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Physics-Engineering Degree Requirements

The Physics department has the following degrees:

Chemistry-Engineering major leading to BS degree

A major in chemistry-engineering leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 47 credits, no more than three credits of which may be from 400-level courses, and including the following:

  1. PHYS 111, 112, 113, 114; CHEM 110, 211, 241 or 241S, 242, 262; ENGN 203, 204, 240 (PHYS 240), 311; MATH 221, 332;
  2. Eight additional credits chosen from courses numbered 200 or above in biology, chemistry, engineering, and physics. No more than three of these credits may be numbered 400 or above.
  1. Required courses
    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 101 or equivalent.

      Corequisite: PHYS 113

      An introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics. Topics include Newton's laws, wave motion, and the laws of thermodynamics. This course must be taken simultaneously with Physics 113.

    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: PHYS 111.

      Corequisite: PHYS 114

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include electricity and magnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum theory. This course must be taken simultaneously with PHYS 114.

    • PHYS 113 - General Physics Laboratory I

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 1


      Corequisite: PHYS 111. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 111.

      Laboratory exercises in classical mechanics.

    • PHYS 114 - General Physics Laboratory II

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 1


      Corequisite: PHYS 112. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 112.

      Laboratory exercises in electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics.

    • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 4


      NOTE: Instructor Consent required for upper-division students ONLY. Contact Steve Desjardins for Instructor Consent.

      This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course.

    • CHEM 211 - Analytical Chemistry

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: CHEM 110 and sophomore standing.

      Emphasis on inorganic systems exhibiting aqueous solution equilibria. Topics covered include acid/base reactions, redox reactions, complexation, precipitation reactions, and solution equilibrium. Laboratory work emphasizes basic wet-chemical as well as more sophisticated instrumental techniques of chemical quantitative analysis with appropriate statistical methods of data handling. Laboratory course with fee.

    • CHEM 241 - Organic Chemistry I

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: Grade of C (2.0) or better in CHEM 110.

      A survey of the compounds of carbon including their structure, chemical and physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms, identification, and synthesis. Laboratory focuses on the development of skills in preparing, purifying, and identifying organic compounds using spectroscopic methods. Laboratory course with fee.

    • or
    • CHEM 241S - Organic Chemistry I at St. Andrews

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisites: An average grade of 3.0 or better in CHEM 110, a 3.000 cumulative grade-point average.

      A survey of the compounds of carbon including their structure, chemical and physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms, identification, and synthesis. Laboratory focuses on the development of skills in preparing, purifying, and identifying organic compounds using spectroscopic methods. Taught at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland with final grade assigned by W&L faculty member. Laboratory course.

    • CHEM 242 - Organic Chemistry II

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: CHEM 241 or 241S.

      A continuation of CHEM 241.  Laboratory course with fee.

    • CHEM 262 - Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Kinetics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter, 2015
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: CHEM 110 and MATH 102 and junior standing.

      An introduction to classical and statistical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics with an emphasis on biological systems. Topics include enzyme kinetics, the thermodynamics of metabolic cycles, and the conformational energetics of biomolecules, especially protein folding.

    • ENGN 203 - Mechanics I: Statics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: MATH-102, PHYS-111 (PHYS 111 as corequisite with instructor consent)

      The science of mechanics is used to study bodies in equilibrium under the action of external forces. Emphasis is on problem solving: trusses, frames and machines, centroids, area moments of inertia, beams, cables, and friction.

    • ENGN 204 - Mechanics II: Dynamics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: ENGN 203.

      A study of kinetics of particles and rigid bodies including force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, momentum. A student may not receive degree credit for both ENGN 204 and PHYS 230.

    • ENGN 240 - Thermodynamics (PHYS 240)

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: PHYS 112 and MATH 221.

      A study of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of matter, and applications to engineering processes.

    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: Take ENGN 204 or PHYS 230.

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow and boundary layer theory. Laboratory course.

    • MATH 221 - Multivariable Calculus

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: The equivalent of MATH 102 with C grade or better. Note: Students needing this course to fulfill an FDR requirement should add to a waiting list when open; additional sections may be added.

      Motion in three dimensions, parametric curves, differential calculus of multivariable functions, multiple integrals, line integrals, and Green's Theorem.

    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: MATH 221 with C grade or better.

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.

  2. Eight additional credits chosen from:
  3. Courses numbered 200 or above in biology, chemistry, engineering, and physics. No more than three of these credits may be numbered 400 or above.

Physics major leading to BS degree

A major in physics leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 46 credits including the following.

