Course Offerings

Spring 2016

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2016, HIST 269-03: Race and Racism in the Americas (3). Studying the development of race across the early-modern Atlantic world, analyzing how the idea has influenced the history of peoples, nations, and knowledge in modern Latin America.  How did Europeans understand themselves in relation to African and Native American "Others"?   We situate race within the history of ideas before tracing its diffusion across the Americas from the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment to our own (post-) modern age, taking into account how religion, science, colonialism and capitalism have influenced both ideas of race and the practice of racism. (HU) Gildner.

Living on the Edge: Identities in Motion in Argentina and Uruguay

SPAN 216 - Michelson, Seth R.

Conducted in Spanish in Argentina and Uruguay, this course comprises a study of Argentine culture, language, and identity. Students live in Buenos Aires with Spanish-speaking families while pursuing coursework on identity in local, national, and international contexts. What does geography have to do with identity? How might a nation redefine its policies and peoples over time? Where does the line exist between an economic system and its individual constituents? And what insights can art offer into domestic and international conflict? This course engages such questions through the study of Argentine historiography, literature, economics, and art. Coursework is accentuated by visits to sites of cultural importance in Argentina and Uruguay, including museums, banks, literary presses, political centers, meat markets, parks, and tango houses.

Special Topics in Conversation

SPAN 295 - Pinto-Bailey, Ana C. (Cristina)

Further development of listening and speaking skills necessary for advanced discussion. Acquisition of both practical and topic-specific vocabulary. Appropriate writing and reading assignments, related to the topic, accompany the primary emphasis on conversational skills. Recent topics include: Hispanic Cinema and La Prensa. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2016, SPAN 295-01: Special Topics in Conversation: Hispanic Women in Literature, Cinema, and Society (4). This course focuses on women in the Hispanic world and on social issues relating to their role in society and the advancement of female agency, as seen through literature, news articles, cinema, and life in the community. The course is organized around several broad issues, including: The Construction of Gender; Women's Roles in Society; The Immigrant Woman; and Ecofeminism. In addition to reading literary works by Hispanic women writers, selections of news articles, and analyzing movies by and about Hispanic women, students meet with and interview Hispanic women from the Lexington/Rockbridge area. Taught in Spanish. Pinto-Bailey.

Winter 2016

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Economic Globalization and Multinational Corporations

BUS 337 - Reiter, Sandra L. (Sandy)

This course focuses on the historical and present effects and issues of economic globalization, and the role of multinational corporations in a global economy. Topics covered may include: production, supply chain, technology, trade, finance, natural environment, labor, development, poverty and inequality, privatization of utilities, immigration, and state sovereignty. Emphasis is on understanding the costs and benefits of economic globalization and the role business plays in contributing to these outcomes.

Special Topics in Environmental Studies

ENV 295 - Freitas, Carlos E.

This courses examines special topics in environmental studies, such as ecotourism, the environment and development, local environmental issues, values and the environment, global fisheries, global climate change, tropical deforestation and similar topics of importance, which could change from year to year. This is a research-intensive course where the student would be expected to write a significant paper, either individually or as part of a group, of sufficient quality to be made useful to the scholarly and policy communities. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Modern Latin America: Túpak Katari to Tupac Shakur

HIST 131 - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A survey of Latin America from the 1781 anticolonial rebellion led by indigenous insurgent Túpak Katari to a globalized present in which Latin American youth listen to Tupac Shakur yet know little of his namesake. Lectures are organized thematically (culture, society, economics, and politics) and chronologically, surveying the historical formation of people and nations in Latin America. Individual countries (especially Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, and Peru) provide examples of how local and transnational forces have shaped the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries of North and South America and the Caribbean, and the cultural distinctions and ethnic diversity that characterize a region too often misperceived as homogeneous.

Modern Latin America: Túpak Katari to Tupac Shakur

HIST 131 - Gildner, Robert M. (Matt)

A survey of Latin America from the 1781 anticolonial rebellion led by indigenous insurgent Túpak Katari to a globalized present in which Latin American youth listen to Tupac Shakur yet know little of his namesake. Lectures are organized thematically (culture, society, economics, and politics) and chronologically, surveying the historical formation of people and nations in Latin America. Individual countries (especially Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, and Peru) provide examples of how local and transnational forces have shaped the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries of North and South America and the Caribbean, and the cultural distinctions and ethnic diversity that characterize a region too often misperceived as homogeneous.

