Course Offerings

Fall 2014

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Games Nature Plays

BIOL 107 - Lamphere

The natural world often seems massively complex to us, yet many simple organisms with little cognitive power exhibit sophisticated strategies for succeeding in the "game of life." This course explores how individuals make decisions and populations evolve adaptations that allow them to survive and reproduce. We focus particularly on strategies for acquiring resources, interacting (or not) with others, and selecting mates. Throughout the course, we also consider the diverse approaches humans take to these challenges, which may explain behaviors ranging from arms races to monogamy.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Simurda

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Fall 2014 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. From cell division to bird migration, clock-like rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Toporikova.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Heart Attacks and High Fructose Corn Syrup (3).  An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we investigate the importance of nutrition in the context of the sweetening of our food supply by understanding the biochemical and physiological basis of atherosclerosis which in many patients, when left untreated, leads to a heart attack. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hamilton.

BIOL 111-04: Communication: From Cells to Organisms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is a discussion of the issues of communication of a cell with its external environment beginning with the single-celled organism. We move on to a consideration of cell size and the evolution of multi-cellular organisms. Multi-cellular forms of communication are introduced and we study their role in maintaining a stable environment for the individual cells of the whole organism. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) I'Anson.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology:Drugs of Abuse (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we use addiction as a model for understanding basic principles of genetics, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. An in-depth discussion of the common mechanisms of action of addictive substances is included, as well as relevant information about treatment and recovery strategies. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Blythe.

 

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Toporikova

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Fall 2014 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. From cell division to bird migration, clock-like rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Toporikova.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Heart Attacks and High Fructose Corn Syrup (3).  An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we investigate the importance of nutrition in the context of the sweetening of our food supply by understanding the biochemical and physiological basis of atherosclerosis which in many patients, when left untreated, leads to a heart attack. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hamilton.

BIOL 111-04: Communication: From Cells to Organisms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is a discussion of the issues of communication of a cell with its external environment beginning with the single-celled organism. We move on to a consideration of cell size and the evolution of multi-cellular organisms. Multi-cellular forms of communication are introduced and we study their role in maintaining a stable environment for the individual cells of the whole organism. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) I'Anson.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology:Drugs of Abuse (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we use addiction as a model for understanding basic principles of genetics, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. An in-depth discussion of the common mechanisms of action of addictive substances is included, as well as relevant information about treatment and recovery strategies. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Blythe.

 

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Hamilton

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Fall 2014 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. From cell division to bird migration, clock-like rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Toporikova.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Heart Attacks and High Fructose Corn Syrup (3).  An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we investigate the importance of nutrition in the context of the sweetening of our food supply by understanding the biochemical and physiological basis of atherosclerosis which in many patients, when left untreated, leads to a heart attack. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hamilton.

BIOL 111-04: Communication: From Cells to Organisms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is a discussion of the issues of communication of a cell with its external environment beginning with the single-celled organism. We move on to a consideration of cell size and the evolution of multi-cellular organisms. Multi-cellular forms of communication are introduced and we study their role in maintaining a stable environment for the individual cells of the whole organism. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) I'Anson.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology:Drugs of Abuse (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we use addiction as a model for understanding basic principles of genetics, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. An in-depth discussion of the common mechanisms of action of addictive substances is included, as well as relevant information about treatment and recovery strategies. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Blythe.

 

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - I'Anson

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Fall 2014 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. From cell division to bird migration, clock-like rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Toporikova.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Heart Attacks and High Fructose Corn Syrup (3).  An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we investigate the importance of nutrition in the context of the sweetening of our food supply by understanding the biochemical and physiological basis of atherosclerosis which in many patients, when left untreated, leads to a heart attack. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hamilton.

BIOL 111-04: Communication: From Cells to Organisms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is a discussion of the issues of communication of a cell with its external environment beginning with the single-celled organism. We move on to a consideration of cell size and the evolution of multi-cellular organisms. Multi-cellular forms of communication are introduced and we study their role in maintaining a stable environment for the individual cells of the whole organism. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) I'Anson.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology:Drugs of Abuse (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we use addiction as a model for understanding basic principles of genetics, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. An in-depth discussion of the common mechanisms of action of addictive substances is included, as well as relevant information about treatment and recovery strategies. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Blythe.

 

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Blythe

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Fall 2014 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. From cell division to bird migration, clock-like rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Toporikova.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Heart Attacks and High Fructose Corn Syrup (3).  An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we investigate the importance of nutrition in the context of the sweetening of our food supply by understanding the biochemical and physiological basis of atherosclerosis which in many patients, when left untreated, leads to a heart attack. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hamilton.

BIOL 111-04: Communication: From Cells to Organisms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is a discussion of the issues of communication of a cell with its external environment beginning with the single-celled organism. We move on to a consideration of cell size and the evolution of multi-cellular organisms. Multi-cellular forms of communication are introduced and we study their role in maintaining a stable environment for the individual cells of the whole organism. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) I'Anson.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology:Drugs of Abuse (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we use addiction as a model for understanding basic principles of genetics, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. An in-depth discussion of the common mechanisms of action of addictive substances is included, as well as relevant information about treatment and recovery strategies. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Blythe.

