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Schools and Centers

Washington and Lee's two undergraduate divisions share a single admissions process, and all undergraduate students, whether they intend to pursue majors in the College or in the Williams School, are enrolled in the College during their freshman year. Although each has its own faculty and is administered by its own dean, there is a close relationship between the two divisions, and students are free to take electives in each during their time at Washington and Lee.

The School of Law, with approximately 400 students, offers both the Juris Doctor and Master of Laws degrees. The school's innovative Third Year Program expands upon the lessons and law of the first- and second-year curriculum, moving students out of the classroom and into the real world of legal practice.

The College

The College is the heart of the W&L liberal arts education. It is the home of twenty-one departments, four interdepartmental majors, and seven interdepartmental programs in the humanities, natural sciences, mathematics, computer science and in certain social sciences. Students may earn either the B.A. or B.S. degree in forty different majors, and may also pursue one or more of fifteen minor programs, including Creative Writing, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Environmental Studies, and Museum Studies. All students, whether they intend to pursue majors in the College or in the Williams School, are enrolled in the College during their first year.

The Williams School of Commerce, Economics, and Politics

The Ernest C. Williams School of Commerce, Economic, and Politics offers both a B.A. and a B.S. degree, with majors in business administration, business administration and accounting, public accounting, economics and politics. Within the major areas, students can design a program of study from over 85 courses offered and participate in a variety of co-curricular opportunities. Additionally, students majoring in other disciplines may take elective and/or general education requirement courses in the Williams School as a means of complementing their work in the arts, sciences, humanities, and languages.

The School of Law

W&L's School of Law, one of the smallest nationally recognized legal programs in the country at about 400 students, has its own dean and faculty. It offers the Juris Doctor degree and, for international law graduates, the Master of Laws degree in United States Law. The school's innovative Third Year Program expands upon the lessons and law of the first- and second-year curriculum, moving students out of the classroom and into the real world of legal practice.

The Mudd Center for Ethics

The Mudd Center for Ethics was established through a gift to the University from award-winning journalist Roger Mudd, a 1950 graduate of W&L. The Mudd Center supports faculty who wish to develop new courses to enhance the study of ethics across the curriculum and engages in programming that fosters serious and sophisticated conversation about public and professional ethics at the University.

Law Centers

The School of Law includes the Center for Law & History, which encourages and supports the interdisciplinary study of law in its historical context; the Frances Lewis Law Center, which enriches the intellectual life of the W&L Law community and supports the research and scholarship of its faculty; and the Transnational Law Institute, which supports and coordinates teaching innovations, externships, internships, a speaker series and visiting faculty to help prepare students for the increasing globalization of legal practice.