Creative Writing Minor

2015 - 2016 Catalog

Creative Writing minor

A minor in creative writing requires six three- or four-credit courses, exclusive of ENGL 201. In meeting the requirements of this minor, a student may not use more than nine credits that are also used to meet the requirements of any other major or minor. The courses must include:

  1. Creative writing workshops: three courses chosen from ENGL 202 (or THTR 220), 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 305, 306, 307, 308, and 309, with at least one at the 300-level.
  2. Literature: two literature courses in English, including one chosen from courses numbered between 230 and 294 and one chosen from ENGL 299 or English courses numbers between 311 and 386.
  3. One additional course chosen from the above or from ENGL 403 or 453. Students majoring in a discipline without an emphasis in literature are strongly encouraged to choose an elective course from the Literature category (number 2 above). English majors wishing to complete a Creative Writing minor should elect a fourth workshop, a 403 in creative writing, or a creative honors thesis in English.
  4. Participation in a capstone public reading in winter or spring of the senior year.
  1. Creative writing workshops:
  2. three courses chosen from:

    • ENGL 202 - Topics in Creative Writing: Playwriting

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring 2015 and alternate years


      Prerequisite: Completion of FDR FW requirement.

      A course in the practice of writing plays, involving workshops, literary study, critical writing, and performance.

    • or
    • THTR 220 - Playwriting

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Offered in fall or winter when interest is expressed and departmental resources permit


      Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

      An introductory workshop in creative writing for the theater that will focus on traditional forms of scene and script writing. Opportunities for collaborative writing and devised theater may be included. Weekly writing and reading assignments are required. Limited enrollment.

    • ENGL 203 - Topics in Creative Writing: Fiction

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 3 credits in Fall or Winter; 4 credits in Spring
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter


      Prerequisites: Completion of FW requirement. Limited enrollment.

      A course in the practice of writing short fiction, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.

    • ENGL 204 - Topics in Creative Writing: Poetry

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter


      Prerequisites: Completion of FW requirement. Limited enrollment.

      A course in the practice of writing poetry, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing.

    • ENGL 205 - Poetic Forms

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring 2017 and alternate years


      Prerequisites: Completion of FW requirement.

      A course in the practice of writing poetry, with attention to a range of forms and poetic modes. Includes workshops, literary study, community outreach, and performance. A service-learning course. This course blends three activities: exercises for generating poems; workshops devoted to student writing; and literary analysis of verse forms and modes, from terza rima to performance poetry. Local field trips and special events augment regular class meetings. For each class, students complete readings, generate a new poem draft, and undertake other short assignments. Students establish a daily writing practice and participate in a service-learning project.

    • ENGL 206 - Topics in Creative Writing: Nonfiction

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 3 in fall, winter; 4 in spring


      Prerequisite: Competition of FW requirement. Limited enrollment.

      A course in the practice of writing nonfiction, involving workshops, literary study, and critical writing. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

    • ENGL 207 - Eco-Writing

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring 2016 and alternate years


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW FDR. Every Tuesday expeditions involve moderate to challenging hiking.

      A course emphasizing students' creative encounters with their environment and their writing about it, along with major works and writers. This expeditionary course in environmental writing allows a four-weeks' immersive study and explores the work of writers from Virgil, Emerson, Whitman, and Frost to Charles Frazier, Annie Dillard, William Cronan, and Gary Snyder.

    • ENGL 305 - Writing Outside the Lines

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2015 and every third year


      Prerequisites: Three credits in 200-level English and instructor consent.

      Previous workshop experience recommended. Students who have successfully completed ENGL 203, 204, 205, 206, or 207 should inform the department's administrative assistant, who will grant them permission to enroll. All others should email a short sample of their writing to the professor. The boundaries between genres can limit imagination; this course opens up those borders and invites experimentation and exploration. Designed to help students become better acquainted with craft, technique, and process, the course focuses on mixed-genre writing that defies easy categorization through combining stylistic traits of more than one creative genre (examples might include the prose poem, narrative poem, dramatic monologue, flash fiction, novel vignettes, poetic memoirs, and other hybrids) as well as transforming a piece from one genre to another (for example, turning a poem into flash fiction or monologue). The course requires regular writing and outside reading.