 

Biology Laboratory

BIOL 113 - Lanier, Winder (Multiple Sections)

A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.

Cell Structure and Function at St. Andrews

BIOL 211S - I'Anson

This is an introductory module covering general aspects of animal cell structure and associated physiology. The module starts with a general overview of the regulation of the cell cycle, the roles of protein complexes essential to cell shape and adhesion and the homeostatic role of ion pumps, transporters and channels in the maintenance of solute compositions in both the intra- and extra-cellular fluid compartments. The module continues with detailed structure-function relationships within cells from three major tissues i) nerve cells and the mechanisms of generation and propagation of the action potential, ii) skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle cells and mechanisms controlling contraction and finally iii) blood cells and O2 transport, immune response, coagulation and cell signaling pathways. No more than four credits may be counted toward the major in biology. Taught at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland with final grade assigned by W&L biology faculty. Laboratory course.

Aquatic Ecology

BIOL 217 - Duncan

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the ecology of freshwater systems, with laboratory emphasis on streams and rivers in the local area. It includes a review of the physical and biological properties of freshwater ecosystems as well as current issues relating to their conservation. Laboratory activities focus around monitoring the impacts of current stream restoration efforts in local watersheds.

Genetics

BIOL 220 - Ayoub, Cabe (Multiple Sections)

A study of the three main branches of modern genetics: 1) Mendelian genetics, the study of the transmission of traits from one generation to the next; 2) molecular genetics, a study of the chemical structure of genes and how they operate at the molecular level; and 3) population genetics, the study of the variation of genes between and within populations. This course is a prerequisite to most 300-level courses in biology.

Genetics Laboratory

BIOL 221 - Ayoub, Cabe (Multiple Sections)

Techniques in modern molecular genetics.

Zoology

BIOL 240 - Lamphere

Form and function of animals with emphasis on evolution and ecology of major invertebrate and vertebrate groups. Laboratory course.

Zoology at St. Andrews

BIOL 240S - I'Anson

A study of zoology with emphasis on the evolution of diversity through adaptive radiation and strategies for existence among the major animal groups, from simplest to most complex forms. No more than four credits may be counted toward the major in biology. Taught at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland with final grade assigned by W&L biology faculty. Laboratory course.

Animal Behavior

BIOL 243 - Marsh

An introduction to the scientific study of animal behavior, including exploration of the evolutionary basis of behavior and examination of how animals choose mates, defend territories, find food, and avoid predators. Field and laboratory exercises focus on testing hypotheses through experiments with a variety of animals, including fish, amphibians, birds, and humans. Laboratory course.

Reproductive Physiology

BIOL 255 - Parker

An examination of sex as a biological phenomenon with consideration of the genetic (chromosomal), embryological, endocrine, and neurological bases of sexual development, differentiation, and identity.

Anatomy and Physiology

BIOL 260 - Blythe / Parker

An introduction to the structure, function, and homeostasis of the major organ systems of humans. Laboratory exercises include basic histology, dissection of the cat with comparisons to human anatomy, and physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and urinary systems. Laboratory course.

Microbiology

BIOL 310 - Simurda

A broadly based course in the study of microorganisms, specifically: prokaryotic cells, microbial diversity, and the effects of microbes in the world, in society and in the bodies of animals and plants. It concerns the central role of microbiology as a basic biological science that enhances our understanding of the biology of higher organisms. Laboratory course.

Developmental Biology

BIOL 365 - Watson

An examination of the goals, practices, and accomplishments of contemporary developmental biology. Topics include gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, organogenesis, genetic control of cell differentiation, transgenic procedures, cloning, embryo manipulation, and stem cells. Lectures, discussions of the developmental literature, and electronic media are utilized. Laboratory sessions focus on experimental manipulations of early invertebrate and vertebrate embryos and emphasize student-designed research projects. Laboratory course.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Ayoub, Blythe, Cabe, Hamilton, Hurd, Marsh, Parker, Simurda, Toporikova, Watson, Whitworth, Winder (Multiple Sections)

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Cabe, Watson (Multiple Sections)

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 422 - Watson

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department Web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Honors Thesis

BIOL 494 - Greer

Laboratory and/or field research resulting in an honors thesis. A total of six credits is required. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.


Spring 2014

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Environmental Biology: Endangered Plants of the Appalachians

BIOL 101 - Winder

Using case studies in plant endangerment as a focal point for understanding ecological and evolutionary processes and the impact of human activities on biodiversity, students gain fundamental insight into their relationship with the living world and the importance of preserving biological diversity through a combination of targeted readings, intensive discussions, and basic research in the field, Field activities take place in regional hotspots of plant endemism and give students experience in applied conservation research. Field sites and subject species vary from year to year.

Biological Illustration

BIOL 104 - Ober / I'Anson

This course covers the classic illustration techniques of pen and ink, carbon dust, watercolor, and colored pencil. It then moves into the digital corollaries of those techniques using professional-grade hardware and software. Regular field trips are included to practice scientific observation, field sketching, and photography.

