Course Offerings

Fall 2014

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

European Civilization, 325-1517

HIST 100 - Peterson (Multiple Sections)

An introductory survey, featuring lectures and discussions of European culture, politics, religion and social life, and of Europe's relations with neighboring societies, from the rise of Christianity in Late Antiquity through the Middle Ages and the Italian Renaissance, to the beginnings of the 16th-century Protestant and Catholic Reformations.

European Civilization, 1500-1789

HIST 101 - Bidlack, Horowitz (Multiple Sections)

The rise of capitalism, Renaissance and Reformation, the age of absolutism, and the Enlightenment.

China: Origins to 20th-Century Reforms

HIST 103 - Luo

China's history embodies the full range of experience -as domain of imperial dynasties, target of imperial aggression, dissident member of the cold war Communist bloc, and current regional superpower in East Asia. This course tracks these transitions in political and social organization that, among other things, terminated history's longest lasting monarchical system, ignited two of its largest revolutions, began World War II and produced the most populous nation on earth. A wide range of cultural, political and intellectual stereotypes of China are challenged in the process of exploring its particular historical experience.

History of the United States to 1876

HIST 107 - Myers, Senechal (Multiple Sections)

A survey of United States history from the colonial period through Reconstruction with emphasis on the American Revolution, the formation of the Constitution, the rise of parties, western expansion, the slavery controversy, sectionalism, secession, Civil War and Reconstruction.

Latin America: Mayas to Independence

HIST 130 - Gildner

An introduction to the "Indian" and Iberian people active from Florida to California through Central and South America between 1450 and 1750.

History of Islamic Civilization I: Origins to 1500

HIST 170 - Blecher

This course surveys the political, social, and cultural history of the Islamic World from the 7th to 15th centuries, with particular attention paid to the diverse geographical and cultural contexts in which pre-modern Islamic civilization flourished. Topics include the origins of Islam in late Antiquity; the development of Islamic religious, political, and cultural institutions; the flourishing of medieval Islamic education, science, and literature; the tension among state, ethnic, sectarian, and global Muslim identities; and the emergence of a distinctly Muslim approach to historiography.

History of Africa to 1800

HIST 175 - STAFF / Peterson

Examination of the history and historiography of Africa from the origins of humankind to the abolition of the trans- Atlantic slave trade. Topics include human evolution in Africa, development of agriculture and pastoralism, ancient civilizations of the Nile, African participation in the spread of Christianity and Islam, empires of West Africa, Swahili city-states, and African participation in the economic and biological exchanges that transformed the Atlantic world.

FS: First-Year Seminar

HIST 180 - Luo

Topics vary by term and instructor.

HIST 180-01: FY: Popular Culture and Everyday Life in Modern China (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. This course surveys the development of Chinese popular culture during the modern era. Popular culture is the key to understanding the economy, politics, and people of a society. It sheds light on art in the everyday and renders the mundane with sensual textures. The course examines different forms of Chinese popular culture, including popular literature, material culture, rituals and religions, fashion, film, etc., from the perspective of their social, political, ideological, and cultural functions. We focus on the 20th century, the formative historical period for contemporary China, though attention is also given to the early modern era. (HU) Di Luo. Fall 2014 HIST 180-02: FY: Fashion in Global History (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. This course uses fashion as a way to explore economic, social, and political changes throughout the globe from antiquity to the French Revolution. By placing clothing and ornamentation within its historic context, we explore how different peoples have used adornment as a marker of status, conformity, and resistance. Topics include: the historic demand for luxury, the role of ornamentation in empire and colonialism, and the way fashion contributed to modern globalization. This course also offers students the opportunity to engage sources about fashion in global history through digital humanities projects. (HU) Stillo. Fall 2014

FS: First-Year Seminar

HIST 180 - STAFF / Peterson

Topics vary by term and instructor.

HIST 180-01: FY: Popular Culture and Everyday Life in Modern China (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. This course surveys the development of Chinese popular culture during the modern era. Popular culture is the key to understanding the economy, politics, and people of a society. It sheds light on art in the everyday and renders the mundane with sensual textures. The course examines different forms of Chinese popular culture, including popular literature, material culture, rituals and religions, fashion, film, etc., from the perspective of their social, political, ideological, and cultural functions. We focus on the 20th century, the formative historical period for contemporary China, though attention is also given to the early modern era. (HU) Di Luo. Fall 2014 HIST 180-02: FY: Fashion in Global History (3). First-Year Seminar. Prerequisite: First-year class standing only. This course uses fashion as a way to explore economic, social, and political changes throughout the globe from antiquity to the French Revolution. By placing clothing and ornamentation within its historic context, we explore how different peoples have used adornment as a marker of status, conformity, and resistance. Topics include: the historic demand for luxury, the role of ornamentation in empire and colonialism, and the way fashion contributed to modern globalization. This course also offers students the opportunity to engage sources about fashion in global history through digital humanities projects. (HU) Stillo. Fall 2014

Topics in History for First-years and Sophomores

HIST 195A - Merchant

Selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2014 topics:

HIST 195A-01: Introductory Seminar: Three Men Who Might Have Been President: John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, and Daniel Webster. (3). This seminar focuses on the public lives of three 19th-century Americans -- Calhoun, Clay, and Webster -- who wanted very much to be President of the United States but did not transform their dreams into reality. It analyzes their strengths and weaknesses, their successes and failures, and their legacies. Students read both primary and secondary sources; discuss their reading in class; locate, evaluate, use primary and secondary sources; organize and integrate sources into coherent narratives; and speak and write accurately, clearly, and concisely. (HU) Merchant

HIST 195B-01: Doomsday Science Then and Now. (3). In recent years, scientific doomsday literature has surged, along with popular publications of a similar kind. A preoccupation with global catastrophes, past and future, and related to the study of contemporary local and regional floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and the like, has a long history in Western culture. This course looks at doomsday science and scientists from the past two and a half centuries, examining late-modern theories of global catastrophe, and explores why, in the course of the 20th century, neo-catastrophism has given renewed legitimacy to fears of "our final hour." (HU) Rupke.

Topics in History for First-years and Sophomores

HIST 195B - Rupke

Selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2014 topics:

HIST 195A-01: Introductory Seminar: Three Men Who Might Have Been President: John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, and Daniel Webster. (3). This seminar focuses on the public lives of three 19th-century Americans -- Calhoun, Clay, and Webster -- who wanted very much to be President of the United States but did not transform their dreams into reality. It analyzes their strengths and weaknesses, their successes and failures, and their legacies. Students read both primary and secondary sources; discuss their reading in class; locate, evaluate, use primary and secondary sources; organize and integrate sources into coherent narratives; and speak and write accurately, clearly, and concisely. (HU) Merchant

HIST 195B-01: Doomsday Science Then and Now. (3). In recent years, scientific doomsday literature has surged, along with popular publications of a similar kind. A preoccupation with global catastrophes, past and future, and related to the study of contemporary local and regional floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and the like, has a long history in Western culture. This course looks at doomsday science and scientists from the past two and a half centuries, examining late-modern theories of global catastrophe, and explores why, in the course of the 20th century, neo-catastrophism has given renewed legitimacy to fears of "our final hour." (HU) Rupke.