    • ENGL 306 - Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2017 and every third year


      Prerequisites: Three credits in 200-level English and instructor consent.

      Previous workshop experience recommended. Students who have successfully completed either ENGL 204 or 205 should inform the department's administrative assistant, who will grant them permission to enroll. All others should email a short sample of their poetry to the professor. A workshop in writing poems, requiring regular writing and outside reading.

    • ENGL 307 - Fresh/Local/Wild: The Poetics of Food

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring


      Prerequisites: Three credits in 200-level English and instructor consent. Students must submit writing samples to qualify for admission. ENGL 203 and/or 204 recommended. Limited enrollment.

      This class visits fresh/local/wild food venues each week, where sensory explorations focus on all aspects of foraging, creating, adapting and eating food. Coursework includes guided writing exercises based on the landscape/geography of food both in the field and classroom, with in-depth readings that help us turn topics like food politics, food insecurity, sustainable agriculture and genetically modified foods into poetry. Individual handmade chapbooks of the term's poems serve as the final product. A service learning component is also included in the course through Campus Kitchen.

    • ENGL 308 - Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring
      Planned Offering: Winter


      Prerequisites: Three credits in 200-level English and instructor consent. Students must submit writing samples to qualify for admission. ENGL 203 and/or 204 recommended.

      A workshop in writing fiction, requiring regular writing and outside reading.

       

       

    • ENGL 309 - Advanced Creative Writing: Memoir

      FDR: HA
      Credits: 3 in fall and winter, 4 in spring
      Planned Offering: Fall 2016 and every third year


      Prerequisite: Three credits in 200-level English and instructor consent.

      Flannery O'Connor once said that any writer who could survive childhood had enough material to write about for a lifetime. Memoir is a mosaic form, utilizing bits and pieces from autobiography, fiction, essay and poetry in ways that allow the author to muse (speculate, imagine, remember, and question) on their own life experiences. Modern literary memoir requires tremendous work from the author, as she moves both backward and forward in time, re-creates believable dialogue, switches back and forth between scene and summary, and controls the pace and tension of the story with lyricism or brute imagery. In short, the memoirist keeps her reader engaged by being an adept and agile storyteller. This is not straight autobiography. Memoir is more about what can be gleaned from a section of one's life than about chronicling an entire life. Like a mosaic, memoir is about the individual pieces as much as the eventual whole. Work focuses on reading established memoirists, free writing, and workshopping in and out of class.

    • with at least one at the 300-level
  3. Literature:
  4. two literature courses in English, including one chosen from:

    • ENGL 230 - Poetry

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      An introductory study of poetry written in English. The course may survey representative poems or focus on a theme. In all versions of the course, students will develop a range of interpretive strategies, learning the vocabulary appropriate to poetry's many structures, modes, and devices.

    • ENGL 231 - Drama

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      An introductory study of drama, emphasizing form, history, and performance. Organization may be chronological, thematic, or generic and may cover English language, western, or world drama. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the interpretation of theatrical texts.

    • ENGL 232 - The Novel

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      An introductory study of the novel written in English. The course may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of modern narrative.

    • ENGL 233 - Film

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      An introductory study of film in English. The course may focus on major representative texts or upon a subgenre or thematic approach. In all cases, the course introduces students to fundamental issues in the history and theory of film.

    • ENGL 234 - Children's Literature

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      A study of works written in English for children. The course treats major writers, thematic and generic groupings of texts, and children's literature in historical context. Readings may include poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction, and illustrated books, including picture books that dispense with text.

    • ENGL 235 - Fantasy

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      A study of major types of narrative in which the imagination modifies the "natural" world and human society: the marvelous in epic, romance, and Islamic story collections; the fantastic in romantic and modern narrative; and the futuristic in science fiction and social fable.

    • ENGL 236 - The Bible as English Literature

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2013 and alternate years


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      An intensive study of the Bible as a literary work, focusing on such elements as poetry, narrative, myth, archetype, prophecy, symbol, allegory, and character. Emphases may include the Bible's influence upon the traditions of English literature and various perspectives of biblical narrative in philosophy, theology, or literary criticism.