Natural History of Rockbridge County

BIOL 140 - Cabe

An introduction to the flora and fauna of Rockbridge County, with heavy emphasis on first-hand field experience. Readings include historical and current descriptions of biological communities and species typical of this area of Virginia, The close relationship between natural history and the fields of ecology and evolution is explored. Discussions and field trips emphasize the history of natural communities in the Shenandoah Valley and Southern Appalachians, the changes to these communities caused by human, and conservation strategies. Students should be prepared to be outside in all weather, hike in rough terrain, and enjoy field exploration (including early mornings and night excursions).

Genetic Engineering and Society

BIOL 150 - Ayoub

Humans have manipulated genes for thousands of years to make better crops and to domesticate animals. But in the last century the ability to transfer genes from one organism to another ("genetic engineering") has dramatically changed our understanding of biology and our lives. In this course, we explore the nuts and bolts of genetic engineering and a small sampling of its applications, including developing drugs and vaccinations, enhancing crops, testing for genetic diseases, and genetic testing in the courtroom. These applications introduce ethical considerations for us to debate. In addition, we use molecular-biology tools to carry out our own genetic engineering projects with spider silk genes, which have potential for multiple medical and industrial applications. Students culminate the term by making a sales pitch to biotech companies to buy their spider-silk genes. Laboratory course.

Topics in Biology

BIOL 195 - Muir

Topics vary with instructor and term. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Spring 2014 topic:

BIOL 195: Human Biology and Nutrition (4). No prerequisites. Open to all classes. An examination of the importance of nutrition in the context of normal human biology and as it relates to poor nutritional choices on human disease states. Potential related topics covered include obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, hyperlipidemia, osteomalacia, and colorectal disorders. Discussion includes nutritional impacts on health, economics, and society. (SC) Muir. Spring 2014

Field Herpetology

BIOL 242 - Marsh

Field Herpetology is a research-based course on the ecology and behavior of amphibians and reptiles. Research projects vary from year-to-year and are designed to give students plenty of time on the field and exposure to a diverse assortment of amphibian and reptile species. Students should be prepared for hiking off-trail, wading in swamps, and catching live animals.

Neural Imaging

BIOL 280 - Watson

This course examines how the architecture of specific types of neurons affect the neuron's ability to receive, process, and transmit synaptic information. In particular, the course examines how some of the important molecular growth and differentiation cues (e.g., growth factors) can transmit signals important for axon growth and survival of developing and mature neurons. Topics may include neurogenesis, axonal pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and regeneration. Students will conduct original research in the laboratory and acquire skills with various imaging techniques and analytical tools.

Pregnancy: A KISS in Time?

BIOL 283 - Toporikova

Kisspeptin (KISS) is a neuropeptide that controls reproductive maturation and function. Its adequate secretion is essential for correct reproductive function and successful pregnancy. Recent experimental studies have shown that KISS may act as a central integrator for other reproductive hormones and neuropeptides. For example, KISS stimulates release of the hormone prolactin (PRL), which helps to maintain pregnancy and prepare the body for lactation. In this class ,students determine the role that KISS plays in successful pregnancy using computational modeling. Students experience the world of computational modeling in neuroendocrinology by working in teams to investigate and extend an existing model for hormonal interaction between KISS and PRL in pregnancy in rats. The model will be used to generate experimentally tested predictions.

Introduction to Systems Biology

BIOL 285 - Whitworth

Over the last decade a host of innovations have dramatically changed the scale on which biologists can perform experiments and interrogate molecular processes. These new quantitative technologies have allowed us to move from single "component" or "process" views of the cell to being able to ask questions about integrated molecular systems. In this course, we review some of the new technologies which have been driving this change, delve into the primary literature in both biology and medicine to explore the ways in which these technologies have shaped investigation, and explore firsthand some of the computational and statistical approaches that are being used to make sense of large-scale datasets.

Topics in Biology

BIOL 297A - Knox

Topics vary with instructor and term.

Spring 2014 topic:

BIOL 297A-01: Field Botany (4). An entirely outdoor course, including some strenuous hiking, in which students learn to identify vascular plants using professional "floras" of the upper Shenandoah Valley watershed The conservation biology of many of these plants is discussed focusing upon alien invasive and rare plants of the upper Chesapeake Bay watershed. With no formal lectures in the course, students work with the group to identify plants as each student accumulates an annotated reference collection (a herbarium) of plants. The class reads and discusses several professional papers dealing with conservation problems caused by alien plants and the conservation ecology of rare plants. Some strenous hiking involved. (SL) Knox.

Plant Functional Ecology

BIOL 332 - Hamilton

The emphasis and location of the study area differs from year to year. Information regarding the specific course topic and field trip schedule is made available in the fall. Through novel research projects in a variety of field settings (e.g., on-campus, Appalachian and Blue Ridge Mountains, The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem), this field-based laboratory course covers topics which investigate the vital roles that plants play in shaping Earth's ecosystems. Topics focus on the responses of native plants to environmental stresses, such as global climate change (elevated temperature and carbon dioxide and drought), herbivory, and invasive species. Field and laboratory exercises focus on testing hypotheses through experiments using a variety of species from intact plant communities. A review of the pertinent literature is used to develop and conduct a term research project. Laboratory course.