France in the 19th and 20th Centuries

HIST 209 - Horowitz

Historical study of France from the Revolution through the present, tracing France's revolutionary tradition and the continuing "Franco-French" war it spawned, and the construction of and challenges to French national identity. Topics include the successive revolutions of the 19th century, the acquisition and loss of two empires, and the transformations in French society brought by wars, industrialization, and immigration.

Germany, 1815-1914

HIST 213 - Patch

The impact of the French Revolution on Germany, the onset of industrialization, the revolution of 1848, the career of Bismarck and Germany's wars of national unification, the Kulturkampf between Protestants and Catholics, the rise of the socialist labor movement, liberal feminism and the movement for women's rights, the origins of "Imperialism" in foreign policy, and Germany's role in the outbreak of the First World War.

History of the British Isles to 1688

HIST 217 - STAFF / Peterson

This course considers 1,600 years of British history, from the coming of the Romans to the Revolution of 1688. It focuses on the major events and most momentous political, cultural, and social changes that shaped the lives of people throughout the British Isles. Topics covered include the introduction and development of Christianity, Viking invasions, the Scottish wars of independence, the evolution of parliament, the Black Death, the War of the Roses, the Protestant Reformation, the witch-trials, the beginnings of the British Empire, and the revolutions of the seventeenth century.

Topics in European History

HIST 229 - STAFF / Peterson

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2014 topic:

HIST 229: Seminar: The Age of the Witch Hunts (3). This course introduces students to one of the most fascinating and disturbing events in the history of the Western world: The witch hunts in early modern Europe and North America. Between 1450 and 1750, more than 100,000 individuals, from Russia to Salem, were prosecuted for the crime of witchcraft. Most were women, and more than half were executed. In this course, we examine the political, religious, social and legal reasons behind the trials, asking why they occurred in Europe when they did, and why they finally ended. We also explore, in brief, global witch hunts that still occur today in places like Africa and India, asking how they resemble yet differ from those of the early-modern world. (HU) Brock.  

The American Civil War

HIST 245 - Myers (Multiple Sections)

The sectional crisis. The election of 1860 and the secession of the southern states. Military strategy and tactics. Weapons, battles, leaders. Life of the common soldier. Diplomacy: King Cotton and King Wheat. The politics of war. The economics of growth and destruction. Emancipation. Life behind the lines. Victory and defeat.

History of Women in America, 1870 to the Present

HIST 258 - Senechal

A survey of some of the major topics and themes in American women's lives from the mid-19th century to the present, including domestic and family roles, economic contributions, reproductive experience, education, suffrage, and the emergence of the contemporary feminist movement. The influence on women's roles, behavior, and consciousness by the social and economic changes accompanying industrialization and urbanization and by variations in women's experience caused by differences in race, class, and region.

The History of the African-American People since 1877

HIST 260 - DeLaney

An intensive study of the African-American experience from 1877 to the present. Special emphasis is given to the development of black intellectual and cultural traditions, development of urban communities, emergence of the black middle class, black nationalism, the civil rights era, and the persistence of racism in American society.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269A - Michelmore

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2014 topics:

HIST 269A: The American Century: U.S. History, 1945 to the Present (3). This course explores the history of the United States after World War II -- a period sometimes referred to as the "American Century." Major topics include the Bomb, the rise and fall of American liberalism, the Cold War at home and abroad, suburbanization and the consumer culture, race and civil rights, feminism, anti-feminism, the gay and lesbian liberation movement, Vietnam and foreign policy, the rise of conservatism and neoliberalism, and the challenges of globalization. (HU) Michelmore. HIST 269B: Afro-Latin America (3). This class examines the intrinsic role that African peoples have played in the historical formation of the geographic and cultural area known as Latin America. We survey the history of African descendant people in the Americas, from the forced migration of the Atlantic slave trade to the Haitian Revolution; from the sugar plantation to the city street; from Brazilian Samba in the 1920s to the emergence of salsa music in Spanish Harlem in the 1970s. Topics include: slavery, the Haitian Revolution and its legacy, debates on "racial democracy," and the relationship between gender, race, and empire. (HU) Gildner.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269B - Gildner

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2014 topics:

HIST 269A: The American Century: U.S. History, 1945 to the Present (3). This course explores the history of the United States after World War II -- a period sometimes referred to as the "American Century." Major topics include the Bomb, the rise and fall of American liberalism, the Cold War at home and abroad, suburbanization and the consumer culture, race and civil rights, feminism, anti-feminism, the gay and lesbian liberation movement, Vietnam and foreign policy, the rise of conservatism and neoliberalism, and the challenges of globalization. (HU) Michelmore. HIST 269B: Afro-Latin America (3). This class examines the intrinsic role that African peoples have played in the historical formation of the geographic and cultural area known as Latin America. We survey the history of African descendant people in the Americas, from the forced migration of the Atlantic slave trade to the Haitian Revolution; from the sugar plantation to the city street; from Brazilian Samba in the 1920s to the emergence of salsa music in Spanish Harlem in the 1970s. Topics include: slavery, the Haitian Revolution and its legacy, debates on "racial democracy," and the relationship between gender, race, and empire. (HU) Gildner.

Topics in Asian, African, or Islamic History

HIST 289 - STAFF / Peterson

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in Asian or African history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2014 topic:

HIST 289: Seminar: Africa in Western Imagination (3). From benefit concerts to AIDS charities to study abroad literature, Africa is everywhere. And yet it is frequently explained only in absence or in suffering. Rather than being a place that is defined by what it is, often Africa is viewed by what it is not, and the term 'Afro-pessimism' has been coined by some to criticize such solely negative depictions of a vast and varied continent. What, then, is 'Africa': a location on a map, a geographical boundary? Who are 'Africans'? What does the idea mean and how is it used? This course draws on literature and popular culture to discuss the very idea of 'Africa' and how the concept has been created, redefined, re-imagined, and (de)constructed in differing times and spaces. (HU) Tallie.

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295 - Rupke

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2014 topic:

HIST 295-01: Seminar: Art and Science from Leonardo Until Today. (3). Art and science are commonly assumed to be two distinct parts of our culture, requiring different talents, skills and even temperaments, and often taught in separate institutions. This distinction, however, has not always been so clear. In this seminar, we explore common denominators in art and science from Leonardo until today, focusing on the manifold ways in which science has been made part of art and art of science. We single out the Romantic Movement, and highlight great names in the holistic practice of art and science such as Coleridge, Goethe, Alexander von Humboldt, and Ernst Haeckel. Moreover, we address how increasingly possible commonalities in artistic and scientific creativity have been discussed in terms of perception, representation, and the science of the brain. (HU, pending faculty approval) Rupke.

Seminar on The Great War in History and Literature

HIST 319 - Patch

An advanced seminar in which students analyze different kinds of written accounts of the First World War (memoirs, autobiographical novels, poems, and diaries) by different kinds of participants, including common soldiers, government leaders, and women who worked on the "home front." In class discussions and two short papers, students evaluate the reliability of these witnesses and what the historian can learn from them about the psychological, cultural, and political consequences of the First World War in Great Britain, France, and Germany. Students choose one question raised in our common meetings for more detailed investigation in a substantial research paper integrating primary and secondary sources.

Seminar in Russian History

HIST 322 - Bidlack

Selected topics in Russian history, including but not limited to heroes and villains, Soviet biography, Stalin and Stalinism, the USSR in the Second World War and origins of the Cold War, the KGB, and the decline and fall of the Soviet Union and the re-emergence of Russia. May be repeated for degree and major credit if the topics are different.