    • ENGL 240 - Arthurian Legend

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2016 and alternate years


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      Why does King Arthur continue to fascinate and haunt our cultural imagination? This course surveys the origins and histories of Arthurian literature, beginning with Celtic myths, Welsh tales, and Latin chronicles, followed by medieval French and English traditions, as well as modern Arthurian medievalisms. In addition to historical and literary contexts, we explore theoretical issues surrounding the texts, especially the relationship between history and fantasy, courtly love and adultery, erotic love and madness, romance and chivalry, gender and agency, and Europe and its Others. All texts are read in modern English translation.

    • ENGL 250 - Medieval and Early Modern British Literature

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      This course is a survey of English literature from the Early Middle Ages to the Early Modern period. We read works in various genres--verse, drama, and prose--and understand their specific cultural and historical contexts. We also examine select modern film adaptations of canonical works as part of the evolving history of critical reception.

    • ENGL 252 - Shakespeare

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      A study of the major genres of Shakespeare's plays, employing analysis shaped by formal, historical, and performance-based questions. Emphasis is given to tracing how Shakespeare's work engages early modern cultural concerns, such as the nature of political rule, gender, religion, and sexuality. A variety of skills are developed in order to assist students with interpretation, which may include verse analysis, study of early modern dramatic forms, performance workshops, two medium-length papers, reviews of live play productions, and a final, student-directed performance of a selected play.

    • ENGL 253 - Southern American Literature

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      A study of selected fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction by Southern writers in their historical and literary contexts. We practice multiple approaches to critical reading, and students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers.

      Fall 2015, ENGL 253-01: Southern American Literature: Region and the Real South (3). William Faulkner's 1936 novel Absalom, Absalom! famously demanded, 'Tell about the South. What's it like there. What do they do there. Why do they live there. Why do they live at all.' We might find an answer to this demand in Houston-based UGK's 2007 instruction to "Quit Hatin' The South" or in Mississippi native Big K.R.I.T.'s 2013 declaration, "We make it cool to be southern." From Faulkner to country music to southern hip-hop, the South has long been a contested space, and regional identity has been an important element of its literary production. This class focuses on two main questions: What happens when we consider geographical region as a major element of literary analysis? And how has the region of the South--and the idea of the "Real South"--been constructed in relation both to other regions and to other (less "real"?) Souths? We look at writing from regionalist authors at the turn of the century (Chesnutt, Freeman, Chopin, and others), as well as southern regional writing at mid-century (Faulkner, O'Conner, Walker, Toomer), before concluding with contemporary hip-hop and country music (OutKast, Goodie Mob, UGK, Big K.R.I.T., Yelawolf, Hank Williams, Jr., Bake Shelton, Tim McGraw, Cadillac Three, Brad Paisley, and others). (HL) Bufkin.

    • ENGL 260 - Literary Approaches to Poverty

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      Examines literary responses to the experience of poverty, imaginative representations of human life in straitened circumstances, and arguments about the causes and consequences of poverty that appear in literature. Critical consideration of dominant paradigms ("the country and the city," "the deserving poor," "the two nations," "from rags to riches," "the fallen woman," "the abyss") augments reading based in cultural contexts. Historical focus will vary according to professor's areas of interest and expertise.

    • ENGL 261 - Reading Gender

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      A course on using gender as a tool of literary analysis. We study the ways ideas about masculinity and femininity inform and are informed by poetry, short stories, novels, plays, films, and/or pop culture productions. Also includes readings in feminist theory about literary interpretation and about the ways gender intersects with other social categories, including race, ethnicity, sexuality, and class. Historical focus will vary according to professor's areas of interest and expertise. We study novels, poems, stories, and films that engage with what might be considered some major modern myths of gender: popular fairy tales. We focus at length upon the Cinderella and Red Riding Hood stories but also consider versions of several additional tales, always with the goal of analyzing the particular ideas about women and men, girls and boys, femininity and masculinity that both underlie and are produced by specific iterations of these familiar stories.

    • ENGL 262 - Literature, Race, and Ethnicity

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3 in fall, winter; 4 in spring
      Planned Offering: Winter


      Prerequisite: Completion of FW requirement.

      A course that uses ethnicity, race, and culture to develop readings of literature. Politics and history play a large role in this critical approach; students should be prepared to explore their own ethnic awareness as it intersects with other, often conflicting, perspectives. Focus will vary with the professor's interests and expertise, but may include one or more literatures of the English-speaking world: Chicano and Latino, Native American, African-American, Asian-American, Caribbean, African, sub-continental (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka), and others.