Experimental Neurophysiology

BIOL 360 - Blythe

An in-depth exploration of the theory and techniques of cellular neurophysiology. Labs utilize extracellular and intracellular recording techniques to explore motor neuron and sensory receptor firing properties and to examine the ionic basis for resting and action potentials and synaptic transmission. Laboratory course.

Richmond Clinical Rotation Program

BIOL 464 - Simurda

This program is for students who have demonstrated an interest in a career in medicine. The Richmond Term Program combines an introductory experience in a medical practice with academic study of Immunology and infectious disease. It exposes the students to the process and problems of medicine through observations, seminars, and discussions. This is a faculty-supervised, off-campus experience with various physicians in Richmond, VA. This course does not meet major requirements.


Winter 2014

See complete information about these courses in the course offerings database. For more information about a specific course, including course type, schedule and location, click on its title.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Ayoub / Rowe

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2014 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: History of Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. A discussion of the history of biological thought from the Greeks to Darwin to the present genomic revolution. This section focuses on how scientists first addressed the fundamental phenomena in life: reliable reproduction and genetic programming, and the origin of species and the evolution of diversity. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Ayoub.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology:Conservation Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the intersection of biology and species conservation, including the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on species and ecosystems, the role of human impacts, and the tools used to make predictions about animal and plant populations. A large section of the course is devoted to participation in a national research project on the effects of roads and development on frog and toad populations. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Marsh.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology:Drugs of Abuse (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we use addiction as a model for understanding basic principles of genetics, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. An in-depth discussion of the common mechanisms of action of addictive substances is included, as well as relevant information about treatment and recovery strategies. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Blythe.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology:Genetics of Human History (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Traditionally, the history of the human species has been the purview of archeologists and historians. More recently, genetic data have been used to explore and better understand many facets of human history. How are Neandertals and other ancient peoples related to modern humans? Where and when did modern humans evolve? What does genetics tell us about the peopling of the Americas? This section examines the foundations and background of human population genetics in addition to research articles investigating the history of the human species. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Cabe.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biology of Marine Organisms (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we examine specific examples of the unique biology of marine organisms and ecosystems, building upon fundamental concepts to explore advanced topics and research. Why are coral reefs dying? Why don't sharks get cancer - or do they? We follow lines of scientific inquiry that have brought us to the current state of understanding on these and other specific examples. In the process, we progress through different levels of organization, generally starting with molecular / cellular biology and moving up through population and community ecology. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Humston.

Fall 2013 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Rapid Communication in Animals (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the structure and function of nerve cells with an emphasis on electrical excitability, synaptic transmission, and sensory transduction. As part of the background, we study the processes of replication, transcription, and translation. In addition, we study the anatomy of the brain and examine the cellular mechanisms underlying simple behaviors and the pathology of degenerative CNS diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Watson.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Genes Drugs and Toxins (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. The ways in which an organism responds to different drugs or toxins can be heavily influenced by its genetics. In this section, we explore the interplay between genetic variation and differences in the ways in which people respond to therapeutic drugs and environmental toxins. We consider a number of example case studies including the genetic basis for resistance to drugs used to treat cancer and individual variation in sensitivity to common pesticides. Our readings are primarily from the current scientific literature as we focus on the new and emerging fields of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics. In the service of exploring these topics, we also cover: the flow of information from genes to proteins; complex cellular behaviors; molecular and population genetics; and many aspects of cellular physiology and regulation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Whitworth.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Diversity of Life (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Biologists use the word diversity, or biodiversity, to describe the variety of life forms in nature. This section is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? (3) what is its future? We cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hurd.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. From cell division to bird migration, clock-like rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Toporikova.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Marsh

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2014 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: History of Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. A discussion of the history of biological thought from the Greeks to Darwin to the present genomic revolution. This section focuses on how scientists first addressed the fundamental phenomena in life: reliable reproduction and genetic programming, and the origin of species and the evolution of diversity. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Ayoub.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology:Conservation Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the intersection of biology and species conservation, including the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on species and ecosystems, the role of human impacts, and the tools used to make predictions about animal and plant populations. A large section of the course is devoted to participation in a national research project on the effects of roads and development on frog and toad populations. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Marsh.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology:Drugs of Abuse (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we use addiction as a model for understanding basic principles of genetics, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. An in-depth discussion of the common mechanisms of action of addictive substances is included, as well as relevant information about treatment and recovery strategies. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Blythe.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology:Genetics of Human History (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Traditionally, the history of the human species has been the purview of archeologists and historians. More recently, genetic data have been used to explore and better understand many facets of human history. How are Neandertals and other ancient peoples related to modern humans? Where and when did modern humans evolve? What does genetics tell us about the peopling of the Americas? This section examines the foundations and background of human population genetics in addition to research articles investigating the history of the human species. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Cabe.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biology of Marine Organisms (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we examine specific examples of the unique biology of marine organisms and ecosystems, building upon fundamental concepts to explore advanced topics and research. Why are coral reefs dying? Why don't sharks get cancer - or do they? We follow lines of scientific inquiry that have brought us to the current state of understanding on these and other specific examples. In the process, we progress through different levels of organization, generally starting with molecular / cellular biology and moving up through population and community ecology. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Humston.