Seminar: America in the 1960s: History and Memory

HIST 355 - Michelmore

Hippies, Flower Power, Panthers, Berkeley, Free Love, Free Speech, Freedom Rides, Dylan, Woodstock, Vietnam, Jimi, Janice, Bobby and Martin. The events and images of the 1960s remain a powerful and often divisive force in America's recent history and national memory. This course moves beyond these stereotypical images of the "Sixties" to examine the decade's politics, culture and social movements. Topics include: the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, the Great Society and the War on Poverty, Vietnam, the Anti-War movement and the Counterculture, Massive Resistance, the "Silent Majority" and the Rise of the Conservative Right.

Seminar: Slavery in the Americas

HIST 366 - DeLaney

An intensive examination of slavery, abolition movements and emancipation in North America, the Caribbean and Latin America. Emphasis is on the use of primary sources and class discussion of assigned readings.

Advanced Seminar

HIST 395 - Rupke

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Fall 2014 topic:

HIST 395-01: Advanced Seminar: Art and Science from Leonardo Until Today. (3). Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, or 15 credits in history, or consent of the instructor. Art and science are commonly assumed to be two distinct parts of our culture, requiring different talents, skills and even temperaments, and often taught in separate institutions. This distinction, however, has not always been so clear. In this seminar, we explore common denominators in art and science from Leonardo until today, focusing on the manifold ways in which science has been made part of art and art of science. We single out the Romantic Movement, and highlight great names in the holistic practice of art and science such as Coleridge, Goethe, Alexander von Humboldt, and Ernst Haeckel. Moreover, we address how increasingly possible commonalities in artistic and scientific creativity have been discussed in terms of perception, representation, and the science of the brain. (HU) Rupke.

Directed Individual Study

HIST 403 - Peterson

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit each term of the junior and senior year.

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Horowitz, Myers, Patch (Multiple Sections)

Honors Thesis. Additional information is available at www.wlu.edu/history-department/about-the-program/honors-in-history.


Spring 2014

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Topics in History for First-years and Sophomores

HIST 195 - Merchant

Selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 topic:

HIST 195: Introductory Seminar on Thomas Jefferson (4). A seminar focusing on the life and times of Thomas Jefferson: planter, slave owner, husband, father, author, legislator, diplomat, Secretary of State, Vice President, President, sage. It devotes much of its attention to his two terms as president and also examines his life before his election to the presidency in 1801 and after the expiration of his second term in office. We analyze his strengths and weaknesses, his successes and failures, and his legacy. Includes readings in primary and secondary sources, discussion, weekly essays, and optional tours of Monticello and Poplar Forest. (HU) Merchant. Spring 2014

Winter 2014 topic:

HIST-195: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America (3). This course examines the history of race and ethnicity in Latin America from the colonial past to the republican present. We focus on the origin and evolution of these contentious concepts and also explore how they operated in distinct local-historical contexts, generating social exclusion and, paradoxically, political inclusion. (HU) Gildner.

Fall 2013 topic:

HIST 195-01: Animal Behavior and Human Morality, 1800-present (3). This course deals with the history of the study of animal behavior in its bearing on human morality, from the beginning of the professionalization of the subject around 1800 till the present day. Time and again, tentative connections have been and are being made between the ways animals behave and how humans conduct themselves, thus conferring legitimacy on shared traits. The line of argument in making these linkages is simple and straightforward: if animals behave in certain ways, these ways are natural and therefore beyond reproach; if humans share these traits, they, too, are free of blame. Issues of gender and sexuality traditionally have been at the center of these considerations, but also marriage, the family, slavery, systems of government (monarchy, republic, etc.) have been argued for or against on the basis of animal examples. (HU) Rupke.

Dante: Renaissance and Redemption

HIST 200 - Peterson

A survey of the culture, society, and politics of early Renaissance Italy using the life of the Florentine poet Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) and his Divine Comedy. This period witnessed revolutions in Florence and Rome and the emergence of new artistic forms aimed at reconciling Christian beliefs with classical thought, notably that of the Greek philosopher Aristotle and the Roman poet Virgil. It also generated conflicts between popes, kings, and emperors that issued ultimately in modern European states. First, we survey Dante's historical setting using a chronicle by one of his contemporaries, Dino Compagni. We then follow Dante on his poetic pilgrimage of personal and collective redemption through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven as he synthesized the artistic, religious, philosophical and political challenges of his age.

Decline and Fall of the Soviet Union and Resurgence of Russia

HIST 222 - Bidlack

This course analyzes the reasons for the decline of the Soviet Union commencing in the latter part of the Brezhnev era and its collapse under the weight of the failed reforms of Gorbachev. It further traces the fragmentation of the USSR into fifteen republics and the simultaneous devolution of authority within the Russian Republic under Yeltsin. The course concludes with the remarkable reassertion of state power under Putin up to the present. Students write an essay assessing the Yeltsin transition and engage in a class debate at the end of the term on the prospects for Russia's future.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - DeLaney

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 Topics:

HIST 269-01: The Freedom Ride. (4). An intensive study of the Civil Rights Movement through the lens of the Freedom Riders. This reading- and writing-intensive four-week study includes a two-week tour of major Civil Rights protest sites in the lower Southern United States. (HU). DeLaney

HIST 269-02: Digital America: A Brief History of the Computer and Modern U.S. Information Society (4). This sprint of a class looks at the birth of the digital computer, traces electronic data processing from the days of mainframes through personal computers and the emergence of today's digital "cloud," and interrogates precisely what a modern "information society" in the United States looks like. Equal parts technology, business, politics, culture, and social theory, the class looks at "information" and how it is has been collected, managed, manipulated, and experienced in America over the past seven decades. (HU) McGee. Spring 2014

 

Winter 2014 Topics:

HIST-269-01: Modern U.S. Business History, Late 19th Century to the Present (3). This seminar in the history of capitalism in the United States focuses on the institutions, individuals, and practices that transformed commerce and industry through waves of industrial, management, post-industrial, and information revolutions. We place this transformation within broader political, social, and cultural context. Topics include entrepreneurship; the rise of new models of firms and corporations; the shifting relationship between state and market; the ways in which businesses and businessmen are portrayed by popular culture; and the often-surprising influences of new technologies, the natural environment, emerging social movements, conflicts over labor and state regulation, shifting political ideologies, and evolution in social thought about the broader place of business in American society. (HU) McGee. HIST-269-02: Blacks in the Age of Jim Crow (3). This course is an intensive examination of southern race relations from 1890 through 1965 which focuses on racial injustice and poverty; black education and entrepreneurship; and the quest for Civil Rights and the white backlash that it provoked. It also focuses on white demagogues and liberals as well as black leaders. (HU) DeLaney. HIST-269-03: Evolution of American Warfare (3). This course examines U.S. military history from the colonial period to the post-9/11 American military experience. Since this is a period of more than four hundred years, the class necessarily limits its focus to major topics and central questions facing the men and women who have fought in American wars. We trace the course of American military history by focusing on three themes: the early development of American military institutions, the evolution of military policy toward civilian populations, and the changing face of battle in which Americans have fought. (HU) Myers.