    • ENGL 291 - Seminar

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter


      Prerequisites: Completion of FW requirement.

      This course studies a group of works related by theme, by culture, by topic, by genre, or by the critical approach taken to the works. Some recent topics have been the Southern Short Story; Gender and Passion in the 19th-Century Novel; Chivalry, Honor, and the Romance; and Appalachian Literature. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

    • ENGL 292 - Topics in British Literature

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3 in fall or winter, 4 in spring
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter


      Prerequisite: Completion of the FW requirement.

      Studies in British literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      Fall 2015, ENGL 292-01: Topics in British Literature: Modern British Poetry (3). This course covers poetry from 1870 through the twenty-first century, asking how British poets have pushed the limits of traditional verse. British poets are known for being less innovative than their American and Continental peers. We sample poems by Walt Whitman and William Carlos Williams before asking: what did "experimentation" mean to Gerard Manley Hopkins and Thomas Hardy? And how did Yeats experiment with history in his poems, as opposed to Ezra Pound? We also see how female poets, such as Edith Sitwell and Stevie Smith, developed highly original voices, and we end by sampling the works of more recent poets, including an influx of immigrant writers. (HL) Brodie.

    • ENGL 293 - Topics in American Literature

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3-4
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter, Spring


      Prerequisite: Completion of the FW requirement.

      Studies in American literature, supported by attention to historical contexts. Versions of this course may survey several periods or concentrate on a group of works from a short span of time. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

      Fall 2015, ENGL 293-01: Topics in American Literature: Sex and Intimacy in American Literature (3). This course surveys the formations of intimate feelings in the literature from Hawthorne's take on Puritans to Ginsberg's open celebration of gay sex. We will look at how different periods of American culture - the Romantics, Realists, Moderns, and post-Moderns - represent intimacy, its relation to gender and race, and why, in a country touted for its optimism, love in literature always seems to end badly. (HL) Leland.

    • ENGL 294 - Topics in Environmental Literature

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3 in fall or winter, 4 in spring
      Planned Offering: Spring


      Prerequisite: Completion of the FW requirement.

      Studies in the literature of natural history, exploration, and science pertaining to the fundamental relationships between nature and human culture. Versions of this course focus on particular periods and national literatures, or they concentrate on a specific theme or problem. Students develop their analytical writing skills in a series of short papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

    • And one chosen from
    • ENGL 299 - Seminar for Prospective Majors

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter


      Prerequisites: Completion of FW composition requirement, at least one course chosen from English courses numbered from 203 to 295.

      A study of a topic in literature issuing in a research process and sustained critical writing. Some recent topics have been Detective Fiction; American Indian Literatures; Revenge; and David Thoreau and American Transcendentalism.

      Fall 2015, ENGL 299-01: Seminar for Prospective Majors: Apocalyptic Narratives (3). Ranging from ancient accounts of floods and plagues, the fall of great cities, and the final revelation to such contemporary texts as Doctor Strangelove, Interstellar, and World War Z, apocalyptic narratives are perhaps the oldest and remain among the most popular genres. In addition, this tradition vividly illustrates one of the most important practical functions of the serious study of literature, that is, how literature allows us to imagine and thereby "game out" scenarios that seldom, if ever, have really happened and that cannot be isolated for study in a lab because by definition they involve the possible end of the human race. Likely texts include histories, poems, films, and novels such as book 2 of The Aeneid, The Book of Revelations, Frankenstein, The War of the Worlds, A Canticle for Leibowitz, Salem's Lot, Oryx and Crake, Aliens, The Road, and Noah. (HL) Adams.