  1. PHYS 111, 112, 113, 114, 210, 215, 220, 225 (ENGN 225), 230, 340; and MATH 332, 333
  2. PHYS 240 (ENGN 240) or PHYS 345
  3. One of the following laboratory courses: ENGN 207, 208, 251; PHYS 207, 208, 251
  4. Six additional credits chosen from courses numbered 200 or above in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology, or physics, or from BIOL 111, 113; CHEM 110; CSCI 111, 112; GEOL 100, 101; Mathematics numbered 300 or above.

Additional courses required as prerequisites for completion of the above include MATH 101 and 102, and 221.

  1. Required courses:
    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 101 or equivalent.

      Corequisite: PHYS 113

      An introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics. Topics include Newton's laws, wave motion, and the laws of thermodynamics. This course must be taken simultaneously with Physics 113.

    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: PHYS 111.

      Corequisite: PHYS 114

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include electricity and magnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum theory. This course must be taken simultaneously with PHYS 114.

    • PHYS 113 - General Physics Laboratory I

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 1


      Corequisite: PHYS 111. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 111.

      Laboratory exercises in classical mechanics.

    • PHYS 114 - General Physics Laboratory II

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 1


      Corequisite: PHYS 112. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 112.

      Laboratory exercises in electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics.

    • PHYS 210 - Modern Physics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: PHYS 112.

      An introduction to the physics of the atom, including the wave description of matter and quantum mechanics, and the experiments that led to the theory. Selected topics from atomic, molecular, nuclear, statistical, and solid state physics are discussed; the choice of topics may vary from year to year.

    • PHYS 215 - Optics

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisites: PHYS 225 (ENGN 225).

      A study of the properties of electromagnetic waves with special emphasis on visible light. Wave descriptions are developed for scattering, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, and polarization. Topics in geometrical optics are also studied, including lenses and aberration theory. Laboratory course.

    • PHYS 220 - Electricity and Magnetism

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: PHYS 112 and 114; Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 225 (ENGN 225).

      An introduction to the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields. The basic equations of electromagnetism (Maxwell's equations) are developed through a study of electrostatics, steady-state magnetism, and electromagnetic induction.

    • PHYS 225 - Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering (ENGN 225)

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: PHYS 112, MATH 221.

      Study of a collection of mathematical techniques particularly useful in upper-level courses in physics and engineering: vector differential operators such as gradient, divergence, and curl; functions of complex variables; Fourier analysis; orthogonal functions; matrix algebra and the matrix eigenvalue problem.

    • PHYS 230 - Newtonian Mechanics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: PHYS 111 and 113, MATH 221.

      A thorough study of Newton's laws of motion, rigid body motion, and accelerated reference frames. A student may not receive degree credit for both ENGN 204 and PHYS 230.

    • PHYS 340 - Quantum Mechanics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: PHYS 210 and PHYS 225 (or ENGN 225), and MATH 332 as prerequisite or corequisite (instructor consent required if as corequisite).

      A study of the postulates and formalism of quantum theory emphasizing the Schroedinger approach. The probabilistic theory is applied to one-dimensional bound and scattering states and the three-dimensional central force problem. Investigation of spin and angular momentum, Clebsch-Gordan coefficients, indistinguishable particles, and perturbation theory. Mathematical formalism includes operators, commutators, Hilbert space, and Dirac notation.

    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: MATH 221 with C grade or better.

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.

    • MATH 333 - Partial Differential Equations

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: MATH 332.

      An introduction to the study of boundary value problems and partial differential equations. Topics include modeling heat and wave phenomena, Fourier series, separation of variables, and Bessel functions. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.

  2. Take one course from:
    • PHYS 240 - Thermodynamics (ENGN 240)

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: PHYS 112 and MATH 221.

      A study of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of matter, and applications to engineering processes.

    • or
    • PHYS 345 - Statistical Physics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: PHYS 340.

      A study of the statistical methods used in various branches of physics. The Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein distribution functions are derived and applied to problems in thermodynamics and the physics of solids.

  3. One of the following laboratory courses:
    • ENGN 207 - Electrical Circuits

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: ENGN/PHYS 225.

      A detailed study of electrical circuits and the methods used in their analysis. Basic circuit components, as well as devices such as operational amplifiers, are investigated. The laboratory acquaints the student both with fundamental electronic diagnostic equipment and with the design and behavior of useful circuits. Laboratory course.

    • ENGN 208 - Electronics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: Take ENGN 207 or PHYS 207.

      An introduction to practical analog and digital electronics emphasizing design, construction, and measurement of circuits in the laboratory. Topics may include diode wave-shaping circuits, transistor audio amplifiers, power supplies, oscillators, data converters (A/D and D/A), Boolean logic gates, programmable logic devices, flip-flops, counters, data storage and retrieval, and a survey of emerging technologies.

    • ENGN 251 - Experimental Methods in Physics and Engineering

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: PHYS 112 or instructor consent.

