of the two following areas of emphasis:

Sociology (24 credits)

a. Theory: SOC 351
b. Emphasis: Three additional courses numbered 180 or above in the department, two in sociology and one in anthropology
c. Electives: Three additional courses chosen from courses numbered 200 and above in anthropology, sociology, or, when approved by the department head, economics, history, philosophy, politics, psychology, religion, or other disciplines
d. Capstone: SOC 395

Anthropology (24 credits)

a. Theory: ANTH 354
b. Emphasis: Three additional courses numbered 180 or above in the department, two in anthropology and one in sociology
c. Electives: Three additional courses chosen from courses numbered 200 and above in anthropology, sociology, or, when approved by the department head, economics, history, philosophy, politics, psychology, religion, or other disciplines
d. Capstone: ANTH 395

Students who also declare a major in psychology may request a substitution for SOC 375.

Students who intend to enroll in a graduate program in Sociology should complete the Sociology emphasis and consider enrolling in SOC 374 as one of the Sociology emphasis electives.

Students who wish to attend graduate school in Anthropology should complete the Anthropology emphasis. Those who have a particular interest in Archaeology should select the Anthropology emphasis and should enroll in ANTH 205 and 377. In addition, they should consider taking other Archaeology courses within the Anthropology track. Those students considering a graduate program in Archaeology are advised to take, as well, ANTH 207, 252, and an elective course in cultural anthropology. Many graduate programs in this field of Anthropology want to see a degree of expertise in the other three fields of the discipline.

  1. Required courses:
    • ANTH 101 - Introduction to Anthropology

      FDR: SS4
      Credits: 3
      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter


      Prerequisite: First-year or sophomore standing. Juniors and seniors with instructor consent.

      An examination of people and their cultures. An introduction to the techniques employed by the physical anthropologist, archaeologist, and ethnographer is provided. Specific subjects considered include: the physical prerequisites to the acquisition of culture, archaeological interpretation of cultural behavior, and the influences of culture upon the individual and society.

    • SOC 102 - General Sociology

      FDR: SS4
      Credits: 3
      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter


      Prerequisite: First-year or sophomore standing. Juniors and seniors with instructor consent.

      Human society: culture, personality, human nature, social groups, associations, and institutions; analysis of major institutions and of modern social trends.

    • SOC 375 - Methods of Social Inquiry

      Credits: 3
      Faculty: Chin
      Planned Offering: Fall


      Prerequisites: SOC 102 or ANTH 101 and at least junior standing.

      The rationale and utility of research and its relationship to social and political theory. The two major aspects of social inquiry-measurement and interpretation-are examined focusing on the structuring of inquiry, modes of observation (experiments, surveys, field research, unobtrusive research, etc.), and analysis of data. The course includes lectures, discussions and field exercises.

  2. One course chosen from
    • INTR 202 - Applied Statistics

      Credits: 4
      Faculty: Staff
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter


      Prerequisite: INTR 201.

      An examination of the principal applications of statistics in accounting, business, economics, and politics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.

    • MATH 118 - Introduction to Statistics

      FDR: SC
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter


      Prerequisite: MATH 101.

      Elementary probability and counting. Mean and variance of discrete and continuous random variables. Central Limit Theorem. Confidence intervals and hypothesis tests concerning parameters of one or two normal populations.

    • PSYC 250 - Research Design and Analysis

      Credits: 4
      Faculty: Johnson, Whiting
      Planned Offering: Fall


      Prerequisite: PSYC 120.

      Students learn about the design and analysis of psychological research, with particular emphasis on experimentation. Students learn statistical inference appropriate for hypothesis testing, and they use standard statistical packages to analyze data. Laboratory course.

    • SOC 118 - Basic Statistics in the Social Sciences

      Credits: 3
      Faculty: Chin
      Planned Offering: Fall 2013 and alternate years


      Introductory statistics course designed to help students become good consumers of statistics, but especially geared for students interested in sociology, archeology, and anthropology. Course is aimed to help students engage in hypothesis-testing. Topics include descriptive and inferential statistics, sampling, and regression analysis. Students also get practical experience with cleaning and analyzing real world secondary data.

  3. Completion of one of the two following areas of emphasis
    • Sociology (24 credits)
      • Theory:
        • SOC 351 - Sociological Theory

          Credits: 3
          Faculty: Eastwood
          Planned Offering: Fall


          Prerequisite: SOC 102 and at least junior standing.

          An introduction to the main ideas of classical social theorists, who established the foundations of sociology, and to the basic theoretical concepts of modern sociology, covering the period from the early 19th century to the present. The origins of theorists' basic ideas are studied, along with the nature of their basic works and their legacies to modern sociological theory. The major schools of sociological theory (functional, conflict, exchange, interactionist, and structural) are discussed, along with the possibilities for the integration of various theoretical perspectives.

      • Emphasis:

        Three additional courses numbered 180 or above in the department, two in sociology and one in anthropology

      • Electives:

        Three additional courses chosen from courses numbered 200 and above in anthropology, sociology, or, when approved by the department head, economics, history, philosophy, politics, psychology, religion, or other disciplines

      • Capstone:
        • SOC 395 - Senior Seminar in Sociological Analysis

          Credits: 3
          Faculty: Jasiewicz
          Planned Offering: Winter


          Prerequisite: SOC 102, and SOC 375, and SOC 118, MATH 118, INTR 202 or PSYC 250.

          This course is designed as a capstone experience for majors with the sociology emphasis. Students, utilizing their knowledge of sociological theory and research methods, design and execute independent research projects, typically involving secondary analysis of survey data. Working on a subject of their choice, students learn how to present research questions and arguments, formulate research hypotheses, test hypotheses through univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses (utilizing appropriate statistical packages such as SPSS), and write research reports.

    • Anthropology (24 credits)
      • Theory:
        • ANTH 354 - Cultural Theory

          Credits: 3
          Faculty: Goluboff
          Planned Offering: Fall


          Prerequisite: ANTH 101 and at least junior standing.

          A consideration of the development of social and cultural theory from an anthropological perspective. A discussion of the major contributors to the field is pursued. Required of all majors in anthropology and sociology.

      • Emphasis:

        Three additional courses numbered 180 or above in the department, two in anthropology and one in sociology

      • Electives:

        Three additional courses chosen from courses numbered 200 and above in anthropology, sociology, or, when approved by the department head, economics, history, philosophy, politics, psychology, religion, or other disciplines

      • Capstone:
        • ANTH 395 - Senior Seminar in Anthropological Analysis

          Credits: 3
          Faculty: Bell
          Planned Offering: Winter


          Prerequisite: ANTH 101 and SOC 375.

          This course provides students with a capstone experience in anthropology. It builds on and expands students' knowledge of anthropological theory, methods, and interpretation by drawing on diverse published case studies in cultural anthropology and archaeology, and on students' experiences in the course. Each student designs and implements an original research project in an area of particular interest within cultural anthropology or archaeology. This process involves students thinking through and choosing among theoretical perspectives, research methods, analytical approaches, and interpretive media individually and collaboratively. Students also reflect on key ethical issues in anthropology, assess their anthropological foundation, and consider the ways in which their educational experiences have encouraged them to think about global cultural diversity and their own positions in western society.