      Fall 2015, ENGL 299-02: Seminar for Prospective Majors: The (M.) Butterfly Effect (3). Marco Polo, in his Travels, boasts of no fewer than 20,000 courtesans ready to serve foreign emissaries and merchants visiting the imperial court of the Great Khan. The East, simultaneously there and here, is always already exoticized and eroticized. This course examines the parallel constructions and representations of Eastern spaces, bodies, genders, and sexualities that continue to haunt the Western imaginary. Central to the discursive history of Orientalism is the figure of Madame Butterfly--geisha, lover, mother, and wife. Alongside and against Cho-Cho San, however, are the Dragon Lady, Mulan the female warrior, and men who intentionally or unwittingly assume the role of the Butterfly. Between fantasy and reality, is the East an effect of cross-cultural encounters? Or does it effect its own figurations in a complex network of negotiations? Cultural artifacts include Pierre Loti's Madame Chrysanthème; John Luther Long's original short story and later novella Madame Butterfly, as well as David Belasco's play, Giacomo Puccini's opera, David Henry Hwang's play M. Butterfly, and Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil's musical Miss Saigon; Arthur Golden's Memoirs of a Geisha; the legends of Mulan and Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior; Graham Greene's The Quiet American; and Marguerite Duras' The Lover. We also look at various cinematic adaptations and visual traditions of the Butterfly, including Kenji Mizoguchi's 1956 Sisters of the Gion, Jerry Lewis' 1958 The Geisha Boy, the films of Anna May Wong, and the works of Margaret Cho. Emphases are on the practice of close reading, introduction to literary theory, and critical research skills. A series of short papers culminate in a long research paper. (HL) Kao.

       

    • or
    • ENGL 311 - History of the English Language

      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring 2018 and alternate years


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299 or instructor consent.

      In The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer's Friar can "make his Englissh sweete upon his tonge."  This course examines not only the alleged "sweetness" of English but also the evolution of the language from its origins to the present.  We study basic terms and concepts of linguistics and trace the changes in structure, pronunciation, and vocabulary from Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English to Modern English.  We consider how historical and cultural forces—invasion, revolution, migration, colonization, and assimilation—shape the language.  Moreover, we examine language myths, the construction of standard English, issues of correctness, orality, pidgins and creoles, and the variety of Englishes in their diverse configurations.  Finally, we ask how new media and technological praxes—hypertext, email, texting, and tweeting—have changed the English language, and if English may or may not be the lingua franca of our increasingly globalized world.

    • ENGL 312 - Gender, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2016


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      A study of the complex nexus of gender, love, and marriage in medieval legal, theological, political, and cultural discourses. Reading an eclectic range of texts--such as romance, hagiography, fabliau, (auto)biography, conduct literature, and drama--we consider questions of desire, masculinity, femininity, and agency, as well as the production and maintenance of gender roles and of emotional bonds within medieval conjugality. Authors include Chaucer, Chretien de Troyes, Heldris of Cornwall, Andreas Cappellanus, Margery Kempe, and Christine de Pisan. Readings in Middle English or in translation. No prior knowledge of medieval languages necessary.

    • ENGL 313 - Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      This course considers the primary work on which Chaucer's reputation rests: The Canterbury Tales. We pay sustained attention to Chaucer's Middle English at the beginning of the semester to ease the reading process. Then we travel alongside the Canterbury pilgrims as they tell their tales under the guise of a friendly competition. The Canterbury Tales is frequently read as a commentary on the social divisions in late medieval England, such as the traditional estates, religious professionals and laity, and gender hierarchies. But despite the Tales' professed inclusiveness of the whole of English society, Chaucer nonetheless focuses inordinately on those individuals from the emerging middle classes. Our aim is to approach the Tales from the practices of historicization and theorization; that is, we both examine Chaucer's cultural and historical contexts and consider issues of religion, gender, sexuality, marriage, conduct, class, chivalry, courtly love, community, geography, history, power, spirituality, secularism, traditional authority, and individual experience. Of particular importance are questions of voicing and writing, authorship and readership. Lastly, we think through Chaucer's famous Retraction at the "end" of The Canterbury Tales, as well as Donald R. Howard's trenchant observation that the Tale is "unfinished but complete." What does it mean for the father of literary "Englishness" to end his life's work on the poetic principle of unfulfilled closure and on the image of a society on the move?

    • ENGL 319 - Shakespeare and Company

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      Focusing on the repertory and working conditions of the two play companies with which he was centrally involved, this course examines plays by Shakespeare and several of his contemporary collaborators and colleagues (Jonson, Middleton, Fletcher). Attentive to stage history and the evolution of dramatic texts within print culture, students consider the degree to which Shakespeare was both a representative and an exceptional player in Renaissance London's "show business."