      An introduction to the design and implementation of experimental methods. Execution of the methods focuses on current data acquisition techniques, along with a study of standard data reduction and analysis. Results are examined in order to review the experimental method employed and to redesign the method for future experiments. This course is intended for any science major interested in performing experimental research on campus or in graduate school.

    • PHYS 207 - Electrical Circuits

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: PHYS/ENGN 225.

      A detailed study of electrical circuits and the methods used in their analysis. Basic circuit components, as well as devices such as operational amplifiers, are investigated. The laboratory acquaints the student both with fundamental electronic diagnostic equipment and with the design and behavior of useful circuits. Laboratory course.

    • PHYS 208 - Electronics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: PHYS/ENGN 207.

      An introduction to practical analog and digital electronics emphasizing design, construction, and measurement of circuits in the laboratory. Topics may include diode wave-shaping circuits, transistor audio amplifiers, power supplies, oscillators, data converters (A/D and D/A), Boolean logic gates, programmable logic devices, flip-flops, counters, data storage and retrieval, and a survey of emerging technologies.

    • PHYS 251 - Experimental Methods in Physics and Engineering

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Offered when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: PHYS 112 or instructor consent.

      An introduction to the design and implementation of experimental methods. Execution of the methods focuses on current data acquisition techniques, along with a study of standard data reduction and analysis. Results are examined in order to review the experimental method employed and to redesign the method for future experiments. This course is intended for any science major interested in performing experimental research on campus or in graduate school.

  4. Six additional credits chosen from courses numbered 200 or above in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology, or physics, or from:
    • BIOL 111 - Fundamentals of Biology

      FDR: SL: BIOL 113 is a corequisite for students seeking laboratory science credits
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: For BIOL 111/113: Limited seating available for sophomores, juniors and seniors. Interested upper-division students should contact Helen I'Anson, Head of the Biology department, for consent as soon as the class schedule is available and before registration begins. Suitable for First-Years interested in pursuing a major in biology, neuroscience or environmental studies or the pre-health curriculum. For First-Years, priority will be given to those who have taken CHEM 110 during fall semester.

      Corequisite: BIOL 113.

      An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

    • BIOL 113 - Biology Laboratory

      FDR: SL: see note in BIOL 111
      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 1


      Prerequisites: For BIOL 111/113: Limited seating available for sophomores, juniors and seniors. Interested upper-division students should contact Helen I'Anson, Head of the Biology department, for consent as soon as the class schedule is available and before registration begins. Suitable for First-Years interested in pursuing a major in biology, neuroscience or environmental studies or the pre-health curriculum.

      Corequisite: BIOL 111.

      A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.

    • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 4


      NOTE: Instructor Consent required for upper-division students ONLY. Contact Steve Desjardins for Instructor Consent.

      This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course.

    • CSCI 111 - Fundamentals of Programming I

      FDR: FM
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 4


      A disciplined approach to programming with Python. Emphasis is on problem-solving methods, algorithm development, and object-oriented concepts. Lectures and formal laboratories.

    • CSCI 112 - Fundamentals of Programming II

      FDR: SC
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: CSCI 111.

      A continuation of CSCI 111. Emphasis is on the use and implementation of data structures, introductory algorithm analysis, and object-oriented design and programming with Python. Laboratory course.

    • GEOL 100 - General Geology with Field Emphasis

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: Open to First-years or sophomores only. Instructor consent for juniors and seniors is rarely given. GEOL 100A is open to FY students only.

      The study of our physical environment and the processes shaping it. The materials and structure of the Earth's crust, the origin of the landforms, the concept of geologic time, and the nature of the Earth's interior are considered, with special emphasis on field study in the region near Lexington. No credit for students who have completed GEOL 101. Offered on occasion as a First-Year Seminar. Contact the instructor for additional information. Laboratory course.

      GEOL 100 FS: General Geology with Field Emphasis (4): First-Year Seminar.

    • GEOL 101 - General Geology

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: Instructor consent required. Preference given to First-years and sophomores.

      The study of our physical environment and the processes shaping it. The materials and structure of the Earth's crust, the origin of the landforms, the concept of geologic time, and the nature of the Earth's interior are considered. No credit for students who have completed GEOL 100. Laboratory course.

    • Mathematics numbered 300 or above.

Physics-Engineering major leading to BS degree

A major in physics-engineering leading to a Bachelor of Science degree requires completion of at least 47 credits, no more than three of which may be from 400-level courses, and including the following:

  1. ENGN 203, 204, 207 (PHYS 207), 225 (PHYS 225), 240 (PHYS 240), 301, 311, 351; MATH 332; and PHYS 111, 112, 113, 114
  2. Three additional credits from 200-level courses in engineering
  3. Three additional credits from 300-level courses in engineering
  4. Six additional credits from courses numbered 200 or above in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology, or physics; from Mathematics 300 or above; or from CHEM 110; CSCI 121.