Fall 2013 Topic:

HIST 269-01: Cancelled

HIST 269-02: Experiencing the American Century: The United States 1945 to Present (3). Prerequisite: Open to any senior, junior or sophomore, and first years who have credit in Hist 107 and 108. A survey of American political, cultural, and social history from 1945 to the present. Explores major events, periods, trends, personages, and concepts associated with the period, and students analyze these themes in broader context. Students engage the historical method and communicate structured arguments effectively (in both written and oral form) using secondary literature and primary documents. (HU) McGee.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - McGee

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 Topics:

HIST 269-01: The Freedom Ride. (4). An intensive study of the Civil Rights Movement through the lens of the Freedom Riders. This reading- and writing-intensive four-week study includes a two-week tour of major Civil Rights protest sites in the lower Southern United States. (HU). DeLaney

HIST 269-02: Digital America: A Brief History of the Computer and Modern U.S. Information Society (4). This sprint of a class looks at the birth of the digital computer, traces electronic data processing from the days of mainframes through personal computers and the emergence of today's digital "cloud," and interrogates precisely what a modern "information society" in the United States looks like. Equal parts technology, business, politics, culture, and social theory, the class looks at "information" and how it is has been collected, managed, manipulated, and experienced in America over the past seven decades. (HU) McGee. Spring 2014

 

Winter 2014 Topics:

HIST-269-01: Modern U.S. Business History, Late 19th Century to the Present (3). This seminar in the history of capitalism in the United States focuses on the institutions, individuals, and practices that transformed commerce and industry through waves of industrial, management, post-industrial, and information revolutions. We place this transformation within broader political, social, and cultural context. Topics include entrepreneurship; the rise of new models of firms and corporations; the shifting relationship between state and market; the ways in which businesses and businessmen are portrayed by popular culture; and the often-surprising influences of new technologies, the natural environment, emerging social movements, conflicts over labor and state regulation, shifting political ideologies, and evolution in social thought about the broader place of business in American society. (HU) McGee. HIST-269-02: Blacks in the Age of Jim Crow (3). This course is an intensive examination of southern race relations from 1890 through 1965 which focuses on racial injustice and poverty; black education and entrepreneurship; and the quest for Civil Rights and the white backlash that it provoked. It also focuses on white demagogues and liberals as well as black leaders. (HU) DeLaney. HIST-269-03: Evolution of American Warfare (3). This course examines U.S. military history from the colonial period to the post-9/11 American military experience. Since this is a period of more than four hundred years, the class necessarily limits its focus to major topics and central questions facing the men and women who have fought in American wars. We trace the course of American military history by focusing on three themes: the early development of American military institutions, the evolution of military policy toward civilian populations, and the changing face of battle in which Americans have fought. (HU) Myers.

Fall 2013 Topic:

HIST 269-01: Cancelled

HIST 269-02: Experiencing the American Century: The United States 1945 to Present (3). Prerequisite: Open to any senior, junior or sophomore, and first years who have credit in Hist 107 and 108. A survey of American political, cultural, and social history from 1945 to the present. Explores major events, periods, trends, personages, and concepts associated with the period, and students analyze these themes in broader context. Students engage the historical method and communicate structured arguments effectively (in both written and oral form) using secondary literature and primary documents. (HU) McGee.

Histories of Everything

HIST 274 - Jennings

Intensive reading and analysis of diverse works of world history and "universal history." Students develop understanding of historiographical traditions and develop their own framework for thinking about the human past.

Supervised Study Abroad: Athens

HIST 287 - Gildner / Laughy

Classics, art history, and/or studio in Greece. The credits may be distributed in any way between art and classics, or three credits may be earned in an approved independent study course in any department, including classics.

Spring 2014 Topic:

HIST 287 (CLAS 287): Supervised Study Abroad: Athens: Nation in Ruins: Ancient Heritage and The Making of The Modern Nation-State. (4) Spring Term Abroad. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. The focus of this interdisciplinary course is the role that ancient heritage plays in shaping the modem nation-state of Greece. After one week of preliminary coursework on campus, we spend three weeks in Athens, Greece, exploring the relationship between the past and present through trips to archaeology sites, museums, and historic neighborhoods. Topics include the art and archaeology of Greece, modem Greek history, the role of foreign schools of archaeology, the socio-political role of museums and archaeology sites, antiquities and the "branding" of national identity, and the relationship between Romanticism in Europe and the creation of the modem Greek national identity. Students will design and carry out group projects in Greece. (HU) Laughy, Gildner

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295A - Rupke (Multiple Sections)

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 topic:

HIST 295A-01: Roll Over, Darwin: The Non-Darwinian Tradition in Evolutionary Biology (4). No prerequisite. We begin by discussing the discipline of the history of science and its place in historical scholarship generally. One of the most influential scientific theories is the theory of organic evolution. Its history has largely been written by Darwin and his followers. We shall look at the "Darwin industry" but then additionally explore a revisionist history that incorporates the non-Darwinian approach to the origin of life and species. We look at the scientific facts, the different theories and raise the question "Where were these situated?" "What socio-political purposes and religious connotations did they have?" We end by bringing the historical perspective to bear on today's ongoing controversies about evolution theory. (HU) Rupke.

HIST 295B-01 Rise to World Power, 1776-1920 (4). In the late 18th century, the newly-independent United States was one of the weakest nations in the world. By the early 20th century, it was one of the most powerful. This course, in the history of U.S. foreign relations from 1776 to 1920, explores how and why this dramatic shift occurred. In the process, it emphasizes the interrelationship between domestic and foreign affairs within that history, as well as the origins and evolution of key American diplomatic principles, documents and doctrines. The course also explores the beliefs Americans developed about their place in the world, their expansion across an entire continent, their acquisition of an overseas empire, and the causes and consequences of their participation in armed conflicts from the War for Independence through World War I. Stoler. Spring 2014

Winter 2014 topic:

HIST-295-02: Science and the Supernatural (3). In modern -- especially late-modern -- times, science has become the adjudicator of truth: truth in terms of fact and law-like rationality. The result has been a retreat of the occult, of many superstitions, and the uncovering of fallacies and frauds. Yet large sectors of modern society have remained enamored of the paranormal. Even scientific practitioners themselves, including Nobel Laureates, have kept alive a belief in telepathy, precognition and such phenomena. Equally persistent, especially in religious circles, has been the conviction that miracles do happen; again, great scientists and medical practitioners have supported such notions. In this course, we explore the fascinating history of the uneasy relationship between science and its contested boundaries where fact and fiction overlap. (HU) Rupke.

Fall 2013 Topic:

HIST 295-01: Seminar: Animal experimentation and animal rights in historical perspective (3). Prerequiste: Open to any senior, junior or sophomore, and first years who have credit in Hist 107 and 108 or Hist 101 and 102. In this course we deal with the place of animals in Western society. More particularly, we trace the history of the use of animals as living objects of laboratory experimentation and explore the controversies that vivisectional practices have engendered. Do animals have rights? What to think of animal liberation activism? To what extent has animal experimentation been essential to the progress of science, especially medical science? We look at these questions in the wider context of humane movements, and of societies that have been established for the prevention of cruelty to animals. Students with sufficient background may engage this course in more depth for credit as HIST 395-02, with instructor consent. Rupke.