Fall 2013 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Rapid Communication in Animals (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the structure and function of nerve cells with an emphasis on electrical excitability, synaptic transmission, and sensory transduction. As part of the background, we study the processes of replication, transcription, and translation. In addition, we study the anatomy of the brain and examine the cellular mechanisms underlying simple behaviors and the pathology of degenerative CNS diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Watson.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Genes Drugs and Toxins (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. The ways in which an organism responds to different drugs or toxins can be heavily influenced by its genetics. In this section, we explore the interplay between genetic variation and differences in the ways in which people respond to therapeutic drugs and environmental toxins. We consider a number of example case studies including the genetic basis for resistance to drugs used to treat cancer and individual variation in sensitivity to common pesticides. Our readings are primarily from the current scientific literature as we focus on the new and emerging fields of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics. In the service of exploring these topics, we also cover: the flow of information from genes to proteins; complex cellular behaviors; molecular and population genetics; and many aspects of cellular physiology and regulation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Whitworth.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Diversity of Life (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Biologists use the word diversity, or biodiversity, to describe the variety of life forms in nature. This section is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? (3) what is its future? We cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hurd.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. From cell division to bird migration, clock-like rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Toporikova.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Blythe

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2014 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: History of Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. A discussion of the history of biological thought from the Greeks to Darwin to the present genomic revolution. This section focuses on how scientists first addressed the fundamental phenomena in life: reliable reproduction and genetic programming, and the origin of species and the evolution of diversity. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Ayoub.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology:Conservation Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the intersection of biology and species conservation, including the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on species and ecosystems, the role of human impacts, and the tools used to make predictions about animal and plant populations. A large section of the course is devoted to participation in a national research project on the effects of roads and development on frog and toad populations. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Marsh.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology:Drugs of Abuse (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we use addiction as a model for understanding basic principles of genetics, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. An in-depth discussion of the common mechanisms of action of addictive substances is included, as well as relevant information about treatment and recovery strategies. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Blythe.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology:Genetics of Human History (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Traditionally, the history of the human species has been the purview of archeologists and historians. More recently, genetic data have been used to explore and better understand many facets of human history. How are Neandertals and other ancient peoples related to modern humans? Where and when did modern humans evolve? What does genetics tell us about the peopling of the Americas? This section examines the foundations and background of human population genetics in addition to research articles investigating the history of the human species. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Cabe.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biology of Marine Organisms (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we examine specific examples of the unique biology of marine organisms and ecosystems, building upon fundamental concepts to explore advanced topics and research. Why are coral reefs dying? Why don't sharks get cancer - or do they? We follow lines of scientific inquiry that have brought us to the current state of understanding on these and other specific examples. In the process, we progress through different levels of organization, generally starting with molecular / cellular biology and moving up through population and community ecology. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Humston.

Fall 2013 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Rapid Communication in Animals (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the structure and function of nerve cells with an emphasis on electrical excitability, synaptic transmission, and sensory transduction. As part of the background, we study the processes of replication, transcription, and translation. In addition, we study the anatomy of the brain and examine the cellular mechanisms underlying simple behaviors and the pathology of degenerative CNS diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Watson.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Genes Drugs and Toxins (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. The ways in which an organism responds to different drugs or toxins can be heavily influenced by its genetics. In this section, we explore the interplay between genetic variation and differences in the ways in which people respond to therapeutic drugs and environmental toxins. We consider a number of example case studies including the genetic basis for resistance to drugs used to treat cancer and individual variation in sensitivity to common pesticides. Our readings are primarily from the current scientific literature as we focus on the new and emerging fields of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics. In the service of exploring these topics, we also cover: the flow of information from genes to proteins; complex cellular behaviors; molecular and population genetics; and many aspects of cellular physiology and regulation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Whitworth.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Diversity of Life (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Biologists use the word diversity, or biodiversity, to describe the variety of life forms in nature. This section is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? (3) what is its future? We cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hurd.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. From cell division to bird migration, clock-like rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Toporikova.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Cabe

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2014 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: History of Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. A discussion of the history of biological thought from the Greeks to Darwin to the present genomic revolution. This section focuses on how scientists first addressed the fundamental phenomena in life: reliable reproduction and genetic programming, and the origin of species and the evolution of diversity. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Ayoub.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology:Conservation Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the intersection of biology and species conservation, including the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on species and ecosystems, the role of human impacts, and the tools used to make predictions about animal and plant populations. A large section of the course is devoted to participation in a national research project on the effects of roads and development on frog and toad populations. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Marsh.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology:Drugs of Abuse (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we use addiction as a model for understanding basic principles of genetics, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. An in-depth discussion of the common mechanisms of action of addictive substances is included, as well as relevant information about treatment and recovery strategies. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Blythe.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology:Genetics of Human History (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Traditionally, the history of the human species has been the purview of archeologists and historians. More recently, genetic data have been used to explore and better understand many facets of human history. How are Neandertals and other ancient peoples related to modern humans? Where and when did modern humans evolve? What does genetics tell us about the peopling of the Americas? This section examines the foundations and background of human population genetics in addition to research articles investigating the history of the human species. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Cabe.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biology of Marine Organisms (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we examine specific examples of the unique biology of marine organisms and ecosystems, building upon fundamental concepts to explore advanced topics and research. Why are coral reefs dying? Why don't sharks get cancer - or do they? We follow lines of scientific inquiry that have brought us to the current state of understanding on these and other specific examples. In the process, we progress through different levels of organization, generally starting with molecular / cellular biology and moving up through population and community ecology. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Humston.