Additional courses required as prerequisites for completion of the above include MATH 101, 102, and 221.

  1. Required courses
    • ENGN 203 - Mechanics I: Statics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: MATH-102, PHYS-111 (PHYS 111 as corequisite with instructor consent)

      The science of mechanics is used to study bodies in equilibrium under the action of external forces. Emphasis is on problem solving: trusses, frames and machines, centroids, area moments of inertia, beams, cables, and friction.

    • ENGN 204 - Mechanics II: Dynamics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: ENGN 203.

      A study of kinetics of particles and rigid bodies including force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, momentum. A student may not receive degree credit for both ENGN 204 and PHYS 230.

    • ENGN 207 - Electrical Circuits (PHYS 207)

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: ENGN/PHYS 225.

      A detailed study of electrical circuits and the methods used in their analysis. Basic circuit components, as well as devices such as operational amplifiers, are investigated. The laboratory acquaints the student both with fundamental electronic diagnostic equipment and with the design and behavior of useful circuits. Laboratory course.

    • ENGN 225 - Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering (PHYS 225)

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: PHYS 112, MATH 221.

      Study of a collection of mathematical techniques particularly useful in upper-level courses in physics and engineering: vector differential operators such as gradient, divergence, and curl; functions of complex variables; Fourier analysis; orthogonal functions; matrix algebra and the matrix eigenvalue problem

    • ENGN 240 - Thermodynamics (PHYS 240)

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: PHYS 112 and MATH 221.

      A study of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of matter, and applications to engineering processes.

    • ENGN 301 - Solid Mechanics

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: ENGN 203.

      Internal equilibrium of members; introduction to mechanics of continuous media; concepts of stress, material properties, principal moments of inertia; deformation caused by axial loads, shear, torsion, bending and combined loading.

    • ENGN 311 - Fluid Mechanics

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 4


      Prerequisite: Take ENGN 204 or PHYS 230.

      Fluid statics; application of the integral mass, momentum, and energy equations using control volume concepts; introduction to viscous flow and boundary layer theory. Laboratory course.

    • ENGN 351 - Solid Mechanics Laboratory

      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 1


      Corequisite: ENGN 301.

      Experimental observation and correlation with theoretical predictions of elastic behavior of structures under static loading; statically determinate and indeterminate loading of beams and trusses; shear; and torsion. Laboratory course.

    • MATH 332 - Ordinary Differential Equations

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: MATH 221 with C grade or better.

      First and second order differential equations, systems of differential equations, and applications. Techniques employed are analytic, qualitative, and numerical.

    • PHYS 111 - General Physics I

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 101 or equivalent.

      Corequisite: PHYS 113

      An introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics. Topics include Newton's laws, wave motion, and the laws of thermodynamics. This course must be taken simultaneously with Physics 113.

    • PHYS 112 - General Physics II

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: PHYS 111.

      Corequisite: PHYS 114

      A continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include electricity and magnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum theory. This course must be taken simultaneously with PHYS 114.

    • PHYS 113 - General Physics Laboratory I

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Fall
      Credits: 1


      Corequisite: PHYS 111. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 111.

      Laboratory exercises in classical mechanics.

    • PHYS 114 - General Physics Laboratory II

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 1


      Corequisite: PHYS 112. A laboratory course to accompany PHYS 112.

      Laboratory exercises in electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics.

  2. Three additional credits from 200-level courses in engineering
  3. Three additional credits from 300-level courses in engineering
  4. Six additional credits from courses numbered 200 or above in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology, or physics; or from:
  5. Mathematics 300 or above; or from:

    • CHEM 110 - General Chemistry

      FDR: SL
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter
      Credits: 4


      NOTE: Instructor Consent required for upper-division students ONLY. Contact Steve Desjardins for Instructor Consent.

      This is a foundational course for those pursuing upper-level chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and principles that appear throughout the chemistry and biochemistry curriculum are introduced. Topics include basic chemistry calculations, quantum mechanics in chemistry, molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. In addition, a range of spectroscopic methods including UV-Vis, Atomic Absorption, and XRF are employed in the laboratory. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, some background is advantageous. Laboratory course.

    • CSCI 121 - Scientific Computing

      FDR: FM
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Winter
      Credits: 4


      An introduction to computer programming for scientific applications and a survey of the main methodological areas of scientific computation. The course provides the tools needed for students to use computers effectively in scientific work, whether in physics, chemistry, mathematics, economics, biology, psychology, or any field involving quantitative work. Programming in Matlab, a scientific-computing software package, with a focus on topics relevant to students' major fields of study. Lectures and formal labs.