    • ENGL 320 - Shakespearean Genres

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2015 and alternate years


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      In a given term, this course focuses on one or two of the major genres explored by Shakespeare (e.g., histories, tragedies, comedies, tragicomedies/romances, lyric and narrative poetry), in light of Renaissance literary conventions and recent theoretical approaches. Students consider the ways in which Shakespeare's generic experiments are variably inflected by gender, by political considerations, by habitat, and by history.

    • ENGL 326 - 17th-Century Poetry

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2016 and alternate years


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      Readings of lyric and epic poetry spanning the long 16th century, and tracing the development of republican and cavalier literary modes. Genres include the metaphysical poetry of Donne, Herbert, Katherine Philips, and Henry Vaughan; erotic verse by Mary Wroth, Herrick, Thomas Carew, Marvell, Aphra Behn, and the Earl of Rochester; elegy by Jonson and Bradstreet; and epic by Milton.

    • ENGL 330 - Milton

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      This course surveys one of the most talented and probing authors of the English language -- a man whose reading knowledge and poetic output has never been matched, and whose work has influenced a host of writers after him, including Alexander Pope, William Blake, William Wordsworth, and Mary Shelley. In this course, we read selections from Milton's literary corpus, drawing from such diverse genres as lyric, drama, epic and prose polemic. As part of their study of epic form, students create a digital humanities project rendering Paradise Lost in gaming context. Quests, heroes,ethical choices and exploration of new worlds in Paradise Lost are rendered as a game. Students read Milton in the context of literary criticism and place him within his historical milieu, not the least of which includes England's dizzying series of political metamorphoses from Monarchy to Commonwealth, Commonwealth to Protectorate, and Protectorate back to Monarchy.

    • ENGL 334 - The Age of Unreason: Studies in 18th-Century Literature

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      The "long eighteenth century" began roughly twenty years after a revolution unseated England's king and reflects subsequent upheavals in England's culture and literature. This course examines these revolutions through poems, plays, art, and philosophy that extol the birth of science; satirize experiment and reason; and debate the status of slaves and what it means to be human. We consider contemporary gossip, read scurrilous love poetry, witness a host of scandals, and even peek into the lives of London's city dwellers, considering how these works reflected and shaped the turbulent world of an increasingly modern age. Authors are likely to include Pope, Swift, Defoe, Behn, Haywood, Gay, Addison, Johnson, and Sterne.

    • ENGL 335 - 18th-Century Novels

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      A study of prose fiction up to about 1800, focusing on the 18th-century literary and social developments that have been called "the rise of the novel." Authors likely include Behn, Haywood, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Burney, and/or Austen.

    • ENGL 341 - The Romantic Imagination

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and every third years


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      A study emphasizing the poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, but giving some attention to their own prose statements, to prose works by such associates as Dorothy Wordsworth, Lamb, Hazlitt, De Quincey, and Mary Shelley, and to novels by Austen and Scott.

    • ENGL 345 - Studies in the 19th-Century British Novel

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2018 and every third year


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      Novels and topics vary from year to year depending upon the interests of the instructor and of the students (who are encouraged to express their views early in the preceding semester). Authors range from Austen and Scott through such high Victorians as Dickens, Gaskell, Eliot, and Trollope to late figures such as Hardy, Bennett, and James. Possible topics include the multiplot novel, women novelists, industrial and country house novels, mysteries and gothics, and the bildungsroman .

    • ENGL 348 - Victorian Poetry: Victorian Pairs

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2019 and every third year


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      This course offers an overview of Victorian poetry by examining four pairs of poets. Elizabeth Barrett Browning and her husband, Robert, offer lessons in gender roles in Victorian England. Dante Gabriel Rossetti and his sister, Christina, provide a window into the Pre-Raphaelite movement. Works by Alfred Tennyson and Matthew Arnold exemplify the Victorian elegiac mode, and Gerard Manley Hopkins and Thomas Hardy illustrate faith and skepticism in the transition to modernism.

       

    • ENGL 350 - Postcolonial Literature

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2015


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      A study of the finest writers of postcolonial poetry, drama, and fiction in English. The course examines themes and techniques in a historical context, asking what "postcolonial" means to writers of countries formerly colonized by the British. Topics include colonization and decolonization; writing in the colonizer's language; questions of universality; hybridity, exile, and migrancy; the relationship of postcolonial to postmodern; Orientalism; censorship; and the role of post-imperial Britain in the publication, distribution, and consumption of postcolonial literature.