Fall 2013 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Rapid Communication in Animals (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the structure and function of nerve cells with an emphasis on electrical excitability, synaptic transmission, and sensory transduction. As part of the background, we study the processes of replication, transcription, and translation. In addition, we study the anatomy of the brain and examine the cellular mechanisms underlying simple behaviors and the pathology of degenerative CNS diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Watson.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Genes Drugs and Toxins (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. The ways in which an organism responds to different drugs or toxins can be heavily influenced by its genetics. In this section, we explore the interplay between genetic variation and differences in the ways in which people respond to therapeutic drugs and environmental toxins. We consider a number of example case studies including the genetic basis for resistance to drugs used to treat cancer and individual variation in sensitivity to common pesticides. Our readings are primarily from the current scientific literature as we focus on the new and emerging fields of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics. In the service of exploring these topics, we also cover: the flow of information from genes to proteins; complex cellular behaviors; molecular and population genetics; and many aspects of cellular physiology and regulation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Whitworth.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Diversity of Life (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Biologists use the word diversity, or biodiversity, to describe the variety of life forms in nature. This section is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? (3) what is its future? We cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hurd.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. From cell division to bird migration, clock-like rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Toporikova.

Fundamentals of Biology

BIOL 111 - Humston

An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication applied to topics that vary among sections and terms. Specific subjects, chosen from within the scope of modern biological investigation according to the expertise of individual instructors, are examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses.

Winter 2014 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: History of Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. A discussion of the history of biological thought from the Greeks to Darwin to the present genomic revolution. This section focuses on how scientists first addressed the fundamental phenomena in life: reliable reproduction and genetic programming, and the origin of species and the evolution of diversity. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Ayoub.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology:Conservation Biology (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the intersection of biology and species conservation, including the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on species and ecosystems, the role of human impacts, and the tools used to make predictions about animal and plant populations. A large section of the course is devoted to participation in a national research project on the effects of roads and development on frog and toad populations. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Marsh.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology:Drugs of Abuse (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we use addiction as a model for understanding basic principles of genetics, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. An in-depth discussion of the common mechanisms of action of addictive substances is included, as well as relevant information about treatment and recovery strategies. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Blythe.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology:Genetics of Human History (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Traditionally, the history of the human species has been the purview of archeologists and historians. More recently, genetic data have been used to explore and better understand many facets of human history. How are Neandertals and other ancient peoples related to modern humans? Where and when did modern humans evolve? What does genetics tell us about the peopling of the Americas? This section examines the foundations and background of human population genetics in addition to research articles investigating the history of the human species. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Cabe.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biology of Marine Organisms (3). Corequisite: BIOL 113. An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. In this section, we examine specific examples of the unique biology of marine organisms and ecosystems, building upon fundamental concepts to explore advanced topics and research. Why are coral reefs dying? Why don't sharks get cancer - or do they? We follow lines of scientific inquiry that have brought us to the current state of understanding on these and other specific examples. In the process, we progress through different levels of organization, generally starting with molecular / cellular biology and moving up through population and community ecology. This course, and its companion laboratory, are prerequisites for all higher level biology courses. (SL when taken with BIOL 113). Humston.

Fall 2013 Topics:

BIOL 111-01: Fundamentals of Biology: Bacterial Genetics (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section is an introduction to the genes and the mechanisms of gene expression by bacterial cells. It focuses on the current issues of bacterial infections in humans, for example: virulence, antibiotic resistance, or emerging diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Simurda.

BIOL 111-02: Fundamentals of Biology: Rapid Communication in Animals (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. This section examines the structure and function of nerve cells with an emphasis on electrical excitability, synaptic transmission, and sensory transduction. As part of the background, we study the processes of replication, transcription, and translation. In addition, we study the anatomy of the brain and examine the cellular mechanisms underlying simple behaviors and the pathology of degenerative CNS diseases. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Watson.

BIOL 111-03: Fundamentals of Biology: Genes Drugs and Toxins (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. The ways in which an organism responds to different drugs or toxins can be heavily influenced by its genetics. In this section, we explore the interplay between genetic variation and differences in the ways in which people respond to therapeutic drugs and environmental toxins. We consider a number of example case studies including the genetic basis for resistance to drugs used to treat cancer and individual variation in sensitivity to common pesticides. Our readings are primarily from the current scientific literature as we focus on the new and emerging fields of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics. In the service of exploring these topics, we also cover: the flow of information from genes to proteins; complex cellular behaviors; molecular and population genetics; and many aspects of cellular physiology and regulation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Whitworth.