Capstone Seminar in Latin American and Caribbean Studies

LACS 396 - Eastwood, Jonathan R. (Jon)

This capstone course builds upon the foundations developed in LACS 101 and related coursework in the distribution areas. Students discuss assigned readings centered around a key theme or themes of Latin American Studies in connection with an individualized research project. This project is carried out with continual mentoring by a faculty member and in collaboration with peer feedback. Each student presents his/her findings in a formal paper, or other approved end-product, and summarizes the results in an oral presentation.

Spanish-American Civilization and Culture

SPAN 212 - Botta, Monica B.

A survey of significant developments in Spanish-American civilizations. The course addresses Spanish-American heritage and the present-day cultural patterns formed by its legacies. Readings, discussions and papers primarily in Spanish for further development of communication skills.

Introducción a la literatura hispanoamericana

SPAN 240 - Barnett, Jeffrey C. (Jeff)

Spanish-American literary masterpieces from colonial times through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.

Introducción a la literatura hispanoamericana

SPAN 240 - Barnett, Jeffrey C. (Jeff)

Spanish-American literary masterpieces from colonial times through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.

Spanish-American Seminar

SPAN 398 - Botta, Monica B.

A seminar focusing on a single period, genre, motif, or writer. Recent topics have included "Spanish American Women Writers: From America into the 21st Century," "20th Century Latin America Theater," and "Past, Memory, and Identity in Contemporary Argentina's Cultural Products." May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2016, SPAN 398: Spanish-American Seminar: Fictions of Self-Representation (3) Prerequisites: SPAN 240 and 275. The course examines forms of self-representation through the reading of literary and non-literary works. In addition to conceptual discussions of how artists use fictionalized forms of self-portraiture in diverse Latin-American contexts, we pay special attention to issues of subjectivity, self-empowerment, authority, and reader recognition, among others. Primary texts focus mainly on the 19th and 20th centuries. (HL) Botta .

Fall 2015

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Introduction to Latin American and Caribbean Studies

LACS 101 - Botta, Monica B.

A multidisciplinary, introductory course designed to familiarize students with the pertinent issues that determine or affect the concept of identity in Latin American and Caribbean societies through a study of their geography, history, politics, economics, literature, and culture. The purpose of the course is to provide a framework or overview to enhance understanding in the students' future courses in particular disciplines and specific areas of Latin American and Caribbean study.

Introducción a la literatura hispanoamericana

SPAN 240 - Michelson, Seth R.

Spanish-American literary masterpieces from colonial times through the present. Readings and discussions are primarily in Spanish.

Spanish-American Seminar

SPAN 398 - Michelson, Seth R.

A seminar focusing on a single period, genre, motif, or writer. Recent topics have included "Spanish American Women Writers: From America into the 21st Century," "20th Century Latin America Theater," and "Past, Memory, and Identity in Contemporary Argentina's Cultural Products." May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2016, SPAN 398: Spanish-American Seminar: Fictions of Self-Representation (3) Prerequisites: SPAN 240 and 275. The course examines forms of self-representation through the reading of literary and non-literary works. In addition to conceptual discussions of how artists use fictionalized forms of self-portraiture in diverse Latin-American contexts, we pay special attention to issues of subjectivity, self-empowerment, authority, and reader recognition, among others. Primary texts focus mainly on the 19th and 20th centuries. (HL) Botta .

Fall 2015, SPAN 398-01: Spanish-American Seminar: Poetry and Power (3) . A course about reading power; more properly, a course about critically reading Spanish American poetry as a site for revealing, rethinking, and resisting enforced inequality. It is a poetic inquiry into social justice, including an exploration the ways in which poetry might help us to realize, reckon, and contest unjust and unequal distributions and codifications of power. We interrogate four major configurations of inequality -- sexism, racism, colonialism, fascism -- studying each in depth, to illuminate through poetry our potential to conceive of and live in more egalitarian, inclusive, and pacifistic worlds. Besides the close reading of poetry, coursework includes listening to music, reading critical theory, viewing documentary footage, and participating in lively discussions. (HL)  Michelson .