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295B - Stoler

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 topic:

HIST 295A-01: Roll Over, Darwin: The Non-Darwinian Tradition in Evolutionary Biology (4). No prerequisite. We begin by discussing the discipline of the history of science and its place in historical scholarship generally. One of the most influential scientific theories is the theory of organic evolution. Its history has largely been written by Darwin and his followers. We shall look at the "Darwin industry" but then additionally explore a revisionist history that incorporates the non-Darwinian approach to the origin of life and species. We look at the scientific facts, the different theories and raise the question "Where were these situated?" "What socio-political purposes and religious connotations did they have?" We end by bringing the historical perspective to bear on today's ongoing controversies about evolution theory. (HU) Rupke.

HIST 295B-01 Rise to World Power, 1776-1920 (4). In the late 18th century, the newly-independent United States was one of the weakest nations in the world. By the early 20th century, it was one of the most powerful. This course, in the history of U.S. foreign relations from 1776 to 1920, explores how and why this dramatic shift occurred. In the process, it emphasizes the interrelationship between domestic and foreign affairs within that history, as well as the origins and evolution of key American diplomatic principles, documents and doctrines. The course also explores the beliefs Americans developed about their place in the world, their expansion across an entire continent, their acquisition of an overseas empire, and the causes and consequences of their participation in armed conflicts from the War for Independence through World War I. Stoler. Spring 2014

Winter 2014 topic:

HIST-295-02: Science and the Supernatural (3). In modern -- especially late-modern -- times, science has become the adjudicator of truth: truth in terms of fact and law-like rationality. The result has been a retreat of the occult, of many superstitions, and the uncovering of fallacies and frauds. Yet large sectors of modern society have remained enamored of the paranormal. Even scientific practitioners themselves, including Nobel Laureates, have kept alive a belief in telepathy, precognition and such phenomena. Equally persistent, especially in religious circles, has been the conviction that miracles do happen; again, great scientists and medical practitioners have supported such notions. In this course, we explore the fascinating history of the uneasy relationship between science and its contested boundaries where fact and fiction overlap. (HU) Rupke.

Fall 2013 Topic:

HIST 295-01: Seminar: Animal experimentation and animal rights in historical perspective (3). Prerequiste: Open to any senior, junior or sophomore, and first years who have credit in Hist 107 and 108 or Hist 101 and 102. In this course we deal with the place of animals in Western society. More particularly, we trace the history of the use of animals as living objects of laboratory experimentation and explore the controversies that vivisectional practices have engendered. Do animals have rights? What to think of animal liberation activism? To what extent has animal experimentation been essential to the progress of science, especially medical science? We look at these questions in the wider context of humane movements, and of societies that have been established for the prevention of cruelty to animals. Students with sufficient background may engage this course in more depth for credit as HIST 395-02, with instructor consent. Rupke.

Seminar in American Social History

HIST 367 - Senechal

An examination of selected topics in the social history of the United States. Requirements include a major research paper based on original source material. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 topic:

HIST 367: Seminar: 9/11 and Modern Terrorism (4). Terrorism is a form of collective violence famously illustrated in the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon near Washington on September 11, 2001. This course provides an intensive interdisciplinary examination of the origins of the 9/11 attacks and the terrorist organization that launched them. The course also addresses the impact of the attacks and the future prospects of mass violence against civilians, as well as the role of the media in covering (and dramatizing) terrorism. Much of the course focuses on the social divisions and conflicts that lead to terrorism and its increasingly lethal nature over time. Topics include "old terrorism" (as seen in Northern Ireland and Algeria), "new terrorism" (such as that associated with Al Qaeda), the logic of terrorist recruitment, and the nature of and spread of weapons of mass destruction. (HU) Senechal. Spring


Winter 2014

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

European Civilization, 1789 to the Present

HIST 102 - Horowitz, Patch (Multiple Sections)

The French Revolution and Napoleon, the era of nationalism, the rise of socialism, imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and European Union.

Japan: Origins to Atomic Aftermath

HIST 104 - Bello

This course traces the span of Japan's historical development from its origins through the Cold War, with a special, but not exclusive, emphasis on an environmental perspective. The first half of the course covers the emergence of indigenous Japanese society and its adaptation to cultural and political influences from mainland East Asia, including Buddhism, Confucianism, and Chinese concepts of empire. The second half covers Japan's successful transition from a declining Tokugawa Shogunate to a modern imperial nation to a reluctant U.S. Cold War ally from the mid?19th to the mid?20th centuries.

History of the United States Since 1876

HIST 108 - McGee, Senechal (Multiple Sections)

A survey of United States History from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, domestic and international developments, wars, and social and cultural movements.

Modern Latin America: Túpak Katari to Tupac Shakur

HIST 131 - Gildner (Multiple Sections)

A survey of Latin America from the 1781 anticolonial rebellion led by indigenous insurgent Túpak Katari to a globalized present in which Latin American youth listen to Tupac Shakur yet know little of his namesake. Lectures are organized thematically (culture, society, economics, and politics) and chronologically, surveying the historical formation of people and nations in Latin America. Individual countries (especially Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, and Peru) provide examples of how local and transnational forces have shaped the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries of North and South America and the Caribbean, and the cultural distinctions and ethnic diversity that characterize a region too often misperceived as homogeneous.

World History to 1300

HIST 173 - Jennings (Multiple Sections)

History of humanity from origins to the Mongol conquests. Focus on large-scale transformation, cross-cultural interaction, and the relationship between human history and natural history. Equal emphasis on Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

Topics in History for First-years and Sophomores

HIST 195 - Gildner

Selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 topic:

HIST 195: Introductory Seminar on Thomas Jefferson (4). A seminar focusing on the life and times of Thomas Jefferson: planter, slave owner, husband, father, author, legislator, diplomat, Secretary of State, Vice President, President, sage. It devotes much of its attention to his two terms as president and also examines his life before his election to the presidency in 1801 and after the expiration of his second term in office. We analyze his strengths and weaknesses, his successes and failures, and his legacy. Includes readings in primary and secondary sources, discussion, weekly essays, and optional tours of Monticello and Poplar Forest. (HU) Merchant. Spring 2014

Winter 2014 topic:

HIST-195: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America (3). This course examines the history of race and ethnicity in Latin America from the colonial past to the republican present. We focus on the origin and evolution of these contentious concepts and also explore how they operated in distinct local-historical contexts, generating social exclusion and, paradoxically, political inclusion. (HU) Gildner.

Fall 2013 topic:

HIST 195-01: Animal Behavior and Human Morality, 1800-present (3). This course deals with the history of the study of animal behavior in its bearing on human morality, from the beginning of the professionalization of the subject around 1800 till the present day. Time and again, tentative connections have been and are being made between the ways animals behave and how humans conduct themselves, thus conferring legitimacy on shared traits. The line of argument in making these linkages is simple and straightforward: if animals behave in certain ways, these ways are natural and therefore beyond reproach; if humans share these traits, they, too, are free of blame. Issues of gender and sexuality traditionally have been at the center of these considerations, but also marriage, the family, slavery, systems of government (monarchy, republic, etc.) have been argued for or against on the basis of animal examples. (HU) Rupke.

Europe in the Late Middle Ages, 1198-1500

HIST 202 - Peterson

Examines, through lectures and discussions, the high medieval papacy; the rise of new lay religious movements; Franciscans and Dominicans; dissent and heresy; the Inquisition; Jews and minorities; the rise of universities; scholasticism and humanism; the development of law; Parliament and constitutionalism; the Hundred Years War; the Black Death; the papal schism and conciliarism; gender roles; family structures and child rearing; Europe's relations with Islam and Byzantium; and the rise of commerce, cities and urban values, as well as of the "new monarchies."