BIOL 111-04: Fundamentals of Biology: Diversity of Life (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. Biologists use the word diversity, or biodiversity, to describe the variety of life forms in nature. This section is concerned with three major questions about biological diversity on earth: (1) how did it come to be? (2) what is its present condition? (3) what is its future? We cover physiological adaptations, genetic sources of diversity, evolutionary and ecological processes, anthropogenic threats to biodiversity, and conservation. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Hurd.

BIOL 111-05: Fundamentals of Biology: Biological Clocks and Rhythms (3). An intensive investigation of scientific thought and communication, examined in the context of major concepts such as evolution, regulation, growth, and metabolism. From cell division to bird migration, clock-like rhythms control the activities of every living organism. In this section we investigate recent advances in chronobiology, the area of biology that studies internal biological clocks. Our topics include the measurement of rhythmic activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying daily rhythms, and the integration of internal and environmental rhythms in complex physiological processes, such as the sleep and reproductive cycles. (SL: BIOL 113 is a co-requisite for students seeking laboratory science credits.) Toporikova.

Biology Laboratory

BIOL 113 - Lanier, Winder (Multiple Sections)

A laboratory course to accompany BIOL 111. Students are trained in basic techniques of biological research by demonstrations and investigatory exercises, including data analysis and scientific communication.

Human Parasitology

BIOL 210 - Simurda

A survey of the phenomenon of animal parasitism, including discussion of the chief distinguishing structures, life cycles, and functions of major pathogenic parasites infecting humans and other animals.

Cell Biology

BIOL 211 - Watson

This course will focus on understanding the components of a cell, the internal organization of a cell, how they move, how they function, how they respond to cues from their external environment, and the limits of our current knowledge. Lecture topics will include the internal organization of a cell, structure and function of DNA, RNA and proteins, membrane and cytoskeleton structure function, protein sorting, membrane transport, cell cycle and cell-cycle control, cell signaling and communication, and cell death. The lab component reinforces the lecture by emphasizing the experimental approaches to the study of cell biology. Laboratory course.

Biochemistry of the Cell

BIOL 215 - Whitworth

A study of the molecular basis of cell structure and function. Topics include biomolecular structure and chemistry, enzyme kinetics and inhibition, bioenergetics, intermediary metabolism and its regulation, membrane structure and transport, membrane receptors and signal transduction, and the endomembrane system. The laboratory stresses techniques for use in current biochemical research. Laboratory course.

Medicinal Plant Biology

BIOL 225 - Hamilton

From Taxol to Vitamin C plants provide important medicinal products for humans. This course is an introduction to the study of plant form and function from the perspective of the utilization of plants by humans for medicinal purposes. Lectures cover plant cell biology, biochemistry, physiology, genetics, and interactions with the environment. The laboratory includes modern plant biology techniques ranging from molecular to organismal. Laboratory course.

Zoology

BIOL 240 - Hurd

Form and function of animals with emphasis on evolution and ecology of major invertebrate and vertebrate groups. Laboratory course.

Vertebrate Endocrinology

BIOL 250 - Blythe

A study of the chemoregulatory mechanisms of the vertebrates; emphasis is on biochemical and cellular, as well as physiological aspects of hormone action.

Seminar in Biology

BIOL 295 - Hamilton

Seminar topics vary with instructor and term. Sample topics include: genetics, molecular genetics, virology, evolutionary biology, history of medicine, biology of aging, ecology, cancer, reproductive strategies, neuroendocrinology, microbiology and immunology. These are in-depth studies of restricted topics within the broad areas indicated by the titles, involving critical review of literature, discussion and oral and/or written presentation. One such seminar is required of each major pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree, and no more than two may be counted toward the 30 credits in biology required for the major. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2014 Topics:

BIOL 295-01: Topics in Biology: Yellowstone Ecology (1). Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 113, and either junior standing or departmental permission. This course examines the interactions of microbes, plants and animals in the world's oldest national park. Through weekly readings, discussions, presentations and written works we cover topics including soil microbes, grazing, fire, predators, and ecosystem function. Hamilton BIOL 295-02: Topics in Biology: Impacts of Non-Native Fish Introductions (1). Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 113, and either junior standing or departmental permission. Intentional and accidental introductions of non-native fish have a long history but their impacts are still poorly understood. Can our fish communities be restored once they have been altered by invaders? How does a new species alter the food web and, in turn, the essential functioning of the ecosystem? This class will explore the known documented impacts of fish introductions, some predicted impacts of recent introductions, as well as options for control of noxious, invasive fish species. Humston

Fall 2013 Topics:

BIOL 295-01: Seminar: The Obesity Epidemic (1). Obesity, once a rare condition, now affects more than one-third of Americans. Is it simply that people now consume too many calories and burn too few? Or is there something more complicated (and biologically interesting) going on? In this seminar we examine the recent scientific literature on the potential causes of the obesity epidemic. We read about and discuss topics such as uterine programming, epigenetics, intestinal community ecology, and toxicology. Marsh

BIOL 295- 02 Seminar: Bug Brains (1). Question: What can fruit flies teach us about the human brain? Answer: A lot! Many advances in neuroscience would not have been possible without the knowledge first acquired in invertebrate organisms. This seminar uses primary literature and student presentations to examine the role of invertebrate animal models in fundamental neurobiological experiments. Blythe