    • ENGL 351 - World Fiction in English

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2016 and every third year


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      Topics in narrative fiction written in English by writers from nations formerly colonized by the British. Readings include novels and short stories originally written in English. Emphasis on techniques of traditional and experimental fiction, subgenres of the novel, international influences, and historical contexts.

    • ENGL 352 - Modern Irish Literature

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2016


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      A study of the major Irish writers from the first part of the 20th century, focusing particularly on Joyce, Yeats, Synge, and Gregory. Some attention is paid to the traditions of Irish poetry, Irish history and language, and the larger context of European modernism that Irish modernism both engages and resists. Major themes may include the Irish past of myth, legend, and folklore; colonialism, nationalism and empire; religious and philosophical contexts; the Irish landscape; and general modernist questions, such as fragmentation, paralysis, alienation, and the nature of the work of art.

    • ENGL 353 - 20th-Century British and Irish Poetry

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2018 and alternate years


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      Selected readings in British poetry from the turn of the century to the present, including the English tradition, international modernism, Irish, and other Commonwealth poetry. We will examine how many poets handle inherited forms, negotiate the world wars, and express identity amid changing definitions of gender and nation.

    • ENGL 354 - Contemporary British and American Drama

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2017 and alternate years


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      This course examines both the masterpieces and undiscovered gems of English language theater from Samuel Beckett to the present. The course investigates contemporary movements away from naturalism and realism towards the fantastical, surreal, and spectacular. Student presentations, film screenings, and brief performance exercises supplement literary analysis of the plays, though no prior drama experience is presumed.

    • ENGL 355 - Studies in British Fiction Since 1900

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2017


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299.

      Focused study of novels and short stories by 20th- and 21st-century British writers. Topics may include modernist experimentation, theories of the novel, cultural and historical contexts, and specific themes or subgenres. Emphasis on the vocabulary and analytical techniques of narrative theory.

    • ENGL 358 - Literature of Gender and Sexuality Before 1900

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

      A study of poetry, narrative, and/or drama written in English before 1900. Texts, topics, and historical emphasis may vary, but the course addresses the relation of gender and sexuality to literature.

    • ENGL 359 - Literature by Women of Color

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2016


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

      This course focuses on the intersection of race and gender as they meet in the lives and identities of contemporary women of color via literature: African-Americans, Native Americans, Chicanas, Asian-Americans, and mixed bloods, or 'mestizas.' Our readings, discussions and writings focus on the work that "coming to voice" does for women of color, and for our larger society and world. Students read a variety of poetry, fiction, and autobiography in order to explore some of the issues most important to and about women of color: identity, histories, diversity, resistance and celebration. Literary analyses-i.e., close readings, explications and interpretations-are key strategies for understanding these readings.

    • ENGL 361 - Native American Literatures

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and every third year


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

      A study of American Indian literature, primarily from the 20th century but including some historical and prehistorical foundations (oral storytelling, early orations and essays). Texts and topics may vary, but this course poses questions about nation, identity, indigenous sovereignty, mythology and history, and the powers of story as both resistance and regeneration. Readings in poetry, fiction, memoir, and nonfiction prose. Authors may include Alexie, Harjo, Hogan, Erdrich, Silko, Chrystos, Ortiz, LeAnne Howe and Paula Gunn Allen.

    • ENGL 362 - American Romanticism

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter in alternate years


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

      A study of American themes and texts from the middle decades of the 19th century. Readings in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction prose. Representative figures could include Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Whitman, Dickinson, Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville.

    • ENGL 363 - American Poetry from 1900 to 1945

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2016 and alternate years


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

      A consideration of American poetry from the first half of the 20th century, including modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, and popular poetry. Students will investigate the interplay of tradition and experiment in a period defined by expatriatism, female suffrage, and the growing power of urban culture.

    • ENGL 364 - American Poetry at Mid-Century

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2017 and alternate years


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299 or instructor consent.

      Readings from the middle generation of 20th century U.S. poets with attention to the Beats, the New York School, Black Arts, and many other movements. Writers may include Elizabeth Bishop, Gwendolyn Brooks, Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, Robert Hayden, and others.