Imperial Russia, 1682 to 1917

HIST 220 - Bidlack

From the rise to power of Peter the Great, Russia's first emperor, through the fall of the Romanov dynasty. Completion of either

International Relations, 1919-1970: The End of European Hegemony

HIST 224 - Patch

Topics include the Versailles peace settlement of 1919, the spread of the British Empire to the Middle East and birth of Palestinian nationalism, the impact of the Great Depression and totalitarianism on international relations, the outbreak of the Second World War, the Holocaust and foundation of the State of Israel, the Nuremberg Trials, decolonization in Africa and Asia, the origins of the Cold War, and the foundation of the European Economic Community. What have Europeans learned about conflict resolution from their experience of two world wars and numerous colonial wars?

Topics in European History

HIST 229 - Horowitz

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2014 Topic:

HIST-229-01: 19th-Century Scandal, Crime and Spectacle (3). This course examines the fascination with scandal and crime in 19th-century Europe. We discuss the nature of scandals, theories of criminality in the 19th century, crime and urbanization, the connection between scandals and political change, and how scandals and ideas about crime were used to articulate new ideas about class, gender and sexuality. Some of the particular topics this class covers include the Diamond Necklace Affair, the Queen Caroline Affair, the trial of Oscar Wilde, and the Jack the Ripper murders. (HU) Horowitz.

History 229-02: Nazism and the Third Reich (3). No prerequisite. This course introduces students to the lively debates among scholars and selected primary sources regarding the causes of the failure of democracy in the Weimar Republic, the mentality of Nazi leaders and followers, the nature of the regime created by them in 1933, the impact of the Third Reich on the position of women in German society, and the degree to which the German people supported the Third Reich's criminal policies of war and racial persecution. (HU) Patch

Topics in European History

HIST 229 - Patch

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in European history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2014 Topic:

HIST-229-01: 19th-Century Scandal, Crime and Spectacle (3). This course examines the fascination with scandal and crime in 19th-century Europe. We discuss the nature of scandals, theories of criminality in the 19th century, crime and urbanization, the connection between scandals and political change, and how scandals and ideas about crime were used to articulate new ideas about class, gender and sexuality. Some of the particular topics this class covers include the Diamond Necklace Affair, the Queen Caroline Affair, the trial of Oscar Wilde, and the Jack the Ripper murders. (HU) Horowitz.

History 229-02: Nazism and the Third Reich (3). No prerequisite. This course introduces students to the lively debates among scholars and selected primary sources regarding the causes of the failure of democracy in the Weimar Republic, the mentality of Nazi leaders and followers, the nature of the regime created by them in 1933, the impact of the Third Reich on the position of women in German society, and the degree to which the German people supported the Third Reich's criminal policies of war and racial persecution. (HU) Patch

Nations and Nationalism

HIST 234 - Eastwood

This course examines the rise and global spread of national identity over the last five centuries by considering cases from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas and using these to test major theories of nationalism from history and the social sciences. Major questions considered include the following: What, if any, are the empirically identifiable relationships between national identity and other major dimensions of "modernization," such as the rise of the modern state and industrial capitalism? Is nationalism a cause, consequence, or victim of "globalization"? Can we construct a theory of the spread of national identity that not only makes sense of macro-level patterns but also articulates clear "microfoundations" and identifiable causal mechanisms?

America in the Gilded Age, 1870-1900

HIST 247 - Senechal

A survey of the transformation of American society under the impact of industrialization and urbanization. It examines how business leaders, workers, farmers, and the middle class attempted to shape the new industrial society to their own purposes. Emphasis is given to social, intellectual, and cultural experiences and to politics.

The Old South to 1860

HIST 262 - Myers

A study of the making of the Old South. Slavery. Antebellum political, economic, social, and cultural developments. The origins and growth of sectionalism.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - McGee

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 Topics:

HIST 269-01: The Freedom Ride. (4). An intensive study of the Civil Rights Movement through the lens of the Freedom Riders. This reading- and writing-intensive four-week study includes a two-week tour of major Civil Rights protest sites in the lower Southern United States. (HU). DeLaney

HIST 269-02: Digital America: A Brief History of the Computer and Modern U.S. Information Society (4). This sprint of a class looks at the birth of the digital computer, traces electronic data processing from the days of mainframes through personal computers and the emergence of today's digital "cloud," and interrogates precisely what a modern "information society" in the United States looks like. Equal parts technology, business, politics, culture, and social theory, the class looks at "information" and how it is has been collected, managed, manipulated, and experienced in America over the past seven decades. (HU) McGee. Spring 2014

 

Winter 2014 Topics:

HIST-269-01: Modern U.S. Business History, Late 19th Century to the Present (3). This seminar in the history of capitalism in the United States focuses on the institutions, individuals, and practices that transformed commerce and industry through waves of industrial, management, post-industrial, and information revolutions. We place this transformation within broader political, social, and cultural context. Topics include entrepreneurship; the rise of new models of firms and corporations; the shifting relationship between state and market; the ways in which businesses and businessmen are portrayed by popular culture; and the often-surprising influences of new technologies, the natural environment, emerging social movements, conflicts over labor and state regulation, shifting political ideologies, and evolution in social thought about the broader place of business in American society. (HU) McGee. HIST-269-02: Blacks in the Age of Jim Crow (3). This course is an intensive examination of southern race relations from 1890 through 1965 which focuses on racial injustice and poverty; black education and entrepreneurship; and the quest for Civil Rights and the white backlash that it provoked. It also focuses on white demagogues and liberals as well as black leaders. (HU) DeLaney. HIST-269-03: Evolution of American Warfare (3). This course examines U.S. military history from the colonial period to the post-9/11 American military experience. Since this is a period of more than four hundred years, the class necessarily limits its focus to major topics and central questions facing the men and women who have fought in American wars. We trace the course of American military history by focusing on three themes: the early development of American military institutions, the evolution of military policy toward civilian populations, and the changing face of battle in which Americans have fought. (HU) Myers.

Fall 2013 Topic:

HIST 269-01: Cancelled

HIST 269-02: Experiencing the American Century: The United States 1945 to Present (3). Prerequisite: Open to any senior, junior or sophomore, and first years who have credit in Hist 107 and 108. A survey of American political, cultural, and social history from 1945 to the present. Explores major events, periods, trends, personages, and concepts associated with the period, and students analyze these themes in broader context. Students engage the historical method and communicate structured arguments effectively (in both written and oral form) using secondary literature and primary documents. (HU) McGee.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - DeLaney

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 Topics:

HIST 269-01: The Freedom Ride. (4). An intensive study of the Civil Rights Movement through the lens of the Freedom Riders. This reading- and writing-intensive four-week study includes a two-week tour of major Civil Rights protest sites in the lower Southern United States. (HU). DeLaney

HIST 269-02: Digital America: A Brief History of the Computer and Modern U.S. Information Society (4). This sprint of a class looks at the birth of the digital computer, traces electronic data processing from the days of mainframes through personal computers and the emergence of today's digital "cloud," and interrogates precisely what a modern "information society" in the United States looks like. Equal parts technology, business, politics, culture, and social theory, the class looks at "information" and how it is has been collected, managed, manipulated, and experienced in America over the past seven decades. (HU) McGee. Spring 2014