Seminar in Biology

BIOL 295 - Humston

Seminar topics vary with instructor and term. Sample topics include: genetics, molecular genetics, virology, evolutionary biology, history of medicine, biology of aging, ecology, cancer, reproductive strategies, neuroendocrinology, microbiology and immunology. These are in-depth studies of restricted topics within the broad areas indicated by the titles, involving critical review of literature, discussion and oral and/or written presentation. One such seminar is required of each major pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree, and no more than two may be counted toward the 30 credits in biology required for the major. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2014 Topics:

BIOL 295-01: Topics in Biology: Yellowstone Ecology (1). Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 113, and either junior standing or departmental permission. This course examines the interactions of microbes, plants and animals in the world's oldest national park. Through weekly readings, discussions, presentations and written works we cover topics including soil microbes, grazing, fire, predators, and ecosystem function. Hamilton BIOL 295-02: Topics in Biology: Impacts of Non-Native Fish Introductions (1). Prerequisites: BIOL 111 and 113, and either junior standing or departmental permission. Intentional and accidental introductions of non-native fish have a long history but their impacts are still poorly understood. Can our fish communities be restored once they have been altered by invaders? How does a new species alter the food web and, in turn, the essential functioning of the ecosystem? This class will explore the known documented impacts of fish introductions, some predicted impacts of recent introductions, as well as options for control of noxious, invasive fish species. Humston

Fall 2013 Topics:

BIOL 295-01: Seminar: The Obesity Epidemic (1). Obesity, once a rare condition, now affects more than one-third of Americans. Is it simply that people now consume too many calories and burn too few? Or is there something more complicated (and biologically interesting) going on? In this seminar we examine the recent scientific literature on the potential causes of the obesity epidemic. We read about and discuss topics such as uterine programming, epigenetics, intestinal community ecology, and toxicology. Marsh

BIOL 295- 02 Seminar: Bug Brains (1). Question: What can fruit flies teach us about the human brain? Answer: A lot! Many advances in neuroscience would not have been possible without the knowledge first acquired in invertebrate organisms. This seminar uses primary literature and student presentations to examine the role of invertebrate animal models in fundamental neurobiological experiments. Blythe

Statistics for Biology and Medicine

BIOL 301 - Marsh

This course examines the principles of statistics and experimental design for biological and medical research. The focus is on the practical and conceptual aspects of statistics, rather than mathematical derivations. Students completing this class will be able to read and understand research papers, to design realistic experiments, and to carry out their own statistical analyses using computer packages.

Microbiology

BIOL 310 - Simurda

A broadly based course in the study of microorganisms, specifically: prokaryotic cells, microbial diversity, and the effects of microbes in the world, in society and in the bodies of animals and plants. It concerns the central role of microbiology as a basic biological science that enhances our understanding of the biology of higher organisms. Laboratory course.

Evolution

BIOL 340 - Ayoub / Rowe

An examination of the evidence for evolution and the mechanisms by which evolution occurs.

Animal Physiology

BIOL 362 - Muir (Multiple Sections)

A comparative study of functional processes of animals, primarily vertebrates, and their environmental interactions. Laboratory emphasis is on functional adaptations and the use of physiological instrumentation in measuring functional processes. Laboratory course.

Neuroendocrinology

BIOL 397 - I'Anson

The study of the interaction between the nervous system and the endocrine system, with special reference to regulation and communication in the mammal. Topics may include neuroendocrine regulation of development, the role of the adrenal axis in stress, metabolic regulation of reproduction, or biological rhythms. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different.

Winter 2014 Topic:

BIOL 397(NEUR 395): Neuroendocrinology: From Genes to Behavior and Back Again! (3). Prerequisites: BIOL 220 and at least junior standing. The study of the interaction between the nervous system and the endocrine system, with special reference to regulation and communication in the mammal. This class will explore epigenetic regulation of behavior.  Through study of the primary literature, we will explore the now classic example of epigenetic programming by maternal behavior. Then we will study the evidence for epigenetic effects on other behaviors. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. I'Anson.

Directed Individual Study

BIOL 401 - Watson

Reading in the primary research literature on a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Study

BIOL 401 - Ayoub, Greer, I'Anson, Simurda (Multiple Sections)

Reading in the primary research literature on a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Ayoub, Blythe, Greer, Hamilton, Humston, Hurd, Toporikova, Whitworth (Multiple Sections)

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Directed Individual Research

BIOL 421 - Watson (Multiple Sections)

Each student conducts primary research in partnership with a faculty member, by prior mutual agreement and according to departmental guidelines (available from biology faculty). Consult the department web page or individual faculty for a description of current research areas. May be repeated for degree credit if the topics are different. No more than six credits of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Honors Thesis Proposal

BIOL 442 - Greer

Writing a proposal for honors thesis research, including a clear statement of the problem being studied, a literature review, and a feasible, detailed plan for the research. Taken no later than the winter term of the junior year. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.

Honors Thesis

BIOL 496 - Blythe

Laboratory and/or field research resulting in an honors thesis. A total of six credits is required. No more than six credit hours of work at the 400 level may apply toward the major.