    • ENGL 366 - African-American Literature

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2016 and alternate years


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

      A focused engagement with the African-American literary tradition, from its beginnings in the late 18th century through its powerful assertions in the 21st. The focus of each term's offering may vary; different versions of the course might emphasize a genre, author, or period such as poetry, Ralph Ellison, or the Harlem Renaissance.

    • ENGL 367 - 19th-Century American Novel

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

      A reading of major American novelists, focusing especially on Poe, Melville, and Hawthorne.  We also consider the relationship between the novel and punishment, especially in the works of Harriet Beecher Stowe, George Lippard, and William Wells Brown.  Additionally, we read fictions during the second half of the century by Twain, Chopin, and Chesnutt. 

    • ENGL 368 - The Modern American Novel

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter i2016 and alternate years


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

      An examination of the American novel in the first half of the 20th century, from the late Realist and Naturalist writers through World War II. The heart of the course focuses on the major figures of American Modernism-Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Faulkner-but may also consider various early and late Modernist writers (Anderson, Toomer, Wharton, Hurston, West). Major concerns include the motif of exile, the figure of the artist, the Lost Generation, the rise of the city and decline of the village or pastoral ideal, conflicts of race and gender, existentialism and religious crisis, and the meanings and impact of Modernism itself.

    • ENGL 369 - Late 20th-Century North American Fiction

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall 2017 and alternate years


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

      An exploration of fiction since World War II. Authors may include Wright, O'Connor, Highsmith, Nabokov, Capote, Pynchon, Silko, Atwood, and Morrison.

    • ENGL 375 - Literary Theory

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Winter 2017 and alternate years


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299.

      An introduction to literary theory, focusing on classic texts in literary criticism and on contemporary developments such as Formalism, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Marxism, New Historicism and Cultural Studies, Feminism and Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism.

    • ENGL 380 - Advanced Seminar

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 3 in fall or winter, 4 in spring
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter, Spring


      Prerequisite: ENGL 299. Enrollment limited.

      A seminar course on a topic, genre, figure, or school (e.g. African-American women's literature, epic film, Leslie Marmon Silko, feminist literary theory) with special emphasis on research and discussion. The topic will be limited in scope to permit study in depth. Student suggestions for topics are welcome. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

    • ENGL 385 - Preparatory Reading for Study Abroad

      Credits: 1
      Planned Offering: Winter


      Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

      Seminar in reading preliminary to study abroad.

    • ENGL 386 - Supervised Study in Great Britain

      FDR: HL
      Credits: 4
      Planned Offering: Spring 2016 and alternate years


      Prerequisites: ENGL 299 or instructor consent.

      An advanced seminar in British literature carried on in Great Britain, with emphasis on independent research and intensive exposure to British culture. Changing topics, rotated yearly from instructor to instructor, and limited in scope to permit study in depth.

  5. One additional course chosen from the above or from
  6. Students majoring in a discipline without an emphasis in literature are strongly encouraged to choose an elective course from the Literature category (number 2 above). English majors wishing to complete a Creative Writing minor should elect a fourth workshop, a 403 in creative writing, or a creative honors thesis in English.

    • ENGL 403 - Directed Individual Study

      Credits: 3


      Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

      A course designed for special students who wish to continue a line of study begun in an earlier advanced course. Their applications approved by the department and accepted by their proposed directors, the students may embark upon directed independent study which must culminate in acceptable papers. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

    • ENGL 453 - Internship in Literary Editing with Shenandoah

      Credits: 3
      Planned Offering: Fall, Winter


      Prerequisites: At least junior standing and consent of the Shenandoah editor.

      An apprenticeship in editing for one or more students each 12-week term with the editor of Shenandoah , Washington and Lee's literary magazine. Students are instructed in and assist in these facets of the editor's work: evaluation of manuscripts, proofreading/copyediting, the arrangement of work within an issue, selection of cover art, composing contributor's notes, responding to queries, and issuing news releases. Interns also work toward an understanding of the role of journals in contemporary literature. May be applied once to the English major or Creative Writing Minor and repeated for a maximum of six additional elective credits, as long as the specific projects undertaken are different.

  7. Participation in a capstone public reading in winter or spring of the senior year.