 

Winter 2014 Topics:

HIST-269-01: Modern U.S. Business History, Late 19th Century to the Present (3). This seminar in the history of capitalism in the United States focuses on the institutions, individuals, and practices that transformed commerce and industry through waves of industrial, management, post-industrial, and information revolutions. We place this transformation within broader political, social, and cultural context. Topics include entrepreneurship; the rise of new models of firms and corporations; the shifting relationship between state and market; the ways in which businesses and businessmen are portrayed by popular culture; and the often-surprising influences of new technologies, the natural environment, emerging social movements, conflicts over labor and state regulation, shifting political ideologies, and evolution in social thought about the broader place of business in American society. (HU) McGee. HIST-269-02: Blacks in the Age of Jim Crow (3). This course is an intensive examination of southern race relations from 1890 through 1965 which focuses on racial injustice and poverty; black education and entrepreneurship; and the quest for Civil Rights and the white backlash that it provoked. It also focuses on white demagogues and liberals as well as black leaders. (HU) DeLaney. HIST-269-03: Evolution of American Warfare (3). This course examines U.S. military history from the colonial period to the post-9/11 American military experience. Since this is a period of more than four hundred years, the class necessarily limits its focus to major topics and central questions facing the men and women who have fought in American wars. We trace the course of American military history by focusing on three themes: the early development of American military institutions, the evolution of military policy toward civilian populations, and the changing face of battle in which Americans have fought. (HU) Myers.

Fall 2013 Topic:

HIST 269-01: Cancelled

HIST 269-02: Experiencing the American Century: The United States 1945 to Present (3). Prerequisite: Open to any senior, junior or sophomore, and first years who have credit in Hist 107 and 108. A survey of American political, cultural, and social history from 1945 to the present. Explores major events, periods, trends, personages, and concepts associated with the period, and students analyze these themes in broader context. Students engage the historical method and communicate structured arguments effectively (in both written and oral form) using secondary literature and primary documents. (HU) McGee.

Topics in United States, Latin American or Canadian History

HIST 269 - Myers

A course offered from time to time, depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in United States, Latin American or Canadian history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 Topics:

HIST 269-01: The Freedom Ride. (4). An intensive study of the Civil Rights Movement through the lens of the Freedom Riders. This reading- and writing-intensive four-week study includes a two-week tour of major Civil Rights protest sites in the lower Southern United States. (HU). DeLaney

HIST 269-02: Digital America: A Brief History of the Computer and Modern U.S. Information Society (4). This sprint of a class looks at the birth of the digital computer, traces electronic data processing from the days of mainframes through personal computers and the emergence of today's digital "cloud," and interrogates precisely what a modern "information society" in the United States looks like. Equal parts technology, business, politics, culture, and social theory, the class looks at "information" and how it is has been collected, managed, manipulated, and experienced in America over the past seven decades. (HU) McGee. Spring 2014

 

Winter 2014 Topics:

HIST-269-01: Modern U.S. Business History, Late 19th Century to the Present (3). This seminar in the history of capitalism in the United States focuses on the institutions, individuals, and practices that transformed commerce and industry through waves of industrial, management, post-industrial, and information revolutions. We place this transformation within broader political, social, and cultural context. Topics include entrepreneurship; the rise of new models of firms and corporations; the shifting relationship between state and market; the ways in which businesses and businessmen are portrayed by popular culture; and the often-surprising influences of new technologies, the natural environment, emerging social movements, conflicts over labor and state regulation, shifting political ideologies, and evolution in social thought about the broader place of business in American society. (HU) McGee. HIST-269-02: Blacks in the Age of Jim Crow (3). This course is an intensive examination of southern race relations from 1890 through 1965 which focuses on racial injustice and poverty; black education and entrepreneurship; and the quest for Civil Rights and the white backlash that it provoked. It also focuses on white demagogues and liberals as well as black leaders. (HU) DeLaney. HIST-269-03: Evolution of American Warfare (3). This course examines U.S. military history from the colonial period to the post-9/11 American military experience. Since this is a period of more than four hundred years, the class necessarily limits its focus to major topics and central questions facing the men and women who have fought in American wars. We trace the course of American military history by focusing on three themes: the early development of American military institutions, the evolution of military policy toward civilian populations, and the changing face of battle in which Americans have fought. (HU) Myers.

Fall 2013 Topic:

HIST 269-01: Cancelled

HIST 269-02: Experiencing the American Century: The United States 1945 to Present (3). Prerequisite: Open to any senior, junior or sophomore, and first years who have credit in Hist 107 and 108. A survey of American political, cultural, and social history from 1945 to the present. Explores major events, periods, trends, personages, and concepts associated with the period, and students analyze these themes in broader context. Students engage the historical method and communicate structured arguments effectively (in both written and oral form) using secondary literature and primary documents. (HU) McGee.

Topics in Asian, African, or Islamic History

HIST 289 - Blecher

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in Asian or African history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2014 Topic:

HIST-289-01: Profit and Prophecy (3). This discussion-intensive course engages the ideals and realities of Islamic commerce, from the 7th century in which Muhammad was reported to have been a merchant, to the roots of modern Islamic banking in the Middle East and South Asia. Through social and intellectual historical inquiry, students investigate a range of themes, including: poverty and charity, economic justice and regulation of merchant capitalism, gender and inheritance, debt, trade with non-Muslims, slavery and wage labor, taxation, usury and gambling. Students learn to take a source-critical approach to Islamic writings in translation, including prophetic literature, commentaries, chronicles and histories. Prior knowledge of Islam or Islamic history is not required. (HU) Blecher.

HIST 289-02: History of South Africa (3). No prerequisite. Survey of the history of South Africa and its neighbors, examining the region both on its own terms and as a part of world history. Topics include the evolution of humans; the arrival of Bantu-speaking peoples; Dutch settlement and British colonization; expansion of the Zulu kingdom; the Anglo-Boer War; colonialism and independence; and the rise and demise of apartheid. (HU) Jennings

Fall 2013 Topic:

HIST 289-01: Modern Islamic Political Thought (3). Perequisite: Open to any senior, junior or sophomore, and first years who have credit in Hist 107 and 108 or Hist 101 and 102. This course investigates Islamic political thought and action from the 18th century to the present in light of Islamic writings on politics from the classical and middle ages. Students learn to approach primary and secondary sources critically on a variety of themes, including: Islamic law and the state; just war and violence; Islamism and democracy; women's participation in the public sphere and in politics; colonialism and the impact of technology and new media in the Middle East and South Asia; blasphemy and free speech; relating to non-Muslims and Muslim minorities in the West; and the changing role of religious education and traditional authority. Blecher.

Topics in Asian, African, or Islamic History

HIST 289 - Jennings

A course offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, on a selected topic or problem in Asian or African history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2014 Topic:

HIST-289-01: Profit and Prophecy (3). This discussion-intensive course engages the ideals and realities of Islamic commerce, from the 7th century in which Muhammad was reported to have been a merchant, to the roots of modern Islamic banking in the Middle East and South Asia. Through social and intellectual historical inquiry, students investigate a range of themes, including: poverty and charity, economic justice and regulation of merchant capitalism, gender and inheritance, debt, trade with non-Muslims, slavery and wage labor, taxation, usury and gambling. Students learn to take a source-critical approach to Islamic writings in translation, including prophetic literature, commentaries, chronicles and histories. Prior knowledge of Islam or Islamic history is not required. (HU) Blecher.

