Paul Gregory Associate Professor of Philosophy, Head of Philosophy

Paul Gregory

Washington Hall 320
Website - Curriculum Vitae

Professor Gregory joined the Department of Philosophy in 2002 and is now an Associate Professor and Head of the Department.

Professor Gregory’s early scholarship centered on the work of W.V. Quine and, more generally, the justification of naturalized approaches to philosophical questions. His first book Quine’s Naturalism was published by Continuum. Gregory’s current project is Formal Logic, a textbook in introductory and intermediate symbolic logic. Appearing in 2016 from Broadview Press, the book will be accompanied by Kahn Academy style instructional videos, and practice software (developed with Sara Sprenkle of the Computer Science Department).

Professor Gregory teaches Introduction to Logic, Intermediate Logic, Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Language, Philosophy of Science, and special courses on cyborgs, human enhancement, and transhumanism.


Ph.D. Philosophy, University of Illinois at Chicago
M.A. Philosophy, University of Illinois at Chicago
B.A. Philosophy and English, Syracuse University


Philosophy of Mind, Language, and Science, W. V. Quine, History of Analytic Philosophy, Epistemology, Metaphysics


Philosophy of Mind, Language, and Science, W. V. Quine, History of Analytic Philosophy, Epistemology, Metaphysics, Logic-through Gödel, Western Humanities

Selected Publications


  1. Quine's Naturalism: Language, Theory, and the Knowing Subject. (Continuum, 2008).
  2. Formal Logic. ≈400 pages. ≈400 exercises. Under contract with Broadview Press, to appear in 2016. An introductory and intermediate text in symbolic logic, covering truth-functional and quantificational logic, introductory set theory, introductory modal logic. Used in introductory and intermediate symbolic logic courses.

Articles and Book Chapters

  1. “Review of Quine in Dialogue”. 2009. Review of Metaphysics. 63 (2): 489–491. Invited.
  2. “On Teaching ‘Science, Nature, Self, and Culture’”. 2009. On the Human. National Humanities Center web project. Invited.
  3. “Willard Van Orman Quine”, The Philosophy of Science: An Encyclopedia, eds. Sahotra Sarkar and Jessica Pfeifer (Routledge Press, 2006), pp. 659-669.
  4. “Putting the Bite Back into ‘Two Dogmas’”, Principia—an International Journal of Epistemology, 7 (2003), pp. 115-129.
  5. “‘Two Dogmas’—All Bark and No Bite? Carnap and Quine on Analyticity”, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 67 (2003), pp. 633–648.