HIST 289-02: History of South Africa (3). No prerequisite. Survey of the history of South Africa and its neighbors, examining the region both on its own terms and as a part of world history. Topics include the evolution of humans; the arrival of Bantu-speaking peoples; Dutch settlement and British colonization; expansion of the Zulu kingdom; the Anglo-Boer War; colonialism and independence; and the rise and demise of apartheid. (HU) Jennings

Fall 2013 Topic:

HIST 289-01: Modern Islamic Political Thought (3). Perequisite: Open to any senior, junior or sophomore, and first years who have credit in Hist 107 and 108 or Hist 101 and 102. This course investigates Islamic political thought and action from the 18th century to the present in light of Islamic writings on politics from the classical and middle ages. Students learn to approach primary and secondary sources critically on a variety of themes, including: Islamic law and the state; just war and violence; Islamism and democracy; women's participation in the public sphere and in politics; colonialism and the impact of technology and new media in the Middle East and South Asia; blasphemy and free speech; relating to non-Muslims and Muslim minorities in the West; and the changing role of religious education and traditional authority. Blecher.

Seminar: Topics in History

HIST 295 - Rupke

A seminar offered from time to time depending on student interest and staff availability, in a selected topic or problem in history. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 topic:

HIST 295A-01: Roll Over, Darwin: The Non-Darwinian Tradition in Evolutionary Biology (4). No prerequisite. We begin by discussing the discipline of the history of science and its place in historical scholarship generally. One of the most influential scientific theories is the theory of organic evolution. Its history has largely been written by Darwin and his followers. We shall look at the "Darwin industry" but then additionally explore a revisionist history that incorporates the non-Darwinian approach to the origin of life and species. We look at the scientific facts, the different theories and raise the question "Where were these situated?" "What socio-political purposes and religious connotations did they have?" We end by bringing the historical perspective to bear on today's ongoing controversies about evolution theory. (HU) Rupke.

HIST 295B-01 Rise to World Power, 1776-1920 (4). In the late 18th century, the newly-independent United States was one of the weakest nations in the world. By the early 20th century, it was one of the most powerful. This course, in the history of U.S. foreign relations from 1776 to 1920, explores how and why this dramatic shift occurred. In the process, it emphasizes the interrelationship between domestic and foreign affairs within that history, as well as the origins and evolution of key American diplomatic principles, documents and doctrines. The course also explores the beliefs Americans developed about their place in the world, their expansion across an entire continent, their acquisition of an overseas empire, and the causes and consequences of their participation in armed conflicts from the War for Independence through World War I. Stoler. Spring 2014

Winter 2014 topic:

HIST-295-02: Science and the Supernatural (3). In modern -- especially late-modern -- times, science has become the adjudicator of truth: truth in terms of fact and law-like rationality. The result has been a retreat of the occult, of many superstitions, and the uncovering of fallacies and frauds. Yet large sectors of modern society have remained enamored of the paranormal. Even scientific practitioners themselves, including Nobel Laureates, have kept alive a belief in telepathy, precognition and such phenomena. Equally persistent, especially in religious circles, has been the conviction that miracles do happen; again, great scientists and medical practitioners have supported such notions. In this course, we explore the fascinating history of the uneasy relationship between science and its contested boundaries where fact and fiction overlap. (HU) Rupke.

Fall 2013 Topic:

HIST 295-01: Seminar: Animal experimentation and animal rights in historical perspective (3). Prerequiste: Open to any senior, junior or sophomore, and first years who have credit in Hist 107 and 108 or Hist 101 and 102. In this course we deal with the place of animals in Western society. More particularly, we trace the history of the use of animals as living objects of laboratory experimentation and explore the controversies that vivisectional practices have engendered. Do animals have rights? What to think of animal liberation activism? To what extent has animal experimentation been essential to the progress of science, especially medical science? We look at these questions in the wider context of humane movements, and of societies that have been established for the prevention of cruelty to animals. Students with sufficient background may engage this course in more depth for credit as HIST 395-02, with instructor consent. Rupke.

Seminar on Nazism and the Third Reich

HIST 312 - Patch

Common readings introduce students to some of the most lively debates among scholars about the causes of the failure of democracy in the Weimar Republic, the mentality of Nazi leaders and followers, the nature of the regime created by the Nazis in 1933, the impact of the Third Reich on the position of women in German society, and the degree to which the German people supported this regime's policies of war and racial persecution. Students develop a research topic related to one of these debates for analysis in a substantial research paper utilizing both primary and secondary sources.

Seminar in Russian History

HIST 322 - Bidlack

Selected topics in Russian history, including but not limited to heroes and villains, Soviet biography, Stalin and Stalinism, the USSR in the Second World War and origins of the Cold War, the KGB, and the decline and fall of the Soviet Union and the re-emergence of Russia. May be repeated for degree and major credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2014 topic:

HIST 322: The USSR in the Second World War and Origins of the Cold War (3). This seminar covers the actions of the Soviet state and people during the Second World War, 1939-1945, and during the early stages of the Cold War up through 1953. (HU)  

Seminar on the Origins of the Constitution

HIST 364 - Merchant

An examination of the historical origins and development to 1791 of the Federal Constitution, including English and colonial backgrounds, state constitutions, the Articles of Confederation, drafting and ratification of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

Seminar: The Struggle Over China's Environment

HIST 387 - Bello

The course covers the more recent periods of China's so-called "3,000 years of unsustainable growth" from about A.D. 618 into the present. Themes focus on China's historical experience with sedentary agriculture, fossil fuel and nuclear energy, wildlife and forest management, disease, water control, and major construction projects like the Great Wall.

Directed Individual Study

HIST 403 - Patch

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit each term of the junior and senior year.

Winter 2014 topic:

HIST 403-03: From Rhodesia to Zimbabwe (3). Focused independent study of major transitions in the late 20th-century history of what is now called Zimbabwe: from the British colony of Southern Rhodesia to the unrecognized white minority-ruled state of Rhodesia (1965) and from Rhodesia to the independent Republic of Zimbabwe (1980). Jennings

Directed Individual Study

HIST 403 - Peterson

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit each term of the junior and senior year.

Winter 2014 topic:

HIST 403-03: From Rhodesia to Zimbabwe (3). Focused independent study of major transitions in the late 20th-century history of what is now called Zimbabwe: from the British colony of Southern Rhodesia to the unrecognized white minority-ruled state of Rhodesia (1965) and from Rhodesia to the independent Republic of Zimbabwe (1980). Jennings

Directed Individual Study

HIST 403 - Jennings

A course which permits the student to follow a program of directed reading or research in an area not covered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit each term of the junior and senior year.

Winter 2014 topic:

HIST 403-03: From Rhodesia to Zimbabwe (3). Focused independent study of major transitions in the late 20th-century history of what is now called Zimbabwe: from the British colony of Southern Rhodesia to the unrecognized white minority-ruled state of Rhodesia (1965) and from Rhodesia to the independent Republic of Zimbabwe (1980). Jennings

Senior Thesis

HIST 473 - DeLaney

This course serves as an alternative for History 493. Please consult the department head for more details.

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Merchant

Honors Thesis.

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - Myers

Honors Thesis.

Honors Thesis

HIST 493 - DeLaney

Honors Thesis.